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Editorial Results (free)

1. 'Too hyperbolic'? School board parental rights push falters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservative groups that sought to get hundreds of "parents' rights" activists elected to local school boards largely fell short in last week's midterm elections, notching notable wins in some Republican strongholds but failing to gain a groundswell of support among moderate voters.

2. Congress faces leaders in flux, big to-do list post-election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is returning to an extremely volatile post-election landscape, with control of the House still undecided, party leadership in flux and a potentially consequential lame-duck session with legislation on gay marriage, Ukraine and government funding.

3. Supreme Court justices cheered at Federalist Society dinner -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four of the five Supreme Court justices who overturned the constitutional right to abortion showed up at the conservative Federalist Society's black-tie dinner marking its 40th anniversary.

4. Biden hails Democrats' 'strong night,' acknowledges concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden claimed vindication the day after the midterm elections, saying Democrats had "a strong night" and he planned to change nothing about his approach despite facing the likelihood of divided government in the nation's capital.

5. Analysis: A stunning draw as Democrats hold their own -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing tremendous headwinds and weighty history, Democrats fought Republicans to a stunning midterm draw.

Many Democrats went into election night dreading how bad their losses could be and pondering how to explain them. By Wednesday, they had quickly shifted into day-after hoping that they could actually maintain a voting majority in the Senate, celebrating victories in key governors' races, and aware that control of the House was still not declared.

6. Trump urged to delay 2024 launch after GOP's uneven election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It was supposed to be a red wave that former President Donald Trump could triumphantly ride to the Republican nomination as he prepares to launch another White House run.

Instead, Tuesday night's disappointing results for the GOP are raising new questions about Trump's appeal and the future of a party that has fully embraced him, seemingly at its peril, while at the same time giving new momentum to his most potent potential rival.

7. Amid midterm show of Democratic strength, warnings for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats defied gravity this week as voters set aside their concerns about President Joe Biden to deny Republicans the sweeping victory they expected, emboldening a Biden team whose political instincts have been routinely questioned or outright dismissed by opponents and even allies.

8. Analysis: A stunning draw as Democrats hold their own -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing tremendous headwinds and weighty history, Democrats fought Republicans to a stunning midterm draw.

Many Democrats went into election night dreading how bad their losses could be and pondering how to explain them. By Wednesday, they had quickly shifted into day-after hoping that they could actually maintain a voting majority in the Senate, celebrating victories in key governors' races, and aware that control of the House was still not declared.

9. GOP closing in on House win; Senate control up for grabs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans were closing in Wednesday on a narrow House majority while control of the Senate hinged on tight Arizona, Nevada and Georgia races in a midterm election that defied expectations of sweeping conservative victories driven by frustration over inflation and President Joe Biden's leadership.

10. Republicans in struggle to break Democrats' hold on Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The promise of a red wave receding, Republicans slogged state by state in a determined fight to break the Democrats' one-party hold on Washington, a breathtakingly close battle for control of Congress and the future of President Joe Biden's agenda.

11. Biden, Trump making final appeals ahead of crucial midterms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An election year that unfolded against a backdrop of economic turmoil, elimination of federal abortion rights and broad concerns about the future of democracy is concluding with a final full day of campaigning by leaders of both parties urgently appealing to their supporters.

12. What to watch in the high-stakes 2022 midterm elections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After months of primaries, campaign events and fundraising pleas, the midterm elections that will determine the balance of power in Washington and state capitals are finally here.

13. Political spat over climate risks in investments gets hotter -

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The political fight is only getting fiercer over whether it's financially wise or "woke" folly to consider a company's impact on climate change, workers' rights and other issues when making investments.

14. Dodge, deny or fib: Candidates stay vague on 2024 plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They dodge. They hedge. And, yes, they sometimes even fib — or at least flip-flop.

Presidential aspirants dreaming of the White House while running for reelection to congressional or state posts often face an uncomfortable question: Whatever your higher hopes — and the timing they might demand — will you commit to serving out a full term for the folks who vote for you now?

15. Titans look to keep rolling against struggling Commanders -

LANDOVER, Md. (AP) — Coming off consecutive victories to get them to .500, coach Mike Vrabel told his Tennessee Titans there was much more to accomplish because half the NFL is 2-2 at this point.

It's actually just below half, but who's counting?

16. Biden to focus on hurricane victims in Florida, not politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will visit hurricane-ravaged Florida with a pledge that federal, state and local governments will work as one to help rebuild homes, businesses and lives — putting politics on mute for now to focus on those in need.

17. Senators push to reform police's cellphone tracking tools -

NEW YORK (AP) — Civil rights lawyers and Democratic senators are pushing for legislation that would limit U.S. law enforcement agencies' ability to buy cellphone tracking tools to follow people's whereabouts, including back years in time, and sometimes without a search warrant.

18. Russia divestment promises by US states largely unfulfilled -

Driven by moral outrage over Russia's invasion of Ukraine earlier this year, U.S. governors and other top state officials made it clear: They wanted to cut their financial ties with Russia.

A few states quickly followed through. Idaho sold $300,000 of bonds in a Russian oil company in early March. A day before the invasion, the Kentucky Teachers Retirement System sold its shares in the Russian bank Sberbank.

19. Insulin cap for Medicare patients signals hope for others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Years before he came to the Senate, Raphael Warnock spent time bedside with Georgia residents suffering from the long-term effects of diabetes, a condition made worse by limited access to life-saving drugs like insulin.

20. Primary takeaways: Abortion politics, DeSantis flexes muscle -

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis learned who his Democratic challenger will be this fall. The impact of redistricting was on full display. Democrats sorted through rivalries amongst themselves. And abortion may give Democrats a lifeline in an otherwise rough November.

21. Florida Democrats choose Rep. Crist to challenge DeSantis -

MIAMI (AP) — U.S. Rep. Charlie Crist won the Democratic nomination for governor in Florida, setting him up to challenge Gov. Ron DeSantis this fall in a campaign that the Republican incumbent sees as the first step toward a potential White House run.

22. What to watch: Top Democrats square off in Florida, New York -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tuesday's primary elections feature two top Florida Democrats squaring off for the chance to face Republican Gov. Ron DeSantis, a rising conservative star frequently mentioned as a top alternative to Donald Trump in the 2024 GOP presidential contest.

23. Abortion ruling prompts variety of reactions from states -

The U.S. Supreme Court on June 24 overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. The ruling was expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states, although the timing of those laws taking effect varies.

24. FBI searches Trump's Florida estate for classified records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI searched Donald Trump's Mar-a-Lago estate as part of an investigation into whether he took classified records from the White House to his Florida residence, people familiar with the matter said, a dramatic and unprecedented escalation of law enforcement scrutiny of the former president.

25. House passes bill banning certain semi-automatic guns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House passed legislation Friday to revive a ban on certain semi-automatic guns, the first vote of its kind in years and a direct response to the firearms often used in the crush of mass shootings ripping through communities nationwide.

26. Some Republicans see good politics in same-sex marriage bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When asked if he'd support legislation to protect same-sex marriage, one conservative Republican senator was almost nonchalant.

"I see no reason to oppose it," Ron Johnson of Wisconsin told reporters, bringing Democrats one vote closer to an unexpected victory as they move to safeguard same-sex marriage and other rights after the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, which legalized abortion nationwide.

27. Buttigieg launches $1B pilot to build racial equity in roads -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg on Thursday launched a $1 billion first-of-its-kind pilot program aimed at helping reconnect cities and neighborhoods racially segregated or divided by road projects, pledging wide-ranging help to dozens of communities despite the program's limited dollars.

28. How Tennessee, other U.S. states have banned, limited, protected abortion -

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

29. Feds search Trump-era official's home, subpoena GOP leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal agents searched a former top Justice Department official's home and seized records from key Republicans in at least four states linked to Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, in what were clear signs that authorities are ramping up their investigation of associates of the former president.

30. Trump weighs another run as GOP rivals eye own campaigns -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As religious conservatives gathered this week at a sprawling resort near the Grand Ole Opry House, Nikki Haley pressed the Faith and Freedom Coalition's "Road to Majority" crowd to look to the future.

31. Revlon files for bankruptcy protection amid heavy debt load -

NEW YORK (AP) — Revlon, the 90-year-old multinational beauty company, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, weighed down by debt load, disruptions to its supply chain network and surging costs.

32. Will Congress act on guns after Sandy Hook, Buffalo, Uvalde? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer swiftly set in motion a pair of background-check bills for gun buyers Wednesday in response to the school massacre in Texas. But the Democrat acknowledged Congress' unyielding rejection of previous legislation to curb the national epidemic of gun violence.

33. Parents hunting for baby formula as shortage spans US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Parents across the U.S. are scrambling to find baby formula because supply disruptions and a massive safety recall have swept many leading brands off store shelves.

Months of spot shortages at pharmacies and supermarkets have been exacerbated by the recall at Abbott, which was forced to shutter its largest U.S. formula manufacturing plant in February due to contamination concerns.

34. Hunter Biden is prime target if Republicans win Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Intelligence officials had gathered to brief select members of Congress on future threats to U.S. elections when a key lawmaker in the room, No. 3 House Republican Elise Stefanik of New York, tried to move the discussion to a new topic: Hunter Biden's laptop.

35. GOP lawmakers vote remotely more often after initial scorn -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 50 Republicans who once joined a lawsuit claiming the House's pandemic-era proxy voting was unconstitutional have themselves voted by proxy this year, remotely without showing up.

36. Cheers, fear as judge strikes down U.S. transit mask mandate -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — A federal judge's decision to strike down a national mask mandate was met with cheers on some airplanes but also concern about whether it's really time to end one of the most visible vestiges of the COVID-19 pandemic.

37. Efforts to make protective medical gear in US falling flat -

UNIVERSITY CITY, Mo. (AP) — When the coronavirus pandemic first hit the U.S., sales of window coverings at Halcyon Shades quickly went dark. So the suburban St. Louis business did what hundreds of other small manufacturers did: It pivoted to make protective supplies, with help from an $870,000 government grant.

38. Library study finds 'challenged' books soared in 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Deborah Caldwell-Stone, director of the American Library Association's Office for Intellectual Freedom, has never been so busy.

"A year ago, we might have been receiving one, maybe two reports a day about a book being challenged at a library. And usually those calls would be for guidance on how to handle a challenge or for materials that support the value of the work being challenged," Caldwell-Stone told The Associated Press. "Now, we're getting three, four, five reports a day, many in need of support and some in need of a great deal of support."

39. Billions, and growing, for lawmakers' projects in big bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Home-district projects for members of Congress are back, sprinkled across the government-wide $1.5 trillion bill President Joe Biden signed recently. The official tally shows amounts modest by past standards yet spread widely around the country — and that understate what lawmakers are claiming credit for.

40. White House: No 'gaming the system' on Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will meet with Senate Judiciary Committee leaders on Tuesday to discuss the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court vacancy and the president's promise to nominate a Black woman to the high court. Aides said Biden's list of potential candidates is longer than three.

41. Vaccine mandate to kick in for first wave of health workers -

Health care workers in about half the states face a Thursday deadline to get their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine under a Biden administration mandate that will be rolled out across the rest of the country in the coming weeks.

42. After Biden's first year, the virus and disunity rage on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From the inaugural platform, President Joe Biden saw American sickness on two fronts — a disease of the national spirit and the one from the rampaging coronavirus — and he saw hope, because leaders always must see that.

43. Snow, ice blast through South with powerful winter storm -

ATLANTA (AP) — A dangerous winter storm combining high winds and ice swept through parts of the U.S. Southeast on Sunday, knocking out power, felling trees and fences and coating roads with a treacherous, frigid glaze.

44. NY Rep. Ocasio-Cortez recovering after positive COVID test -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New York Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has tested positive for COVID-19 and "is experiencing symptoms and recovering at home," her office said in a statement Sunday evening.

The Democratic congresswoman's office said Ocasio-Cortez received a booster shot last fall, adding that she "encourages everyone to get their booster" and follow the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

45. How a Kennedy built an anti-vaccine juggernaut amid COVID-19 -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strode onto the stage at a Southern California church, radiating Kennedy confidence and surveying the standing ovation crowd with his piercing blue Bobby Kennedy eyes. Then, he launched into an anti-vaccine rant. Democrats "drank the Kool-Aid," he told people assembled for a far right conference, branded as standing for "health and freedom."

46. AP seeks answers from US gov't on tracking of journalists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Associated Press sought answers Monday from the Department of Homeland Security on its use of sensitive government databases for tracking international terrorists to investigate as many as 20 American journalists, including an acclaimed AP reporter.

47. Connell named fellow for two attorney groups -

Virginia (Ginger) J. Connell has been accepted as a fellow of the International Academy of Family Lawyers and the Nashville Bar Foundation.

IAFL is a worldwide association of practicing lawyers who are recognized by their peers for their experience and expertise in family law. Membership is by invitation.

48. No joke: Comedians, cannabis companies push pot legalization -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big cannabis companies are backing a new, celebrity-infused campaign to enlist marijuana users to pressure members of Congress to legalize pot nationwide.

Federal legalization has advanced somewhat but still faces strong headwinds on Capitol Hill. The "Cannabis in Common" initiative launched Tuesday aims to change that.

49. 'Stupid' and 'insane': Some billionaires vent over tax plan -

Elon Musk isn't happy. With a personal fortune that is flirting with $300 billion, the Tesla CEO — the richest person on earth — has been attacking a Democratic proposal to tax the assets of billionaires like him.

50. Biden, top Dems strategize; Pelosi says deal 'very possible' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Congress' top two Democrats labored to wrap up their giant domestic legislation Friday as the party continued scaling back the measure and determining ways to pay for it ahead of new deadlines.

51. On climate change, Biden $3.5T plan making up for lost time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden visited one disaster site after another this summer — from California wildfires to hurricane-induced flooding in Louisiana and New York — he said climate change is "everybody's crisis" and America must get serious about the "code red" danger posed by global warming.

52. Top Dems: We have framework to pay for $3.5T bill; no detail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House and congressional Democrats have agreed to a "framework" of options to pay for their huge, emerging social and environment bill, top Democrats said Thursday, but they offered no details and the significance was unclear.

53. After unrelenting summer, Biden looks to get agenda on track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The collapse of the Afghan government, a surge of COVID-19 cases caused by the delta variant, devastating weather events, a disappointing jobs report. What next?

After a torrent of crises, President Joe Biden is hoping to turn the page on an unrelenting summer and refocus his presidency this fall around his core economic agenda.

54. TN, other state mask bans face federal civil rights inquiries -

The Education Department on Monday opened civil rights investigations into five Republican-led states that have banned or limited mask requirements in schools, saying the policies could amount to discrimination against students with disabilities or health conditions.

55. GOP governors, school districts battle over mask mandates -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Millions of students in Florida, Texas and Arizona are now required to wear masks in class as school boards in mostly Democratic areas have defied their Republican governors and made face coverings mandatory.

56. DeSantis top donor invests in COVID drug governor promotes -

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis — who has been criticized for opposing mask mandates and vaccine passports — is now touting a COVID-19 antibody treatment in which a top donor's company has invested millions of dollars.

57. Biden chides Republican governors who resist vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called on resistant Republican governors to "get out of the way" of vaccine rules aimed at containing the more transmissible and dangerous COVID-19 variant. He backed city and private mandates requiring people to be vaccinated to go about some daily activities.

58. Delivery apps expand reach to meet customer demands -

Spurred by skyrocketing consumer demand during the pandemic, restaurant delivery companies like DoorDash and Uber Eats are rapidly expanding their services to grocers, convenience stores, pharmacies, pet stores and even department stores.

59. In shift, GOP ramps up vaccine push as resistance hardens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican politicians are under increasing pressure to speak out to persuade COVID-19 vaccine skeptics to roll up their sleeves and take the shots as a new, more contagious variant sends caseloads soaring. But after months of ignoring — and, in some cases, stoking — misinformation about the virus, new polling suggests it may be too late to change the minds of many who are refusing.

60. Senate leader lends clout to marijuana legalization push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat is backing a bill that would strike down a longstanding federal prohibition on marijuana, embracing a proposal that has slim chance of becoming law yet demonstrates growing public support for decriminalizing the drug.

61. Critics: Postal Service plans imperil community newspapers -

The U.S. Postal Service's plan to raise mailing rates could present one more damaging blow to community newspapers already reeling from the coronavirus pandemic and advertising declines, a trade group says.

62. Charges expected Thursday for Trump's company, top executive -

Donald Trump's company and his longtime finance chief are expected to be charged Thursday with tax-related crimes stemming from a New York investigation into the former president's business dealings, people familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

63. Pandemic pets are a 'furry annuity,' says Petco CEO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Yummy, a 12-year-old Labrador retriever, is in Petco's San Diego offices so much he has his own title.

"We call him the chief dog officer," says CEO Ron Coughlin, the real top dog at Petco, who brings Yummy to work every day. "He sits right next to me in my office."

64. Kirkland installed as TMA president -

Dr. Ronald “Ron” H. Kirkland, a board-certified otolaryngologist from Jackson, has been installed as the 167th president of the Tennessee Medical Association, the statewide professional association for more than 9,500 member physicians and their patients.

65. Trump's 'Big Lie' imperils Republicans who don't embrace it -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Allegiance to a lie has become a test of loyalty to Donald Trump and a means of self-preservation for Republicans.

Trump's discredited allegations about a stolen election did nothing to save his presidency when courtrooms high and low, state governments and ultimately Congress — meeting in the chaos of an insurrection powered by his grievances — affirmed the legitimacy of his defeat and the honesty of the process that led to it.

66. GOP White House hopefuls move forward as Trump considers run -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than three months after former President Donald Trump left the White House, the race to succeed him atop the Republican Party is already beginning.

Trump's former secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has launched an aggressive schedule, visiting states that will play a pivotal role in the 2024 primaries, and he has signed a contract with Fox News Channel. Mike Pence, Trump's former vice president, has started a political advocacy group, finalized a book deal and later this month will give his first speech since leaving office in South Carolina. And Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has been courting donors, including in Trump's backyard, with a prominent speaking slot before the former president at a GOP fundraising retreat dinner this month at Mar-a-Lago, the Florida resort where Trump now lives.

67. Passports, please: Another good idea we can’t agree on -

A question for those who oppose COVID vaccine passports: Why? I’ve already applied for mine.

In case you’re not familiar with the concept, a vaccine passport is proof of a negative test or protection against certain infections. “You can carry it with you and show it if required, like before you go into the office, board an airplane or visit a restaurant, movie theater or gym,” WebMD says.

68. Lee joins GOP push against vaccine passports -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Tuesday joined fellow Republicans nationwide to advocate against COVID-19 vaccine passports, which are being developed in some areas to let inoculated people travel, shop and dine more freely.

69. Jan. 6 commission stalls, for now, amid partisan dissension -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation creating an independent, bipartisan panel to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is stalled, for now, with Democrats and Republicans split over the scope and structure of a review that would revisit the deadly attack and assess former President Donald Trump's role.

70. Conservative gathering to feature Trump's false fraud claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gathering of conservatives this weekend in Florida will serve as an unabashed endorsement of former President Donald Trump's desire to remain the leader of the Republican Party — and as a forum to fan his false claim that he lost the November election only because of widespread voter fraud.

71. GOP rallies solidly against Democrats' virus relief package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are closing ranks against Democrats' proposed $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, even as the White House seemed to rule out a procedural Senate power play to protect one provision most treasured by progressives: a minimum wage hike.

72. Suspected Russian hack fuels new US action on cybersecurity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jolted by a sweeping hack that may have revealed government and corporate secrets to Russia, U.S. officials are scrambling to reinforce the nation's cyber defenses and recognizing that an agency created two years ago to protect America's networks and infrastructure lacks the money, tools and authority to counter such sophisticated threats.

73. How a leading anti-Trump group ignored a crisis in its ranks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last June, the Lincoln Project was on a high. Led by several prominent former Republican consultants, its slickly produced ads attacking President Donald Trump made it perhaps the best known of the so-called Never Trump organizations.

74. Petco goes public again as spending on dogs and cats soars -

NEW YORK (AP) — Petco, the pet store chain, went public again Thursday, hoping to cash in on people's obsessions with their furry pets.

Petco's stock, which opened at $18 Thursday, soared 60% to $29.26 in afternoon trading, valuing the company at more than $6 billion. It raised $864 million, after selling 48 million shares in its initial public offering. The company plans to use that money to pay off debt.

75. US shifts to speed COVID shots as cases, deaths rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach alarming new highs.

76. US ramps up vaccinations to get doses to more Americans -

The U.S. is entering the second month of the biggest vaccination drive in history with a major expansion of the campaign, opening football stadiums, major league ballparks, fairgrounds and convention centers to inoculate a larger and more diverse pool of people.

77. Race to vaccinate millions in US off to slow, messy start -

TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Terry Beth Hadler was so eager to get a lifesaving COVID-19 vaccination that the 69-year-old piano teacher stood in line overnight in a parking lot with hundreds of other senior citizens.

78. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

79. Klain brings decades of DC experience to Biden White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ron Klain has checked all the boxes of a classic Washington striver: Georgetown, Harvard Law, Supreme Court clerk and Capitol Hill staffer, White House adviser and, along the way, of course, lobbyist and lawyer.

80. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

81. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

82. US Rhodes Scholars chosen virtually for the 1st time -

The U.S. Rhodes Scholars for 2021 were elected virtually this year for the first time as the coronavirus pandemic swept across the globe, though that didn't extinguish enthusiasm among the 32 students who won scholarships to Oxford University.

83. 'Tired to the bone': Hospitals overwhelmed with virus cases -

Overwhelmed hospitals are converting chapels, cafeterias, waiting rooms, hallways, even a parking garage into patient treatment areas. Staff members are desperately calling around to other medical centers in search of open beds. Fatigue and frustration are setting in among front-line workers.

84. AP FACT CHECK: Falsehoods and fumbles in Trump-Biden debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The facts took a hit right out of the gate Thursday night.

President Donald Trump's first line of the night, about COVID-19 deaths, was false and set the tone as he and Democratic rival Joe Biden unleashed a torrent of claims in their last presidential debate.

85. AP Explains: Trump seizes on dubious Biden-Ukraine story -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looking to undermine rival Joe Biden two weeks before the election, President Donald Trump's campaign has seized on a tabloid story offering bizarre twists to a familiar line of attack: Biden's relationship with Ukraine. But the story in the New York Post raised more questions than answers, including about the authenticity of an email at the center of the story.

86. Trump on defense, courting voters in two must-win states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Backed into a corner and facing financial strains, President Donald Trump fought to defend his sagging reelection bid Friday in a state Republicans haven't lost in nearly three decades. With Election Day looming, Democrat Joe Biden pushed to keep voters focused on health care in the Midwest.

87. Waiting for Trump's $200 prescription cards? Could be a long wait -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you're on Medicare, don't run to the mailbox looking for a $200 prescription drug card courtesy of President Donald Trump.

Government officials said Friday that key details of Trump's election-year giveaway still have to be fleshed out, including the exact timing and how Medicare's cost would be covered — a sum that could approach $7 billion.

88. Virus cases rise in US heartland, home to anti-mask feelings -

MISSION, Kan. (AP) — It began with devastation in the New York City area, followed by a summertime crisis in the Sun Belt. Now the coronavirus outbreak is heating up fast in smaller cities in the heartland, often in conservative corners of America where anti-mask sentiment runs high.

89. Trump infuses politics into his choice for the Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is infusing deliberations over his coming nomination of a new Supreme Court justice with political meaning as he aims to maximize the benefit before Nov. 3 and even secure an electoral backstop should the result be contested.

90. Trump, Biden fight to define campaign's most pressing issues -

SWANTON, Ohio (AP) — President Donald Trump was interrupted twice during an Ohio rally this week by sign-waving supporters chanting, "Fill that seat!"

"I will fill that seat," Trump responded before launching into an extended riff on his plans to quickly nominate a successor to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. "They say it's the most important thing a president can do."

91. Trump heats up culture war in appeal to Wisconsin voters -

MOSINEE, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump stepped up his rhetoric on cultural issues, aiming to boost enthusiasm among rural Wisconsin voters as he tries to repeat his path to victory four years ago.

92. Romney: Biden probe 'not legitimate role of government' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Mitt Romney is sharply criticizing an investigation by his own party into Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden's son, saying it's "not the legitimate role of government" to try and damage political opponents.

93. Postmaster: No pre-election return of mail boxes, equipment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressed by senators, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy said Friday he was unaware of recent mail operation changes until they sparked a public uproar. But he also said he has no plans to restore mailboxes or high-speed sorting machines that have been removed.

94. Pelosi says postmaster has no plans to restore mail cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday that President Donald Trump's postmaster general has no intention of restoring mail equipment or funding overtime hours he cut, despite public outcry that operational changes are undermining service before the November election.

95. Postal Service halts some changes amid outcry, lawsuits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing mounting public pressure and a crush of state lawsuits, President Donald Trump's new postmaster general says he is halting some operational changes to mail delivery that critics blame for widespread delays and warn could disrupt the November election.

96. Confirmed US virus cases rise amid new global restrictions -

MIAMI (AP) — California, Arizona, Texas and Florida together reported about 36,000 new coronavirus cases Wednesday as restrictions aimed at combating the spread of the pandemic took hold in the United States and around the world in an unsettling sign reminiscent of the dark days of April.

97. Virus cases rise in U.S. states amid new world restrictions -

MIAMI (AP) — Arizona, Texas and Florida together reported about 25,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday as restrictions aimed at combating the spread of the pandemic took hold in the United States and around the world in an unsettling sign reminiscent of the dark days of April.

98. Lawmakers to get classified briefing on Russia bounty intel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials will provide a classified briefing for congressional leaders Thursday about intelligence assessment that Russia offered bounties for killing U.S. troops in Afghanistan.

99. Trump officials defend response to Russia bounty threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Criticized for inaction, President Donald Trump and top officials on Wednesday stepped up their defense of the administration's response to intelligence assessments that Russia offered bounties for killing U.S. troops in Afghanistan. Trump's national security adviser said he had prepared a list of retaliatory options if the intelligence proved true.

100. Trump faces pressure on Russian bounties to kill US troops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Tuesday came under growing pressure to respond to allegations that Russia offered bounties for killing American troops in Afghanistan, with Democrats demanding answers and accusing Trump of bowing to Russian President Vladimir Putin at the risk of U.S. soldiers' lives.