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Editorial Results (free)

1. Year 2: Biden plans more public outreach, less legislating -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden launched into his second year in office Thursday with a new focus on making fatigued Americans believe they're better off under his leadership as he embraces a pared-back agenda before the midterm elections.

2. Analysis: Biden finds inflation overshadows strong economy -

President Joe Biden is paying a steep price for high inflation — a problem that festered during his first year in office instead of fading away as he suggested it would.

His $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, enacted in March, drove what will probably be the fastest economic growth since 1984 and pulled the unemployment rate down to 3.9% at a quicker pace than experts predicted.

3. Biden approval hits new low at one-year mark: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden ends his first year in the White House with a clear majority of Americans for the first time disapproving of his handling of the presidency in the face of an unrelenting pandemic and roaring inflation, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

4. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

5. Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm -

ATLANTA (AP) — A dangerous winter storm combining high winds and ice swept through parts of the U.S. Southeast on Sunday, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and coating roads with a treacherous, frigid glaze.

6. Analysis: Biden overshoots on what's possible in divided DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He was supposed to break through the congressional logjam. End the pandemic. Get the economy back on track.

Days before he hits his one-year mark in office, a torrent of bad news is gnawing at the foundational rationale of President Joe Biden's presidency: that he could get the job done.

7. Hurdles ahead for city’s political convention hopes -

Having made it a couple of weeks into 2022 without any major new attacks on democracy (fingers crossed), let us briefly turn our attention to 2024 politics: How does the prospect of tens of thousands of ardent Republicans or Democrats swarming through Nashville strike you?

8. EPA moves to crack down on dangerous coal ash storage ponds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Environmental Protection Agency is taking its first major action to address toxic wastewater from coal-burning power plants, ordering utilities to stop dumping waste into unlined storage ponds and speed up plans to close leaking or otherwise dangerous coal ash sites.

9. Trump maintains grip on GOP despite violent insurrection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a raging band of his supporters scaled walls, smashed windows, used flagpoles to beat police and breached the U.S. Capitol in a bid to overturn a free and fair election, Donald Trump's excommunication from the Republican Party seemed a near certainty, his name tarnished beyond repair.

10. Biden pushed to speak out more as US democracy concerns grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has gotten the same troubling questions from worried world leaders, ones that he never thought he would hear.

"Is America going to be all right?" they ask. "What about democracy in America?"

11. Biden's words on voting rights meet call to action after 1/6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has gotten the same troubling questions from worried world leaders, ones that he never thought he would hear.

"Is America going to be all right?" they ask. "What about democracy in America?"

12. Biden and Dems scramble to salvage social, climate package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, along with progressive and moderate Democrats, appears determined to return to the negotiating table with Sen. Joe Manchin, the holdout Democrat who effectively tanked the party's signature $2 trillion domestic policy initiative.

13. US delays intelligence center targeting foreign influence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia was working to subvert U.S. elections and sow discord among Americans, Congress directed the creation of an intelligence center to lead efforts to stop interference by foreign adversaries. But two years later, that center still is not close to opening.

14. Vols’ biggest commitment comes from QB Hooker -

Before the signatures began rolling into the Tennessee football offices last week, the Vols received a huge commitment.

But it wasn’t from an incoming recruit. It was from a player already on the roster.

15. Biden and Dems scramble to salvage social, climate package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, along with progressive and moderate Democrats, appears determined to return to the negotiating table with Sen. Joe Manchin, the holdout Democrat who effectively tanked the party's signature $2 trillion domestic policy initiative.

16. Manchin's child tax credit stance draws criticism back home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Joe Manchin's reluctance to endorse the Biden administration's expanded child tax credit program is rippling through his home state of West Virginia.

Manchin, a moderate Democrat, is one of the last holdouts delaying passage of President Joe Biden's massive social and environmental package, dubbed the Build Back Better Act. The West Virginia senator has expressed concerns over multiple aspects of the roughly $2 trillion package, including the continuation of the expanded Child Tax Credit program.

17. Biden pledges 'whatever it takes' to assist tornado victims -

DAWSON SPRINGS, Ky. (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday pledged to do "whatever it takes, as long as it takes" to help Kentucky and other states after a series of deadly tornadoes that he said left a trail of unimaginable devastation. "You will recover and rebuild," he said.

18. Garlington is new CFO at Centerstone -

Centerstone, a not-for-profit health system specializing in mental health and substance use disorder services, has selected Andy Garlington as the new chief financial officer.

Garlington will manage Centerstone’s revenues of more than $295 million and lead a finance team of 225 professionals.

19. Biden visiting Kentucky to console tornado victims, give aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the fifth time since taking office less than a year ago, President Joe Biden is taking on the grim task Wednesday of visiting an area ravaged by natural disaster to offer comfort and condolences.

20. Colleges go back to drawing board – again – to fight virus -

Facing rising infections and a new COVID-19 variant, colleges across the U.S. have once again been thwarted in seeking a move to normalcy and are starting to require booster shots, extend mask mandates, limit social gatherings and, in some cases, revert to online classes.

21. Wagon Wheel Title adds 2 attorneys -

Wagon Wheel Title & Escrow has added two commercial attorneys to its team, Jatin A. Shah and Quinton Horner.

Specializing in real estate transactions and lease negotiation and review, Shah graduated from New York’s Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center before continuing on to the SMU Dedman School of Law, where he earned his LL.M.

22. Bass, Berry & Sims bolsters health care practice -

Bass, Berry & Sims has added seven experienced health care attorneys to its national health care practice, including Travis Lloyd as a member in Nashville. The other six will be based in the firm’s Washington D.C. office.

23. Events -

Williamson County Real Estate Summit. Speakers: Lawrence Yun, chief economist of the National Association of Realtors. Williamson County Residential Real Estate panel and conversation, moderated by Bo Patten, CEO of the Williamson County Association of Realtors. Retail trends and the future of the Factory at Franklin, Elam Freeman, founder and principal, Ojas Partners. State of Commercial Real Estate, moderated by Elizabeth McCreary, Williamson, Inc. chief economic development officer. Virginia Springs II, 5501 Virginia Way, Brentwood. Tuesday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Fee: $55 members, $65 non-members, $750 Company table of 10. Information

24. Connell named fellow for two attorney groups -

Virginia (Ginger) J. Connell has been accepted as a fellow of the International Academy of Family Lawyers and the Nashville Bar Foundation.

IAFL is a worldwide association of practicing lawyers who are recognized by their peers for their experience and expertise in family law. Membership is by invitation.

25. Biden signs $1T infrastructure bill with bipartisan audience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed his $1 trillion infrastructure deal into law Monday on the White House lawn, hailing it as an example of what bipartisanship can achieve.

The president hopes to use the law to build back his popularity and says it will deliver jobs, clean water, high-speed internet and a clean energy future. Support for Biden has taken a hit amid rising inflation and the inability to fully shake the public health and economic risks from COVID-19.

26. Biden picks former FDA chief Califf to again lead the agency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday is tapping former Food and Drug Administration commissioner Robert Califf to again lead the powerful regulatory agency, according to a person familiar with the decision.

27. Biden announces plan to ID, treat vets' ills from toxic air -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden, whose son Beau was an Iraq war veteran, is using his first Veterans Day in office to announce an effort to better understand, identify and treat medical conditions suffered by troops deployed to toxic environments.

28. Events -

Hospitality Link. Industry Update and Networking Happy Hour presented by Infinity Hospitality. Panel discussion on the state of Nashville’s hospitality industry. Networking mixer including complimentary beverages and light bites to follow the presentation. Complimentary event, but pre-registration is required. Mask wearing is requested when not eating or drinking. Panelists include Adam Mansell, Tennessee Department of Travel and Tourism; Beth Morrow, Lipscomb University Hospitality and Entertainment; Nathaniel Beaver, Infinity Hospitality. Moderator: Sherry Franklin, Renaissance Nashville Hotel. The Bell Tower, 400 4th Ave. S., Nashville. Wednesday, 4-6 p.m.

29. Biden asking Democrats do so much with so little in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rarely have the leaders of Congress been asked to do so much, with so little, as in navigating President Joe Biden's big domestic vision into law.

Reaching for FDR-style accomplishments with slimmer-than-ever Democratic majorities has been politically messy at best, arduous at worst, and about to become even more daunting for the president and his party.

30. Biden faces fresh challenges after infrastructure victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He has been here before.

President Joe Biden doesn't need to look any further back than his time as vice president to grasp the challenges that lie ahead in promoting his new $1 trillion infrastructure deal to the American people and getting the money out the door fast enough that they can feel a real impact.

31. Biden's bet that economy would boost Democrats falls flat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy was supposed to help President Joe Biden and Democrats, but as of late it's been hurting them with voters.

Biden on Friday praised the U.S. economy for performing better than the rest of the world, saying it's largely because of his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package and plans for additional spending of roughly $2.75 trillion on infrastructure, families, schools, health care and climate change.

32. Analysis: After tough election, Biden dismisses danger signs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The hazard lights are blinking for President Joe Biden after Democratic setbacks in this week's elections, but the president professes to see no reason for panic.

Just one year after he rode to the White House with a record 81 million votes, Biden saw Democratic stalwart Terry McAuliffe fall to first-time Republican candidate Glenn Youngkin in the governor's race in Virginia, a state that Biden had won by 10 percentage points. In New Jersey, incumbent Gov. Phil Murphy barely won in a state that Biden had won by 16 percentage points.

33. Divided Democrats call for new strategy after disaster in VA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A brutal loss in blue-leaning Virginia and a too-close-for-comfort race in New Jersey sent divided Democrats in Washington scrambling for answers Wednesday, and calling for new strategies to unstick a stalled legislative agenda before they sustain more political damage.

34. Clarksville’s Customs House earns awards -

The Customs House Museum & Cultural Center is the recent recipient of multiple awards in 2021 from the Southeastern Museums Conference.

The SEMC awards come from two categories – Technology and Publication Design. The Technology Competition recognizes excellence in the use of technology and winning entries demonstrate innovation, effective design, accessibility, creativity and recognition of institutional identity. The Publications Design Competition encourages communication, effective design, creativity, pride of work and recognition of institutional image and identity. Museum publications play a vital role in the institution’s educational mission as they document exhibitions and collections through high-quality design and production.

35. Baker Donelson names health group leaders -

Baker Donelson has named two attorneys to leadership roles within its Health Law Group.

S. Craig Holden has been named co-chair of the Baker Ober Health Law Group, one of the largest health law practices in the country. He serves as co-chair of the group with Ashby Q. Burks, a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office.

36. Vol QB Hooker happy for UT chance, not sure about staying for 2022 -

Hendon Hooker’s passion for football was never in question. But even the most dedicated athlete can use a reminder of how much the sport means.

That realization struck the Tennessee senior quarterback in September 2020 when, while still playing at Virginia Tech, he tested positive for COVID-19. He received a heart screening after he was released from quarantine, but the tests uncovered a potential heart issue that was unrelated to COVID.

37. Youngkin's Virginia win jolts Democrats, tight race in NJ -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Republican Glenn Youngkin won the Virginia governor's race early Wednesday, tapping into culture war fights over schools and race to unite former President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters with enough suburban voters to become the first GOP candidate to win statewide office in a dozen years.

38. Governors and more: What to watch in Tuesday's elections -

It may be an odd-numbered year but Tuesday's elections aren't sleepy, local contests. Voters in Virginia are weighing in on a governor's race that could rattle President Joe Biden and Democrats in Washington. In Minneapolis, a city still shaken by George Floyd's murder will vote on whether to disband its police department and create a new public safety agency. School board races across the country have become the new battlegrounds for partisan debates over race.

39. Supreme Court won't hear case involving transgender rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is declining to wade into a case involving transgender rights and leaving in place a lower court decision against a Catholic hospital that wouldn't allow a transgender man to have a hysterectomy there.

40. Analysis: Biden faces liberal angst after under-delivering -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden set out to be a president who under-promised and over-delivered.

That worked, until it didn't.

As the White House tries to nail down a nearly $3 trillion domestic package that Biden frames as a historic investment in infrastructure and social spending, the moment is clouded by a sense among many on the left that the pared-back package falls far short of the lofty expectations set by the president himself.

41. Poll: Biden, Dems get low marks on spending talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden and Democrats try to get a roughly $2 trillion package over the finish line, a new poll shows that fewer than half of Americans approve of how they have handled the spending bill. And many say they know little to nothing about it.

42. Biden bound for global summits, aims to pass domestic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden promised to show the world that democracies can work to meet the challenges of the 21st century. As he prepares to push that message at a pair of global summits, his case could hinge on what's happening in Washington, where he is rushing to finalize a major domestic legislative package.

43. Bradley adds East to real estate group -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has hired Van P. East III to the firm’s real estate practice group as a partner in the Nashville office.

East has extensive experience in commercial real estate, representing clients in purchasing, financing, leasing and selling commercial properties ranging from shopping centers to vacant land. He also works with clients on matters involving closely held business entities, including formations, conversions, mergers, acquisitions and dispositions, as well as restructuring ownership and control.

44. COVID cases falling, but trouble signs arise as winter looms -

Tumbling COVID-19 case counts have some schools around the U.S. considering relaxing their mask rules, but deaths nationally have been ticking up over the past few weeks, some rural hospitals are showing signs of strain, and cold weather is setting in.

45. Poll: Majority in US concerned about climate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden heads to a vital U.N. climate summit at a time when a majority of Americans regard the deteriorating climate as a problem of high importance to them, an increase from just a few years ago.

46. Billionaire tax takes shape as Biden pushes for budget deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are working frantically to shore up the revenue side of President Joe Biden's domestic package, poised to unveil a new billionaires' tax  to help pay for his social services and climate change plan after earlier tax plans fizzled.

47. Vols face 2 familiar foes in visit to No. 4 Crimson Tide -

Tennessee senior offensive lineman Jerome Carvin doesn’t need to watch extra tape this week to get a scouting report on Alabama’s leading tackler.

Carvin saw firsthand how disruptive Henry To’o To’o could be during years of practices. Now, Carvin and the Vols will have to deal with To’o To’o as an opponent in a game.

48. Biden pushing child care provisions in stalled spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden was set to highlight his plan to lower the cost of child care for most American families as he makes the case for his stalled social spending bill during a visit to Connecticut on Friday.

49. Vols find their running game, face another test with SC -

Josh Heupel revealed the Tennessee game plan days before the Vols took the field against Missouri, explaining “the secret behind the sauce is really the run game for us.”

The Vols gave proof to concept in a dominating victory at Missouri that provided Tennessee fans with a glimpse of what was promised when Heupel was hired in January.

50. Biden eager to get out of DC, push benefits of spending plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is shifting strategy to sell his ambitious social spending plans by traveling outside Washington and courting moderate Democrats who are key to hopes for any deal.

51. Biden at Capitol as Democrats scale back $3.5T plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden traveled to Capitol Hill Friday to meet with lawmakers on their home ground as Democrats strained to rescue a scaled-back version  of his $3.5 trillion government overhaul and salvage a related public works bill after days of frantic negotiations resulted in no deal.

52. On climate change, Biden $3.5T plan making up for lost time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden visited one disaster site after another this summer — from California wildfires to hurricane-induced flooding in Louisiana and New York — he said climate change is "everybody's crisis" and America must get serious about the "code red" danger posed by global warming.

53. EXPLAINER: Drama, deadlines as Congress weighs Biden agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The drama and deadlines driving action on Capitol Hill right now can be disorienting. Democrats are trying to pass more than $4 trillion in infrastructure and social programs at the center of President Joe Biden's agenda — and at the same time avert a government shutdown and prevent a federal default that could send financial markets crashing.

54. What's the price of Biden's plan? Democrats drive for zero -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What will it cost to enact President Joe Biden's massive expansion of social programs?

Congress has authorized spending up to $3.5 trillion over a decade, but Biden is prodding Democrats to fully cover the cost of the legislation — by raising taxes on corporations and the wealthy, negotiating the price of prescription drugs and dialing up other sources of federal revenue such as increased IRS funding.

55. Poll: Americans have little trust in online security -

Most Americans don't believe their personal information is secure online and aren't satisfied with the federal government's efforts to protect it, according to a poll.

The poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and MeriTalk shows that 64% of Americans say their social media activity is not very or not at all secure. About as many have the same security doubts about online information revealing their physical location. Half of Americans believe their private text conversations lack security.

56. Biden $3.5T plan tests voter appeal of expansive gov't role -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's "build back better" agenda is poised to be the most far-reaching federal investment since FDR's New Deal or LBJ's Great Society — a prodigious effort to tax the rich and shift money into projects and programs touching the lives of nearly every American.

57. Largest colleges push student vaccines with mandates, prizes -

STORRS, Conn. (AP) — At most of the largest U.S. public universities, students are under no obligation to be vaccinated against COVID-19. Some schools do require vaccines, but with leniency for those who opt out. Still others have expelled students who do not comply.

58. Lawmakers: Ida damage shows need for infrastructure upgrades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shaken by haunting images of surging rivers, flooded roads and subways and other damage caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, lawmakers from both parties are vowing to upgrade the nation's aging infrastructure network.

59. Lawmakers vow action after Ida floods Gulf Coast, Northeast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shaken by haunting images of surging rivers, flooded roads and subways and other damage caused by the remnants of Hurricane Ida, lawmakers from both parties are vowing to upgrade the nation's aging infrastructure network.

60. Tea party 2.0? Conservatives get organized in school battles -

MEQUON, Wis. (AP) — A loose network of conservative groups with ties to major Republican donors and party-aligned think tanks is quietly lending firepower to local activists engaged in culture war fights in schools across the country.

61. 100,000 more COVID deaths seen unless US changes its ways -

The U.S. is projected to see nearly 100,000 more COVID-19 deaths between now and Dec. 1, according to the nation's most closely watched forecasting model. But health experts say that toll could be cut in half if nearly everyone wore a mask in public spaces.

62. Many Bible Belt preachers silent on shots as COVID-19 surges -

Dr. Danny Avula, the head of Virginia's COVID-19 vaccination effort, suspected he might have a problem getting pastors to publicly advocate for the shots when some members of his own church referred to them as "the mark of the beast," a biblical reference to allegiance to the devil, and the minister wasn't sure how to respond.

63. Biden's complicated new task: keeping Democrats together -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden overcame skepticism, deep political polarization and legislative gamesmanship to win bipartisan approval in the Senate this week of his $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

64. Titans top pick Farley practices; Jones leaves drills early -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Titans first-round draft pick Caleb Farley took his first training camp snaps on Monday.

The cornerback and this spring's 22nd overall draft selection was activated from the non-football injury list, where he'd been designated while rehabilitating from a pair of back surgeries.

65. AP-NORC poll: Democrats optimistic but divided on compromise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Six months into Democrats' unified control of Washington, most Democrats are on board with President Joe Biden and where he's trying to take the country — even if they're divided on how to get there.

66. VUMC’s Wilkins lands major national award -

Consuelo Wilkins, M.D., MSCI, is the 2021 recipient of the Marion Spencer Fay Award from Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

The national award recognizes women physicians and/or scientists who have made “an exceptionally significant contribution to health care.” Previous recipients include the late Bernadine Healy, M.D., the first female director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and pioneering breast cancer geneticist Mary-Claire King, Ph.D.

67. Inflation fears and politics shape views of Biden economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is banking on the idea of making life more affordable for middle-class families — and that's where the recent bout of inflation poses both a political and an economic risk.

68. AP-NORC poll: Parties split on some infrastructure proposals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The overwhelming majority of Americans -- about 8 in 10 -- favor plans to increase funding for roads, bridges and ports and for pipes that supply drinking water. But that's about as far as Democrats and Republicans intersect on infrastructure, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

69. Experts: Spend opioid settlement funds on fighting opioids -

As a $26 billion settlement over the toll of opioids looms, some public health experts are citing the 1998 agreement with tobacco companies as a cautionary tale of runaway government spending and missed opportunities for saving more lives.

70. Grant selected for TN Supreme Court board -

Charles K. Grant, a shareholder in the Nashville office of Baker Donelson, has been appointed by the Supreme Court of Tennessee to serve on its Board of Professional Responsibility.

Grant is a veteran litigator who has tried more than 50 jury trials to verdict in both federal and state courts, and represented numerous clients in mediation and arbitration proceedings across more than a dozen states.

71. Complaint alleges group funneled data from RNC to lawmakers -

Washington (AP) — A prominent conservative group funneled valuable information about Republican voters between the Republican National Committee and state lawmakers, a move that violated its nonpartisan status and tax law, according to a whistleblower complaint filed Tuesday with the Internal Revenue Service.

72. Klobuchar: Infrastructure bill could include voting measures -

ATLANTA (AP) — Congressional Democrats are exploring ways to include financial incentives for states to expand voting access as part of a multitrillion-dollar infrastructure bill, a key senator said Sunday.

73. UAW factory workers ratify deal, will end Volvo truck strike -

NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — Striking blue-collar workers at a Volvo heavy truck plant in southwestern Virginia have narrowly ratified what the company said was its final offer in a long-running labor dispute.

74. Democrats eye immigration action in budget, but outlook hazy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats and immigration advocates are staring at their best chance in years to overcome Republican opposition and give millions of people in the U.S. without legal authorization a way to become citizens.

75. Pressured by allies, Biden escalates fight for voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will lay out the "moral case" for voting rights as he faces growing pressure from civil rights activists and other Democrats to combat efforts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

76. Latest hack to test Biden's vow for consequences for Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said he would "deliver" a message to Russian President Vladimir Putin about the latest ransomware attacks targeting American businesses, setting up a test of Biden's ability to balance his pledge to respond firmly to cyber breaches with his goal of developing a stable relationship with Russia.

77. Voting rights ruling increases pressure on Democrats to act -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats are facing renewed pressure to pass legislation that would protect voting rights after a Supreme Court ruling made it harder to challenge Republican efforts to limit ballot access in many states.

78. Rental assistance falls victim to politics, bureaucracy -

Before the pandemic hit, Jacqueline Bartley, a mother of two girls and a boy, had a comfortable life. Then the 41-year-old lost her job at American Airlines, quickly spent her savings and found herself months behind on the $1,350-a-month home she rented. Until then she had never missed a rent payment.

79. Millions skipped church during pandemic. Will they return? -

WALDOBORO, Maine (AP) — With millions of people having stayed home from places of worship during the coronavirus pandemic, struggling congregations have one key question: How many of them will return?

80. New UAW president will face huge post-pandemic challenges -

DETROIT (AP) — Ray Curry is taking over leadership of the United Auto Workers perhaps the most critical juncture in the union's history.

The UAW's International Executive Board on Monday named Curry, its secretary-treasurer, as union president, replacing Rory Gamble, who retires on Wednesday.

81. Transgender rights, religion among cases justices could add -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A closely watched voting rights dispute from Arizona is among five cases standing between the Supreme Court and its summer break. But even before the justices wrap up their work, likely later this week, they could say whether they'll add more high-profile issues to what already promises to be a consequential term, beginning in October.

82. Habitat for Humanity struggles with high construction costs -

Reeling from massive cutbacks in volunteers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and grappling with high construction costs, Habitat for Humanity leaders would be the first to admit they're struggling.

The past year has felt like one punch after the other, they say. First hit: Habitat's local affiliates had to limit volunteers over virus concerns, forcing them to fork over more money to hire contractors. Second hit: Revenue was dented by temporary closures of ReStores, the reuse stores operated by local Habitat organizations. The third: Construction delays caused by pandemic-induced kinks in the supply chain, which make affiliates wait longer for supplies.

83. Texas knocks Volunteers out of CWS with 8-4 win -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Freshman nerves? Apparently there's no such thing to Texas relief pitcher Tanner Witt.

With the Longhorns in an elimination game at the College World Series and Tennessee on the verge of a big inning in a one-run game, Witt got the call with two runners on base and one out.

84. GOP ready to block elections bill in Senate showdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democrats' expansive elections and voting bill headed  for all but certain rejection late Tuesday in a key Senate test vote, providing a dramatic example of Republicans' use of the filibuster  to block legislation and forcing hard questions for Democrats over next steps.

85. Michaels, Abbott lead Virginia past Vols 6-0 in CWS opener -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Logan Michaels gave his dad one of the greatest Father's Day gifts imaginable Sunday.

In his first College World Series at-bat, the light-hitting catcher for Virginia homered for the first time this season. Jeff Michaels, a three-year pancreatic cancer survivor, was there to see his son do it — and more — in the Cavaliers' 6-0 victory over Tennessee.

86. AP-NORC poll: Many Americans resuming pre-virus activities -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Many Americans are relaxing precautions taken during the COVID-19 pandemic and resuming everyday activities, even as some worry that coronavirus-related restrictions were hastily lifted, a new poll shows.

87. Harris announces $1.25 billion for community lenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris announced Tuesday that the Biden administration is distributing $1.25 billion to hundreds of community lenders in an effort to help boost the economic recovery from the coronavirus for small businesses and disadvantaged business owners.

88. US vaccine surplus grows by the day as expiration dates loom -

In Tennessee and North Carolina, demand for the COVID-19 vaccine has slowed down so much that they have given millions of doses back to the federal government, even though less than half of their total populations are vaccinated.

89. Sales pitch summer? Dems aim to showcase virus relief effort -

MAIDENS, Va. (AP) — When Sherry Brockenbrough and her family opened a distillery on a leafy vista overlooking the James River on March 5, 2020, the coronavirus still seemed like a distant threat.

But in the coming weeks, Hill Top Distillery faced the kind of barriers few businesses could survive and almost none had prepared for. By the thousands, restaurants, breweries and distilleries across the country would largely shutter.

90. Former VW boss to pay firm $13 million over diesel scandal -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Former Volkswagen CEO Martin Winterkorn has agreed to pay 11.2 million euros ($13.6 million) in compensation for what the company called his failure to quickly get to the bottom of the 2015 scandal over diesel engines rigged to cheat on emissions tests, the company said Wednesday.

91. Civil rights leaders don't budge key senator on voting bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin was unswayed Tuesday by civil rights leaders who implored him to rethink his opposition to a sprawling election bill that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said is crucial to countering a "Republican assault on our democracy."

92. NRA's gun rights message lingers despite legal, money woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Liberals have cheered the highly public legal and financial jeopardy ensnaring the National Rifle Association, seeing the gun lobby's potential demise as the path to stricter firearms laws.

93. Biden offers tax deal to Republicans in infrastructure talks -

President Joe Biden is trying to break a logjam with Republicans on how to pay for infrastructure improvements, proposing a 15% minimum tax on corporations and the possibility of revenues from increased IRS enforcement as a possible compromise.

94. 4 tips for small-business owners paying down pandemic debt -

After more than a year of navigating lockdowns, mandates and COVID-19 protocols, small-business owners are starting to see a light at the end of the tunnel. But the debt many needed to take on to weather the pandemic still casts an ominous shadow.

95. Gibson Garage opens June 9 with concert -

Gibson, the iconic, American instrument brand based in Nashville, is debuting the Gibson Garage, which it bills as the “ultimate guitar experience.”

The 8,000-square-foot shop will officially open to the public June 9 at historic Cummins Station, located on 209 10th Avenue South.

96. Biden to GOP: 'Don't get in the way' of infrastructure plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is warning naysayers in Congress not to "get in the way" of his big infrastructure plans as the White House panned a counteroffer from Republican senators to tap unused COVID-19 relief for a more modest investment in roads, highways and other traditional public works projects.

97. Kennedy to lead new Sherrard group -

Nashville law firm Sherrard Roe Voigt & Harbison has launched a new health care services group focused on dentists, optometrists and veterinarians.

Cornell Kennedy, a partner at the firm, will head the group. Kennedy specializes in representing specialty health care providers by counseling them on various transactional matters that arise with running a practice. Some of those services include navigating providers through the process of startups, practice acquisitions, commercial lease review, drafting partnership agreements, employment agreements and negotiating equity buy-ins.

98. California and US agree to allow big offshore wind farms -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California and the U.S. government announced an agreement Tuesday to open up areas off the state's central and northern coasts to the first commercial wind energy farms on the Pacific Coast.

99. Bradley names Jacques Nashville managing partner -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has named Lauren B. Jacques managing partner of the firm’s Nashville office. She succeeds Lela M. Hollabaugh, who has served as the Nashville office managing partner since 2015. Hollabaugh will continue as a litigation partner in the Nashville office.

100. As GOP restricts voting, Democrats move to expand access -

Last year, for the first time in more than a quarter-century, Democrats in Virginia took control of the statehouse and the governor's mansion. Since then, one priority has become clear: expanding voting rights.