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Editorial Results (free)

1. Lawsuits filed against auto insurers over rates in pandemic -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Class action lawsuits were filed in Nevada against 10 major auto insurance companies on Tuesday, contending that the companies charged excessive insurance premiums during the pandemic by failing to account for a drop in driving and crashes.

2. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's shaky claims on virus, Dem misfires -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Impatient to return to the campaign trail, President Donald Trump dubiously claimed he's fully recovered and immune from COVID-19, hailed a cure that isn't so and declared the coronavirus is "disappearing" even as cases spiked.

3. AP FACT CHECK: Pence on climate, Harris on taxes, in debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Although more buttoned-up on the stage than his boss, Vice President Mike Pence nevertheless echoed many of President Donald Trump's falsehoods in the one and only debate with Democratic rival Kamala Harris.

4. AP FACT CHECK: Pence echoes Trump misfires in VP debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Although more buttoned-up on the stage than his boss, Vice President Mike Pence nevertheless echoed many of President Donald Trump's falsehoods Wednesday in the one and only debate with Democratic rival Kamala Harris.

5. Less driving, fewer crashes should bring cheaper insurance -

DETROIT (AP) — Those lightly traveled freeways and streets could be putting a few dollar bills into your wallet.

With most states under stay-at-home orders from governors, traffic is down almost everywhere, and that means lower crash rates and fewer insurance claims.

6. Consumers get some breaks, but layoffs keep coming -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

7. Nashville attorneys selected for AHLA -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has announced two of the firm’s Nashville attorneys, Stephanie M. Hoffmann and Janus Pan have been selected to participate in the American Health Lawyers Association Leadership Development Program.

8. Technology and energy companies help send US stocks higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks rallied Tuesday as technology companies continued to recover from their recent losses.

The approach of Hurricane Florence sent home improvement retailers and gas prices higher. The Department of Energy said it's seeing signs that shipments of oil from Iran are falling as the U.S. prepares to resume sanctions on the Iranian energy industry and pushes other countries to stop buying.

9. Compelling storytelling, relationships sell brands -

The art of storytelling is more important than ever, as evidenced by the Content Marketing Institute’s benchmark research for 2018, which predicts 91 percent of business-to-business and 86 percent of business-to-consumer marketers plan to use content marketing in their campaigns.

10. An accounting for meteorological violence among insurers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Allstate expects insurance losses of about $593 million in August after Hurricane Harvey left a path of destruction along the Gulf Coast.

The initial accounting Thursday follows warnings from other insurers that are tallying the damages from a hurricane season that is nowhere near being over.

11. Worst-case scenario not happening and insurance sector soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Though damage from Hurricane Irma is extensive, property insurers are breathing a sigh of relief with the storm nowhere near as catastrophic as many had feared.

Shares in insurance companies that had been hammered in the days leading up to the storm are surging Monday, the first day of trading since the hurricane was downgraded to a tropical storm.

12. Drivers see higher premiums after not-at-fault crashes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most drivers don't expect to be hit with a rate hike on their auto insurance after a car accident that wasn't their fault.

But a consumer group says it happens and often. And it's a problem.

13. Haslam's trustee appointments -

Gov. Bill Haslam's appointments to boards of trustees for Tennessee State University, Middle Tennessee State University, Tennessee Tech, Austin Peay, University of Memphis and East Tennessee State:

14. Rowland named judicial clerk to Judge Nixon -

Maggie Rowland, who has served as a staff attorney at Patterson Intellectual Property Law since 2014, has been named a judicial clerk to Senior Judge John Trice Nixon, U.S. District Court, Middle District of Tennessee.

15. Bass, Berry & Sims names new leadership -

W. Brantley Phillips, Jr. has been elected to serve on the executive committee of Bass, Berry & Sims PLC.

Phillips serves as chair of the firm’s Securities & Shareholder Litigation Group, and his practice focuses on class action defense, derivative actions and other complex business litigation. Phillips has, for the past three years, served as chair of the firm’s Marketing & Business Development Committee.

16. Saint Thomas names Wood to top HR post -

Marvin ‘Bud’ Wood has assumed the role of chief human resources officer for Saint Thomas Health’s nine-hospital network.

As former senior director of human resources for Community Health Systems in Franklin. Wood brings 25 years of human resources experience to his new role.

17. Hogan, Evans named to CapStar leadership -

Dan W. Hogan has been appointed chief operating officer and Tipton H. Evans chief information officer as part of a reorganization of management at CapStar Bank.

18. Storm's cost may hit $50B; rebuilding to ease blow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Superstorm Sandy will end up causing about $20 billion in property damages and $10 billion to $30 billion more in lost business, according to IHS Global Insight, a forecasting firm.

19. Seckman new president of Diversified Trust -

Diversified Trust, a wealth management firm with more than $4 billion in assets under management, has named current chief operating officer John P. Seckman as its new president. Seckman will lead company operations from Nashville, a geographic center for the firm with additional offices in Atlanta, Greensboro and Memphis.

20. Reagan named CMO for Tennessee Department of Health -

David R. Reagan, M.D., Ph.D., has been named chief medical officer for the Tennessee Department of Health. In this position, Reagan will serve as an advisor to the commissioner on matters of health policy and assist in setting priorities for the department.

21. Irene likely to lead to higher insurance premiums -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $7 billion in estimated losses from Hurricane Irene will compound the vast damage caused by weather in the United States this year. Yet despite billions they've paid out for floods, tornadoes and earthquakes, big insurance companies can expect another profitable year.

22. HealthSpring’s Fritch joins CEO Council -

Herb Fritch, chairman and CEO of HealthSpring, Inc., has joined Council Ventures’ CEO Council. With Fritch’s addition, the CEO Council includes 24 experienced chief executives who give portfolio companies access to important networks and expertise to complement their capabilities.

23. Allstate 2Q weather beaten, but a silver lining -

BOSTON (AP) — Allstate reported a $620 million second-quarter loss Monday, hammered by a previously disclosed $2.3 billion in catastrophe losses from waves of tornadoes, wildfires and storms this year.