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Editorial Results (free)

1. Politico pardoned by Trump accused of illegal campaign scam -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Republican political operative pardoned by President Donald Trump after his conviction in a 2012 bribery plot has been charged again with campaign-related crimes, this time involving a 2016 illegal campaign contribution scheme and a Russian national.

2. Organizer of Saturday rally looks to rewrite Jan. 6 history -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The architect of a Washington protest planned for Saturday that aims to rewrite history about the violent January assault on the U.S. Capitol is hardly a household name.

Matt Braynard worked as an analyst for the Republican Party, crunched data for a small election firm and later started a consulting business that attracted few federal clients, records show. He started a nonprofit after he was dismissed by Donald Trump's 2016 campaign following several months on the job, but struggled to raise money. The group's tax-exempt status was revoked last year.

3. Biden's vaccine rules ignite instant, hot GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's aggressive push to require millions of U.S. workers to vaccinate against the coronavirus is running into a wall of resistance from Republicans threatening everything from lawsuits to civil disobedience, plunging the country deeper into culture wars that have festered since the onset of the pandemic.

4. Texas GOP bets on hard right turn amid changing demographics -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republicans in America's largest conservative state for years racked up victories under the slogan "Keep Texas Red," a pledge to quash a coming blue wave that Democrats argued was inevitable given shifting demographics.

5. After unrelenting summer, Biden looks to get agenda on track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The collapse of the Afghan government, a surge of COVID-19 cases caused by the delta variant, devastating weather events, a disappointing jobs report. What next?

After a torrent of crises, President Joe Biden is hoping to turn the page on an unrelenting summer and refocus his presidency this fall around his core economic agenda.

6. 'Bracing for the worst' in Florida's COVID-19 hot zone -

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — As quickly as one COVID patient is discharged, another waits for a bed in northeast Florida, the hot zone of the state's latest surge. But the patients at Baptist Health's five hospitals across Jacksonville are younger and getting sick from the virus faster than people did last summer.

7. States banning mask mandates could face civil rights probes -

In an escalating battle with Republican governors, President Joe Biden on Wednesday ordered his Education secretary to explore possible legal action against states that have blocked school mask mandates and other public health measures meant to protect students against COVID-19.

8. Top Davidson County commercial sales for July 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

9. Biden eyes tougher vaccine rules without provoking backlash -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the pace of vaccinations in the U.S. first began to slow, President Joe Biden backed incentives like million-dollar cash lotteries if that's what it took to get shots in arms. But as new coronavirus infections soar, he's testing a tougher approach.

10. Biden's complicated new task: keeping Democrats together -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden overcame skepticism, deep political polarization and legislative gamesmanship to win bipartisan approval in the Senate this week of his $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

11. Republicans take to mask wars as virus surges in red states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Republicans are battling school districts in their own states' urban, heavily Democratic areas over whether students should be required to mask up as they head back to school — reigniting ideological divides over mandates even as the latest coronavirus surge ravages the reddest, most unvaccinated parts of the nation.

12. Analysis: Delta variant upends politicians' COVID calculus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration drew up a strategy to contain one coronavirus strain, then another showed up that's much more contagious.

This week — a month late — Biden met his goal of 70% of U.S. adults having received at least one COVID-19 shot. Originally conceived as an affirmation of American resiliency to coincide with Independence Day, the belated milestone offered little to celebrate. Driven by the delta variant, new cases are averaging more than 70,000 a day, above the peak last summer when no vaccines were available. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is drawing criticism from experts in the medical and scientific community for its off-and-on masking recommendations.

13. Biden chides Republican governors who resist vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called on resistant Republican governors to "get out of the way" of vaccine rules aimed at containing the more transmissible and dangerous COVID-19 variant. He backed city and private mandates requiring people to be vaccinated to go about some daily activities.

14. Delivery apps expand reach to meet customer demands -

Spurred by skyrocketing consumer demand during the pandemic, restaurant delivery companies like DoorDash and Uber Eats are rapidly expanding their services to grocers, convenience stores, pharmacies, pet stores and even department stores.

15. Biden pitches huge budget, says Dems will 'get a lot done' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden made a quick foray to the U.S. Capitol hunting support for his multitrillion-dollar agenda of infrastructure, health care and other programs, a potential landmark achievement that would require near-unanimous backing from fractious Democrats.

16. Senate leader lends clout to marijuana legalization push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat is backing a bill that would strike down a longstanding federal prohibition on marijuana, embracing a proposal that has slim chance of becoming law yet demonstrates growing public support for decriminalizing the drug.

17. New infrastructure deal must focus on climate, activists say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate activists and their Democratic allies in Congress are pressing with renewed urgency for huge investments to slow global warming, after a bipartisan infrastructure plan cut out some of President Joe Biden's key climate initiatives.

18. White House reports 56% of hires are women, pay gap narrowed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has filled about 56% of his senior White House staff positions with women, including about 36% who come from racially and-or ethnically diverse backgrounds, according the White House.

19. Impatient Democrats prepare to go-it-alone on infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Patience running thin, Democratic leaders are laying the groundwork for a go-it-alone approach on President Joe Biden's big jobs and families infrastructure plans even as the White House continues negotiating with Republicans on a much more scaled-back $1 trillion proposal.

20. ProPublica: Many of the uber-rich pay next to no income tax -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The rich really are different from you and me: They're better at dodging the tax collector.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos paid no income tax in 2007 and 2011. Tesla founder Elon Musk's income tax bill was zero in 2018. And financier George Soros went three straight years without paying federal income tax, according to a report Tuesday from the nonprofit investigative journalism organization ProPublica.

21. Senate confirms Brooks-LaSure to run health care programs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday confirmed President Joe Biden's pick to run U.S. health insurance programs, putting in place a key player who'll carry out his strategy for expanding affordable coverage and reining in prescription drug costs.

22. No evidence '3/5 compromise' aimed to end slavery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a claim that has surfaced and been debunked before, but Republican lawmakers in recent days have given it new voice: the notion that the clause in the Constitution counting slaves as three-fifths of a person actually was a step toward ending slavery.

23. GOP lawmaker: Three-Fifths Compromise was to end slavery -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee Republican falsely declared Tuesday that an 18th century policy designating a slave as three-fifths of a person was adopted for "the purpose of ending slavery," commenting amid a debate over whether educators should be restricted while teaching about systematic racism in America.

24. Flurry of diplomatic contacts fuel Iran deal speculation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A flurry of diplomatic contacts and reports of major progress suggest that indirect talks between the U.S. and Iran may be nearing an agreement. That's despite efforts by U.S. officials to play down chances of an imminent deal that would bring Washington and Tehran back into compliance with the 2015 nuclear deal.

25. GOP White House hopefuls move forward as Trump considers run -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than three months after former President Donald Trump left the White House, the race to succeed him atop the Republican Party is already beginning.

Trump's former secretary of state, Mike Pompeo, has launched an aggressive schedule, visiting states that will play a pivotal role in the 2024 primaries, and he has signed a contract with Fox News Channel. Mike Pence, Trump's former vice president, has started a political advocacy group, finalized a book deal and later this month will give his first speech since leaving office in South Carolina. And Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has been courting donors, including in Trump's backyard, with a prominent speaking slot before the former president at a GOP fundraising retreat dinner this month at Mar-a-Lago, the Florida resort where Trump now lives.

26. Passports, please: Another good idea we can’t agree on -

A question for those who oppose COVID vaccine passports: Why? I’ve already applied for mine.

In case you’re not familiar with the concept, a vaccine passport is proof of a negative test or protection against certain infections. “You can carry it with you and show it if required, like before you go into the office, board an airplane or visit a restaurant, movie theater or gym,” WebMD says.

27. Biden boosted by Senate rules as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

28. Vaccine skepticism runs deep among white evangelicals in US -

The president of the Southern Baptist Convention, America's largest evangelical denomination, posted a photo on Facebook last week of him getting the COVID-19 vaccine. It drew more than 1,100 comments — many of them voicing admiration for the Rev. J.D. Greear, and many others assailing him.

29. Biden summons public support as GOP bucks infrastructure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With an appeal to think big, President Joe Biden is promoting his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan directly to Americans, summoning public support to push past the Republicans lining up against the massive effort they sum up as big taxes, big spending and big government.

30. Biden's 'Jobs Cabinet' to sell infrastructure as GOP resists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden set about convincing America it needs his $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan on Thursday, deputizing a five-member "jobs Cabinet" to help in the effort. But the enormity of his task was clear as Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's vowed to oppose the plan "every step of the way."

31. Biden to hold first Cabinet meeting amid infrastructure push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's first Cabinet meeting will be used to promote his new infrastructure plan, but the gathering will look very different from those held by his predecessor.

To begin with, the full Cabinet won't meet Thursday in the room that bears its name, instead assembling in the more spacious East Room to allow for social distancing. All attendees, including the president, will wear masks. Also, the afternoon meeting probably will not include the over-the-top tributes to the chief executive that came to define Cabinet meetings held by President Donald Trump.

32. Trump's heir? Pence reemerges, lays groundwork for 2024 run -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When former President Donald Trump was asked to list those he considers the future leaders of the Republican Party, he quickly rattled off names including Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis and Sens. Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz. Conspicuously absent from the list: Mike Pence.

33. Jan. 6 commission stalls, for now, amid partisan dissension -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation creating an independent, bipartisan panel to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is stalled, for now, with Democrats and Republicans split over the scope and structure of a review that would revisit the deadly attack and assess former President Donald Trump's role.

34. Biden aims for quicker shots, 'independence from this virus' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One year after the nation was brought to a near-standstill by the coronavirus, President Joe Biden pledged in his first prime-time address to make all adults eligible for vaccines by May 1 and raised the possibility of beginning to "mark our independence from this virus" by the Fourth of July. He offered Americans fresh hope and appealed anew for their help.

35. Biden signs big virus aid bill before speech to nation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marking a year of loss and disruption, President Joe Biden on Thursday signed into law the $1.9 trillion relief package that he said will help the U.S. defeat the coronavirus and nurse the economy back to health. Some checks to Americans could begin arriving this weekend.

36. Eager to act, Biden and Democrats leave Republicans behind -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress are jamming their agenda forward with a sense of urgency, an unapologetically partisan approach based on the calculation that it's better to advance the giant COVID-19 rescue package and other priorities than waste time courting Republicans who may never compromise.

37. Budget nominee Tanden withdraws nomination amid opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to head the Office of Management and Budget, Neera Tanden, has withdrawn her nomination after she faced opposition from key Democratic and Republican senators for her controversial tweets.

38. Minimum wage hike all but dead in Senate virus relief bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats' efforts to include a minimum wage increase in their $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill seemed all but dead Monday as Senate leaders prepared to begin debate on their own version of the House-passed aid package.

39. Trump calls for GOP unity, repeats lies about election loss -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — Taking the stage for the first time since leaving office, former President Donald Trump called for GOP unity, even as he exacerbated intraparty divisions by attacking fellow Republicans and promoting lies about the election in a speech that made clear he intends to remain a dominant political force.

40. Dems near relief bill OK by House, ponder wage plan rescue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A $1.9 trillion package aimed at helping the country rebuild from the pandemic seemed headed toward House passage Friday, even as Democrats searched for a way to revive their derailed drive to boost the minimum wage.

41. Conservative gathering to feature Trump's false fraud claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gathering of conservatives this weekend in Florida will serve as an unabashed endorsement of former President Donald Trump's desire to remain the leader of the Republican Party — and as a forum to fan his false claim that he lost the November election only because of widespread voter fraud.

42. GOP rallies solidly against Democrats' virus relief package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are closing ranks against Democrats' proposed $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill, even as the White House seemed to rule out a procedural Senate power play to protect one provision most treasured by progressives: a minimum wage hike.

43. Tech firms say there's little doubt Russia behind major hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Leading technology companies said Tuesday that a monthslong breach of corporate and government networks was so sophisticated, focused and labor-intensive that a nation had to be behind it, with all the evidence pointing to Russia.

44. Takeaways from Congress' first hearing on Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Security officials testifying at Congress' first hearing on the deadly siege of the Capitol cast blame and pointed fingers on Tuesday but also acknowledged they were woefully unprepared for the violence.

45. Pandemic first job for HHS pick but health agenda is broader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary nominee Xavier Becerra told senators Tuesday that confronting the coronavirus pandemic will be his first priority if confirmed, but he also pledged to expand health insurance, rein in prescription drug costs and reduce racial and ethnic disparities in medical care.

46. Suspected Russian hack fuels new US action on cybersecurity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jolted by a sweeping hack that may have revealed government and corporate secrets to Russia, U.S. officials are scrambling to reinforce the nation's cyber defenses and recognizing that an agency created two years ago to protect America's networks and infrastructure lacks the money, tools and authority to counter such sophisticated threats.

47. White House aide suspended for threatening reporter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House deputy press secretary T.J. Ducklo has been suspended for a week without pay after he reportedly issued a sexist and profane threat to a journalist seeking to cover his relationship with another reporter.

48. Trial highlights: Harrowing footage, focus on Trump's words -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats opened their first day of arguments in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial with searing footage of the U.S. Capitol riot as they painted Trump as an "inciter in chief" who systematically riled up his supporters and falsely convinced them the election had been stolen, culminating in the deadly attack.

49. Vaccine appointments canceled amid confusion over supply -

An increasing number of COVID-19 vaccination sites around the U.S. are canceling thousands of appointments because of vaccine shortages in a rollout so rife with confusion that even the new CDC director admitted she doesn't know exactly how many shots are in the pipeline.

50. First female VP swears in 1st female Treasury secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen was sworn in Tuesday as the nation's 78th Treasury secretary and the first woman to hold the office.

She was sworn in by Vice President Kamala Harris, the first woman elected to the position, at a ceremony performed outside on the East Wing entrance to the White House in view of the department Yellen will now lead. Yellen's husband, George Akerlof, winner of the 2001 Nobel prize in economics, and their son Robert, also an economist, were present for the brief ceremony.

51. Trump impeachment to go to Senate Monday, triggering trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday that she will send the article of impeachment against Donald Trump to the Senate on Monday, triggering the start of the former president's trial on a charge of incitement of insurrection over the deadly Capitol Jan. 6 riot.

52. Biden's test: Engineering economic boom in a partisan divide -

BALTIMORE (AP) — When Joe Biden entered the White House as vice president, the economy was cratering. Job losses were mounting. Stocks were crashing. Millions of Americans were in the early stages of losing their homes to foreclosure as the housing bubble burst.

53. Democrats build impeachment case, alleging 'dangerous crime' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The lead prosecutor for President Donald Trump's historic second impeachment began building his case for conviction at trial, asserting on Sunday that Trump's incitement of the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol was "the most dangerous crime" ever committed by a president against the United States. A Senate trial could begin as soon as this week, just as Democrat Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president.

54. US shifts to speed COVID shots as cases, deaths rise -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach alarming new highs.

55. Republicans raise first objection in Congress to Biden win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican lawmakers mounted their first official challenge to Joe Biden's presidential election win Wednesday, objecting to state results from Arizona as they took up Donald Trump's relentless effort to overturn the election results in an extraordinary joint session of Congress.

56. Trump, allies in desperate bid to undo Biden win at Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With mounting desperation, President Donald Trump called on Republican lawmakers Monday to reverse his election loss to Joe Biden when Congress convenes for a joint session this week to confirm the Electoral College  vote.

57. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

58. US angling to secure more of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials say they're actively negotiating for additional purchases of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine after passing up a chance to lock in a contract this summer since it was still unclear how well the shots would work.

59. US angling to secure more of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials say they're actively negotiating for additional purchases of Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine after passing up a chance to lock in a contract this summer since it was still unclear how well the shots would work.

60. 'Democracy prevailed': Biden aims to unify divided nation -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden pointedly criticized President Donald Trump for threatening core principles of democracy even as he told Americans that their form of self-government ultimately "prevailed."

61. Biden aides hope Electoral College vote is GOP turning point -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden and his top aides have a message for President Donald Trump and his supporters: It's long past time to move on.

With the Electoral College meeting to formally elect Biden as president on Monday, the president-elect's team says it hopes Republicans will consider their own long-term interests (and the country's), accept Trump's defeat and focus their attention on fighting the coronavirus pandemic and staving off economic tumult.

62. Trump virus coordinator Birx seeks role in Biden government -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Dr. Deborah Birx was brought into President Donald Trump's orbit to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, she had a sterling reputation as a former U.S. Army physician, a globally recognized AIDS researcher and a rare Obama administration holdover.

63. Trump virus coordinator Birx seeks role in Biden government -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Dr. Deborah Birx was brought into President Donald Trump's orbit to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, she had a sterling reputation as a former U.S. Army physician, a globally recognized AIDS researcher and a rare Obama administration holdover.

64. Trump tries to revive stalled election-eve drug discounts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is trying to revive the president's stalled election-eve plan to send millions of Medicare recipients a $200 prescription discount card.

A person familiar with the effort tells The Associated Press that government agencies still face legal questions about the plan. That's on top of the daunting logistics of sending an estimated 39 million people a functional card in the midst of the holiday season without the benefit of much advance planning. The person was not authorized to publicly discuss internal deliberations and spoke on condition of anonymity.

65. Klain brings decades of DC experience to Biden White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ron Klain has checked all the boxes of a classic Washington striver: Georgetown, Harvard Law, Supreme Court clerk and Capitol Hill staffer, White House adviser and, along the way, of course, lobbyist and lawyer.

66. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

67. Analysis: Biden prioritizes experience with Cabinet picks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Competence is making a comeback.

President-elect Joe Biden has prized staying power over star power when making his first wave of Cabinet picks and choices for White House staff, with a premium placed on government experience and proficiency as he looks to rebuild a depleted and demoralized federal bureaucracy.

68. Trump makes late-term bid to lower prescription drug costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trying to close out major unfinished business, the Trump administration issued regulations Friday that could lower the prices Americans pay for many prescription drugs.

But in a time of political uncertainty, it's hard to say whether the rules will withstand expected legal challenges from the pharmaceutical industry or whether the incoming Biden administration will accept, amend or try to roll them back entirely.

69. Biden adds Obama administration veterans to top staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is adding four Obama-Biden administration veterans to his top ranks as he continues to build out his White House team.

Cathy Russell, who was Jill Biden's chief of staff during the Obama administration, will serve as director of the White House Office of Presidential Personnel, evaluating applicants for administration roles. Louisa Terrell, who served as a legislative adviser to the president in the Obama administration and worked as deputy chief of staff for Biden in the Senate, will be director of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. Terrell has already been engaged in Capitol Hill outreach as part of Biden's transition team.

70. Biden filling top White House team with campaign veterans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden announced a raft of top White House staff positions on Tuesday, drawing from the senior ranks of his campaign and some of his closest confidants to fill out an increasingly diverse White House leadership team.

71. Pandemic politics leave DC in gridlock as virus surges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the nation gripped by a resurgent coronavirus and looking to Washington for help, President Donald Trump and lawmakers in Congress have a message for struggling Americans: Just keep waiting.

72. Trump tweets words 'he won'; says vote rigged, not conceding -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump worked to take back an apparent acknowledgment that Joe Biden won the White House and was making clear he would keep trying to overturn the election result.

73. Biden seeks window on vaccine plans as Trump stalls handoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden's scientific advisers plan to meet with vaccine makers in coming days even as a stalled presidential transition keeps them out of the loop on government plans to inoculate all Americans against COVID-19.

74. Trump, stewing over election, to deliver remarks on vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is set to deliver his first public remarks Friday since his defeat by President-elect Joe Biden, as he seeks to highlight positive developments in the race for a vaccine for the resurgent coronavirus, even as he refuses to concede the election.

75. Biden chooses longtime adviser Ron Klain as chief of staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden has chosen his longtime adviser Ron Klain to reprise his role as his chief of staff, installing an aide with decades of experience in the top role in his White House.

76. Florida, butt of election jokes, believes system is ready -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Even if the presidential election hinges on a Florida recount like 20 years ago, hanging chads and butterfly ballots won't be around to trip up voters and officials — changes to ballots, equipment and laws have made the Bush-Gore circus a relic never to be revisited, state elections officials believe.

77. 1,000-plus faith leaders call for 'free and fair election' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 1,000 clergy members, religious scholars and other faith-based advocates have signed onto a unique statement that supports a comprehensive path to "a free and fair election" and urges leaders to heed the verdict of "legitimate election results" regardless of who wins in November.

78. AP FACT CHECK: Falsehoods and fumbles in Trump-Biden debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The facts took a hit right out of the gate Thursday night.

President Donald Trump's first line of the night, about COVID-19 deaths, was false and set the tone as he and Democratic rival Joe Biden unleashed a torrent of claims in their last presidential debate.

79. Trump tends to his electoral map, Biden eyes Obama boost -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is hopping from one must-win stop on the electoral map to the next in the leadup to a final presidential debate that may be his last, best chance to alter the trajectory of the 2020 campaign.

80. AP finds most arrested in protests aren't leftist radicals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump portrays the hundreds of people arrested nationwide in protests against racial injustice as violent urban left-wing radicals. But an Associated Press review of thousands of pages of court documents tell a different story.

81. Trump on defense, courting voters in two must-win states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Backed into a corner and facing financial strains, President Donald Trump fought to defend his sagging reelection bid Friday in a state Republicans haven't lost in nearly three decades. With Election Day looming, Democrat Joe Biden pushed to keep voters focused on health care in the Midwest.

82. Trump's election-eve drug discounts for seniors get snagged -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's plan to mail millions of seniors a $200 prescription savings card has hit legal and budget roadblocks, making it unlikely the government can carry it out before Election Day.

83. Infected senator vows 'moon suit' to vote Trump's court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shuttered by COVID-19 infections, the Republican-led Senate is refusing to delay confirmation of President Donald Trump's pick for the Supreme Court. They are even willing to make special arrangements so sick senators can vote for Judge Amy Coney Barrett, and Democrats appear powerless to stop them.

84. What we know, and what we don't, about Trump's diagnosis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some answers emerged Saturday on President Donald Trump's condition as he battles the coronavirus, but Trump's medical team withheld some key information in their first full, televised update.

85. Virus spreads on panel handling Supreme Court nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two Republican members of the Senate Judiciary Committee have tested positive for the coronavirus, raising questions about the timing of Supreme Court confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett and whether additional senators may have been exposed. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell declared the confirmation process was going "full steam ahead."

86. Waiting for Trump's $200 prescription cards? Could be a long wait -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If you're on Medicare, don't run to the mailbox looking for a $200 prescription drug card courtesy of President Donald Trump.

Government officials said Friday that key details of Trump's election-year giveaway still have to be fleshed out, including the exact timing and how Medicare's cost would be covered — a sum that could approach $7 billion.

87. Trump infuses politics into his choice for the Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is infusing deliberations over his coming nomination of a new Supreme Court justice with political meaning as he aims to maximize the benefit before Nov. 3 and even secure an electoral backstop should the result be contested.

88. Ginsburg's death exposes fragility of health law protection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With COVID-19 the newest preexisting condition, the Obama-era health law that protects Americans from insurance discrimination is more fragile following the death of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

89. Trump heats up culture war in appeal to Wisconsin voters -

MOSINEE, Wis. (AP) — President Donald Trump stepped up his rhetoric on cultural issues, aiming to boost enthusiasm among rural Wisconsin voters as he tries to repeat his path to victory four years ago.

90. Confirmation gets trickier for Trump Homeland Security pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A whistleblower's complaint and a tight timeline are making it increasingly unlikely that the Senate will confirm Chad Wolf as secretary of the Department of Homeland Security before the election.

91. 4 members of Congress question NFL on concussion payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four members of Congress sent a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Wednesday questioning the league's formula for making concussion settlement payments to Black former players.

92. Postmaster: No pre-election return of mail boxes, equipment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pressed by senators, Postmaster General Louis DeJoy said Friday he was unaware of recent mail operation changes until they sparked a public uproar. But he also said he has no plans to restore mailboxes or high-speed sorting machines that have been removed.

93. Pelosi says postmaster has no plans to restore mail cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Wednesday that President Donald Trump's postmaster general has no intention of restoring mail equipment or funding overtime hours he cut, despite public outcry that operational changes are undermining service before the November election.

94. Postal Service halts some changes amid outcry, lawsuits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing mounting public pressure and a crush of state lawsuits, President Donald Trump's new postmaster general says he is halting some operational changes to mail delivery that critics blame for widespread delays and warn could disrupt the November election.

95. Getting creative with unused office space -

In a COVID-19 world, employees are working from home en masse, and it’s having rippling effects on commercial office space throughout Middle Tennessee. From Nashville’s downtown buildings to smaller, coworking spaces, landlords are pivoting to attract renters in new ways and reworking their spaces to accommodate new guidelines hoping people will return.

96. Extra $600 in jobless aid set to lapse as talks deadlock -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A deadlocked Senate on Thursday exited Washington for the weekend without acting to extend a $600 per-week expanded jobless benefit that has helped keep both families and the economy afloat as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the country.

97. Stakes rise for virus talks as jobless aid lapses, GDP drops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Frustrated negotiators of a massive coronavirus relief bill face heightened pressure with Thursday's brutal economic news and the rapidly approaching lapse in a $600 per-week expanded jobless benefit that has helped prop up consumer demand.

98. House COVID oversight panel demands docs from TN, 3 other states -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The head of a congressional coronavirus oversight panel on Wednesday demanded Tennessee's Gov. Bill Lee and three other Republican governors provide documents showing how their states are combating the pandemic.

99. White House drops payroll tax cut after GOP allies object -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House reluctantly dropped its bid to cut Social Security payroll taxes Thursday as Republicans prepared to unveil a $1 trillion COVID-19 rescue package, yielding to opposition to the idea among top Senate allies.

100. White House, GOP agree on virus testing in new aid bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans and the White House reached tentative agreement for more testing funds in the next COVID-19 relief package, but deep disagreements over the scope of the $1 trillion in federal aid remain ahead of Thursday's expected roll out.