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Editorial Results (free)

1. Government regulations controlling speech are dangerous -

I was recently on a panel that discussed where free speech ends and dangerous speech begins.

The topic is a recurring one in U.S. history and plays out in debates about hate speech, burning crosses in people’s yards, burning American flags and what is uttered by teachers in public schools.

2. How to maximize your ‘health span’ during longer life -

We’re living longer on average, but the number of years we’re healthy hasn’t kept up. This lagging “health span” translates into more time living with serious illness and disabilities at the end of our lives.

3. Events -

Williamson Inc. Policy Talks. Williamson, Inc. Policy Talks is a monthly community forum featuring elected officials centered on the issues being discussed in the Tennessee Legislature and in Williamson County. Representatives are given a platform to discuss the issues in greater depth with their constituents. Columbia State Community College, Community Room – Building A, 1228 Liberty Pike, Franklin. Friday, 7:30-8:30 a.m. No charge for Williamson Inc. Business Partners and Guests. Information

4. Come together: Beatles, Realtors eventually succeed -

With the exception of politics – and COVID now falls into that realm, apparently – nothing has received as much press ballyhoo as the release of Peter Jackson’s film “Get Back.” For those who might have missed it, the film is an eight-hour documentary on the Beatles making of the album and movie that was originally called Let it Be.

5. Saints, sinners share space on Music City streets -

On a small plot of land at the intersection of Ewing and Sixth Avenues and Lafayette Street in Nashville sits the Church of the Holy Trinity, where it has ministered to an Episcopal flock since 1853.

6. Biden puts focus on infrastructure amid new virus concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden visits a Minnesota community college Tuesday to highlight how his $1 trillion infrastructure law will create jobs and help train workers.

The trip occurs at a crucial pivot point for Biden, who is facing the threat of the new omicron strain of the coronavirus and high levels of inflation as vital parts of his agenda are still awaiting congressional approval. Biden needs to get his nearly $2 trillion social and economic agenda through the Senate, as well as temporarily fund the government and preserve its ability to borrow as the debt limit could be breached in December.

7. Omicron brings COVID-19 vaccine inequity 'home to roost' -

LONDON (AP) — The emergence of the new omicron variant and the world's desperate and likely futile attempts to keep it at bay are reminders of what scientists have warned for months: The coronavirus will thrive as long as vast parts of the world lack vaccines.

8. Inflation in 19 nations using euro hits record high of 4.9% -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices across the 19 countries that use the euro currency are rising at a record rate as a result of a huge spike in energy costs this year, official figures showed Tuesday.

Eurostat, the European Union's statistics agency, said the eurozone's annual inflation rate hit 4.9% in November, the highest since recordkeeping began in 1997 and up from 4.1% in October, the previous high mark.

9. Walmart said she shoplifted; jury awards her $2.1 million -

MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama woman who says she was falsely arrested for shoplifting at a Walmart and then threatened by the company after her case was dismissed has been awarded $2.1 million in damages.

10. Titans finally reach bye week with chance to rest, heal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — No NFL team needs its bye week as much as the Tennessee Titans.

The Titans (8-4) finally get to rest and heal up some of the many injured players for a stretch run to finish the season. Tennessee has used 86 different players this season, most by an NFL team since at least 1993 and topping the mark of 84 first set by Miami in 2019. They've also started 49 different players.

11. US mortgage rates mixed: 30-year unchanged at 3.1% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. mortgage rates were mixed this week.

The average rate on the benchmark 30-year, fixed rate home loan was unchanged from last week at 3.1%; a year ago, it stood at 2.72%. Fifteen-year, fixed rate mortgage rates blipped up to 2.42% from 2.39% last week; it was 2.28% a year ago.

12. Slovakia approves 2-week nationwide lockdown infection surge -

BRATISLAVA, Slovakia (AP) — Slovakia's government on Wednesday approved a two-week national lockdown amid a record surge of coronavirus infections.

Prime Minister Eduard Heger said the measures that take effect Friday will target all — both unvaccinated and vaccinated.

13. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

14. On the road again: Travelers emerge in time for Thanksgiving -

DALLAS (AP) — Determined to reclaim Thanksgiving traditions that were put on pause last year by the pandemic, millions of Americans will be loading up their cars or piling onto planes to gather again with friends and family.

15. Christmas events planned for Tennessee Residence, Capitol -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The annual Christmas celebration at the Tennessee Capitol will take place next Monday and tours of the governor's mansion begin Dec. 10, according to an announcement from Gov. Bill Lee and first lady Maria Lee.

16. The Santa experience this year is a mix of laps, distancing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Santa is back this year, but he pleads caution as he continues to tiptoe through the pandemic.

"Be smart. Be caring. If you have the tiniest tickle in your throat, the tiniest feeling, worry about yourself and worry about everybody else, and know Santa will always be there next year," said 57-year-old Kevin Chesney, who's been donning the big red suit since he was a kid.

17. Is travel safe during the pandemic this holiday season? -

Is travel safe during the pandemic this holiday season?

It depends. It can be safe if you're fully vaccinated against COVID-19, but officials say people who haven't gotten the shots should delay travel.

18. Titans have lots to clean up after ugly end to win streak -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans' six-game winning streak is over. The resilience, determination and fight shown through that stretch keeps them a contender even after a sloppy loss.

The Titans (8-3) have lots to clean up after a season-high five turnovers, four off interceptions by Ryan Tannehill, in a 22-13 loss to the Houston Texans.

19. Is travel safe during the pandemic this holiday season? -

Is travel safe during the pandemic this holiday season?

It depends. It can be safe if you're fully vaccinated against COVID-19, but officials say people who haven't gotten the shots should delay travel.

20. Giving Thanks – mostly that we’ve moved past 2020 -

Thanksgiving of 2020 was a special kind of torture. We’d all been isolated for months, and it didn’t feel safe to be around loved ones yet. The gloom accentuated the early sundowns and the cold nights.

21. 3 times you need money advice from a human -

You can now manage most aspects of your money without ever consulting another human being. You can budget, borrow, save, invest, buy insurance, prepare your tax return and create a will – among many other tasks – by using apps, websites and software.

22. French IT firm to invest $20 million in Nashville -

Capgemini officials have announced the global IT consulting firm will invest $20.1 million to establish operations in Nashville.

Headquartered in France and located in 50 countries, Capgemini says it will create a minimum of 500 new jobs and as many as 1,000 as the company launches its first Tennessee delivery center at Broadwest in Nashville.

23. Events -

Williamson County Real Estate Summit. Featuring Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors. Williamson County Residential Real Estate Panel and Conversation, Moderated by Bo Patten, CEO of the Williamson County Association of Realtors. Additional topics and speakers: Retail trends and the future of the Factory at Franklin, Elam Freeman, founder and principal of Ojas Partners. State of commercial real estate, moderated by Elizabeth McCreary, Williamson, Inc. chief economic development officer. Virginia Springs II, 5501 Virginia Way, Brentwood. Tuesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members, $750 Company table of 10. Information

24. Santa’s bag holds no pools, major appliances this year -

Prices are ascending as the holidays descend upon the city, and developers and builders are frustrated as they are unable to keep pace with demand. Individuals desiring renovations, additions and swimming pools are incensed that no one will work for them.

25. No need for horse, buggy to take a drive back in time -

With COVID concerns and restrictions putting a crimp in the foreign travel to which we aspire, we recently decided instead to take a trip back in time.

Destination: 1840 or thereabouts.

This did not involve a Hot Tub Time Machine (though I wouldn’t mind having one). We just climbed into my Jeep and headed northeast a couple of hundred miles to the restored village in Pleasant Hill, Kentucky, once home to a colony of Shakers.

26. Need knows no calendar -

The French political scientist Alexis de Tocqueville visited the United States in 1831 to study the American penal system. But he also noticed something that while not unique to this nation certainly runs through the fabric of it more than in most other countries.

27. New hurdle for COVID-19 home testing -- the holiday season -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions more home tests for COVID-19 are hitting store shelves, but will there be enough for Americans hoping to screen themselves before holiday gatherings?

Gone are last year's long lines to get tested, thanks to nearly a year of vaccinations, increased testing supplies and quicker options. But with many Americans unvaccinated and reports of infections among those who've gotten the shots, some are looking to home tests for an extra layer of protection ahead of this year's festivities.

28. Dems confident on methane fee as budget bill moves to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic plan to impose a fee on methane emissions from oil and gas wells has cleared a key hurdle, but it faces strong opposition from the oil and gas industry and criticism by centrist Sen. Joe Manchin.

29. Target to keep stores closed on Thanksgiving going forward -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will no longer open its stores on Thanksgiving Day, making permanent a shift to the unofficial start of the holiday season that was suspended during the pandemic.

To limit crowds in stores, retailers last year were forced to turn what had become a weekend shopping blitz into an extended event, with holiday sales beginning as early as October.

30. Too many Titans' mistakes end winning streak at 6 straight -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The end of the Tennessee Titans' six-game winning streak comes down to a simple number: Five.

Ryan Tannehill was intercepted a career-high four times, and the Titans lost the ball on a muffed punt for a season-high five turnovers Sunday in a 22-13 loss to the Houston Texans that snapped the longest active winning streak in the NFL.

31. Texas abortion ban stays in force as justices mull outcome -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two weeks have passed since the Supreme Court's extraordinarily rushed arguments over Texas' unique abortion law without any word from the justices.

They raised expectations of quick action by putting the case on a rarely used fast track. And yet, to date, the court's silence means that women cannot get an abortion in Texas, the second-largest state, after about six weeks of pregnancy.

32. Europe's central banker: Not adding to pinch with rate hike -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The head of the European Central Bank warned that high oil and gas prices are hitting consumers in the 19 countries that use the euro harder than in other major economies and underlined that the bank won't add to the squeeze by raising interest rates anytime soon.

33. US stocks shuffle lower, pulling indexes further from highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes shuffled lower on Wall Street Wednesday, pulling a bit further off their record heights.

The S&P 500 fell 12.23 points, or 0.3%, to 4,688.67 after earlier drifting between a tiny gain and a 0.4% decline. It's sitting just 13.03 points below its all-time high set a week and a half ago.

34. Texas abortion ban stays in force as justices mull outcome -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two weeks have passed since the Supreme Court's extraordinarily rushed arguments over Texas' unique abortion law without any word from the justices.

They raised expectations of quick action by putting the case on a rarely used fast track. And yet, to date, the court's silence means that women cannot get an abortion in Texas, the second-largest state, after about six weeks of pregnancy.

35. Four reasons to shop Small Business Saturday -

When you think about holiday shopping, your mind probably goes to big-box retailers before your neighborhood bookstore or antique shop. But in a time marked by widespread supply chain disruptions and inflation, underdog small businesses deserve our attention.

36. Workers are own CEOs during ‘Great Resignation’ -

Until recently, we never would have guessed that there would be anything called the Great Resignation. But here we are. It feels like everyone is looking for a new job – in every industry – all at the same time.

37. How to talk money with your parents this holiday -

Holiday gatherings may present an opportunity to talk to your parents about important money issues, including estate planning or long-term care. The need to discuss this stuff might feel particularly acute if you don’t see your folks often or these are the first holidays you’ll be together since the pandemic started.

38. Events -

Williamson County Real Estate Summit. Speakers: Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors. Williamson County Residential Real Estate panel and conversation, moderated by Bo Patten, CEO of the Williamson County Association of Realtors. Retail trends and the future of the Factory at Franklin, Elam Freeman, founder and principal, Ojas Partners. State of Commercial Real Estate, moderated by Elizabeth McCreary, Williamson, Inc. chief economic development officer. Virginia Springs II, 5501 Virginia Way, Brentwood. Tuesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members, $750 Company table of 10. Information

39. LifePoint Health launches 25m Health incubator -

LifePoint Health has announced a joint venture with New York-based venture studio 25madison and Apollo Global Management that will be seeded initially with $20 million to launch 25m Health, a first-of-its-kind health tech startup incubator in Nashville.

40. Top Davidson County commercial sales for October 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

41. Thanksgiving has good claim for top US holiday -

As the 400th anniversary of the first Thanksgiving approaches, I suggest that maybe the annual celebration should be recognized as America’s top holiday. Ahead even of Christmas, the perennial No. 1.

42. Another COVID toll: $2 billion for funeral costs -

Pulverized homes, splintered trees and decimated buildings over a mile-long debris trail. Scorched earth or waist-high floodwaters. Those images of natural disasters come to mind when the Federal Emergency Management Agency rushes in the help Americans in times of need.

43. EXPLAINER: Europe lacks natural gas. Is it Russia's fault? -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe is short of natural gas — dangerously short. A cold winter could mean a severe crunch, and utility bills are headed higher, burdening ordinary people and weighing on the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.

44. Target tames global supply backups; sales surge 13.2% in Q3 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target delivered another strong quarter, overcoming a slew of challenges from inflationary pressures to congested ports.

Third-quarter profits rose nearly 47%, while sales increased 13.2%, both exceeding expectations and the Minneapolis company raised projections for fourth-quarter comparable store sales.

45. Christmas stretch: UK inflation highest in nearly a decade -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the United Kingdom surged at the fastest rate in nearly a decade in October amid soaring energy costs, official figures showed Wednesday, a development that has cemented market expectations that the Bank of England will raise interest rates next month.

46. Defying inflation, Americans ramped up spending last month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans have taken a darker view of the economy as inflation has worsened. Yet so far, they appear no less willing to spend freely at retailers — an encouraging sign for the crucial holiday shopping season.

47. Child care providers can apply for Tennessee grant program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — ChildcareTennessee on Monday announced a $5 million grant program to establish new childcare services or expand existing ones.

Providers can apply for up to $1,000 per licensed child care slot, up to a maximum of $100,000 per program. The grants can be used for furniture, equipment, supplies, curriculum and other items and services, according to a news release from ChildcareTennessee.

48. Experience in close games helps Titans extend win streak -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans would prefer easier wins that don't come down to a final stand at the goal line or scratching out a victory in overtime.

They also don't flinch in such situations. They're scrappy and tested, used to big moments late in games because they've been in more of them than any other NFL team with coach Mike Vrabel.

49. US stock indexes end wobbly day mostly lower on Wall Street -

Stocks closed mostly lower after wobbling most of Monday on Wall Street as the market comes off its first weekly loss in six weeks and investors move past the recent round of mostly solid corporate earnings.

50. Stocks close higher, but indexes still end week in the red -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street on Friday, but the market still ended the week lower as inflation worries weighed on investors' moods earlier in the week.

The S&P 500 index added 33.58 points, or 0.7%, to end at 4,682.85. While it closed higher, the benchmark index still ended the week down 0.3%. It was the first weekly loss for the S&P 500 in six weeks.

51. Disappearing shorts: As stocks soar, skeptics surrender -

NEW YORK (AP) — The skeptics on Wall Street have gone missing.

As the stock market has surged to records — unbowed by recession, pandemic or warnings of a dangerous bubble — activity has dwindled to a nearly two-decade low for the traders known as short sellers, who make their money betting stocks will fall.

52. Biden: Infrastructure bill will ease economy woes, just wait -

BALTIMORE (AP) — President Joe Biden touted his $1 trillion infrastructure plan Wednesday as an eventual fix for the nation's inflation and supply chain woes — if Americans just have the patience to wait for the construction to begin.

53. Can at-home COVID-19 tests make holiday gatherings safer? -

Can at-home COVID-19 tests make holiday gatherings safer?

Yes, combined with vaccination, home test kits for COVID-19 can add a layer of safety and reassurance by providing on-the-spot results during this second year of pandemic holidays.

54. Democrats sell infrastructure bill, push for Biden backup -

STILWELL, Kan. (AP) — Traffic whizzing behind her, Rep. Sharice Davids gathered reporters at a transportation facility along U.S. 69 in eastern Kansas this week to celebrate the surge of federal money headed in her state's direction.

55. UK economic growth held back by supply chain problems -

LONDON (AP) — The British economy slowed down during the third quarter of the year as widespread supply chain problems hobbled the recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, official figures showed Thursday.

56. Bloomberg pledges $120 million to curb drug overdose deaths -

Michael Bloomberg will spend $120 million in an effort to reduce the soaring numbers of deaths from drug overdoses, he announced today at a healthcare summit he organized. The pledge more than doubles the $50-million philanthropic commitment he made toward the same goal in 2018.

57. The cutest thing or a clever ploy? 5 steps to weed out Instagram ad scams -

Holiday shoppers, prepare to be bombarded with social media ads – and scams.

Highly targeted advertising on social media sites like Instagram and Facebook makes it easier than ever for brands to get in front of their target market. But these ads also make it easier for shady brands to dupe eager scrollers and shoppers with glossy images, only to deliver low-quality goods or nothing at all.

58. Reluctant to retire? 3 signs you’re ready to pull trigger -

Many people don’t have much choice about when they retire. Illness, job loss or caretaking responsibilities push them out of the labor force, ready or not.

But some people have the opposite problem: They have a choice and can’t quite bring themselves to quit working.

59. Barings and Hines buys Reed District property -

Barings, global investment managers, and Hines, an international real estate firm, have formed a joint venture partnership to acquire the Reed District site in Nashville for the future development of a 2.7 million-square foot multiphased mixed-use project.

60. 7-2 Titans are an anomaly in pass-happy NFL -

Those who grew up on Sesame Street will remember the game and accompanying song: “One of These Things is Not Like the Other.”

In the NFL version, always go with the Tennessee Titans as the odd man out.

61. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

62. TikTok made me: A selection of viral, gifty finds -

Look no further than TikTok and its pandemic-expanded ranks for unique holiday gifts, from the hot Halara athleisure dress to a miracle cleaning paste called The Pink Stuff, worthy of any neat freak’s Christmas stocking.

63. Top Davidson County residential sales for October 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

64. What a difference a year makes in new build prices -

When preparing to take the real estate examination, students learn of the term force majeure, a little used procedure in the world of real estate. Force majeure would fall into the “Let the buyer beware” category, though both these terms have more relevance than they have had in the past 40 years.

65. Remember when government intrusion was a bad thing? -

Tennessee legislators have shown they don’t need a monthslong session to commit mayhem. When they put their hive mind to it, they can muck things up in just three days.

Three days and change, actually, since the recent special session ran from Wednesday into the wee hours of Saturday morning.

66. 'Strong' start to kids vaccine campaign, but challenges loom -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The campaign to vaccinate elementary school age children in the U.S. is off to a strong start, health officials said Wednesday, but experts say there are signs that it will be difficult to sustain the initial momentum.

67. Facebook parent Meta to remove sensitive ad categories -

Facebook's parent company Meta says it will remove sensitive ad targeting options related to health, race or ethnicity, political affiliation, religion or sexual orientation beginning on Jan. 19.

Currently, advertisers can target people who have expressed interest in issues, public figures or organizations connected to these topics. That information comes from tracking user activity on Facebook, Instagram and other platforms the company owns.

68. Rare Starbucks union vote set to begin in Buffalo -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Never in its 50-year history has Starbucks relied on union workers to serve up frothy lattes as its U.S. cafes. But some baristas aim to change that.

Workers at three separate Starbucks stores in and around Buffalo, New York, are expected to begin voting by mail this week on whether they want to be represented by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

69. Tennessee taking applications for Supreme Court vacancy -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee officials have begun taking applications to fill a state Supreme Court seat left vacant by the death of Justice Cornelia Clark.

The Governor's Council for Judicial Appointments has set a deadline of midday Nov. 19 for applications to arrive at the Administrative Office of the Courts.

70. White House rushes with infrastructure fixes for US economy -

BALTIMORE (AP) — The Biden administration is relying on infrastructure dollars to help fix the clogged ports and blanket the nation with internet access — but a series of initiatives rolled out on Tuesday show that the urgent pace might not be fast enough to address the immediate needs of an economy coping with a supply chain squeeze and a shift to remote work.

71. Philanthropies planning a nonprofit newsroom in Cleveland -

A coalition of philanthropies announced plans Tuesday to launch a nonprofit newsroom that will provide coverage of Cleveland, kicking off an effort to help fill a void left by the shrinking of news organizations in Ohio.

72. Powell highlights Fed's commitment to 'inclusive' recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inequality can prevent the U.S. economy from reaching its potential, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday, and he underscored the Fed's commitment to reducing unemployment as broadly as possible, including among disadvantaged groups.

73. Fed: Risks to US financial system ease as economy recovers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The risks to the U.S. financial system have eased significantly compared to a year earlier, the Federal Reserve said Monday.

The central bank noted that as the economy recovers from the pandemic-driven recession, the balance sheets of individual Americans and businesses continue to strengthen.

74. Titans off to best start under Vrabel at NFL's halfway mark -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans like to play physical football and call themselves resilient.

It's also time to consider them contenders.

Tennessee hits the midway point with the NFL's longest active winning streak at five games — the past four over playoff teams from last season. The Titans also are the AFC's first team to seven wins, and their latest is the most impressive for a team trying to reach its first Super Bowl since January 2000.

75. AP FACT CHECK: Biden hypes $1T bill impact on electric cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boasting about his $1 trillion infrastructure package, President Joe Biden overstated its reach by claiming it would result in 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations and meet his pledge to nudge half of U.S. drivers into EVs by decade's end.

76. Biden's bet that economy would boost Democrats falls flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was supposed to help President Joe Biden and Democrats, but as of late it's been hurting them with voters.

Biden on Friday praised the U.S. economy for performing better than the rest of the world, saying it's largely because of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package and plans for additional spending of roughly $2.75 trillion on infrastructure, families, schools, health care and climate change.

77. No arm-twisting: Kerry says corporates back plan to cut CO2 -

GENEVA (AP) — A new project trumpeted by U.S. President Joe Biden in which companies underpin development of low-carbon technologies through their buying power amounts to a "big transformation," U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Thursday.

78. Groups sue Tennessee over law against trans school athletes -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two civil rights groups filed a federal court challenge Thursday against a Tennessee law that bars transgender athletes from playing public high school or middle school sports aligned with their gender identity.

79. Analyst who aided Trump-Russia dossier charged with lying -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Russian analyst who contributed to a dossier of Democratic-funded research into ties between Russia and Donald Trump was arrested Thursday on charges of lying to the FBI about his sources of information, among them an associate of Hillary Clinton.

80. Bank of England holds rates steady, confounding expectations -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has confounded market expectations and held interest rates steady, saying it wanted to see more information about what happens to unemployment after the government recently ended a program that subsidized worker pay during the coronavirus pandemic.

81. Roll up your sleeves: Kids' turn arrives for COVID-19 shots -

Hugs with friends. Birthday parties indoors. Pillow fights. Schoolchildren who got their first COVID-19 shots Wednesday said these are the pleasures they look forward to as the U.S. enters a major new phase in fighting the pandemic.

82. Justice Dept. conducting cyber crackdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is stepping up actions to combat ransomware and cybercrime through arrests and other actions, its No. 2 official told The Associated Press, as the Biden administration escalates its response to what it regards as an urgent economic and national security threat.

83. Text of the Federal Reserve's statement after its meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

The Federal Reserve is committed to using its full range of tools to support the U.S. economy in this challenging time, thereby promoting its maximum employment and price stability goals.

84. What happens to all your crypto riches when you die? -

If you’re merely dipping your toe in cryptocurrency, it can be hard to imagine your crypto as something worth talking to an estate attorney about. But that $100 in fun money could grow to a significant percentage of your total investments, sometimes overnight. Sorry to be a downer, but YOLO – so make a plan for your crypto in the event you die.

85. There are limits to what your will can accomplish -

A will allows you to distribute your worldly goods, select a guardian for minor children and name an executor to carry out your wishes.

But you should be aware of what a will can’t or shouldn’t do. This is particularly true if you’re drafting your own document without an attorney’s help, since you could unknowingly make a mistake that upends your whole estate plan.

86. Events -

CMA Awards. The 55th CMA Awards honors the best in country music with star-studded performances, presenters and more. Two-Time CMA Entertainer of the Year and “American Idol” judge Luke Bryan will host this year’s event broadcasting live from Bridgestone Arena. Wednesday, 7 p.m.

87. What we don’t know about economic development -

Four years ago, an investigative journalist in Nashville examined the cash grants and tax breaks given to companies as part of the state’s economic development deals to create jobs.

The headline: “Are Tennessee job subsidies a success? Secrecy makes it nearly impossible to know.”

88. Titans lean on Tannehill with Henry out of picture -

Now what? In less than 24 hours, the Tennessee Titans climbed to the top of the AFC playoff standings and learned running back Derrick Henry – the primary factor in getting there – would be undergoing foot injury.

89. Davidson County real estate trends for October 2021 -

October 2021 real estate trends for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

90. Paying too much to relocate? It depends on your options -

In the past 30 days, 76 homes sold in Davidson County for $1 million or more with 60 of those being homes built since the turn of the century. That number is slightly down from the 83 sold during the same period last year when 50 of those sales were for homes built since 2000.

91. Throw the book at thieves hitting li’l free libraries -

Maybe some shadowy group with an anti-book agenda is behind the shameful deeds. Bibliophobes in Action, say. Illiterates United.

Whatever the motivation, a person (or persons) unknown has been cleaning out some Little Free Libraries around Nashville. It’s a breach of the social contract and honor system upon which Little Free Libraries rely.

92. High court seems ready to strike down New York gun law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday seemed ready to strike down a restrictive New York gun permitting law, but the justices also seemed worried that a broad ruling could threaten gun restrictions on subways, bars, stadiums and other gathering places.

93. UK tells private sector it must invest big to save planet -

GLASGOW, Scotland (AP) — Britain called Wednesday for the world's financial industry to channel its vast funds towards greener investments to ensure that global efforts to curb global warming succeed.

94. Giving to top charities rose 3.7% in 2020, driven by wealthy -

In the wake of the most devastating public-health emergency in a century and the resulting economic uncertainty, Americans provided more charitable dollars to United Way Worldwide than any other nonprofit focused on direct aid, followed by the Salvation Army and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, according to new rankings by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

95. US says oil, gas sales damage climate — won't stop them -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration is planning to sell oil and gas leases on huge tracts of public land in the U.S. West, despite the Interior Department's conclusion that doing so could cost society billions of dollars in climate change impacts.

96. Robots hit the streets as demand for food delivery grows -

ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Robot food delivery is no longer the stuff of science fiction. But you may not see it in your neighborhood anytime soon.

Hundreds of little robots — knee-high and able to hold around four large pizzas — are now navigating college campuses and even some city sidewalks in the U.S., the U.K. and elsewhere. While robots were being tested in limited numbers before the coronavirus hit, the companies building them say pandemic-related labor shortages and a growing preference for contactless delivery have accelerated their deployment.

97. Biden's climate plan aims to reduce methane emissions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Tuesday launched a wide-ranging plan to reduce methane emissions, targeting a potent greenhouse gas that contributes significantly to global warming and packs a stronger short-term punch than even carbon dioxide.

98. Hotels rethink the concierge: From selfies to sustainability -

Looking to increase your vacation selfie game? Don't worry, Eduardo Vallin has you covered.

As "Instagram concierge" at the W Punta de Mita hotel in Mexico, Vallin helps guests locate and take the best social media-worthy photos while they bask in that vacation glow.

99. Tesla software recall may head off fight with US regulators -

DETROIT (AP) — Tesla has issued a recall that automatically sent a software update fixing a safety problem in its electric vehicles, apparently heading off a looming confrontation with U.S. safety regulators.

100. Titans will have to get creative without NFL rushing leader -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans have had plenty of experience dealing with injuries this season and now must adapt to their biggest challenge yet.

No Derrick Henry for the foreseeable future.