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Editorial Results (free)

1. Judge set to rule on Purdue Pharma's opioid settlement plan -

A federal bankruptcy judge is expected to rule Wednesday on whether to accept a settlement between OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma, the states and thousands of local governments over an opioid crisis that has killed a half-million Americans over the last two decades.

2. Judge urges talks between Purdue Pharma and holdout states -

A federal bankruptcy judge on Friday urged states that oppose a settlement plan with Purdue Pharma to try to work out differences with the OxyContin maker before he issues a ruling next week.

During a videoconference hearing, Judge Robert Drain warned of lengthy and expensive appeals if he approves the plan over their objections.

3. Purdue: Settlement better for states than continuing suits -

As much as some dislike it, Purdue Pharma's plan to settle thousands of lawsuits over opioids is better for states than allowing them to continue lawsuits against the company and its owners, a company lawyer told a judge Wednesday.

4. Owner: Purdue hoped new Oxy would help in crisis; no apology -

The family that owns Purdue Pharma had hoped a reformulated version of Oxycontin would help rein in the burgeoning opioid crisis a decade ago, a member of the Sackler family said Thursday in court testimony that once again stopped short of an apology or acceptance of responsibility for the epidemic.

5. OxyContin-maker Purdue goes to judge to confirm settlement -

NEW YORK (AP) — Purdue Pharma's quest to settle thousands of lawsuits over the toll of OxyContin and its other prescription opioid painkillers entered its final phase Thursday with the grudging support of many of those who have claims against the company.

6. Medicare for 60-year-olds not guaranteed to be a better deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and progressive Democrats have proposed to lower Medicare's eligibility age to 60, to help older adults get affordable coverage. But a new study finds that Medicare can be more expensive than other options, particularly for many people of modest means.

7. Money promised to combat US overdose crisis sits unused -

When it filed for bankruptcy last year, Purdue Pharma agreed to an innovative plan: It would make $200 million available immediately to help those those harmed by its signature painkiller, OxyContin, and ease the effects of the opioid crisis.

8. GOP Convention takeaways: Pence pounces while crises swirl -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans proceeded with the third night of their national convention, but many Americans — particularly those in the path of Hurricane Laura — were focused on more immediate concerns.

9. Judge: Purdue Pharma must halt some political contributions -

A federal bankruptcy judge ruled Tuesday that OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma can't make any more contributions to partisan organizations that seek to boost the election efforts of candidates for state attorney general offices.

10. Judge: Purdue workers should get bonuses, but maybe not CEO -

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — More time is needed to sort out whether the CEO of OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma should receive a $1.3 million bonus next year, but the company should be allowed to pay about $35 million in bonuses to 682 other employees, the judge overseeing the company's bankruptcy case said Wednesday.

11. Bankruptcy judge considers $1.3M bonus for Purdue Pharma CEO -

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — The judge overseeing the bankruptcy case of OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma will consider Wednesday whether the company's CEO should get a bonus equal to half his $2.6 million salary.

12. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tale about Romney unrest, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing an impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook to defend himself: blasting the inquiry as illegal, attacking his investigators and critics alike, and deriding the whistleblower process as all-but-rigged.

13. Trump's Cabinet has had more ex-lobbyists than Obama or Bush -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In less than three years, President Donald Trump has named more former lobbyists to Cabinet-level posts than his most recent predecessors did in eight, putting a substantial amount of oversight in the hands of people with ties to the industries they're regulating.

14. Purdue Pharma begins Chapter 11 bankruptcy journey -

NEW YORK (AP) — Purdue Pharma gets its day in court Tuesday after the OxyContin maker filed for bankruptcy and negotiated a potential multi-billion dollar settlement to resolve thousands of lawsuits.

15. Can Purdue Pharma's opioid settlement win judge's approval? -

BOSTON (AP) — OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma has embarked on a multibillion-dollar plan to settle thousands of lawsuits over the nation's deadly opioid crisis by transforming itself in bankruptcy court into a sort of hybrid between a business and a charity.

16. Trump, in 2020 campaign mode, calls Democrats 'radical' -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — President Donald Trump jabbed at the press and poked the political establishment he ran against in 2016 as he kicked off his reelection campaign with a grievance-filled rally that focused more on settling scores than laying out his agenda for a possible second term.

17. AP FACT CHECK: Trump and the disputed border crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In his prime-time speech to the nation, President Donald Trump declared a border crisis that's in sharp dispute, wrongly accused Democrats of refusing to pay for border security and ignored the reality of how drugs come into the country as he pitched his wall as a solution to varied ills.

18. White House faces brain drain at perilous moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increasingly convinced that the West Wing is wholly unprepared to handle the expected assault from Democrats if they win the House in November, President Donald Trump's aides and allies are privately raising alarm as his circle of legal and communications advisers continues to shrink.

19. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's bent reality: Cohen, clean air, taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is living in an alternate reality when it comes to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and other controversies swirling around him.

He laments the threat of a "perjury trap" in explaining why he's hesitant to be interviewed by Mueller in the Russia probe, even as Trump's lawyers assert that Mueller had ruled out trying to indict a sitting president.

20. Trump's lawyer pleads guilty, implicates president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer has pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations and his former campaign chairman convicted for financial fraud, raising questions about the president's own legal jeopardy.

21. White House picnic email led to congressman's indictment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New York Rep. Chris Collins was one of the first House members to back Donald Trump for president in 2016 and quickly became a ubiquitous surrogate for the future president on cable television.

22. Wave of exits from West Wing sparks talk of brain drain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump once presided over a reality show in which a key cast member exited each week. The same thing seems to be happening in his White House.

Trump's West Wing has descended into a period of unparalleled tumult amid a wave of staff departures — and despite the president's insistence that it's a place of "no Chaos, only great Energy!" The latest key figure to announce an exit: Gary Cohn, Trump's chief economic adviser, who had clashed with Trump over trade policy.

23. Russia probe snags GOP, Democratic interests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The indictment that alleges covert foreign lobbying by two former Trump campaign officials is casting shadows on three powerful Washington lobbying and legal firms, with Democratic as well as Republican ties, broadening the stakes of the Russia investigation and drawing in the brother of Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman.

24. Report: Trump-tied lobbyists cash in on their connections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The day after the presidential election, the Washington lobbying firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck touted its Republican team's "significant relationships ... with those who will steer the incoming Trump administration." It highlighted Marc Lampkin, managing partner of its Washington office and a Trump fundraiser.

25. Norman family tradition lives on at Bud’s Corner -

Willie Eason is a regular visitor to Bud’s Corner, an oft-overlooked section of North Nashville real estate named for Edward “Bud” Norman, the man who owned this three-block section of the city, putting a firm stamp of family and love on it that continues eight years after his death.

26. US moves to block mining near Yellowstone -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. officials plan to block new mining claims outside Yellowstone National Park as the Obama administration races in its last days to keep industry out of pristine and environmentally sensitive areas.

27. Greece gets temporary lifeline, turns hope to new summit -

ATHENS, Greece (AP) — With the clock running down on Greece's chances of avoiding a painful exit from the euro, the country got a temporary lifeline Friday to help it cope with a bank deposit drain and turned its hopes to a European leaders' summit next week.

28. Gov't to overhaul Medicare payments to doctors, hospitals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare will change the way it pays hospitals and doctors to reward quality over volume, the Obama administration said Monday, in a shift that officials hope will be a catalyst for the nation's $3-trillion health care system.

29. Challenges face Bezos as he buys Washington Post -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jeff Bezos turned selling books online into a multibillion-dollar business that has changed retailing forever. Many are now anxious to see if Bezos can do the same for the media industry, after the Amazon.com founder announced he is buying The Washington Post and other newspapers for $250 million.

30. Twinkies sale approved by judge -

NEW YORK (AP) — A bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved the sale of Twinkies to a pair of investment firms, one of which has said it hopes to have the cakes back on shelves by summer.

Hostess Brands Inc. is selling Twinkies, Ding Dongs, Ho Hos and other brands to Apollo Global Management and Metropoulos & Co. for $410 million. Evan Metropoulos, a principal of the latter firm, said in an interview that he wants to have the snack cakes back on shelves by June and that the brands could benefit from new flavors and other product extensions.

31. Judge orders Hostess to mediate with union -

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. (AP) — Twinkies won't die that easily after all.

Hostess Brands Inc. and its second largest union will go into mediation to try and resolve their differences, meaning the company won't go out of business just yet. The news came Monday after Hostess moved to liquidate and sell off its assets in bankruptcy court citing a crippling strike last week.

32. Twinkies likely to survive sale of Hostess -

DETROIT (AP) — Twinkie lovers, relax.

The tasty cream-filled golden spongecakes are likely to survive, even though their maker will be sold in bankruptcy court.

Hostess Brands Inc., baker of Wonder Bread as well as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Ho's, will be in a New York bankruptcy courtroom Monday to start the process of selling itself.

33. Getting ready for football and other things -

Football season is officially here, and the fall weather is not far behind. In fact, the last few cooler, rainy days have got most of us itching for what I consider one of the most beautiful times of the year to come on and “get the party started!”

34. AP IMPACT: EPA rules threaten older power plants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 32 mostly coal-fired power plants in a dozen states will be forced to shut down and an additional 36 might have to close because of new federal air pollution regulations, according to an Associated Press survey.