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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks edge higher after another choppy day on Wall Street -

Wall Street capped another wobbly day of trading Wednesday with an uneven finish for the major stock indexes ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wavering between small gains and losses most of the morning. The benchmark index regained its footing in the final hour of trading.

2. White House: 92% of fed workers under mandate are vaccinated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration's vaccine mandate for millions of federal workers seems to be working, with no apparent disruption to law enforcement, intelligence-gathering or holiday travel.

3. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

4. US jobless claims hit 52-year low after seasonal adjustments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits plummeted last week to the lowest level in more than half a century, another sign that the U.S. job market is rebounding rapidly from last year's coronavirus recession.

5. US GDP slowed sharply in Q3, big rebound expected in Q4 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy slowed to a modest annual rate of 2.1% in the July-September quarter according to the government's second read of the data, slightly better than its first estimate. But economists are predicting a solid rebound in the current quarter as long as rising inflation and a recent uptick in COVID cases do not derail activity.

6. Biden names women of color to lead White House budget office -

NANTUCKET, Mass. (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Wednesday that he is nominating Shalanda Young to lead the White House budget office and Nani Coloretti to serve as Young's deputy.

If confirmed by the Senate, Young would be the first Black woman to lead the Office of Management and Budget while Coloretti, who is Filipino American, would become one of the highest-ranking Asian Americans in the Biden administration.

7. On the road again: Travelers emerge in time for Thanksgiving -

DALLAS (AP) — Determined to reclaim Thanksgiving traditions that were put on pause last year by the pandemic, millions of Americans will be loading up their cars or piling onto planes to gather again with friends and family.

8. Jury holds pharmacies responsible for role in opioid crisis -

CLEVELAND (AP) — CVS, Walgreens and Walmart pharmacies recklessly distributed massive amounts of pain pills in two Ohio counties, a federal jury said Tuesday in a verdict that could set the tone for U.S. city and county governments that want to hold pharmacies accountable for their roles in the opioid crisis.

9. Fed's Powell will aim to win a high-stakes bet in 2nd term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell gambled last year that his ultra-low rate policies would help revive an economy that had sunk deep into a pandemic-induced recession. So far, his bet has mostly paid off.

10. Gov. Lee backs signing bill aide said violates US law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's governor on Monday stood by his decision to sign sprawling limits on COVID-19 restrictions into law, even though his own office warned the bill would violate federal disability law and put the state at risk of losing federal funds.

11. Tennessee wins Supreme Court water fight with Mississippi -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A unanimous Supreme Court on Monday rejected a claim that the Memphis, Tennessee, area has been taking water that belongs to Mississippi from an underground aquifer that sits beneath parts of both states.

12. Coal-fired power plants to close after new wastewater rule -

Climate change isn't what's driving some U.S. coal-fired power plants to shut down. It's the expense of stricter pollution controls on their wastewater.

Dozens of plants nationwide plan to stop burning coal this decade to comply with more stringent federal wastewater guidelines, according to state regulatory filings, as the industry continues moving away from the planet-warming fossil fuel to make electricity.

13. French IT firm to invest $20 million in Nashville -

Capgemini officials have announced the global IT consulting firm will invest $20.1 million to establish operations in Nashville.

Headquartered in France and located in 50 countries, Capgemini says it will create a minimum of 500 new jobs and as many as 1,000 as the company launches its first Tennessee delivery center at Broadwest in Nashville.

14. Bass, Berry & Sims bolsters health care practice -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added seven experienced health care attorneys to its national health care practice, including Travis Lloyd as a member in Nashville. The other six will be based in the firm’s Washington D.C. office.

15. Official: More than 90% of fed workers got shots by deadline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 90% of federal workers received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday's deadline set by President Joe Biden.

Biden announced in September that more than 3.5 million federal workers were required to undergo vaccination, with no with option to get regularly tested instead, unless they secured an approved medical or religious exemption. A U.S. official said the vast majority of federal workers are fully vaccinated, and that a smaller number have pending or approved exceptions to the mandate.

16. Stocks end mostly lower, but tech gains push Nasdaq higher -

Wall Street closed out a week of choppy trading with stocks mostly lower Friday, though gains for several tech companies pushed the Nasdaq composite to another record high and its first close over 16,000 points.

17. Texas abortion ban stays in force as justices mull outcome -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two weeks have passed since the Supreme Court's extraordinarily rushed arguments over Texas' unique abortion law without any word from the justices.

They raised expectations of quick action by putting the case on a rarely used fast track. And yet, to date, the court's silence means that women cannot get an abortion in Texas, the second-largest state, after about six weeks of pregnancy.

18. US advisers support expanding COVID boosters to all adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government on Friday moved to open up COVID-19 booster shots to all adults, expanding efforts to get ahead of rising coronavirus cases that experts fear could snowball into a winter surge as millions of Americans travel for the holidays.

19. Virus surge worsens in Midwest as states expand boosters -

A surge in cases in the Upper Midwest has some Michigan schools keeping students at home ahead of Thanksgiving and the military sending medical teams to Minnesota to relieve hospital staffs overwhelmed by COVID-19 patients.

20. State attorneys general probing Instagram's effects on kids -

A group of state attorneys general are investigating the photo-sharing platform Instagram and its effects on children and young adults, saying its parent company Facebook — now called Meta Platforms — ignored internal research about the physical and mental health dangers it posed to young people.

21. Biden aims to limit turnover among federal contract workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is signing an executive order Thursday aimed at limiting turnover for federal service contract workers by offering them right of first refusal when a contract changes hands.

22. Pressure on Fed's Powell is rising as inflation worsens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell surely expected to have some breathing room after taking the first step this month to dial back the Fed's emergency aid for the economy.

23. GOP paints Biden's choice for bank regulator as radical -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to become one of the top banking regulators endured a contentious nomination hearing Thursday, with Republican senators warning she would nationalize the U.S. banking system and Democrats saying she's eminently qualified and would be tough overseer of Wall Street.

24. U.S. jobless claims drop seventh straight week to 268,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell for the seventh straight week to a pandemic low of 268,000.

U.S. jobless claims dipped by 1,000 last week from the week before, the Labor Department reported Thursday.

25. Review says Pentagon reacted appropriately to Jan. 6 riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent review has concluded that the Defense Department and its top leaders acted appropriately before and during the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, despite sharp criticism from some local and congressional leaders that the military did not respond quick enough as protesters breached the building.

26. SpaceX's Musk: 1st Starship test flight to orbit in January -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX founder Elon Musk said Wednesday that his company will attempt to launch its futuristic, bullet-shaped Starship to orbit in January, but he's not betting on success for that first test flight.

27. Couple's $86M award in Monsanto pesticide case stands -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — California's highest court rejected on Wednesday a challenge by Monsanto Co.'s to $86.2 million in damages to a couple who developed cancer after spraying the company's Roundup weed-killer in their yards for three decades.

28. Texas abortion ban stays in force as justices mull outcome -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than two weeks have passed since the Supreme Court's extraordinarily rushed arguments over Texas' unique abortion law without any word from the justices.

They raised expectations of quick action by putting the case on a rarely used fast track. And yet, to date, the court's silence means that women cannot get an abortion in Texas, the second-largest state, after about six weeks of pregnancy.

29. Biden's nominee for bank regulator faces hostile opposition -

NEW YORK (AP) — A fierce battle is being waged in Washington over President Biden's choice to lead a typically low-profile agency that oversees the banking industry.

Saule Omarova, 55, was nominated in September to be the nation's next comptroller of the currency. If confirmed, she would be the first woman and person of color to run the 158-year-old agency. But her nomination has drawn intense opposition from Republicans and the banking industry, with the criticism at times echoing the Red Scare that plagued the U.S. after World War II.

30. Tesla has competition with Volkswagen ID.4 -

Introduced for 2021, the Volkswagen ID.4 is the German automaker’s first all-electric SUV and part of a new wave of electric vehicles for American consumers. It boasts a spacious interior and styling that’s futuristic but not too futuristic.

31. Another COVID toll: $2 billion for funeral costs -

Pulverized homes, splintered trees and decimated buildings over a mile-long debris trail. Scorched earth or waist-high floodwaters. Those images of natural disasters come to mind when the Federal Emergency Management Agency rushes in the help Americans in times of need.

32. Reviving Biden's big bill, Democrats look to regain momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regaining momentum, Democratic leaders are pressing ahead on President Joe Biden's  big domestic policy bill, with the House expected to vote later this week and the Senate vowing to follow by Christmas in hopes of boosting the party's standing and delivering on a main campaign promise.

33. Biden pushes electric vehicle chargers as energy costs spike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is highlighting billions of dollars in his giant bipartisan infrastructure deal to pay for the installation of electric vehicle chargers across the country, an investment he says will go a long way to curbing planet-warming carbon emissions while creating good-paying jobs.

34. Universities to buses: Tennessee COVID law exemptions sought -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Universities, transportation agencies and the operator of a national laboratory are among those landing exemptions to a new Tennessee law that strictly limits or prohibits most government entities and businesses from implementing COVID-19 prevention mandates. For some, approval was almost immediate.

35. Christmas stretch: UK inflation highest in nearly a decade -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the United Kingdom surged at the fastest rate in nearly a decade in October amid soaring energy costs, official figures showed Wednesday, a development that has cemented market expectations that the Bank of England will raise interest rates next month.

36. Ping-pong ball bounce could determine vaccine mandate's fate -

The fate of President Joe Biden's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for private employers could come down to the bounce of a ping-pong ball.

Republican officials in 27 states, employers and several conservative and business organizations filed challenges to the mandate in numerous federal courts shortly after the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration released details of the emergency rule Nov. 4. Several unions also filed challenges in other federal courts, contending it doesn't go far enough.

37. Racial disparities in kids' vaccinations are hard to track -

The rollout of COVID-19 shots for elementary-age children has exposed another blind spot in the nation's efforts to address pandemic inequalities: Health systems have released little data on the racial breakdown of youth vaccinations, and community leaders fear that Black and Latino kids are falling behind.

38. Bannon indictment defies history of Congress' contempt power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon's indictment on contempt of Congress charges is the nation's first since 1983, and his appearance in federal court provides a rare glimpse into one of U.S. lawmakers' politically messiest and least-used powers.

39. US: Oil, gas leases on hold around New Mexico's Chaco park -

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New oil and gas leasing within 10 miles (16 kilometers) of Chaco Culture National Historical Park will be prohibited for the next two years as officials consider a proposal to withdraw federal land in the area from development for a 20-year period, the U.S. Department of Interior said Monday.

40. Biden to protect Native American heritage site, boost safety -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden sought to showcase his commitment to Native Americans on Monday by announcing a step to help improve public safety and justice for their communities, which experience violent crime at rates more than double the national average.

41. Bannon indicted on contempt charges for defying 1/6 subpoena -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon, a longtime ally of former President Donald Trump, was indicted Friday on two counts of criminal contempt of Congress after he defied a subpoena from the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

42. Biden picks former FDA chief Califf to again lead the agency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday is tapping former Food and Drug Administration commissioner Robert Califf to again lead the powerful regulatory agency, according to a person familiar with the decision.

43. Biden salutes troops as 'spine of America' on Veterans Day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden saluted the nation's military veterans as "the spine of America" Thursday as he marked his first Veterans Day as president in a wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

44. Education, religious groups gain most from giving strategy -

The somewhat mysterious charitable giving strategy known as donor-advised funds is a point of contention in the philanthropic community, but a new report released Thursday is shedding light on what types of organizations benefited most from it in the past few years.

45. Biden announces plan to ID, treat vets' ills from toxic air -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, whose son Beau was an Iraq war veteran, is using his first Veterans Day in office to announce an effort to better understand, identify and treat medical conditions suffered by troops deployed to toxic environments.

46. US budget deficit eases to $165B in October, down 42% -

The U.S. monthly budget deficit fell in October as the government collected more taxes from individuals and corporations thanks to a much improved economy emerging from the coronavirus pandemic.

The Treasury Department reported Wednesday that the federal government posted a deficit of $165 billion last month. That was 42% lower than the same month last year when it rang up a record October deficit of $284.1 billion as revenues declined while spending to deal with the impact of the coronavirus soared.

47. Bloomberg pledges $120 million to curb drug overdose deaths -

Michael Bloomberg will spend $120 million in an effort to reduce the soaring numbers of deaths from drug overdoses, he announced today at a healthcare summit he organized. The pledge more than doubles the $50-million philanthropic commitment he made toward the same goal in 2018.

48. The cutest thing or a clever ploy? 5 steps to weed out Instagram ad scams -

Holiday shoppers, prepare to be bombarded with social media ads – and scams.

Highly targeted advertising on social media sites like Instagram and Facebook makes it easier than ever for brands to get in front of their target market. But these ads also make it easier for shady brands to dupe eager scrollers and shoppers with glossy images, only to deliver low-quality goods or nothing at all.

49. Barings and Hines buys Reed District property -

Barings, global investment managers, and Hines, an international real estate firm, have formed a joint venture partnership to acquire the Reed District site in Nashville for the future development of a 2.7 million-square foot multiphased mixed-use project.

50. 'Strong' start to kids vaccine campaign, but challenges loom -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The campaign to vaccinate elementary school age children in the U.S. is off to a strong start, health officials said Wednesday, but experts say there are signs that it will be difficult to sustain the initial momentum.

51. US-funded child care aid nearing reality with Biden bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Women — and some men — in Congress have been fighting for government child care assistance for almost 80 years. With President Joe Biden's $1.85 trillion social services package, they are as close as they have ever been to winning.

52. Court seems reluctant to sweep Puerto Rico into SSI program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court appeared reluctant Tuesday to rule for a resident of Puerto Rico who claims it's unconstitutional to be excluded from a welfare program that's available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

53. Whistleblowers to play key role in enforcing vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To enforce President Joe Biden's forthcoming COVID-19 mandate, the U.S. Labor Department is going to need a lot of help. Its Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't have nearly enough workplace safety inspectors to do the job.

54. Oklahoma court overturns $465M opioid ruling against J&J -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Supreme Court on Tuesday overturned a $465 million opioid ruling against drugmaker Johnson & Johnson, finding that a lower court wrongly interpreted the state's public nuisance law in the first case of its kind in the U.S. to go to trial.

55. Biden to continue FEMA virus aid for states until April 1 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is extending the federal government's 100% reimbursement of COVID-19 emergency response costs to states, tribes and territories through April 1, 2022, the White House is announcing Tuesday.

56. Railroads fight with unions in court over vaccine mandates -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Another major railroad has gone to court to determine whether it has the authority to require all its employees to get vaccinated against the coronavirus.

BNSF railroad filed a lawsuit Sunday against its major unions over its mandate. It joins Norfolk Southern and Union Pacific, which both filed similar lawsuits against the unions last month. The unions, which have filed some of their own lawsuits in response, argue that the railroads should have negotiated with them before imposing their mandates.

57. Congress mandates new car technology to stop drunken driving -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has created a new requirement for automakers: Find a high-tech way to keep drunken people from driving cars.

It's one of the mandates along with a burst of new spending aimed at improving auto safety amid escalating road fatalities in the $1 trillion infrastructure package  that President Joe Biden is expected to sign soon.

58. No joke: Comedians, cannabis companies push pot legalization -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big cannabis companies are backing a new, celebrity-infused campaign to enlist marijuana users to pressure members of Congress to legalize pot nationwide.

Federal legalization has advanced somewhat but still faces strong headwinds on Capitol Hill. The "Cannabis in Common" initiative launched Tuesday aims to change that.

59. Biden faces fresh challenges after infrastructure victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He has been here before.

President Joe Biden doesn't need to look any further back than his time as vice president to grasp the challenges that lie ahead in promoting his new $1 trillion infrastructure deal to the American people and getting the money out the door fast enough that they can feel a real impact.

60. Quarles to leave Fed's board, giving Biden another slot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Randal Quarles announced Monday that he will resign from the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors at the end of the year after completing a four-year term as its top bank regulator, opening up another vacancy on the Fed's influential board for President Joe Biden to fill.

61. Biden vaccine mandates face first test with federal workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is pushing forward with a massive plan to require millions of private sector employees to get vaccinated by early next year. But first, he has to make sure workers in his own federal government get the shot.

62. Feds urge schools to provide COVID-19 shots, info for kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is encouraging local school districts to host clinics to provide COVID-19 vaccinations to kids — and information to parents on the benefits of the shots — as the White House looks to speedily provide vaccines to those ages 5 to 11.

63. AP FACT CHECK: Biden hypes $1T bill impact on electric cars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boasting about his $1 trillion infrastructure package, President Joe Biden overstated its reach by claiming it would result in 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations and meet his pledge to nudge half of U.S. drivers into EVs by decade's end.

64. Governor extends school mask opt-out order again -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Friday again extended an executive order that allows parents to opt students out of school COVID-19 mask requirements that federal judges have blocked from applying in three counties.

65. Japan game maker Nintendo sees no quick fix for chips crunch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers stepped up their hiring in October, adding a solid 531,000 jobs, the most since July and a sign that the recovery from the pandemic recession may be overcoming a virus-induced slowdown.

66. Bank of England holds rates steady, confounding expectations -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has confounded market expectations and held interest rates steady, saying it wanted to see more information about what happens to unemployment after the government recently ended a program that subsidized worker pay during the coronavirus pandemic.

67. Roll up your sleeves: Kids' turn arrives for COVID-19 shots -

Hugs with friends. Birthday parties indoors. Pillow fights. Schoolchildren who got their first COVID-19 shots Wednesday said these are the pleasures they look forward to as the U.S. enters a major new phase in fighting the pandemic.

68. Fed pulls back economic aid in face of rising uncertainties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you find the current economy a bit confusing, don't worry: So does the nation's top economic official, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

69. Analysis: After tough election, Biden dismisses danger signs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hazard lights are blinking for President Joe Biden after Democratic setbacks in this week's elections, but the president professes to see no reason for panic.

Just one year after he rode to the White House with a record 81 million votes, Biden saw Democratic stalwart Terry McAuliffe fall to first-time Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin in the governor's race in Virginia, a state that Biden had won by 10 percentage points. In New Jersey, incumbent Gov. Phil Murphy barely won in a state that Biden had won by 16 percentage points.

70. Justice Dept. conducting cyber crackdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is stepping up actions to combat ransomware and cybercrime through arrests and other actions, its No. 2 official told The Associated Press, as the Biden administration escalates its response to what it regards as an urgent economic and national security threat.

71. Supply chain delays disrupt California agriculture exports -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Amid an historic drought posing threats to future harvests, California farmers now say they have no way to export the crops they do have because of a kink in the global supply chain that has left container ships lined up off the Southern California coast with nowhere to deliver their goods.

72. US government works to 'cocoon' old nuclear reactors -

SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Costs to clean up a massive nuclear weapons complex in Washington state are usually expressed in the hundreds of billions of dollars and involve decades of work.

But one project on the Hanford Nuclear Reservation is progressing at a much lower price.

73. Germany reports record number of new coronavirus cases -

BERLIN (AP) — Germany's disease control agency on Thursday reported the highest number of new coronavirus infections since the outbreak of the pandemic.

The Robert Koch Institute, or RKI, said 33,949 new cases had been registered in the last 24 hours, up from 28,037 daily cases a week ago. The previous record was 33,777 new cases on Dec. 18, 2020.

74. Fed to begin slowing economic aid as inflation worries rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will begin dialing back the extraordinary economic aid it's provided since the pandemic erupted last year, a response to high inflation that now looks likely to persist longer than it did just a few months ago.

75. GEO ordered to pay $23.2M in detainee minimum wage cases -

SEATTLE (AP) — A private prison company has been ordered to pay more than $23 million over lawsuits that accused it of running its for-profit immigration lockup in Washington state on the backs of detainees.

76. Stocks gain, pushing the Dow Jones industrials past 36,000 -

Wall Street added to its recent run of milestones Tuesday as stock indexes hit new highs again and the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 36,000 points for the first time.

The Dow and benchmark S&P 500 each rose 0.4%. The Nasdaq gained 0.3%. The three indexes also notched all-time highs on Monday.

77. Giving to top charities rose 3.7% in 2020, driven by wealthy -

In the wake of the most devastating public-health emergency in a century and the resulting economic uncertainty, Americans provided more charitable dollars to United Way Worldwide than any other nonprofit focused on direct aid, followed by the Salvation Army and St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, according to new rankings by the Chronicle of Philanthropy.

78. US files antitrust suit to stop major book publisher merger -

The Justice Department is suing to block a $2.2 billion book publishing deal  that would have reshaped the industry, saying consolidation would hurt authors and, ultimately, readers.

German media giant Bertelsmann's Penguin Random House, already the largest American publisher, wants to buy New York-based Simon & Schuster, whose authors include Stephen King, Hillary Clinton and John Irving, from TV and film company ViacomCBS.

79. US says oil, gas sales damage climate — won't stop them -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration is planning to sell oil and gas leases on huge tracts of public land in the U.S. West, despite the Interior Department's conclusion that doing so could cost society billions of dollars in climate change impacts.

80. White House rolls out new plan to combat gun suicides in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is rolling out a new initiative aimed at reducing suicides by gun and combating the significant increases in suicides by members of the military and veterans.

81. Schools face strict hurdles for mask mandates under new bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee schools will have to jump through even more hoops if they want to implement mask mandates to prevent the spread of COVID-19 under legislation recently approved by the state's GOP-controlled General Assembly.

82. Manchin wavers on Biden's plan, rebuffs progressives -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Joe Manchin wavered Monday on his support for President Joe Biden's sweeping $1.75 trillion domestic policy proposal, saying instead it's "time to vote" on a slimmer $1 trillion infrastructure package that has stalled amid talks.

83. Fed to start reining in economic aid as inflation risk rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation at its highest point in three decades, the Federal Reserve is set this week to begin winding down the extraordinary stimulus it has given the economy since the pandemic recession struck early last year, a process that could prove to be a risky balancing act.

84. Supreme Court rejects appeal over secretive court's work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear an appeal over whether the public should have access to opinions of the secretive court that reviews bulk email collection, warrantless internet searches and other government surveillance programs.

85. An "eraser button?" Focused ideas could help bridle Big Tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Break up Big Tech? How about shrinking the tech companies' shield against liability in cases where the content they push to users causes harm? Or creating a new regulator to strictly oversee the industry?

86. US to look at climate emissions from oil and gas lease sales -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Biden administration announced Friday that industry regulators for the first time have begun analyzing greenhouse gas emissions from federal oil and gas leases on a national scale, as they prepare to hold sales in numerous Western states next year amid a fierce debate over federal fossil fuel reserves.

87. US wages jump by the most in records dating back 20 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wages jumped in the three months ending in September by the most on records dating back 20 years, a stark illustration of the growing ability of workers to demand higher pay from companies that are desperate to fill a near-record number of available jobs.

88. US consumer spending up a modest 0.6% with inflation high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers slowed their spending to a gain of just 0.6% in September, a cautionary sign for an economy that remains in the grip of a pandemic and a prolonged bout of high inflation.

89. Medicaid issues, not Medicare's, get fixes in Biden budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicaid issues are turning up as winners in President Joe Biden's social agenda framework even as divisions force Democrats to hit pause on far-reaching improvements to Medicare.

90. US cites 'crisis' as road deaths rise 18% in first-half 2021 -

DETROIT (AP) — The number of U.S. traffic deaths in the first six months of 2021 hit 20,160, the highest first-half total since 2006, the government reported Thursday, a sign of growing reckless driving during the coronavirus pandemic.

91. Amazon stumbles on slower sales growth, higher labor costs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon isn't just grappling with the easing of pandemic-induced shopping splurges. The online retail behemoth is also contending with surging costs as it navigates a snarled supply chain and labor shortages.

92. Sen. Burr under investigation again for pandemic stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr and his brother-in-law are being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission for potential insider trading, a case that stems from their abrupt sales of financial holdings during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, according to recent federal court filings.

93. Garland defends school violence memo against GOP criticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland defended a Justice Department memo aimed at combating threats and violence against teachers, administrators and other school officials while Republicans insisted that he rescind the directive. He signaled no plans to do so despite their criticism

94. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

95. Garland defends school board memo amid Republican criticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Wednesday defended a memo aimed at combating threats against school officials nationwide while Republicans insisted he rescind the directive. He signaled he had no plans to do so despite their criticism.

96. US-China tensions evident as Biden heads to twin summits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For nine months under President Joe Biden, the U.S. has pursued a diplomatic strategy that could be characterized as about China, without China.

On security, trade, climate and COVID-19, the Biden White House has tried to reorient the focus of the U.S. and its allies toward the strategic challenges posed by a rising China — all while there has been little direct engagement between the two rivals.

97. Microsoft profit up 24% in quarter, driven by cloud growth -

REDMOND, Wash. (AP) — Growth in Microsoft's cloud computing business helped push its profit up 24% in the July-September quarter over the same time last year.

The Redmond, Washington-based tech company on Tuesday reported quarterly profit of $17.2 billion, or $2.27 per share, beating Wall Street expectations of $2.08 per share.

98. US consumer confidence rebounds in October after 3 declines -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence rose in October after three straight declines as the public's anxiety about the delta variant of the coronavirus appear to have abated.

The Conference Board reported Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose to a reading of 113.8 in October, up from 109.8 in September.

99. DAs to school boards, Tennessee COVID session takes wide aim -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican lawmakers in Tennessee are gearing up to take a broad swipe at officials who have had a role in maintaining COVID-19 pandemic protections, from school boards that passed mask mandates to a prosecutor who has pledged not to enforce the governor's order letting parents exempt their students from classroom mask wearing.

100. EXPLAINER: What's a 'wealth tax' and how would it work? -

To help pay for his big economic and social agenda, President Joe Biden is looking to go where the big money is: billionaires.

Biden never endorsed an outright "wealth tax" when campaigning last year. But his more conventional proposed rate hikes on the income of large corporations and the wealthiest Americans have hit a roadblock.