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Editorial Results (free)

1. Biden heading to Kentucky to see flood damage, meet families -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden will travel to eastern Kentucky on Monday to survey the damage from last week's devastating floods and meet with those affected.

2. Nichols joins Meharry as senior vice president -

Michelle Nichols, M.D., M.S., MBA, FAAFP, has been named as senior vice president of clinical affairs Meharry Medical College. Nichols will lead Meharry’s clinical enterprise, collaborating with the college’s clinicians and overseeing its graduate medical education programs. She will spearhead efforts to advance health equity and reduce disparities among those in underserved communities.

3. UT’s Hooker ready for football after busy offseason -

Hendon Hooker knows sleep is a valued commodity for an athlete in terms of performance recovery. But Hooker has so much he’s excited about each day that it’s hard for him to stay still.

4. Unexpected deal would boost Biden pledge on climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An unexpected deal reached by Senate Democrats would be the most ambitious action ever taken by the United States to address global warming and could help President Joe Biden come close to meeting his pledge to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2030, experts said Thursday, as they sifted through a massive bill that revives action on climate change weeks after the legislation appeared dead.

5. FDA chief's long-promised opioid review faces skepticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As U.S. opioid deaths mounted in 2016, the incoming head of the Food and Drug Administration promised a "sweeping review" of prescription painkillers in hopes of reversing the worst overdose epidemic in American history.

6. GOP AGs ask Google not to limit anti-abortion center results -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A month after some members of Congress urged Google to limit the appearance of anti-abortion pregnancy centers in certain abortion-related search results, 17 Republican attorneys general are warning the company that doing so could invite investigations and possible legal action.

7. Senators propose changes to electors law after Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of senators agreed Wednesday on proposed changes to the Electoral Count Act, the post-Civil War-era law for certifying presidential elections that came under intense scrutiny after the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol and Donald Trump's effort to overturn the 2020 election.

8. All about Manchin: What Biden wanted for US, senator did not -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It launched as the new president's ambitious plan for rebuilding America — a $2.3 trillion domestic infrastructure investment coupled with a $1.8 trillion plan to bolster U.S. families with support for health care, child care, college costs, unseen in generations.

9. Womble Bond Dickinson welcomes new partner -

Masami Izumida Tyson has joined Womble Bond Dickinson (US) LLP as a global business and international trade partner in the corporate and securities group. She is based in the firm’s new Nashville office.

10. Many won't rely on virtual options after COVID: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many Americans don't expect to rely on the digital services that became commonplace during the pandemic after COVID-19 subsides, according to a new poll, even as many think it's a good thing if those options remain available in the future.

11. High cost of Russian gains in Ukraine may limit new advance -

After more than four months of ferocious fighting, Russia claimed a key victory: full control over one of the two provinces in Ukraine's eastern industrial heartland.

But Moscow's seizure of the last major stronghold of Ukrainian resistance in Luhansk province came at a steep price. The critical question now is whether Russia can muster enough strength for a new offensive to complete its capture of the Donbas and make gains elsewhere in Ukraine.

12. 'Stay tuned' for new evidence against Trump in July hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More evidence is emerging in the House's Jan. 6 investigation that lends support to recent testimony that President Donald Trump wanted to join an angry mob that marched to the Capitol where they rioted, a committee member said Sunday.

13. Jan. 6 panel: More turning up with evidence against Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More witnesses are coming forward with new details on the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol riot following former White House aide Cassidy Hutchinson's devastating testimony last week against former President Donald Trump, says a member of a House committee investigating the insurrection.

14. Cyberattack disrupts unemployment benefits in some states -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A cyberattack on a software company has disrupted unemployment benefits and job seeking assistance for thousands of people in several states.

In Tennessee, the website for unemployment benefits remained down Thursday morning after the vendor, Geographic Solutions Inc., told the state Sunday that service would be interrupted. Some 12,000 Tennesseans rely on the unemployment program, and for now, they're not getting their payments.

15. Jan. 6 panel subpoenas counsel who resisted Trump schemes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection issued a subpoena Wednesday to former White House counsel Pat Cipollone, whose reported resistance to Donald Trump's schemes to overturn his 2020 election defeat has made him a long-sought and potentially revelatory witness.

16. About half say Trump should be charged for 1/6: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — About half of Americans believe former President Donald Trump should be charged with a crime for his role in the U.S. Capitol attack on Jan. 6, 2021, a new poll shows.

The survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 48% of U.S. adults say the Republican former president should be charged with a crime for his role, while 31% say he should not be charged. An additional 20% say they don't know enough to have an opinion. Fifty-eight percent say Trump bears a great deal or quite a bit of responsibility for what happened that day.

17. Enviros train drone pilots to find and pursue pollution -

POOLESVILLE, Md. (AP) — When environmentalist Brent Walls saw a milky-white substance in a stream flowing through a rural stretch of central Pennsylvania, he suspected the nearby rock mine was violating the law.

18. How Tennessee, other U.S. states have banned, limited, protected abortion -

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

19. Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade; states can ban abortion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday stripped away women's constitutional protections for abortion, a fundamental and deeply personal change for Americans' lives after nearly a half-century under Roe v. Wade. The court's overturning of the landmark court ruling is likely to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states.

20. Feds search Trump-era official's home, subpoena GOP leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal agents searched a former top Justice Department official's home and seized records from key Republicans in at least four states linked to Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, in what were clear signs that authorities are ramping up their investigation of associates of the former president.

21. Justices dismiss Trump-era immigration case, in a Biden win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court said Wednesday it was wrong to wade into a dispute involving a Trump-era immigration rule that the Biden administration has abandoned, so the justices dismissed the case.

22. 'Will we do our duty?' Cheney lays her legacy on the line -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Liz Cheney has been thinking lately about her great-great-grandfather, a man who fought for the Union in the Civil War, as the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol insurrection prepares to launch a prime-time hearing of its work.

23. Napaway Coach to offer D.C.-Nashville service -

Napaway Coach, a new type of premium sleeper coach service designed to offer comfortable, convenient, overnight journeys between cities across the country, has revealed it will officially begin operations June 17 with service between Washington, D.C., and Nashville.

24. $1,730 per month for 1-bedroom apartment -

The online listing for a two-bedroom, two-bath condo in Green Hills went up on a Thursday, complete with plenty of color photos, even though it won’t be available until September.

Two days later, Tamara Graham was sorting through more than 50 responses, including some from out-of-towners willing to rent sight unseen.

25. Commodores embrace rare NCAA postseason road trip -

Vanderbilt baseball coach Tim Corbin often talks about how much his team enjoys road trips. That’s a good attitude to have this time of year with a road trip to Oregon looming and the College World Series in Omaha serving as the ultimate destination.

26. Wray: FBI blocked planned cyberattack on children's hospital -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI thwarted a planned cyberattack on a children's hospital in Boston that was to have been carried out by hackers sponsored by the Iranian government, FBI Director Christopher Wray said Wednesday.

27. Will Congress act on guns after Sandy Hook, Buffalo, Uvalde? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer swiftly set in motion a pair of background-check bills for gun buyers Wednesday in response to the school massacre in Texas. But the Democrat acknowledged Congress' unyielding rejection of previous legislation to curb the national epidemic of gun violence.

28. FDA chief under fire for slow response to baby formula issue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the Food and Drug Administration faced bipartisan fury from House lawmakers Wednesday over months of delays investigating problems at the nation's largest baby formula plant that prompted an ongoing shortage.

29. Yellen's global tax plan meets resistance abroad and at home -

KOENIGSWINTER, Germany (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen celebrated a "historic day" last summer when more than 100 nations agreed to a global minimum tax deal, aimed at putting the world's countries on a more equal footing in attracting and keeping multinational companies. President Joe Biden tweeted that the idea was "diplomacy reshaping our global economy and delivering for our people."

30. Illinois seen as best option for Tennesseans seeking abortions -

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Leaders of a Tennessee abortion clinic calculated driving distances and studied passenger rail routes as they scanned the map for another place to offer services if the U.S. Supreme Court lets states restrict or eliminate abortion rights.

31. In Buffalo, Biden to confront the racism he's vowed to fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Joe Biden talks about his decision to run against President Donald Trump in 2020, the story always starts with Charlottesville. He says it was the men with torches shouting bigoted slogans that drove him to join what he calls the "battle for the soul of America."

32. Biden showcases deficit progress in bid to counter critics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday highlighted new figures showing the government's red ink will grow less than expected this year and the national debt will shrink this quarter as he tried to counter criticism of his economic leadership amid growing dismay over inflation going into midterm elections that will decide control of Congress.

33. Weatherly & Dixon merges with Lewis Thomason -

The law firm of Weatherly & Dixon PLLC and its partners, James L. Weatherly and Jacqueline B. Dixon, have merged their practices with Lewis Thomason, P.C., says Lisa Ramsay Cole, president and managing shareholder for the statewide firm.

34. Baker Donelson adds 3 Nashville associates -

Baker Donelson has added 16 new associates across the firm, including Katelyn R. Dwyer (labor & employment), Kareim S. Oliphant (corporate) and Kathryn White (corporate) in Nashville

Dwyer represents clients in a wide variety of employment litigation matters, including cases involving discrimination, retaliation, covenants not to compete, and wage and hour issues.

35. Biden's election year challenge: Blame GOP for nation's woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has an election-year message for frustrated voters: At least he's trying.

For those who think he isn't doing enough to help Ukraine fend off the Russian invasion, Biden announced $800 million in new military support on Thursday. To ease the pain of high gas prices, he's tapped the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and reopened onshore sales of oil and natural gas leases on public land. And to address historic inflation, Biden has tried to smooth out supply chain-crimping bottlenecks at the nation's ports.

36. Bitcoin's new puzzle: How to ditch fossil fuels and go green -

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — For the past year a company that "mines" cryptocurrency had what seemed the ideal location for its thousands of power-thirsty computers working around the clock to verify bitcoin transactions: the grounds of a coal-fired power plant in rural Montana.

37. Talk of race, sex in schools divides Americans: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans are deeply divided over how much children in K-12 schools should be taught about racism and sexuality, according to a new poll released as Republicans across the country aim to make parental involvement in education a central campaign theme this election year.

38. Ketanji Brown Jackson is and isn't 1st Black female justice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shirley Troutman, a judge on New York's highest court, was working last week when her daughter texted messages that included a clapping hands emoji. Soon, her phone was buzzing with other celebratory messages. The applause and the excitement was for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, who last week was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court and will become its first Black female justice.

39. Billions, and growing, for lawmakers' projects in big bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home-district projects for members of Congress are back, sprinkled across the government-wide $1.5 trillion bill President Joe Biden signed recently. The official tally shows amounts modest by past standards yet spread widely around the country — and that understate what lawmakers are claiming credit for.

40. Bradley adds Chaloner to intellectual property group -

Aaron Chaloner has joined Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP as a senior attorney in the Intellectual Property Practice Group.

Chaloner focuses his practice on patent prosecution in the life science and biotechnology industry. He is experienced in all stages of intellectual property prosecution and provides strategic counsel to his clients regarding copyright, trademark, patent and trade secret concerns.

41. Senate makes wrong move in locking clocks -

News that the U.S. Senate had passed a bill that could establish permanent daylight saving time took me quite by surprise.

What’s more, and even more surprising, it passed unanimously. This despite the fact that red and blue senators can’t be relied on to agree on what day it is, much less what time it ought to be.

42. How China's TikTok, Facebook influencers push propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To her 1.4 million followers across TikTok, YouTube, Instagram and Facebook, Vica Li says she is a "life blogger" and "food lover" who wants to teach her fans about China so they can travel the country with ease.

43. EXPLAINER: How would billionaire income tax work? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A "Billionaire Minimum Income Tax" is included in President Joe Biden's fiscal year 2023 budget proposal — part of the administration's effort to reduce the federal deficit over the next decade and fund new spending. The proposal "eliminates the inefficient sheltering of income for decades or generations," the White House says.

44. EXPLAINER: How would billionaire income tax work? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A "Billionaire Minimum Income Tax" is included in President Joe Biden's fiscal year 2023 budget proposal — part of the administration's effort to reduce the federal deficit over the next decade and fund new spending. The proposal "eliminates the inefficient sheltering of income for decades or generations," the White House says.

45. Vol baseball showing no weaknesses while building 23-1 start -

Tennessee has been so dominant through the first six weeks of the season that coach Tony Vitello said it probably was good the Volunteers had a one-run game in the finale of their road sweep of previously top-ranked Mississippi.

46. High from hemp: States wrestle with chemically made THC -

Over the past few years, Jonny Griffis has invested millions of dollars in his legal marijuana farm in northern Michigan, which produces extracts to be used in things like gummy bears and vape oils.

47. Republican 'unforced errors' threaten path to Senate control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the prospect of a red wave grows, a series of Republican missteps including recruiting stumbles, weak fundraising and intense infighting is threatening the GOP's path to the Senate majority.

48. As vaccine demand falls, states are left with huge stockpile -

As demand for COVID-19 vaccines collapses in many areas of the U.S., states are scrambling to use stockpiles of doses before they expire and have to be added to the millions that have already gone to waste.

49. When sellers hold the cards, it’s hard to get them to fold -

Not since the release of “The Exorcist” has there been as much debate about possession, though the focus now is on real estate.

With offers being accepted for mountains of cash over list price, some of the other terms of the contract are sometimes being overlooked. One of the more important being the possession of the property.

50. Pandemic fears are fading along with omicron: AP-NORC poll -

Omicron is fading away, and so are Americans' worries about COVID-19.

As coronavirus pandemic case numbers, hospitalizations and deaths continue to plummet, fewer people now than in January say they are concerned that they will be infected after the rise and fall of the wildly contagious virus variant, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

51. What to watch in Biden's 1st State of the Union address -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden sat through many State of the Union speeches as a senator and vice president. On Tuesday night, he'll deliver the address himself.

But it comes at a challenging time for Biden, who is weighed down by public disapproval of his handling of the economy and the pandemic. The address also comes days after Russia opened war against Ukraine, despite U.S.-led efforts to prevent military conflict. And it follows Biden's announcement last week of his candidate for an opening on the Supreme Court.

52. Reading Putin: Unbalanced or cagily preying on West's fears? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For two decades, Vladimir Putin has struck rivals as reckless, impulsive. But his behavior in ordering an invasion of Ukraine — and now putting Russia's nuclear forces on high alert — has some in the West questioning whether the Russian president has become dangerously unstable.

53. Big tech grapples with Russian state media, propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia's war in Ukraine  plays out for the world on social media, big tech platforms are moving to restrict Russian state media from using their platforms to spread propaganda and misinformation.

54. J&J, distributors finalize $26B landmark opioid settlement -

CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson and three major distributors finalized nationwide settlements over their role in the opioid addiction crisis Friday, an announcement that clears the way for $26 billion to flow to nearly every state and local government in the U.S.

55. High court wades into clash over Trump-era immigration rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court waded into a political clash Wednesday between the Biden administration and Republican-led states seeking to defend a signature Trump-era immigration rule that the new administration has abandoned.

56. Study: Child poverty rising after tax credit expires -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of children in America living in poverty jumped dramatically after just one month without the expanded child tax credit payments, according to a new study. Advocates fear the lapse in payments could unravel what they say were landmark achievements in poverty reduction.

57. Altria says judge has dismissed lawsuit over Juul investment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tobacco giant Altria said Tuesday that an administrative law judge has dismissed a federal lawsuit alleging the company's partnership with e-cigarette maker Juul Labs amounted to an anticompetitive agreement that hurt consumers.

58. Biden puts focus on drug prices as he tries to revive agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is trying to jump-start progress on his stalled domestic agenda by refocusing attention on one of his most popular proposals, limiting the cost of prescription drugs.

59. FDA's agenda in limbo as Biden's nominee stalls in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to lead the Food and Drug Administration has stalled in the narrowly divided Senate, an unexpected setback that could delay decisions on electronic cigarettes and a raft of other high-profile health issues pending at the agency.

60. High court conservatives target O'Connor, Kennedy opinions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For years, the Supreme Court moved to the left or right only as far as Justices Sandra Day O'Connor and Anthony Kennedy allowed.

61. Biden grappling with 'perfect storm' of rising gun violence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Illegal guns are flooding the streets. Teenagers are being murdered. And alarming numbers of police officers have been shot dead.

Gun violence already on the rise during the pandemic is spiking anew, and beleaguered cities are struggling with how to manage it. President Joe Biden visits one of them, New York, on Thursday as he tries to dispel criticism from the right that he hasn't been tough enough on crime.

62. Doeg elected to Baker Donelson board -

Bruce C. Doeg has been elected a member of Baker Donelson’s board of directors by the firm’s shareholders.

Doeg, a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office and co-chair of the Firm’s Privacy and Technology Center of Excellence, concentrates his practice in the area of business law with an emphasis on rapidly changing industries, including technology, digital health and life sciences.

63. Top athletes finally cashing in on name, image, likeness change -

Scotty Pippen Jr., Donovan Sims and Uros Plavsic come from vastly different backgrounds but have this much in common: They all play college basketball in Tennessee and are among the hundreds of the state’s collegiate athletes – joined by thousands nationwide – that have taken advantage of the name, image, likeness (NIL) opportunities now afforded them.

64. EXPLAINER: What's next for the Supreme Court vacancy? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Senate Democrats are expected to move quickly to fill the seat of retiring Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, seizing the chance to energize their voting base ahead of November's midterm elections, when control of Congress will be at stake.

65. Vaccine mandate to kick in for first wave of health workers -

Health care workers in about half the states face a Thursday deadline to get their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine under a Biden administration mandate that will be rolled out across the rest of the country in the coming weeks.

66. Year 2: Biden plans more public outreach, less legislating -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden launched into his second year in office Thursday with a new focus on making fatigued Americans believe they're better off under his leadership as he embraces a pared-back agenda before the midterm elections.

67. Analysis: Biden finds inflation overshadows strong economy -

President Joe Biden is paying a steep price for high inflation — a problem that festered during his first year in office instead of fading away as he suggested it would.

His $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, enacted in March, drove what will probably be the fastest economic growth since 1984 and pulled the unemployment rate down to 3.9% at a quicker pace than experts predicted.

68. Biden approval hits new low at one-year mark: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden ends his first year in the White House with a clear majority of Americans for the first time disapproving of his handling of the presidency in the face of an unrelenting pandemic and roaring inflation, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

69. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

70. Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm -

ATLANTA (AP) — A dangerous winter storm combining high winds and ice swept through parts of the U.S. Southeast on Sunday, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and coating roads with a treacherous, frigid glaze.

71. Analysis: Biden overshoots on what's possible in divided DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He was supposed to break through the congressional logjam. End the pandemic. Get the economy back on track.

Days before he hits his one-year mark in office, a torrent of bad news is gnawing at the foundational rationale of President Joe Biden's presidency: that he could get the job done.

72. Hurdles ahead for city’s political convention hopes -

Having made it a couple of weeks into 2022 without any major new attacks on democracy (fingers crossed), let us briefly turn our attention to 2024 politics: How does the prospect of tens of thousands of ardent Republicans or Democrats swarming through Nashville strike you?

73. EPA moves to crack down on dangerous coal ash storage ponds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is taking its first major action to address toxic wastewater from coal-burning power plants, ordering utilities to stop dumping waste into unlined storage ponds and speed up plans to close leaking or otherwise dangerous coal ash sites.

74. Trump maintains grip on GOP despite violent insurrection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a raging band of his supporters scaled walls, smashed windows, used flagpoles to beat police and breached the U.S. Capitol in a bid to overturn a free and fair election, Donald Trump's excommunication from the Republican Party seemed a near certainty, his name tarnished beyond repair.

75. Biden pushed to speak out more as US democracy concerns grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has gotten the same troubling questions from worried world leaders, ones that he never thought he would hear.

"Is America going to be all right?" they ask. "What about democracy in America?"

76. Biden's words on voting rights meet call to action after 1/6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has gotten the same troubling questions from worried world leaders, ones that he never thought he would hear.

"Is America going to be all right?" they ask. "What about democracy in America?"

77. Biden and Dems scramble to salvage social, climate package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, along with progressive and moderate Democrats, appears determined to return to the negotiating table with Sen. Joe Manchin, the holdout Democrat who effectively tanked the party's signature $2 trillion domestic policy initiative.

78. US delays intelligence center targeting foreign influence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia was working to subvert U.S. elections and sow discord among Americans, Congress directed the creation of an intelligence center to lead efforts to stop interference by foreign adversaries. But two years later, that center still is not close to opening.

79. Vols’ biggest commitment comes from QB Hooker -

Before the signatures began rolling into the Tennessee football offices last week, the Vols received a huge commitment.

But it wasn’t from an incoming recruit. It was from a player already on the roster.

80. Biden and Dems scramble to salvage social, climate package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, along with progressive and moderate Democrats, appears determined to return to the negotiating table with Sen. Joe Manchin, the holdout Democrat who effectively tanked the party's signature $2 trillion domestic policy initiative.

81. Manchin's child tax credit stance draws criticism back home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Joe Manchin's reluctance to endorse the Biden administration's expanded child tax credit program is rippling through his home state of West Virginia.

Manchin, a moderate Democrat, is one of the last holdouts delaying passage of President Joe Biden's massive social and environmental package, dubbed the Build Back Better Act. The West Virginia senator has expressed concerns over multiple aspects of the roughly $2 trillion package, including the continuation of the expanded Child Tax Credit program.

82. Biden pledges 'whatever it takes' to assist tornado victims -

DAWSON SPRINGS, Ky. (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday pledged to do "whatever it takes, as long as it takes" to help Kentucky and other states after a series of deadly tornadoes that he said left a trail of unimaginable devastation. "You will recover and rebuild," he said.

83. Garlington is new CFO at Centerstone -

Centerstone, a not-for-profit health system specializing in mental health and substance use disorder services, has selected Andy Garlington as the new chief financial officer.

Garlington will manage Centerstone’s revenues of more than $295 million and lead a finance team of 225 professionals.

84. Biden visiting Kentucky to console tornado victims, give aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the fifth time since taking office less than a year ago, President Joe Biden is taking on the grim task Wednesday of visiting an area ravaged by natural disaster to offer comfort and condolences.

85. Colleges go back to drawing board – again – to fight virus -

Facing rising infections and a new COVID-19 variant, colleges across the U.S. have once again been thwarted in seeking a move to normalcy and are starting to require booster shots, extend mask mandates, limit social gatherings and, in some cases, revert to online classes.

86. Wagon Wheel Title adds 2 attorneys -

Wagon Wheel Title & Escrow has added two commercial attorneys to its team, Jatin A. Shah and Quinton Horner.

Specializing in real estate transactions and lease negotiation and review, Shah graduated from New York’s Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center before continuing on to the SMU Dedman School of Law, where he earned his LL.M.

87. Bass, Berry & Sims bolsters health care practice -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added seven experienced health care attorneys to its national health care practice, including Travis Lloyd as a member in Nashville. The other six will be based in the firm’s Washington D.C. office.

88. Events -

Williamson County Real Estate Summit. Speakers: Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors. Williamson County Residential Real Estate panel and conversation, moderated by Bo Patten, CEO of the Williamson County Association of Realtors. Retail trends and the future of the Factory at Franklin, Elam Freeman, founder and principal, Ojas Partners. State of Commercial Real Estate, moderated by Elizabeth McCreary, Williamson, Inc. chief economic development officer. Virginia Springs II, 5501 Virginia Way, Brentwood. Tuesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members, $750 Company table of 10. Information

89. Connell named fellow for two attorney groups -

Virginia (Ginger) J. Connell has been accepted as a fellow of the International Academy of Family Lawyers and the Nashville Bar Foundation.

IAFL is a worldwide association of practicing lawyers who are recognized by their peers for their experience and expertise in family law. Membership is by invitation.

90. Biden signs $1T infrastructure bill with bipartisan audience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed his $1 trillion infrastructure deal into law Monday on the White House lawn, hailing it as an example of what bipartisanship can achieve.

The president hopes to use the law to build back his popularity and says it will deliver jobs, clean water, high-speed internet and a clean energy future. Support for Biden has taken a hit amid rising inflation and the inability to fully shake the public health and economic risks from COVID-19.

91. Biden picks former FDA chief Califf to again lead the agency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday is tapping former Food and Drug Administration commissioner Robert Califf to again lead the powerful regulatory agency, according to a person familiar with the decision.

92. Biden announces plan to ID, treat vets' ills from toxic air -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, whose son Beau was an Iraq war veteran, is using his first Veterans Day in office to announce an effort to better understand, identify and treat medical conditions suffered by troops deployed to toxic environments.

93. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

94. Biden asking Democrats do so much with so little in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rarely have the leaders of Congress been asked to do so much, with so little, as in navigating President Joe Biden's big domestic vision into law.

Reaching for FDR-style accomplishments with slimmer-than-ever Democratic majorities has been politically messy at best, arduous at worst, and about to become even more daunting for the president and his party.

95. Biden faces fresh challenges after infrastructure victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He has been here before.

President Joe Biden doesn't need to look any further back than his time as vice president to grasp the challenges that lie ahead in promoting his new $1 trillion infrastructure deal to the American people and getting the money out the door fast enough that they can feel a real impact.

96. Biden's bet that economy would boost Democrats falls flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was supposed to help President Joe Biden and Democrats, but as of late it's been hurting them with voters.

Biden on Friday praised the U.S. economy for performing better than the rest of the world, saying it's largely because of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package and plans for additional spending of roughly $2.75 trillion on infrastructure, families, schools, health care and climate change.

97. Analysis: After tough election, Biden dismisses danger signs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hazard lights are blinking for President Joe Biden after Democratic setbacks in this week's elections, but the president professes to see no reason for panic.

Just one year after he rode to the White House with a record 81 million votes, Biden saw Democratic stalwart Terry McAuliffe fall to first-time Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin in the governor's race in Virginia, a state that Biden had won by 10 percentage points. In New Jersey, incumbent Gov. Phil Murphy barely won in a state that Biden had won by 16 percentage points.

98. Divided Democrats call for new strategy after disaster in VA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A brutal loss in blue-leaning Virginia and a too-close-for-comfort race in New Jersey sent divided Democrats in Washington scrambling for answers Wednesday, and calling for new strategies to unstick a stalled legislative agenda before they sustain more political damage.

99. Clarksville’s Customs House earns awards -

The Customs House Museum & Cultural Center is the recent recipient of multiple awards in 2021 from the Southeastern Museums Conference.

The SEMC awards come from two categories – Technology and Publication Design. The Technology Competition recognizes excellence in the use of technology and winning entries demonstrate innovation, effective design, accessibility, creativity and recognition of institutional identity. The Publications Design Competition encourages communication, effective design, creativity, pride of work and recognition of institutional image and identity. Museum publications play a vital role in the institution’s educational mission as they document exhibitions and collections through high-quality design and production.

100. Baker Donelson names health group leaders -

Baker Donelson has named two attorneys to leadership roles within its Health Law Group.

S. Craig Holden has been named co-chair of the Baker Ober Health Law Group, one of the largest health law practices in the country. He serves as co-chair of the group with Ashby Q. Burks, a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office.