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Editorial Results (free)

1. EU chief says key to energy crisis is pushing Green Deal -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union's top official on Wednesday exhorted the 27 member nations to wean themselves off natural gas not only to speed the transition to clean energy but also to make the bloc a more independent player in the world.

2. Report details Trump's all-out bid to undo election results -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's extraordinary effort to overturn his 2020 election defeat brought the Justice Department to the brink of chaos, and prompted top officials there and at the White House to threaten to resign, a Senate Judiciary Committee report found.

3. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

4. McGlinchey adds Schwegler to corporate law team -

Michael Schwegler has joined McGlinchey Stafford’s Nashville office where he will work in its national business corporate practice.

Schwegler has represented lenders, creditors and businesses in commercial and consumer lending transactions, consumer finance regulation and compliance, real estate, workouts, bankruptcy and commercial litigation matters.

5. UK pledges to hit all-renewable electricity by 2035 -

MANCHESTER, England (AP) — All Britain's electricity will come from renewable sources by 2035, the governing Conservatives announced Monday, saying the move would help end the country's reliance on imported fuel.

6. Surging natural gas prices: Threat to consumers this winter? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Brace for a rude surprise on your winter heating bills.

After years of unusually inexpensive levels, the price of natural gas in the United States has more than doubled since this time last year. In Europe and Asia, wholesale prices are more than five times what they were a year ago.

7. House Dems begin moving parts of Biden $3.5T domestic plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats began pushing plans for providing paid family and medical leave, easing climate change and bolstering education through House committees Thursday as they battled Republicans and among themselves over President Joe Biden's $3.5 trillion vision for reshaping federal priorities.

8. EU pushes for more autonomy amid Afghanistan fallout -

BRDO CASTLE, Slovenia (AP) — Still reeling from the European Union's shortcomings in Afghanistan, officials from the 27-nation bloc met Thursday to discuss ways to improve their response to future crises and not be so reliant on the U.S.

9. Holman retiring as Centerstone CFO -

Centerstone, a national provider of behavioral health and addiction services, has announced chief financial officer Steve Holman will retire at the end of the year.

Holman has been with Centerstone for more than eight years, helping the nonprofit grow from a relatively small organization into one of the largest community-based behavioral health care providers in the country.

10. Misread warnings helped lead to chaotic Afghan evacuation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The warnings were clear: The Afghan government would likely fall once U.S. troops pulled out. But intelligence agencies and ultimately President Joe Biden missed how quickly it would happen, losing weeks that could have been used for evacuations and spurring a foreign policy crisis.

11. Airbnb cuts 2Q loss to $68 million, COVID clouds forecast -

Airbnb said Thursday that it narrowed its second-quarter loss to $68 million and gave a bullish forecast for revenue, but the company warned that new variants of COVID-19 will make future bookings and cancellations harder to predict.

12. Groups make own drugs to fight high drug prices, shortages -

Impatient with years of inaction in Washington on prescription drug costs, U.S. hospital groups, startups and nonprofits have started making their own medicines in a bid to combat stubbornly high prices and persistent shortages of drugs with little competition.

13. Olympics, pandemic and politics: There's no separating them -

TOKYO (AP) — Over and over, year after year, the stewards of the Olympics say it: The Games aren't supposed to be political. But how do you avoid politics when you're trying to pull off an event of this complexity during a lethal and protracted pandemic?

14. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

15. EU unveils tough climate rules, eyes tax on foreign firms -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Wednesday unveiled sweeping new legislation to help meet its pledge to cut emissions of the gases that cause global warming by 55% over this decade, including a controversial plan to tax foreign companies for the pollution they cause.

16. Young Greeks promised cash to get vaccinated -

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Greece will give young adults 150 euros ($180) in credit to get vaccinated as it launches a two-tier access policy over the summer, Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis said Monday.

17. A look at travel rules in popular European destinations -

Europe is opening up to Americans and other visitors after more than a year of COVID-induced restrictions. But travelers will need patience to figure out who's allowed into which country, how and when.

18. Help wanted: Labor crisis plagues US restaurant industry -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sherry Villanueva's family of Santa Barbara restaurants employed 350 people before the pandemic took hold and darkened dining rooms across California. Now, with the state's economy officially reopened, about 250 workers are back on the job.

19. Why are Olympics going on despite public, medical warnings? -

TOKYO (AP) — Public sentiment in Japan has been generally opposed to holding the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, partly based on fears the coronavirus will spike as almost 100,000 people — athletes and others — enter for both events.

20. House poised to repeal 2002 Iraq War authorization -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House, with the backing of President Joe Biden, is expected to approve legislation to repeal the 2002 authorization for use of military force in Iraq, a step supporters say is necessary to constrain presidential war powers even though it is unlikely to affect U.S. military operations around the world.

21. Ally Bank ends all overdraft fees, first large bank to do so -

NEW YORK (AP) — Ally Financial is ending overdraft fees entirely on all of its bank products, the company said Wednesday, being the first large bank to end overdraft fees across its entire business.

22. Senate R&D bill to counter China shelved by GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sweeping Senate bill aimed at making the United States more competitive with China and shoring up domestic computer chip manufacturing with $50 billion in emergency funds was abruptly shelved Friday after a handful of Republican senators orchestrated a last-minute attempt to halt it.

23. EU takes big step toward relaxing travel for vaccinated -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union took a step toward relaxing travel rules for tourists from outside the 27-nation bloc Wednesday when EU ambassadors agreed on measures to allow in fully vaccinated visitors.

24. Public transit hopes to win back riders after crushing year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking the Los Angeles Metro for his first trip in months, Brad Hudson felt a moment of normalcy when the train rolled into the station in South Pasadena, California, harkening back to his daily commute into LA before the coronavirus pandemic.

25. India cases up as scientists appeal to Modi to release data -

NEW DELHI (AP) — Indian scientists appealed to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to publicly release virus data that would allow them to save lives as coronavirus cases climbed again Friday, prompting the army to open its hospitals in a desperate bid to control a massive humanitarian crisis.

26. Continental Europe could allow US tourists back this summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — American tourists could soon be visiting continental Europe again, more than a year after the European Union restricted travel to the 27-nation bloc to a bare minimum to contain the coronavirus.

27. Jobs are make-or-break argument for Biden in climate plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is bringing out the billionaires, the CEOs and the union executives Friday to help sell President Joe Biden's climate-friendly transformation of the U.S. economy at his virtual summit of world leaders.

28. World leaders pledge climate cooperation despite other rifts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The leaders of Russia and China put aside their raw-worded disputes with U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday long enough to pledge international cooperation on cutting climate-wrecking coal and petroleum emissions in a livestreamed summit showcasing America's return to the fight against global warming.

29. US sanctions Chinese computer makers in widening tech fight -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government on Friday criticized the Biden administration's curbs on access to U.S. technology for its supercomputer developers and said sanctions "only strengthen China's determination" to invent its own.

30. Lawmakers call YouTube Kids a 'wasteland of vapid' content -

A House subcommittee is investigating YouTube Kids, saying the Google-owned video feeds children inappropriate material in "a wasteland of vapid, consumerist content" so it can serve them ads.

The inquiry comes despite Google agreeing to pay $170 million in 2019 to settle allegations that YouTube collected personal data on children without their parents' consent.

31. China's Huawei says 2020 sales rose despite US sanctions -

BEIJING (AP) — Chinese tech giant Huawei said Wednesday it eked out higher sales and profit last year but growth plunged after its smartphone unit was hammered by U.S. sanctions imposed in a fight with Beijing over technology and security.

32. China cuts taxes to spur semiconductor development -

BEIJING (AP) — China announced tax breaks Monday to spur growth of its semiconductor industry following U.S. sanctions that alarmed the ruling Communist Party by cutting off access to American processor chips for tech giant Huawei and some other companies.

33. WeWork stock offer comes amid doubtful need for office space -

NEW YORK (AP) — Uncertainty about demand for office space in a global pandemic is a big risk that investors will have to weigh as WeWork makes a second run at a public stock offering.

A year after the novel coronavirus turned office towers into ghost towns worldwide, the embattled communal work space company said Friday it would merge with special purposes acquisition company BowX Acquisition and seek a public listing.

34. WeWork attempts to go public again, this time through a SPAC -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly two years after its attempted initial public offering of shares disintegrated, WeWork is going public in a merger with a special-purpose acquisition company.

WeWork is merging with BowX Acquisition, a SPAC, in a transaction that would value the embattled communal office-space company at $9 billion plus debt, the companies said in a joint statement Friday.

35. EU sets out virus pass plan to allow free travel by summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — With summer looming and tourism-reliant countries anxiously waiting for the return of a steady influx of tourism income amid the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union's executive body presented a proposal Wednesday that would allow European citizens and residents — vaccinated or not — to travel freely across the 27-nation region by the summer.

36. Democratic-led House makes conservation push with lands bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House passed legislation Friday that would create about 1.5 million acres of new wilderness and incorporate nearly 1,200 miles of waterways into the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System as Democrats move to protect more public lands — with President Joe Biden's blessing.

37. DoorDash's sales triple in Q4, but 2021 could see slowdown -

Meal delivery company DoorDash said its revenue more than tripled last year thanks to pandemic-driven demand, but it still lost money because it spent more heavily on marketing and expanding its business.

38. Wealth Strategies’ Allen makes Forbes state list -

Wealth Strategies Partners’ Paul Allen, CFP®, MS, has been named to Forbes’ 2021 list of America’s Best-in-State Wealth Advisors. This marks the second time that he has received this prestigious recognition.

39. Biden to order a review of US supply chains for vital goods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is preparing to sign an executive order to review U.S. supply chains for large-capacity batteries, pharmaceuticals, critical minerals and semiconductors that power cars, phones, military equipment and other goods.

40. Bass, Berry & Sims adds 10 in Nashville -

Bass, Berry & Sims has hired 15 new attorneys, 10 of whom are located in Nashville. They are, grouped by specialty:

Corporate and securities

• Dixon Babb, a graduate of the University of Tennessee College of Law and the University of Georgia.

41. Bradley starts clinic for Black-owned businesses -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP is launching its Black-Owned Small Business and Nonprofit Clinic. The firm has partnered with the Arts& Business Council of Greater Nashville and its Volunteer Lawyers & Professionals for the Arts program to provide accessible and affordable business-oriented legal services to Black-owned small businesses and nonprofits.

42. Small SUV showdown: Nissan Rogue vs. Mazda CX-5 -

The immense popularity of small SUVs means that every manufacturer competing in this space has to bring its A-game.

To that end, Nissan is hitting the reset button with its fully redesigned 2021 Rogue, built in Smyrna. Boasting bolder styling and greater emphasis on technology and interior appointments, this overhauled Rogue improves upon its predecessor in almost every way. But can it run toe-to-toe with the best that the class has to offer?

43. Titans get second chance to clinch AFC South with road win -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Titans at least should be comfortable in this spot.

For a fourth straight year, they go to the regular-season finale needing a victory to clinch a playoff berth. Just like a year ago, they head to Houston needing a win to guarantee they go to the postseason.

44. EU-UK leaders seek way out of Brexit trade impasse -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and the United Kingdom kicked efforts into higher gear on Tuesday to settle a fight over fishing quotas in British waters, the main dispute standing in the way of a trade deal that would avoid a chaotic New Year's Day economic divorce between the two.

45. EU-UK trade talks slog on past another Brexit deadline -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Problems increased Monday in the bid to put a trade deal between the European Union and the United Kingdom on the rails before a Brexit transition period ends on New Year's Day, with the EU legislature insisting ever more it will not have time to vet and approve an agreement in time.

46. EU says EU-UK face weekend 'last attempt' to get trade deal -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union and the United Kingdom are heading into the weekend on a "last attempt" to clinch a post-Brexit trade deal, with EU fishing rights in British waters the most notable remaining obstacle to avoid a chaotic and costly changeover in the new year.

47. China's leaders say tech growth top priority amid US tension -

BEIJING (AP) — China's ruling Communist Party called Friday for faster technology development to increase the country's economic independence amid tensions with Washington that have disrupted access to computer chips and other high-tech components.

48. Millions of hungry Americans turn to food banks for 1st time -

The deadly pandemic that tore through the nation's heartland struck just as Aaron Crawford was in a moment of crisis. He was looking for work, his wife needed surgery, then the virus began eating away at her work hours and her paycheck.

49. Brexit broken record: Trade deal close but big issues remain -

LONDON (AP) — Much like a broken record, Brexit trade talks are rumored to be poised for success on the cusp of a deadline, only to face the same old fundamental differences on fishing rights, legal oversight and fair competition that have dogged the European Union and Britain for months.

50. Brexit broken record: Trade deal close but big issues remain -

LONDON (AP) — Much like a broken record, Brexit trade talks are rumored to be poised for success on the cusp of a deadline, only to face the same old fundamental differences on fishing rights, legal oversight and fair competition that have dogged the European Union and Britain for months.

51. EU gives upbeat assessment of state of Brexit trade talks -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union on Friday issued one of its most upbeat assessments of the state of post-Brexit trade negotiations, as the talks face an ever tighter deadline for a deal to enter into force for the start of the new year.

52. Cupcake Collection wins NAACP grant -

Nashville’s The Cupcake Collection is one of 10 Black-owned small business winners of the NAACP Powershift Grant.

The company, which also has a location in New Orleans, was founded by Mignon Francois, who serves as CEO.

53. Global travel and tourism projected to shed 174 million jobs -

LONDON (AP) — The global travel and tourism industry is on course to lose 174 million jobs this year if current restrictions to curb the spread of the coronavirus remain in place, a leading industry group warned Friday.

54. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

55. China's leaders vow to become self-reliant technology power -

BEIJING (AP) — China's leaders are vowing to make their country a self-reliant "technology power" as a feud with Washington cuts access to U.S. computer chips and other high-tech components, hampering Beijing's industrial ambitions.

56. From Beijing to Brussels, Trump's trade wars at a glance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he would shake up American trade policy. That he did. From Beijing to Brussels to Mexico City, he waged war with trading partners on multiple fronts. Here's a look at four tumultuous years of Trump trade policy:

57. U.S. antitrust case against Google mirrors Microsoft battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's legal assault on Google actually feels like a blast from the past.

The U.S. Justice Department filed an equally high-profile case against a technology giant in 1998, accusing it of leveraging a monopoly position to lock customers into its products so they wouldn't be tempted by potentially superior options from smaller rivals.

58. China's economy accelerates as virus recovery gains strength -

BEIJING (AP) — China's shaky economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic is gaining strength as consumers return to shopping malls and auto dealerships while the United States and Europe endure painful contractions.

59. Secretive, never profitable Palantir makes its market debut -

BOSTON (AP) — Seventeen years after it was born with the help of CIA seed money, the data-mining outfit Palantir Technologies is finally going public in the biggest Wall Street tech offering since last year's debut of Slack and Uber.

60. Germany welcomes China climate goal, sees need for EU action -

BERLIN (AP) — German Chancellor Angela Merkel has welcomed China's plan to be carbon-neutral by 2060, contrasting it with the U.S. failure to abide by the goals of the Paris climate accord.

61. US judge orders stop to Postal Service cuts, echoing others -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A federal judge in Philadelphia joined others Monday in ordering a halt to recent Postal Service cuts that critics say are causing mail delays and threatening the integrity of the presidential election.

62. Biden: Would push for less US reliance on nukes for defense -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrat Joe Biden leaves little doubt that if elected he would try to scale back President Donald Trump's buildup in nuclear weapons spending. And although the former vice president has not fully detailed his nuclear priorities, he says he would make the U.S. less reliant on the world's deadliest weapons.

63. Trump claims environmental progress, but he's weakened rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is out to claim the mantle of environmental steward on Tuesday as he highlights conservation and restoration projects in Florida. But his administration has overturned or weakened numerous regulations meant to protect air and water quality and lands essential for imperiled species.

64. Japan's economy shrinks 28% in 2Q, worse than 1st estimate -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's economy shrank at a record, even worse rate in the April-June quarter than initially estimated.

The Cabinet Office said Tuesday Japan's seasonally adjusted real gross domestic product contracted at an annualized rate of 28.1%, worse than the 27.8% figure given last month.

65. Jobless claims fall to 881,000 but layoffs remain elevated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a still-elevated 881,000 last week, evidence that the viral pandemic keeps forcing many businesses to slash jobs.

66. US jobless claims fall to 881,000, layoffs remain elevated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell to a still-elevated 881,000 last week, evidence that the viral pandemic keeps forcing many businesses to slash jobs.

67. Wall Street has biggest gain since July, sets more records -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged more than 450 points Wednesday as the stock market notched its best day in nearly two months.

The S&P 500 rose 1.5%, it's best day since July 6. The benchmark index and the Nasdaq composite each hit new highs, extending Wall Street's milestone-setting run in recent weeks.

68. Pandemic tests shopper loyalty for clothing brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Archie Jafree heard that Lord & Taylor filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in early August, he was sad about the fate of the storied retailer with roots dating back to 1824.

Still, the 36-year-old northern Virginia resident acknowledged he hadn't shopped there in months, preferring instead to go to Nordstrom and Zara, where he feels the customer service is better.

69. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts record; BLM falsely accused -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump claimed accomplishments he didn't earn on the pandemic, energy and veterans at a Republican convention finale that also heard Black Lives Matter baselessly accused of coordinating violent protests across the country.

70. Postal Service loses $2.2B in 3 months as virus woes persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Postal Service says it lost $2.2 billion in the three months that ended in June as the beleaguered agency — hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic — piles up financial losses that officials warn could top $20 billion over two years.

71. Congress urges Postal Service to undo changes slowing mail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers from both parties are calling on the U.S. Postal Service to immediately reverse operational changes that are causing delays in deliveries across the country just as big volume increases are expected for mail-in election voting.

72. Senator launches investigation into Postal Service delays -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic senator said Thursday he is launching an investigation into changes at the U.S. Postal Service that are causing delays in mail deliveries across the country just as big volume increases are expected for mail-in election voting.

73. 1.2 million seek jobless aid after $600 federal check ends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 1.2 million laid-off Americans applied for state unemployment benefits last week, evidence that the coronavirus keeps forcing companies to slash jobs just as a critical $600 weekly federal jobless payment has expired.

74. AAA: Partially automated driving systems don't always work -

DETROIT (AP) — Two tests by AAA during the past two years show that partially automated driving systems don't always function properly, so the auto club is recommending that car companies limit their use.

75. 1.2 million seek jobless aid after $600 federal check ends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 1.2 million laid-off Americans applied for state unemployment benefits last week, evidence that the coronavirus keeps forcing companies to slash jobs just as a critical $600 weekly federal jobless payment has expired.

76. Capitol negotiators still stuck, still trying on virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than a week's worth of meetings, at least some clarity is emerging in the bipartisan Washington talks on a huge COVID-19 response bill. Negotiators are still stuck but still trying.

77. AAA: Partially automated driving systems don't always work -

DETROIT (AP) — Two tests by AAA during the past two years show that partially automated driving systems don't always function properly, so the auto club is recommending that car companies limit their use.

78. Bradley’s Odubeko accepted to ABA Leaders Academy -

Junaid Odubeko, a partner in Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office, has been accepted to the American Bar Association Section of Litigation’s Diverse Leaders Academy.

DLA provides opportunities for lawyers in underrepresented groups to participate in leadership roles within the ABA Section of Litigation. Odubeko will serve a two-year term beginning Aug. 1, during which he will participate in Diversity & Inclusion Committee activities and engage in substantive work as a member of a Section committee or task force.

79. Barr says US has become overly reliant on Chinese goods, services -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States has become overly reliant on Chinese goods and services, including face masks, medical gowns and other protective equipment designed to curb the spread of the coronavirus, Attorney General William Barr said Thursday.

80. Facebook removes Trump ads with symbols once used by Nazis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook has removed campaign ads by President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence that featured an upside-down red triangle, a symbol once used by Nazis to designate political prisoners, communists and others in concentration camps.

81. Facebook says it's promoting accurate info on vote-by-mail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook said Thursday that it is working to help Americans vote by mail, including by notifying users about how to request ballots and whether the date of their state's election has changed.

82. 'We need help': Small cities face fiscal calamity from virus -

ALLENTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Unfilled potholes, uncollected trash, un-mowed grass and, most significantly, fewer police on the street are some of what Allentown says it's contemplating unless Washington helps it plug a multimillion-dollar budget hole left by the coronavirus pandemic.

83. McNally honored with Bar’s Norman Award -

Patrick T. McNally has been named the recipient of the Nashville Bar Association’s 2020 Jack Norman, Sr. Award, given annually to criminal law practitioners – including specifically defense attorneys, prosecuting attorneys and judges of courts with criminal jurisdiction – who practice before or serve as judges of courts exercising criminal jurisdiction located in the Metropolitan Nashville area.

84. EU unveils plans to save vacations and avoid a lost summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union unveiled Wednesday its plan to help citizens across the 27 nations salvage their summer vacations after months of tough coronavirus confinement and to hopefully resurrect Europe's badly battered tourism industry.

85. Chemicals, not karma, cause sycamore’s ills -

We were sitting on the front porch luxuriating in the budding signs of spring when I saw alarming signs on our senior sycamore.

The vibrant green leaves we had celebrated just weeks earlier were turning brown, shriveling up and giving every indication that they were ready to throw in the towel and croak.

86. Tesla says its cars automatically stop for traffic lights -

DETROIT (AP) — After testing on public roads, Tesla is rolling out a new feature of its partially automated driving system designed to spot stop signs and traffic signals.

The update of the electric car company's cruise control and auto-steer systems is a step toward CEO Elon Musk's pledge to convert cars to fully self-driving vehicles later this year.

87. Pandemic is dealing European tourism 'staggering' blow -

HALLE, Belgium (AP) — The European Union says its vaunted tourist industry is facing "staggering" figures of decline because of the coronavirus crisis and the bloc's internal market commissioner wants the sector to be first in line when it comes to recovery funds.

88. 10 years after BP spill: Oil drilled deeper; rules relaxed -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters, where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

89. US pork farmers panic as virus ruins hopes for great year -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — After enduring extended trade disputes and worker shortages, U.S. hog farmers were poised to finally hit it big this year with expectations of climbing prices amid soaring domestic and foreign demand.

90. 4/20 fizzle: Pot industry tested as virus slams economy -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The unofficial holiday celebrating all things cannabis arrives Monday as the nation's emerging legal marijuana market braces for an economic blow from the coronavirus crisis, with many consumers reducing spending or going underground for deals.

91. As mail voting pushed, some fear loss of in-person option -

ATLANTA (AP) — Scrambling to address voting concerns during a pandemic, election officials across the country are eliminating polling places or scaling back opportunities for people to cast ballots in person — a move raising concerns among voting rights groups and some Democrats who say some voters could be disenfranchised.

92. Drafting for an NFL season that might never be played -

Are NFL teams using next week’s draft to fill their roster needs for one year or two? It’s a question that’s never been relevant with previous drafts, but these are unprecedented times thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic.

93. Virus outbreak delivers tech darlings a harsh reality check -

Just as the coronavirus outbreak has boxed in society, it's also squeezed high-flying tech companies reliant on people's freedom to move around and get together.

Since the beginning of March, for instance, Uber shares have lost a quarter of their value. Rival Lyft is down 28 percent. Over the same period, the S&P 500 has fallen just 10 percent, even with wild swings along the way. The picture is even less clear for other, still-private "unicorn" companies once valued at more than $1 billion, such as Airbnb and WeWork.

94. Hackers' new target during pandemic: video conference calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ceri Weber had just begun to defend her dissertation when the chaos began: Echoes and voices interrupted her. Someone parroted her words. Then Britney Spears music came on, and someone told Weber to shut up. Someone threatened to rape her.

95. Turn out the lights, the party’s over -

He’s seen fire and he’s seen rain, but his violinist and accompanying vocalist, Andrea Zonn, says James Taylor never thought that he’d see a time when a virus from China would wipe out his spring and, likely, summer schedules.

96. Rural America watches pandemic erupt in cities as fear grows -

DUFUR, Ore. (AP) — The social distancing rules repeated like a mantra in America's urban centers, where the coronavirus is spreading exponentially, might seem silly in wide-open places where neighbors live far from each other and "working from home" means another day spent branding calves or driving a tractor alone through a field.

97. Warren ends 2020 presidential bid after Super Tuesday rout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Elizabeth Warren, who electrified progressives with her "plan for everything" and strong message of economic populism, dropped out of the Democratic presidential race on Thursday, according to a person familiar with her plans. The exit came days after the onetime front-runner couldn't win a single Super Tuesday state, not even her own.

98. Warren's future uncertain after loss in home state of Mass. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The future of Sen. Elizabeth Warren's presidential campaign was in serious doubt after she finished a surprisingly weak third in Tuesday's Democratic primary in her home state of Massachusetts.

99. Morgan Stanley to buy E-Trade for $13 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investment bank Morgan Stanley announced it would buy the online brokerage E-Trade for roughly $13 billion, one of the biggest deals on Wall Street since the financial crisis.

100. Morgan Stanley buying E-Trade for about $13 billion -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investment bank Morgan Stanley announced it would buy the online brokerage E-Trade for roughly $13 billion, one of the biggest deals on Wall Street since the financial crisis.