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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks edge higher after another choppy day on Wall Street -

Wall Street capped another wobbly day of trading Wednesday with an uneven finish for the major stock indexes ahead of the Thanksgiving holiday in the U.S.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after wavering between small gains and losses most of the morning. The benchmark index regained its footing in the final hour of trading.

2. US mortgage rates mixed: 30-year unchanged at 3.1% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. mortgage rates were mixed this week.

The average rate on the benchmark 30-year, fixed rate home loan was unchanged from last week at 3.1%; a year ago, it stood at 2.72%. Fifteen-year, fixed rate mortgage rates blipped up to 2.42% from 2.39% last week; it was 2.28% a year ago.

3. Consumer spending rebounds despite rising October inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending rebounded by a solid 1.3% in October despite inflation that over the past year has accelerated faster than it has at any point in more than three decades.

4. US GDP slowed sharply in Q3, big rebound expected in Q4 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy slowed to a modest annual rate of 2.1% in the July-September quarter according to the government's second read of the data, slightly better than its first estimate. But economists are predicting a solid rebound in the current quarter as long as rising inflation and a recent uptick in COVID cases do not derail activity.

5. On the road again: Travelers emerge in time for Thanksgiving -

DALLAS (AP) — Determined to reclaim Thanksgiving traditions that were put on pause last year by the pandemic, millions of Americans will be loading up their cars or piling onto planes to gather again with friends and family.

6. Fed's Powell will aim to win a high-stakes bet in 2nd term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell gambled last year that his ultra-low rate policies would help revive an economy that had sunk deep into a pandemic-induced recession. So far, his bet has mostly paid off.

7. A late afternoon slump leaves major US indexes mostly lower -

A late drop robbed the S&P 500 of another record high on Wall Street Monday and left major indexes mostly lower after being up for much of the day.

The S&P 500 ended 0.3% lower. It was up as much as 1% earlier.

8. Biden to keep Powell as Fed chair, Brainard gets vice chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Monday he is nominating Jerome Powell for a second four-year term as Federal Reserve chair, endorsing his stewardship of the economy through a brutal pandemic recession in which the Fed's ultra-low rate policies helped bolster confidence and revitalize the job market.

9. Stocks end mostly lower, but tech gains push Nasdaq higher -

Wall Street closed out a week of choppy trading with stocks mostly lower Friday, though gains for several tech companies pushed the Nasdaq composite to another record high and its first close over 16,000 points.

10. Two Democratic senators oppose Powell as Fed chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Democratic senators said Friday that they oppose the nomination of Jerome Powell to a second term as chair of the Federal Reserve, saying Powell has been insufficiently committed to fighting climate change, an issue that the world's central banks are increasingly confronting.

11. Europe's central banker: Not adding to pinch with rate hike -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The head of the European Central Bank warned that high oil and gas prices are hitting consumers in the 19 countries that use the euro harder than in other major economies and underlined that the bank won't add to the squeeze by raising interest rates anytime soon.

12. Pressure on Fed's Powell is rising as inflation worsens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell surely expected to have some breathing room after taking the first step this month to dial back the Fed's emergency aid for the economy.

13. GOP paints Biden's choice for bank regulator as radical -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to become one of the top banking regulators endured a contentious nomination hearing Thursday, with Republican senators warning she would nationalize the U.S. banking system and Democrats saying she's eminently qualified and would be tough overseer of Wall Street.

14. US stocks shuffle lower, pulling indexes further from highs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes shuffled lower on Wall Street Wednesday, pulling a bit further off their record heights.

The S&P 500 fell 12.23 points, or 0.3%, to 4,688.67 after earlier drifting between a tiny gain and a 0.4% decline. It's sitting just 13.03 points below its all-time high set a week and a half ago.

15. Biden's nominee for bank regulator faces hostile opposition -

NEW YORK (AP) — A fierce battle is being waged in Washington over President Biden's choice to lead a typically low-profile agency that oversees the banking industry.

Saule Omarova, 55, was nominated in September to be the nation's next comptroller of the currency. If confirmed, she would be the first woman and person of color to run the 158-year-old agency. But her nomination has drawn intense opposition from Republicans and the banking industry, with the criticism at times echoing the Red Scare that plagued the U.S. after World War II.

16. Four reasons to shop Small Business Saturday -

When you think about holiday shopping, your mind probably goes to big-box retailers before your neighborhood bookstore or antique shop. But in a time marked by widespread supply chain disruptions and inflation, underdog small businesses deserve our attention.

17. Christmas stretch: UK inflation highest in nearly a decade -

LONDON (AP) — Consumer prices in the United Kingdom surged at the fastest rate in nearly a decade in October amid soaring energy costs, official figures showed Wednesday, a development that has cemented market expectations that the Bank of England will raise interest rates next month.

18. US industrial production rebounded 1.6% in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. industrial production rebounded in October as automakers, stung by supply chain problems, posted strong increases and the adverse effects from a hurricane that struck the nation's energy complex in the Gulf of Mexico faded.

19. Key reason for supply shortages: Americans keep spending -

DETROIT (AP) — Take a step back from the picked-over store shelves, the stalled container ships and the empty auto showrooms, and you'll find a root cause of the shortages of just about everything.

20. Roads, transit, internet: What's in the infrastructure bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $1 trillion infrastructure plan that President Joe Biden plans to sign into law has money for roads, bridges, ports, rail transit, safe water, the power grid, broadband internet and more.

21. Biden salutes troops as 'spine of America' on Veterans Day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden saluted the nation's military veterans as "the spine of America" Thursday as he marked his first Veterans Day as president in a wreath-laying ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery.

22. Disappearing shorts: As stocks soar, skeptics surrender -

NEW YORK (AP) — The skeptics on Wall Street have gone missing.

As the stock market has surged to records — unbowed by recession, pandemic or warnings of a dangerous bubble — activity has dwindled to a nearly two-decade low for the traders known as short sellers, who make their money betting stocks will fall.

23. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, and when it may ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is starting to look like that unexpected — and unwanted — houseguest who just won't leave.

For months, many economists had sounded a reassuring message that a spike in consumer prices, something that had been missing in action in the U.S. for a generation, wouldn't stay long. It would prove "transitory,'' in the soothing words of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell and White House officials, as the economy shifted from virus-related chaos to something closer to normalcy.

24. Biden announces plan to ID, treat vets' ills from toxic air -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, whose son Beau was an Iraq war veteran, is using his first Veterans Day in office to announce an effort to better understand, identify and treat medical conditions suffered by troops deployed to toxic environments.

25. Hot inflation report slams bond market, sends stocks lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — An eye-opening report on inflation that was hotter than expected slammed into the bond market on Wednesday, sending yields jumping, and helping knock stocks lower.

The sharpest inflation since 1990 forced investors to boost bets that the Federal Reserve will have to raise short-term interest rates more quickly off their record low.

26. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

27. US average long-term mortgage rates fall; 30-year at 2.98% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates in the U.S. fell this week, as the key 30-year rate again retreated below the 3% mark.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Wednesday that the average rate on the benchmark home loan declined to 2.98% from 3.09% last week. Last year at this time the rate stood at 2.84%.

28. US consumer prices soared 6.2% in past year, most since 1990 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices for U.S. consumers jumped 6.2% in October compared with a year earlier as surging costs for food, gas and housing left Americans grappling with the highest inflation rate since 1990.

29. Powell highlights Fed's commitment to 'inclusive' recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inequality can prevent the U.S. economy from reaching its potential, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Tuesday, and he underscored the Fed's commitment to reducing unemployment as broadly as possible, including among disadvantaged groups.

30. Fed: Risks to US financial system ease as economy recovers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The risks to the U.S. financial system have eased significantly compared to a year earlier, the Federal Reserve said Monday.

The central bank noted that as the economy recovers from the pandemic-driven recession, the balance sheets of individual Americans and businesses continue to strengthen.

31. Fed's Powell: Pandemic recession has particularly hurt women -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell expressed concern Monday that the pandemic recession has had an unusually harmful economic effect on women, who have been forced to shoulder additional responsibilities for childcare, forcing many of them to leave work.

32. Quarles to leave Fed's board, giving Biden another slot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Randal Quarles announced Monday that he will resign from the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors at the end of the year after completing a four-year term as its top bank regulator, opening up another vacancy on the Fed's influential board for President Joe Biden to fill.

33. Biden's bet that economy would boost Democrats falls flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was supposed to help President Joe Biden and Democrats, but as of late it's been hurting them with voters.

Biden on Friday praised the U.S. economy for performing better than the rest of the world, saying it's largely because of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package and plans for additional spending of roughly $2.75 trillion on infrastructure, families, schools, health care and climate change.

34. US employers shrugged off virus, stepped up hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers boosted their hiring last month, adding a solid 531,000 jobs, the most since July and a sign that the recovery from the pandemic recession is overcoming a virus-induced slowdown.

35. Japan game maker Nintendo sees no quick fix for chips crunch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's employers stepped up their hiring in October, adding a solid 531,000 jobs, the most since July and a sign that the recovery from the pandemic recession may be overcoming a virus-induced slowdown.

36. 'Burned out'? Why won't more women return to the job market? -

NEW YORK (AP) — There was a time when Naomi Peña could seemingly do it all: Work a full-time job and raise four children on her own.

But when the viral pandemic struck early last year, her personal challenges began to mount and she faced an aching decision: Her children or her job?

37. Average US long-term mortgage rate ticks back down this week -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The average long-term mortgage rate in the U.S. ticked back down this week following several weeks of increases.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage fell to 3.09% from 3.14% last week. Last year at this time the long-term rate stood at 2.78%.

38. Bank of England holds rates steady, confounding expectations -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England has confounded market expectations and held interest rates steady, saying it wanted to see more information about what happens to unemployment after the government recently ended a program that subsidized worker pay during the coronavirus pandemic.

39. Fed pulls back economic aid in face of rising uncertainties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you find the current economy a bit confusing, don't worry: So does the nation's top economic official, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

40. Stocks rise after Fed says it will dial back aid for economy -

Stocks climbed to more record highs Wednesday after the Federal Reserve said it will begin dialing back the extraordinary aid for the economy it has been providing since the early days of the pandemic.

41. Text of the Federal Reserve's statement after its meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

The Federal Reserve is committed to using its full range of tools to support the U.S. economy in this challenging time, thereby promoting its maximum employment and price stability goals.

42. Fed to begin slowing economic aid as inflation worries rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve will begin dialing back the extraordinary economic aid it's provided since the pandemic erupted last year, a response to high inflation that now looks likely to persist longer than it did just a few months ago.

43. Stocks gain, pushing the Dow Jones industrials past 36,000 -

Wall Street added to its recent run of milestones Tuesday as stock indexes hit new highs again and the Dow Jones Industrial Average closed above 36,000 points for the first time.

The Dow and benchmark S&P 500 each rose 0.4%. The Nasdaq gained 0.3%. The three indexes also notched all-time highs on Monday.

44. Major Wall Street stock indexes eke out more record highs -

Stocks ended a wobbly day modestly higher on Wall Street, enough to notch more all-time highs for major indexes.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.3%. The Nasdaq rose 0.6%. Smaller company stocks far outpaced the broader market.

45. Treasury report calls for stricter oversight of stablecoins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is calling on Congress to pass legislation that would strengthen government regulation of stablecoins, a form of cryptocurrency that has soared in popularity in the past year.

46. Fed to start reining in economic aid as inflation risk rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With inflation at its highest point in three decades, the Federal Reserve is set this week to begin winding down the extraordinary stimulus it has given the economy since the pandemic recession struck early last year, a process that could prove to be a risky balancing act.

47. US wages jump by the most in records dating back 20 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wages jumped in the three months ending in September by the most on records dating back 20 years, a stark illustration of the growing ability of workers to demand higher pay from companies that are desperate to fill a near-record number of available jobs.

48. US consumer spending up a modest 0.6% with inflation high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers slowed their spending to a gain of just 0.6% in September, a cautionary sign for an economy that remains in the grip of a pandemic and a prolonged bout of high inflation.

49. US economy slowed to a 2% rate last quarter in face of COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hampered by rising COVID-19 cases and persistent supply shortages, the U.S. economy slowed sharply to a 2% annual growth rate in the July-September period, the weakest quarterly expansion since the recovery from the pandemic recession began last year.

50. European Central Bank leaves pandemic stimulus unchanged -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — The European Central Bank decided Thursday to keep its pandemic stimulus efforts unchanged even as consumer prices spike and central banks in other parts of the world look to dial back support as their economies bounce back from the worst of the COVID-19 outbreak.

51. US-China tensions evident as Biden heads to twin summits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For nine months under President Joe Biden, the U.S. has pursued a diplomatic strategy that could be characterized as about China, without China.

On security, trade, climate and COVID-19, the Biden White House has tried to reorient the focus of the U.S. and its allies toward the strategic challenges posed by a rising China — all while there has been little direct engagement between the two rivals.

52. US consumer confidence rebounds in October after 3 declines -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence rose in October after three straight declines as the public's anxiety about the delta variant of the coronavirus appear to have abated.

The Conference Board reported Tuesday that its consumer confidence index rose to a reading of 113.8 in October, up from 109.8 in September.

53. EXPLAINER: What's a 'wealth tax' and how would it work? -

To help pay for his big economic and social agenda, President Joe Biden is looking to go where the big money is: billionaires.

Biden never endorsed an outright "wealth tax" when campaigning last year. But his more conventional proposed rate hikes on the income of large corporations and the wealthiest Americans have hit a roadblock.

54. Powell says inflation risks rising, but Fed can be 'patient' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Friday that the tangled supply chains and shortages that have bedeviled the U.S. economy since this summer have gotten worse and will likely keep inflation elevated well into next year.

55. US regulators endorse efforts to address climate risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. financial regulators on Thursday approved a series of steps toward addressing the dangers that climate change poses to the nation's financial system.

The Financial Stability Oversight Council, which is headed by Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen and includes Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, acknowledged in a report that climate change is a serious economic threat.

56. Fed imposes sweeping new limits on policymakers' investments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is imposing a broad new set of restrictions on the investments its officials can own, a response to questionable recent trades that forced two top Fed officials to resign.

57. Existing home sales surge as interest rates point higher -

Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes bounced back in September to their strongest pace since January as mortgage rates tick higher, motivating buyers to get off the sidelines.

The National Association of Realtors said Thursday that existing homes sales rose 7% compared with August to a seasonally-adjusted annual rate of 6.29 million units. That was stronger than the 6.11 million units that economists had been expecting, according to FactSet.

58. US unemployment claims fall to new pandemic low of 290,000 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits fell last week to a new low point since the pandemic erupted, evidence that layoffs are declining as companies hold onto workers.

59. Inflation, Fed action set stage for higher mortgage rates -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mortgage rates have hovered near all-time lows for much of this year, even as inflation has increased sharply across much of the economy.

That could begin to change in the weeks to come, now that the Federal Reserve has signaled it could announce as early as next month plans to begin rolling back the measures it has taken to shore up the economy during the pandemic.

60. Fed survey finds economy facing supply chain, other drags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve reports that the economy faced a number of headwinds at the start of this month, ranging from supply-chain disruptions and labor shortages to uncertainty about the delta variant of COVID.

61. Industrial production falls 1.3% as effects from Ida linger -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. industrial production fell 1.3% in September, much more than expected as the lingering effects of Hurricane Ida continue to stymie activity.

The Federal Reserve reported Monday that nearly half, or 0.6%, of the overall decline in total industrial production was attributable to the hurricane.

62. US wholesale prices rose record 8.6% over 12 months -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation at the wholesale level rose 8.6% in September compared to a year ago, the largest advance since the 12-month change was first calculated in 2010.

The Labor Department reported Thursday that the monthly increase in its producer price index, which measures inflationary pressures before they reach consumers, was 0.5% for September compared to a 0.7% gain in August.

63. Bank profits soar, helped by merger frenzy, fewer bad loans -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's good to be a bank right now.

Four of the largest U.S. banks said their profits grew by double-digits last quarter, as a healthier U.S. economy has helped reduce the number of loans in default or that the bank won't likely recoup. The results for Citigroup, Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Morgan Stanley also show that all four benefitted from various one-time boosts to their profits.

64. Modest gain breaks a 3-day losing streak for S&P 500 index -

Major U.S. stock indexes closed mostly higher Thursday, snapping a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 despite another choppy day of trading.

The benchmark index rose 0.3% after having been down 0.5% in the early going. It's still on pace for a 0.6% weekly loss. The Dow Jones Industrial Average ended flat, while the Nasdaq rose 0.7%.

65. Fed officials: Bond purchases could end by middle of 2022 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials agreed at their last meeting that if the economy continued to improve, they could start reducing their monthly bond purchases as soon as next month and bring them to an end by the middle of 2022.

66. Inflation rises 5.4% from year ago, matching 13-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Another surge in consumer prices in September pushed inflation up 5.4% from where it was a year ago, matching the highest shift higher since 2008 as tangled global supply lines continue to create havoc.

67. White House: LA port going 24/7 to ease shipping backlog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House said Wednesday it has helped broker an agreement for the Port of Los Angeles to become a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week operation, part of an effort to relieve supply chain bottlenecks and move stranded container ships that are driving prices higher for U.S. consumers.

68. Stock indexes closing lower as jobs data sparks questions -

U.S. stock indexes are closing lower Friday after a weak jobs report sparked questions about when the Federal Reserve could pare back its immense support for the markets.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after wavering throughout the day.

69. Delta variant and worker shortage keep a lid on job growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added just 194,000 jobs in September, a second straight tepid gain and evidence that the pandemic has kept its grip on the economy, with many companies struggling to fill millions of open jobs.

70. Texas judge says abortions can resume, but future uncertain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Abortions in Texas can resume under a federal judge's ruling this week, but for how long? A conservative federal appeals court, and ultimately the Supreme Court, might take a more skeptical look at the Biden administration's lawsuit over Texas' six-week abortion ban.

71. US average mortgage rates decline; 30-year at 2.99% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates declined this week, with the benchmark 30-year loan slipping back below 3%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage eased to 2.99% from 3.01% last week. The rate stood at 2.87% this time last year. It peaked this year at 3.18% in April.

72. Puzzle overhanging job market: When will more people return? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the U.S. government issues the September jobs report on Friday, the spotlight will fall not only on how many people were hired last month. A second question will command attention, too: Are more people finally starting to look for work?

73. Inflation knocks businesses off balance as recovery slows -

Companies will soon start reporting their latest quarterly financial results and investors have been warned that inflation is going to sting.

Retailers, auto makers and a wide range of manufacturers have all warned investors that a supply chain crunch and higher raw materials costs are adding to expenses and hurting profits. A COVID-19 resurgence during the third quarter threw many industries off-balance just as they were regaining their footing from the pandemic slump.

74. Pentagon mandates COVID-19 vaccine for civilian workers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — All civilians who work for the Defense Department and the military services must be fully vaccinated for COVID-19 by Nov. 22, under new guidelines released Monday.

A memo signed by Deputy Defense Secretary Kathleen Hicks on Friday said the new mandate is in line with the presidential directive issued last month requiring federal agencies to implement vaccine requirements.

75. Fed watchdog to investigate officials' financial trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent investigator will look into whether Federal Reserve officials broke the law with financial trades last year that have come under congressional scrutiny and sharp criticism from outside the central bank.

76. Biden tells GOP to 'get out of the way' on debt limit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden urged Republican senators to "get out of the way" and let Democrats suspend the nation's debt limit, hoping to keep the U.S. government from bumping dangerously close to a credit default as Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell refuses to lend his party's help.

77. US consumer spending rebounded in August despite COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer spending accelerated in August amide a surge in COVID-19 cases, even as soaring demand and snarled supply chains kept inflation high.

Consumer spending rose 0.8% in August, up from a decline of 0.1% in July. Income rose by a smaller 0.2%, the Commerce Department reported Friday. That suggests consumers dug into their savings to fuel more spending. Americans bought more furniture, clothes, and groceries, while the delta variant caused them to pull back on traveling and eating out.

78. US average mortgage rates jump; 30-year at 3.01% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates rose jumped this week as the benchmark 30-year loan edged over 3%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage increased to 3.01% from 2.88% last week. The rate stood at 2.88% this time last year. It peaked this year at 3.18% in April.

79. Senate confirms Biden pick to lead consumer watchdog agency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate narrowly approved President Joe Biden's pick to run the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau on Thursday, giving the bureau a director who is likely to embrace an aggressive "watchdog" role, similar to how the agency operated under former President Barack Obama.

80. Recovery hampered as inflation hits new highs in US, Europe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation has reached new highs in the United States and Europe as rising energy prices and supply bottlenecks restrain an economic recovery from the pandemic in both economies.

81. S&P 500 fell 4.8% in September, worst month since March 2020 -

Stocks are closing out September with their worst monthly loss since the beginning of the pandemic.

The S&P 500 ended the month down 4.8%, its first monthly drop since January and the biggest since March 2020.

82. Powell sees inflation cooling, evading 'difficult situation' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Thursday that current high levels of inflation are likely to fade next year and won't prevent the Fed from pushing toward its goal of full employment.

83. US slightly revises up its GDP estimate for Q2 to 6.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a 6.7% annual pace from April through June, the Commerce Department said Thursday, slightly upgrading its estimate of last quarter's growth in the face of a resurgence of COVID-19 in the form of the delta variant.

84. S&P 500 clings to a modest gain as other indexes end mixed -

Wall Street capped a wobbly day of trading Wednesday with a mixed finish for the major stock indexes, as technology and communication companies weighed on the market for a second straight day.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2% after shedding most of a 0.8% gain. The modest gain came a day after the benchmark index posted its worst drop since May. The index is on pace for its first first monthly loss since January.

85. Powell defends Fed policies, says inflation might persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell on Wednesday defended the ultra-low interest rate policies he has pursued since the pandemic decimated the economy more than 18 months ago.

86. A potential Powell renomination for Fed faces some dissent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Resistance to the potential renomination of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell intensified this week, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming the first senator to publicly oppose him and many progressive groups pushing for some alternative leader at the Fed.

87. Lagarde: European Central Bank won't overreact to fleeting inflation -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Europe's current burst of inflation is temporary and won't lead the European Central Bank to "overreact" by withdrawing stimulus or raising interest rates, ECB President Christine Lagarde said Tuesday.

88. Yellen warns delay in raising debt limit will slow economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen sounded an urgent call Tuesday for Congress to raise the government's borrowing limit, a day after Senate Republicans blocked consideration  of a bill that would have done so.

89. 2 top Fed officials retire in wake of trading disclosures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a rare moment of ethical controversy for the Federal Reserve, two top officials resigned Monday in the wake of revelations about their financial trading that exposed potential shortcomings in the Fed's rules on investments.

90. Powell says spike in inflation lasting longer than expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is preparing to tell Congress that the current spike in U.S. inflation has proven to be larger and more long-lasting than expected.

91. Powell meets a changed economy: Fewer workers, higher prices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Restaurant and hotel owners struggling to fill jobs. Supply-chain delays forcing up prices for small businesses. Unemployed Americans unable to find work even with job openings at a record high.

92. US long-term mortgage rates up slightly; 30-year at 2.88% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term mortgage rates rose slightly this week continuing a months-long trend of little movement. They remained under 3%.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday that the average rate for a 30-year mortgage edged up to 2.88% from 2.86% last week. That's very close to where the benchmark rate stood at this time last year, 2.90%. It peaked this year at 3.18% in April.

93. Another rally on Wall Street erases losses for the week -

Stocks rose broadly for a second day in a row on Wall Street Thursday, reversing the market's losses for the week just three days after the S&P 500 had its biggest skid since May.

The S&P 500 added 1.2% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 1.5%.

94. Under pressure, Powell says Fed to revamp its trading rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said Wednesday that the central bank will overhaul its financial ethics policies in response to growing questions about investing and trading decisions by high-ranking Fed officials that raise potential conflicts of interest.

95. Stocks hold their gains on Wall Street after Fed statement -

Stocks held on to their gains on Wall Street Wednesday after the Federal Reserve signaled it may begin easing its extraordinary support measures for the economy later this year.

The central bank said it may start raising its benchmark interest rate sometime next year, earlier than it envisioned three months ago.

96. Text of the Federal Reserve's statement after its meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

The Federal Reserve is committed to using its full range of tools to support the U.S. economy in this challenging time, thereby promoting its maximum employment and price stability goals.

97. Fed: On track to slow support for economy later this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell signaled Wednesday that the Fed plans to announce as early as November that it will start withdrawing the extraordinary support it unleashed after the coronavirus paralyzed the economy 18 months ago.

98. Existing US home sales fell in August, price growth slows -

Sales of previously occupied U.S. homes fell in August and prices that have been soaring eased, the latest sign the housing market is cooling as intense competition leaves many would-be buyers on the sidelines.

99. Democrats tie government funding to debt bill, GOP digs in -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic congressional leaders backed by the White House say they will push ahead with a vote to fund the government and suspend the debt limit, all but daring Republicans who say they will vote against it despite the risk of a fiscal crisis.

100. Stocks drop the most since May on worries over China, Fed -

Stocks on Wall Street closed sharply lower Monday, mirroring losses overseas and handing the S&P 500 index its biggest drop in four months.

Worries about debt-engorged Chinese property developers — and the damage they could do to investors worldwide if they default — rippled across markets. Investors are also concerned that the U.S. Federal Reserve could signal this week that it's planning to pull back some of the support measures it's been giving markets and the economy.