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Editorial Results (free)

1. Second Avenue tops ‘Nashville Nine’ list -

The 2021 Nashville Nine, a list of the city’s historic properties endangered by demolition, neglect or development, is topped by 170, 172, 174 and 176 Second Avenue North, all damaged by the Christmas Day 2020 bombling.

2. French IT firm to invest $20 million in Nashville -

Capgemini officials have announced the global IT consulting firm will invest $20.1 million to establish operations in Nashville.

Headquartered in France and located in 50 countries, Capgemini says it will create a minimum of 500 new jobs and as many as 1,000 as the company launches its first Tennessee delivery center at Broadwest in Nashville.

3. Barings and Hines buys Reed District property -

Barings, global investment managers, and Hines, an international real estate firm, have formed a joint venture partnership to acquire the Reed District site in Nashville for the future development of a 2.7 million-square foot multiphased mixed-use project.

4. Pipeline CEO defends paying ransom amid cyberattack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A pipeline company CEO made no apologies Tuesday for his decisions to abruptly halt fuel distribution for much of the East Coast and pay millions to a criminal gang in Russia as he faced down one of the most disruptive ransomware attacks in U.S. history.

5. How will insurers cover a new Alzheimer's drug? -

Federal regulators have approved the first new drug for Alzheimer's disease in nearly 20 years, leaving patients waiting to see how insurers will handle the pricey new treatment.

Health care experts expect broad coverage of the drug, which was approved Monday. But what that means for patients will vary widely depending on their insurance plan. In some cases, that could mean coming up with several thousand dollars to pay for what the insurer didn't cover.

6. With bankruptcy tossed, what's next for the NRA? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that a judge has rejected the National Rifle Association's bankruptcy bid, blocking its plan to reincorporate in Texas, the gun rights group is back to fighting a lawsuit that threatens to put it out of business.

7. GOP White House hopefuls move forward as Trump considers run -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than three months after former President Donald Trump left the White House, the race to succeed him atop the Republican Party is already beginning.

Trump's former secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has launched an aggressive schedule, visiting states that will play a pivotal role in the 2024 primaries, and he has signed a contract with Fox News Channel. Mike Pence, Trump's former vice president, has started a political advocacy group, finalized a book deal and later this month will give his first speech since leaving office in South Carolina. And Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has been courting donors, including in Trump's backyard, with a prominent speaking slot before the former president at a GOP fundraising retreat dinner this month at Mar-a-Lago, the Florida resort where Trump now lives.

8. Openings begin March 4 at Fifth + Broadway -

Brookfield Properties’ mixed-use project Fifth + Broadway in downtown Nashville will begin its first tenant openings March 4.

The event culminates a multiyear effort by the company and local developer Pat Emery on the former site of the Nashville Convention Center.

9. Business owners ponder whether to require COVID-19 shots -

NEW YORK (AP) — As more coronavirus vaccine doses become available in the weeks and months ahead, many business owners face a difficult decision: whether to require employees to be inoculated.

And if they decide "yes," they have to be ready for the possibility that some staffers will refuse.

10. How a leading anti-Trump group ignored a crisis in its ranks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last June, the Lincoln Project was on a high. Led by several prominent former Republican consultants, its slickly produced ads attacking President Donald Trump made it perhaps the best known of the so-called Never Trump organizations.

11. Doggie desserts: Ben & Jerry's enters the pet food business -

Think your dog deserves dessert? So does Ben & Jerry's.

The venerable Vermont ice cream company said Monday it's introducing a line of frozen dog treats, its first foray into the lucrative pet food market. Doggie Desserts, sold in 4-ounce cups, go on sale in U.S. groceries and pet stores later this month.

12. Deutsche Bank to pay $130 million to avoid bribery charge -

NEW YORK (AP) — Deutsche Bank agreed Friday to pay fines and penalties of about $130 million to avoid a criminal prosecution on charges it participated in a foreign bribery scheme to win business in Saudi Arabia.

13. OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma pleads guilty in criminal case -

Purdue Pharma pleaded guilty Tuesday to three criminal charges, formally taking responsibility for its part in an opioid epidemic that has contributed to hundreds of thousands of deaths but also angering critics who want to see individuals held accountable, in addition to the company.

14. Financially troubled startup helped power Trump campaign -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — President Donald Trump's 2020 reelection campaign was powered by a cell phone app that allowed staff to monitor the movements of his millions of supporters, and offered intimate access to their social networks.

15. How Trump plowed through $1B, losing cash advantage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's sprawling political operation has raised well over $1 billion since he took the White House in 2017 — and set a lot of it on fire.

Trump bought a $10 million Super Bowl ad when he didn't yet have a challenger. He tapped his political organization to cover exorbitant legal fees related to his impeachment. Aides made flashy displays of their newfound wealth — including a fleet of luxury vehicles purchased by Brad Parscale, his former campaign manager.

16. GOP megadonor Sheldon Adelson, wife finance anti-Biden group -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican megadonor Sheldon Adelson and his wife have given $75 million to a new super PAC that is attacking Democratic nominee Joe Biden, an investment made amid GOP concern that President Donald Trump's campaign is flailing and might not be able to correct course.

17. Trump business deductions: sketchy, normal or in-between? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The massive losses Donald Trump has claimed on his tax returns were reportedly due at least in part to the huge deductions he took against the income his businesses made before and after he became president.

18. Trump business deductions: sketchy, normal or in-between? -

NEW YORK (AP) — The massive losses Donald Trump has claimed on his tax returns were reportedly due at least in part to the huge deductions he took against the income his businesses made before and after he became president.

19. Charges, sanctions revive specter of Russian interference -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration has charged a Russian national in a sweeping plot to sow distrust in the American political process and imposed sanctions against a Russia-linked Ukrainian lawmaker accused of interfering in the U.S. presidential election.

20. Dem report: Govt. paid $6M to bolster personal image of Medicare chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Private consultants to the federal official who oversees Medicare billed taxpayers almost $6 million in less than two years to bolster her personal image, including efforts to win awards, place her on lists of powerful women and arrange meetings with influential people, a report by congressional Democrats said Thursday.

21. Microsoft: Russia GRU hackers target U.S. campaigns, parties -

BOSTON (AP) — The same Russian military intelligence outfit that hacked the Democrats in 2016 has attempted similar intrusions into the computer systems of more than 200 organizations including political parties and consultants, Microsoft said Thursday.

22. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

23. New York attorney general seeks to dissolve NRA -

New York's attorney general sued the National Rifle Association on Thursday, seeking to put the powerful gun advocacy organization out of business over allegations that high-ranking executives diverted millions of dollars for lavish personal trips, no-show contracts for associates and other questionable expenditures.

24. Vanderbilt wins NASA student competition -

Vanderbilt Aerospace Design Lab won the 2020 NASA Student Launch competition.

The Vanderbilt University program claimed top honors for the seventh time in the last eight years.

The category and overall winners were announced virtually July 23.

25. Watchdog group: Trump campaign improperly masking payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's reelection effort allegedly hid nearly $170 million in spending from mandatory public disclosure by routing payments through companies tied to his former campaign manager, a government oversight group said Tuesday.

26. Data: Congress created virus aid, then reaped the benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At least a dozen lawmakers have ties to organizations that received federal coronavirus aid, according to newly released government data, highlighting how Washington insiders were both author and beneficiary of one of the biggest government programs in U.S. history.

27. Supreme Court upholds cellphone robocall ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday upheld a 1991 law that bars robocalls to cellphones.

The case, argued by telephone in May because of the coronavirus pandemic, only arose after Congress in 2015 created an exception in the law that allowed the automated calls for collection of government debt.

28. Companies prodded to rely less on China, but few respond -

BEIJING (AP) — The United States, Japan and France are prodding their companies to rely less on China to make the world's smartphones, drugs and other products. But even after the coronavirus derailed trade, few want to leave China's skilled workforce and efficient suppliers of raw materials to move to other countries.

29. CEO pay has topped $12.3M. Can it keep rising post-pandemic? -

The typical pay package for CEOs at the biggest U.S. companies topped $12.3 million last year, and the gap between the boss and their workforces widened further, according to AP's annual survey of executive compensation.

30. Justices wary of 'Obamacare' birth control coverage changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court seemed concerned Wednesday about the sweep of Trump administration rules that would allow more employers who cite a religious or moral objection to opt out of providing no-cost birth control to women as required by the Affordable Care Act.

31. Administration offers plan to cover COVID care for uninsured -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration announced a plan Wednesday to start paying hospitals and doctors who care for uninsured COVID-19 patients, but Democratic lawmakers and health industry groups are likely to press for more.

32. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

33. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

34. Two Lebanon medical office buildings sold -

Marcus & Millichap, a leading commercial real estate investment services firm, has sold two medical office buildings located in Lebanon.

The two-property portfolio sold for $1.55 million, says Jody McKibben, vice president and regional manager of the firm’s Nashville office.

35. Dow drops 7.8%, 2,013 points as free-fall slams markets -

Stocks took their worst one-day beating on Wall Street since the global financial crisis of 2008 as a collapse in oil prices Monday combined with mounting alarm over what the coronavirus could do to the world economy.

36. Spreading virus could deal big blow to malls -

NEW YORK (AP) — The growing fear over a new virus has transformed busy streets and shopping centers into ghost towns in parts of China, Japan and Italy.

Now, with the virus spreading in the U.S., it could deal a major blow to the country's over 1,000 malls at time when many are already struggling with a slew of retail bankruptcies. New diagnoses of the disease in several U.S. states have raised the tally of cases to more than 100. Nine people have died, all in Washington state.

37. Warren ends 2020 presidential bid after Super Tuesday rout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Elizabeth Warren, who electrified progressives with her "plan for everything" and strong message of economic populism, dropped out of the Democratic presidential race on Thursday, according to a person familiar with her plans. The exit came days after the onetime front-runner couldn't win a single Super Tuesday state, not even her own.

38. Spreading virus could deal big blow to malls -

NEW YORK (AP) — The growing fear over a new virus has transformed busy streets and shopping centers into ghost towns in parts of China, Japan and Italy.

Now, with the virus spreading in the U.S., it could deal a major blow to the country's over 1,000 malls at time when many are already struggling with a slew of retail bankruptcies. New diagnoses of the disease in several U.S. states have raised the tally of cases to more than 100. Nine people have died, all in Washington state.

39. Warren's future uncertain after loss in home state of Mass. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The future of Sen. Elizabeth Warren's presidential campaign was in serious doubt after she finished a surprisingly weak third in Tuesday's Democratic primary in her home state of Massachusetts.

40. Governors warn Trump rule could lead to big Medicaid cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Governors of both major political parties are warning that a little-noticed regulation proposed by President Donald Trump's administration could lead to big cuts in Medicaid, reducing access to health care for low-income Americans.

41. Fraud at Airbus: European courts weigh $4B plea deal -

PARIS (AP) — Courts in Britain and France are considering Friday whether to accept a plea deal that could cost Airbus up to $4 billion and end years of corruption investigations.

If approved, the deal would be among the biggest-ever settlements in both France and Britain in a company corruption case.

42. Season's greetings at Sears: Dingy shops, sparse shelves -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly 10 months out of bankruptcy, Sears is limping into the holiday shopping season.

Eddie Lampert, the hedge fund billionaire who promised to save 425 Sears and Kmart stores and roughly 45,000 jobs when he bought the company out of bankruptcy, has seen his $5.2 billion lifeline wither.

43. Twitter pulls back on political ads, but pitfalls await -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter announced an end Wednesday to political campaign and issue ads on its service, calling it an important step in reducing the flow of election-related misinformation.

But some of its users might face an unintended consequence or two.

44. Twitter pulls back on political ads, but pitfalls await -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter announced an end Wednesday to political campaign and issue ads on its service, calling it an important step in reducing the flow of election-related misinformation.

But some of its users might face an unintended consequence or two.

45. Former Juul exec alleges company shipped tainted products -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Juul Labs executive who was fired earlier this year is alleging that the vaping company knowingly shipped 1 million tainted nicotine pods to customers.

The allegation comes in a lawsuit filed Tuesday by lawyers representing Siddharth Breja, a one-time finance executive at the e-cigarette maker. The suit claims that Breja was terminated after opposing company practices, including shipping the contaminated flavored pods and not listing expiration dates on Juul products.

46. Nissan ex-chairman Ghosn's lawyers want charges dismissed -

TOKYO (AP) — The lawyers of former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, who is awaiting trial in Japan, said Thursday they have requested that financial misconduct charges against him be dismissed.

They said in a statement that they filed papers in Tokyo District Court alleging prosecutorial misconduct that would prevent Ghosn from having a fair trial.

47. Nissan ex-chairman Ghosn's lawyers want charges dismissed -

TOKYO (AP) — The lawyers of former Nissan Chairman Carlos Ghosn, who is awaiting trial in Japan, said Thursday they have requested that financial misconduct charges against him be dismissed.

They said in a statement that they filed papers in Tokyo District Court alleging prosecutorial misconduct that would prevent Ghosn from having a fair trial.

48. Sanders, Warren stockpile millions more than 2020 rivals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren don't just lead the Democratic presidential primary in fundraising. They've stockpiled millions more than their rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden, who burned through money at a fast clip over the past three months while posting an anemic fundraising haul.

49. With less to lose, will retiring Republicans desert Trump? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Retiring congressional Republicans are a natural group to watch for defectors as Democrats' impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump builds steam. But they're not crumbling yet.

50. Benefits to franchising outweigh most pitfalls -

The dream of owning a business is a common one.

Being your own boss, controlling when you work, mentoring young employees in the ways of business … there are a lot of lofty goals lumped under the heading of “entrepreneur.”

51. Franchising is the future -

Ever eat at a Captain D’s or a Shoney’s restaurant? Grab a cupcake from Gigi’s or a latte at Just Love Coffee?

People who do so every day are fueling the success of many new and longtime franchise brands which started in and around Nashville, and who still call Tennessee home.

52. Nashville companies partner on home health -

Ascension Saint Thomas and Nashville-based Contessa are joining together to offer Home Recovery Care, an emerging health care option that brings inpatient care to patients’ homes.

Home Recovery Care will be available for patients at Saint Thomas Midtown and West hospitals this fall, followed by Saint Thomas Rutherford and surrounding communities.

53. Cumberland Consulting rates No. 3 in KLAS report -

Nashville-based Cumberland Consulting has been recognized as one of the top three consulting firms in the 2019 Payer IT Consulting report by KLAS, a peer-reviewed health care technology research organization.

54. Heritage Medical Associates names CEO -

Heritage Medical Associates has hired James Shill as CEO. Shill brings more than 25 years of health care leadership experience to his new role.

Most recently, he served as CEO of Ferguson Medical Group, a multispecialty physician group with locations throughout southeast Missouri. Before that, he held leadership positions with multiple health care organizations in Alaska, including the state’s largest locally-owned medical clinic.

55. Search warrants tied to former Trump lawyer Cohen released -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Months before the FBI raided Michael Cohen's office and hotel room, investigators were examining the flow of foreign money into his bank accounts and looking into whether the funds might be connected to a plan to lift Russian sanctions, according to court filings unsealed Wednesday.

56. Facebook busts Israel-based campaign to disrupt elections -

JERUSALEM (AP) — Facebook said Thursday it banned an Israeli company that ran an influence campaign aimed at disrupting elections in various countries and has canceled dozens of accounts engaged in spreading disinformation.

57. Time for businesses to set up employee retirement plans? -

NEW YORK (AP) — With 2019 more than one-third over, small business owners without employee retirement plans may want to consider starting one before more time passes.

Businesses get tax deductions for the contributions they make to employee plans, and contributions can be as high as $56,000 per employee for 2019. Plans vary in terms of their complexity and cost to set up. And the IRS offers flexibility for when contributions must be made — it's OK, for example, to make a contribution in 2019 for the 2018 tax year, up until the due date of the owner's tax return. That means owners who filed for extensions of this year's March or April filing deadlines still have time to make contributions and get a deduction for last year. And it's still possible to create one type of plan known as a SEP.

58. Lee considering using private consultants to shape agenda -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee is exploring whether or not to use private consultants to help develop and implement his agenda.

The moves comes after Lee closed out his first legislative session by narrowly securing a win on his most high-profile priority involving a contentious voucher-like bill that has been threatened with lawsuits.

59. Does your company have a plan for your kidnapping? -

Today’s average sedan sports approximately 15 square feet of trunk room.

It’s big enough to easily fit one oversize suitcase and two roll-ons. Or it could fit two golf bags and two overnighters, or maybe a midsize tent, sleeping bags and a cooler.

60. State of small business more mixed than administration says -

NEW YORK (AP) — As Small Business Week approaches, the nation's smallest companies in the aggregate are by many accounts doing fairly well. They're not, however, thriving en masse in direct response to Trump administration and Republican policies.

61. Jack’s white sauce wins top barbecue prize -

Music City White Sauce, a specialty at Jack’s Bar-B-Que, has won first place at the National Barbecue & Grilling Association Awards.

The annual awards recognize the commercial side of barbecue.

62. Poll: Americans split on college admissions fairness -

BOSTON (AP) — As a sweeping bribery scandal reignites debate over college admissions, a pair of polls reveal that many Americans think the nation's universities place too much emphasis on factors such as wealth, family ties and athletic ability.

63. The amenities of downtown in laid-back Nolensville -

When she’s in the mood for a casual meal, Nathalie Burack can step out the door of her new townhome and stroll down the street for a gourmet hamburger. A shop selling spirits, wine and craft beer is opening nearby, along with a popular Mexican restaurant and a nail bar.

64. Transportation study targets south corridor -

The Greater Nashville Regional Council, WeGo Public Transit and Tennessee Department of Transportation have kicked-off the South Corridor Study to find public transportation options for the corridor stretching through Davidson, Williamson and Maury counties.

65. Uber acquires Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion -

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Ride-hailing service Uber announced on Tuesday it has acquired Mideast competitor Careem for $3.1 billion, giving the San Francisco-based firm the commanding edge in a region with a large, young, tech-savvy population.

66. Group with consumer-friendly vibe pushes drugmakers' message -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As ominous music plays in the background, the narrator of a radio ad warns that a Trump administration proposal to apply international pricing to certain Medicare drugs would be a nightmare for seniors.

67. Emergency Response Fund to aid flooding victims -

In the wake of record-setting rains, power outages, road closures and water rescues throughout the region, The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee has created the Middle Tennessee Emergency Response Fund to support the affected communities and nonprofits helping victims address their ongoing needs.

68. Howard Dean to head new Dem voter data exchange -

Howard Dean is back. The one-time presidential candidate, former Vermont governor and ex-Democratic National Committee chairman is set to return to prominence as head of a new operation that Democrats hope puts them back on par with Republicans in the never-ending race to use voter data to drive Americans to the polls.

69. Battle lines forming ahead of a looming US privacy law fight -

Consumer advocates and the data-hungry technology industry are drawing early battle lines in advance of an expected fight this year over what kind of federal privacy law the U.S. should have.

On Thursday, more than a dozen privacy organizations unveiled a plan that would create a new federal data-protection agency focused on regulating the way businesses and other organizations collect and make use of personal data, even if aggregated or anonymized. The proposal would sideline the Federal Trade Commission, which has limited powers and a mixed record of holding companies to account for privacy problems.

70. Physicians criticize state lawsuits over pelvic mesh -

SEATTLE (AP) — Doctors who specialize in female pelvic medicine say lawsuits by four states, including Washington and California, over products used to treat pelvic floor disorders and incontinence might scare patients away from the best treatment options — or maybe even push the products off the market.

71. Physicians criticize state lawsuits over pelvic mesh -

SEATTLE (AP) — Doctors who specialize in female pelvic medicine say lawsuits by four states, including Washington and California, over products used to treat pelvic floor disorders and incontinence might scare patients away from the best treatment options — or maybe even push the products off the market.

72. Health care, business services lead November hiring -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health care and business services led U.S. job gains in November, a month that saw slower hiring overall.

Health care firms gained more than 40,000 jobs, as hospitals, physicians' offices and home health care providers added staff. Professional services, which include architects and consultants and administrative support, added 32,000.

73. Knoxville's Blühen Botanicals adds processing plant to R&D operations -

Knoxville is now home to Blühen Botanicals, an industrial hemp processor that’s aiming to be one of the largest companies of its kind in the Southeast.

The new company, which formed this year, operates a 2,000-square-foot research and development facility at 1329 Chilhowee Ave., and is on the verge of opening an 18,000-square-foot processing plant at 2209 North Central St.

74. Lee dislikes lottery, likes education plans they make possible -

Republican gubernatorial candidate Bill Lee didn’t exactly shock anyone by saying he would fight legislative efforts to legalize sports gambling in Tennessee.

Lee, after all, is this campaign’s most likely to wear Jesus on his sleeve. And, it marked just one more opportunity for him to disagree with Democratic candidate Karl Dean, who, like most pragmatists, says he would sign sports betting into law if it’s done correctly.

75. Leaders ignore calls to drop out of Obamacare lawsuit -

A Christian group pleading with Tennessee leaders to drop out of a lawsuit seeking to overturn the Affordable Care Act could be compared to a tree falling in the forest.

If nobody’s listening, what chance do they have of being heard?

76. Microsoft to contractors: Give new parents paid leave -

Microsoft will begin requiring its contractors to offer their U.S. employees paid leave to care for a new child.

It's common for tech firms to offer generous family leave benefits for their own software engineers and other full-time staff, but paid leave advocates say it's still rare to require similar benefits for contracted workers such as janitors, landscapers, cafeteria crews and software consultants.

77. Hardaway Construction gets new owner, CEO -

Construction executive David Frazier has acquired Hardaway Construction Corporation, which has served Middle Tennessee for 95 years, and will serve as its new CEO.

Frazier, who joined Hardaway Construction in 2017 as president, has purchased the firm from the Hardaway Family nearly a century after it was founded by L. Hall Hardaway in 1924.

78. Voluntary approach to affordable housing -

Real estate developer Todd Fishbein is new to Nashville. He leads Red Seal Homes’ land acquisition, zoning and development efforts and is a third-generation owner in the 85-year-old company that had until 2016 primarily only developed in the Chicago area.

79. Hard to find an ‘adult in the room’ in this year’s campaign ads -

TV executives, ad reps and political consultants will hate to see this governor’s primary race end. But they can take solace from all the pain they’ve helped dole out while dining on caviar and grilled halibut while in the Caribbean Islands this fall, if they like fish eggs.

80. WSJ: Tesla seeking cash from suppliers -

Tesla has asked some of its suppliers to refund a portion of what the auto maker has already spent to help it become profitable, the Wall Street Journal reports.

The plea raises questions about the company's cash position, which has dwindled following some production issues.

81. McGlinchey Stafford opens Nashville office -

McGlinchey Stafford PLLC is expanding into Tennessee with a Nashville office.

This office is the firm’s 14th nationwide and the seventh new office opened by the firm in nine years.

Serving McGlinchey Stafford’s clients from the Nashville office is an initial team of attorneys experienced in appellate law, class action defense, commercial litigation, consumer financial services litigation, insurance defense and coverage, and products liability litigation: Shaun K. Ramey, who recently joined McGlinchey Stafford as a member; member John T. Rouse, who also practices in McGlinchey Stafford’s Jackson, Mississippi, office; and associate Jessica B. Spade, who assists clients from both the Nashville and Birmingham, Alabama, offices.

82. Where Americans found jobs: Business services and factories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Professional and business services drove nearly a quarter of U.S. job growth in June. The category, which includes computer systems designers, engineers, consultants and administrative staff, added 50,000 jobs during a robust month of hiring. Over the past year, it has added more than a half-million jobs.

83. Sanctioned Russian oligarch linked to Cohen has vast US ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long before Viktor Vekselberg was tied to a scandal over the president and a porn star, the Russian oligarch had been positioning himself to extend his influence in the United States.

84. Sanctioned Russian oligarch linked to Cohen has vast US ties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Long before Viktor Vekselberg was tied to a scandal over the president and a porn star, the Russian oligarch had been positioning himself to extend his influence in the United States.

85. Adams and Reese adds pair of litigators -

TaKeena Thompson Sandifer has joined Adams and Reese’s Nashville office and litigation practice group as special counsel, and Jacob “Jake” L. Perry has joined as an associate.

Sandifer has a diverse practice in which she represents clients in medical malpractice, insurance bad faith litigation and products liability litigation, including pharmaceutical drug and medical device litigation. Her products liability experience has involved oral contraceptives, transvaginal mesh, inferior vena cava (IVC) filters, metal-on-metal hip replacements, hormone therapy and pain pump devices.

86. AT&T chief lobbyist out after hiring Trump attorney, Cohen -

NEW YORK (AP) — The chief lobbyist for AT&T is leaving the company after overseeing a $50,000-per-month contract for President Donald Trump's attorney Michael Cohen to serve as a political consultant.

87. Insight or influence? Trump attorney's business scrutinized -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Already under investigation for a payment to a porn star, President Donald Trump's longtime personal attorney is facing intensifying legal and ethical scrutiny for selling his Trump World experience and views at a hefty price to companies that sought "insight" into the new president.

88. Pinnacle’s Collier named top program manager -

Bank Investment Consultant magazine has named branch manager Gary Collier No. 1 nationwide among the top managers of investment services programs at banks and credit unions. He has appeared on the list several times before, but this is his first time to earn the top spot.

89. Insight or influence? Trump attorney's business scrutinized -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Already under investigation for a payment to a porn star, President Donald Trump's longtime personal attorney is facing intensifying legal and ethical scrutiny for selling his Trump World experience and views at a hefty price to companies that sought "insight" into the new president.

90. Porn star's lawyer says Russian paid Trump attorney Cohen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stormy Daniels' lawyer says he has information showing that Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's longtime personal attorney, received $500,000 from a company associated with a Russian billionaire within months of paying hush money to Daniels, a porn star who claims she had an affair with Trump.

91. Breaking up with Facebook? It's harder than it looks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's latest privacy scandal, involving Trump campaign consultants who allegedly stole data on tens of millions of users in order to influence elections, has some people reconsidering their relationship status with the social network.

92. UK investigating Cambridge Analytica, Facebook -

LONDON (AP) — Britain's information commissioner says she is using all her legal powers to investigate the handling of millions of people's personal Facebook data by the social media giant and by political campaign consultants Cambridge Analytica.

93. Musicians want freelance, contractor harassment protections -

Country music singer Katie Armiger re-emerged in the spotlight Monday to back legislation giving freelancers and contractors protection against sexual harassment.

Some two years after going public with accusations detailing country’s music’s untold story about how women are treated, one of sexual innuendoes, crude comments and unwanted touching by radio programmers and “influential professionals,” the 26-year-old Armiger remains caught up in a legal battle but hopes to keep other performers from falling into the same trap.

94. Bradley named 2018 Southeast Firm of The Year -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has been named the 2018 Southeast Firm of the Year by Benchmark Litigation.

This is the first year for the regional firm of the year awards, which recognize firms with a strong litigating presence in multiple states in their respective regions.

95. Customer-focused government not always a pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

96. Distillers struggle to comply with water quality regulations -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As the whiskey industry continues to grow, Tennessee's two largest distilleries struggled to comply with water quality regulations last year.

Jack Daniels and George Dickel exceeded their limits for chlorine and other pollutants that can harm aquatic wildlife. After investigating the violations, the distilleries traced the problems to broken or inadequate machinery and faulty testing. State officials say the companies have fixed the problems and are now back in compliance.

97. Nashville region 8th on Milken Index -

The Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin area is the eighth-best-performing city in the U.S., according to the Milken Institute’s Best-Performing Cities 2017 Index.

In the large city/metro area category, Provo-Orem, Utah, came in first followed by Raleigh, North Carolina, Dallas-Plano-Irving, Texas, and the San Francisco-Redwood City-South San Francisco area.

98. Patterson names Levy managing shareholder -

Ryan Levy has been named managing shareholder at Patterson Intellectual Property Law. He also serves as the co-chair of the firm’s Litigation Practice Group.

Levy focuses on intellectual property litigation with an emphasis on patent litigation. He has represented international and domestic companies as both plaintiff and defendant in matters involving chemical formulations and related properties; large-scale industrial equipment; processes for roadway design; automotive equipment; and various software ranging from web-based protocols to automated detection systems.

99. Pinnacle’s Kidd named top bank advisor in US -

Bank Investment Consultant magazine has named Pinnacle Financial Partners associate Brock Kidd No. 1 on its list of Top 100 Bank Advisors. This is his eighth appearance on the list.

Pinnacle associates Jamie Hare (No. 20), Brick Sturgeon (No. 47) and Barry Moody (No. 62) also earned spots on the magazine’s annual ranking.

100. 5 things small business owners should know about tax bills -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners are awaiting details of a reported Republican deal in principle on a tax overhaul, the details of which could come soon.

The deal, which would reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of the tax bill, may answer the question of which business owners will pay lower taxes, and how much of a break they'll get. Both bills have raised the possibility that many owners, including professionals like accountants and consultants, wouldn't see a tax cut.