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Editorial Results (free)

1. Sen. Burr under investigation again for pandemic stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr and his brother-in-law are being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission for potential insider trading, a case that stems from their abrupt sales of financial holdings during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, according to recent federal court filings.

2. Kentucky Sen. Paul failed to disclose wife's COVID-related stock trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul waited more than a year to disclose that his wife purchased stock in a company that makes a COVID-19 treatment, an investment made after Congress was briefed on the threat of the virus but before the public was largely aware of its danger.

3. Infrastructure senators brush off criticism from left, right -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The often-elusive political center is holding steady in the Senate with a strong coalition of Democrats and Republicans brushing off critics to push  the $1 trillion infrastructure package toward passage.  Final votes are expected Tuesday.

4. Dems eye $6T plan on infrastructure, Medicare, immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are eyeing a $6 trillion infrastructure investment plan that goes far beyond roads and bridges to include core party priorities, from lowering the Medicare eligibility age to 60 and adding vision and hearing benefits to incorporating a long-running effort to provide legal status for certain immigrants, including "Dreamers."

5. Bipartisan infrastructure group swells to 21 senators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan senators' group working on a $1 trillion infrastructure compromise more than doubled in size to 21 members Wednesday, a key threshold that gives momentum to their effort as President Joe Biden returns from overseas at a pivotal time for his big legislative priority.

6. As pandemic spread pain and panic, congressman chased profit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the pandemic, New Jersey Rep. Tom Malinowski scolded those looking to capitalize on the once-in-a-century health crisis.

"This is not the time for anybody to be profiting off of selling ventilators, vaccines, drugs, treatments, PPE (personal protective equipment), anywhere in the world," the two-term Democrat and former assistant secretary of state told MSNBC in April 2020.

7. Pandemic first job for HHS pick but health agenda is broader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Health secretary nominee Xavier Becerra told senators Tuesday that confronting the coronavirus pandemic will be his first priority if confirmed, but he also pledged to expand health insurance, rein in prescription drug costs and reduce racial and ethnic disparities in medical care.

8. Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that Congress will establish an independent, Sept. 11-style commission to look into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol.

9. What to watch as Trump's 2nd impeachment trial kicks off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, a solemn proceeding that will force lawmakers to relive the violent events of Jan. 6 as House Democrats prosecute their case for "incitement of insurrection."

10. Biden EPA nominee vows 'sense of urgency' on climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's nominee to run the Environmental Protection Agency pledged Wednesday to "move with a sense of urgency on climate change" and other priorities, while working with lawmakers from both parties to protect the environment.

11. Justice Dept. won't charge Sen. Burr over stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Richard Burr said Tuesday that the Justice Department has told him it will not prosecute him over stock sales made during the coronavirus pandemic, ending an insider trading investigation that led him to at least temporarily step aside from a powerful committee chairmanship last year.

12. With US in COVID-19 panic, Georgia Sen. Perdue saw stock opportunity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the ravages of the novel coronavirus forced millions of people out of work, shuttered businesses and shrank the value of retirement accounts, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged to a three-year low.

13. Biden seeks swift Cabinet votes, but GOP Senate stays silent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President-elect Joe Biden started rolling out his administrative team, one voice has been notably silent: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Senate Republicans will hold great sway in confirming or denying Biden's Cabinet nominees, regardless of which party controls the narrowly split Senate after runoff elections. But key Republican senators, including the GOP leader, are keeping quiet, for now, choosing their battles ahead.

14. With US in COVID-19 panic, Georgia Sen. Perdue saw stock opportunity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the ravages of the novel coronavirus forced millions of people out of work, shuttered businesses and shrank the value of retirement accounts, the Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged to a three-year low.

15. AP EXPLAINS: What happens if a candidate for president dies? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a month before Election Day and President Donald Trump is in the hospital, infected with a virus that has killed more than 209,000 Americans. What happens in the election — already well underway — should his condition take a turn for the worse?

16. Trump campaign's Russia contacts 'grave' threat, Senate says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump campaign's interactions with Russian intelligence services during the 2016 presidential election posed a "grave" counterintelligence threat, a Senate panel concluded Tuesday as it detailed how associates of Donald Trump had regular contact with Russians and expected to benefit from the Kremlin's help.

17. Senate report: Trump campaign's Russia contacts 'grave' threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump campaign's interactions with Russian intelligence services during the 2016 presidential election posed a "grave" counterintelligence threat, a Senate panel concluded Tuesday as it detailed how associates of Donald Trump had regular contact with Russians and expected to benefit from the Kremlin's help.

18. US closes probes into 3 senators over their stock trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has closed investigations into stock trading by Sens. Dianne Feinstein of California, Kelly Loeffler of Georgia and Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, according to people familiar with notifications sent to the senators. The senators came under scrutiny for transactions made in the weeks before the coronavirus sent markets downhill.

19. Rubio warns of foreign actors amplifying virus conspiracies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Marco Rubio, the new Republican chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, is warning that foreign actors will seek to amplify conspiracy theories about the coronavirus and find new ways to interfere in the 2020 presidential election.

20. Committee approves Ratcliffe for DNI, sends to full Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate intelligence committee on Tuesday approved the nomination of Texas GOP Rep. John Ratcliffe to be director of national intelligence, sending the nomination to the Senate floor for his likely confirmation.

21. Burr steps aside as Senate intelligence chair amid FBI probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Richard Burr temporarily stepped aside as chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday after the FBI served a search warrant for his cellphone as part of an investigation into a well-timed sale of stocks tied to the coronavirus pandemic.

22. Senate panel backs assessment that Russia interfered in 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan Senate report released Tuesday affirms the U.S. intelligence community's conclusions that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election in a far-ranging influence campaign approved by Russian President Vladimir Putin and aimed at helping Donald Trump win the White House.

23. Florida congressman flouts House rules with district lease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Florida Rep. Matt Gaetz is paying a former legal client and donor $5,000 a month to rent space for his district office, a possible violation of U.S. House rules that dictate that lawmakers should not lease from people with whom they have had a professional or legal relationship.

24. Intelligence official 'disappointed' after ouster by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The ousted inspector general of the intelligence community says he is "disappointed and saddened" that President Donald Trump fired him, but he also encouraged other inspectors general to continue to speak out when they are aware of wrongdoing.

25. Georgia Sen. Loeffler gets renewed scrutiny over stock moves -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The husband of Georgia Sen. Kelly Loeffler recently acquired as much as $415,000 in stock in DuPont de Nemours, a chemical company that manufactures protective equipment in exceedingly high demand because of the coronavirus pandemic.

26. Senator asks for ethics review of his stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C., is asking for an ethics review after coming under criticism for selling off as much as $1.7 million in stocks just before the market dropped in February amid coronavirus fears.

27. Senate votes to extend, not tweak, 3 surveillance powers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Senate has voted to extend, rather than tweak, three surveillance powers that federal law enforcement officials use to fight terrorists, passing the bill back to an absent House and throwing the future of the authorities in doubt.

28. US surveillance powers set to temporarily expire -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three surveillance powers available to the U.S. government are set to temporarily expire Sunday after a trio of senators opposed a bipartisan House bill that would renew the authorities and impose new restrictions.

29. Senate: Obama officials hamstrung by Russia election attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration was ill-prepared to handle and failed to respond effectively to Russian interference during the 2016 election, according to a bipartisan congressional report released Thursday. It noted officials feared getting caught up in a heavily politicized environment and undermining public confidence in the electoral process.

30. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

31. Trial highlights: Conspiracy theories and fidget spinners -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats argued that President Donald Trump sought a phony investigation of a political rival and pursued a discredited conspiracy theory about Ukraine, while restless senators played with a new toy Thursday during Trump's impeachment trial.

32. GOP support for Trump shows no overt signs of cracking -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republican support for President Donald Trump is showing no overt signs of buckling, the latest demonstration of how Democrats' impeachment inquiry has left the two parties dwelling in different political universes.

33. With less to lose, will retiring Republicans desert Trump? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Retiring congressional Republicans are a natural group to watch for defectors as Democrats' impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump builds steam. But they're not crumbling yet.

34. What's next as House committees launch impeachment probes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are planning a rapid start to their push for impeachment of President Donald Trump, with hearings and depositions starting this week.

Democratic leaders have instructed committees to move quickly — and not to lose momentum — after revelations that Trump asked Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate his potential 2020 Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, and his family. The action is beginning even though lawmakers left town Friday for a two-week recess.

35. Trump Jr. glad Senate testimony 'is finally over' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump Jr., the president's eldest son, said he is "glad this is finally over" after speaking to the Senate Intelligence Committee for around three hours on Wednesday.

Trump Jr. said he was happy to clarify answers from an interview with the panel's staff in 2017, but told reporters, "I don't think I changed any of what I said because there was nothing to change."

36. Trump Jr. to speak with Senate panel Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's eldest son will meet with the Senate intelligence committee Wednesday behind closed doors, according to two people familiar with the meeting.

The people requested anonymity because they weren't authorized to discuss the confidential interview. The meeting with Donald Trump Jr. comes after the committee's Republican chairman, North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr, subpoenaed him as part of the panel's Russia investigation.

37. Panel reaches deal with Trump Jr. for interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Intelligence Committee has struck a deal with Donald Trump Jr. to appear for a closed-door interview next month, pulling the two sides back, for now, from a confrontation over a subpoena as part of the panel's Russia investigation.

38. Canceled interviews led to Trump Jr. subpoena -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate intelligence committee subpoenaed Donald Trump Jr. after he backed out of two scheduled interviews as part of the panel's Russia investigation, the chairman of the committee told his Republican colleagues last week as he tried to stem criticism from the move.

39. Sen. Burr takes GOP fire over Trump Jr subpoena -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans lashed out Thursday at fellow GOP Sen. Richard Burr for his committee's subpoena of President Donald Trump's son, a move that suggested the Russia investigation is not "case closed" as some in the party insist. Trump said he was "very surprised" at the move.

40. Senate subpoenas Trump Jr. over earlier testimony -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate intelligence committee has subpoenaed Donald Trump Jr., calling him in to answer questions about his 2017 testimony to the panel as part of its probe into Russian election interference.

41. Senate subpoenas Trump Jr. over earlier testimony -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate intelligence committee has subpoenaed Donald Trump Jr., calling him in to answer questions about his 2017 testimony to the panel as part of its probe into Russian election interference.

42. White House steps up attacks as Mueller report release nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took a victory lap after special counsel Robert Mueller concluded his Russia investigation. It may have been premature.

43. Cohen expected to claim lying, racism and cheating by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, is expected to give a behind-the-scenes account of what he will claim is Trump's lying, racism and cheating, and possibly even criminal conduct, when he testifies publicly before a House committee on Wednesday, according to a person with knowledge of the matter.

44. Report: Russia still using social media to roil US politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports released Monday by the Senate intelligence committee.

45. Russia social media influence efforts ongoing, report says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russia's sweeping political disinformation campaign on U.S. social media was more far-reaching than originally thought, with troll farms working to discourage black voters and "blur the lines between reality and fiction" to help elect Donald Trump in 2016, according to reports released Monday by the Senate intelligence committee.

46. Senate GOP taking up judicial nominee some call 'the worst' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are working to soon fill the nation's longest judicial vacancy with a North Carolina lawyer whose nomination has raised objections from black lawmakers and civil rights groups concerned about his work defending state laws found to have discriminated against African-Americans.

47. Senate aims to confirm man for bench despite racial concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are working to soon fill the nation's longest judicial vacancy with a North Carolina lawyer whose nomination has raised objections from black lawmakers and civil rights groups concerned about his work defending state laws found to have discriminated against African-Americans.

48. Papadopoulos says he'd testify in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — George Papadopoulos, the former Trump campaign adviser who triggered the Russia investigation, is willing to testify before the Senate intelligence committee, Thomas Breen, his lawyer, said Wednesday.

49. Facebook, Twitter pledge to defend against foreign intrusion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Twitter executives assured Congress on Wednesday that they are aggressively working to root out foreign attempts to sow discord in America, and they pledged to better protect their social networks against manipulation during the 2018 midterm elections and beyond.

50. Election security bill backers say delay helps Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just two months before the midterm elections, bipartisan legislation to try to prevent foreign hacking into U.S. election systems is stalled in Congress as the White House and some Republicans worry it could exert too much federal control over the states.

51. Amid harsh criticism, Trump tries a tougher tone on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent a second day managing the political fallout from his widely criticized meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin, shifting stances and mopping up what the White House said were misstatements.

52. Trump: news media wants confrontation, even war, with Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump accused the news media Thursday of trying to provoke a confrontation with Russia that could lead to war, as he continues to push back against criticism of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

53. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tax 'miracle,' immigration flip-flops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Boasting about his tax cuts, President Donald Trump inflated his role in boosting the economy to mythical proportions, claiming full credit for U.S. growth that was already in the making and ignoring the reality of a mounting deficit. On immigration, he and administration officials repeatedly spread questionable alarms by linking weak border enforcement to pervasive crime and a "surge" in MS-13 gangs.

54. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for May 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

55. Dem, GOP leaders to get classified briefings on Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House and Senate lawmakers from both parties are set to meet with top intelligence officials Thursday for classified briefings as President Donald Trump raises new suspicions about the federal investigation into his 2016 campaign.

56. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tweets on Russia probe short on facts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is skimming over the facts involving the investigations into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

In a series of tweets Sunday, he repeatedly assails special counsel Robert Mueller's probe as hopelessly biased, insisting that it is effectively controlled by Democrats. He also repeats a claim that his campaign had been cleared of collusion with Russia.

57. CIA nominee wins Senate panel backing, confirmation expected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gina Haspel, President Donald Trump's nominee to head the CIA, won the backing of the Senate intelligence committee on Wednesday, paving the way for her expected confirmation to lead the spy agency.

58. CIA nominee says she wouldn't restart interrogation program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the next CIA director says that if she is confirmed by the Senate, the spy agency will not undertake a detention and harsh interrogation program like the one used after 9/11.

59. State election systems still waiting for security checkups -

With the midterm congressional primaries about to go into full swing, the Department of Homeland Security is playing catch-up in helping to ensure that state election systems are secure against cybertampering by the Russians or others bent on mischief.

60. Homeland officials to talk election security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are expected to press Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen on the department's efforts to secure state election systems as the Senate Intelligence Committee launches an effort to safeguard against foreign meddling in this year's elections.

61. Senate committee launches effort to prevent election hacking -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the 2018 primary season already underway, leaders of the Senate intelligence committee are launching an effort to protect U.S. elections from a repeat episode of foreign interference.

62. US doing little to combat Russia meddling in next elections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Russians are going to try it again. Even President Donald Trump's intelligence chiefs say so. But with congressional primaries just two weeks away, the U.S. has done little to aggressively combat the kinds of Russian election meddling that was recently unmasked in federal court.

63. Grassley may release Russia interviews of Trump Jr., others -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee is finishing its investigation into a June 2016 meeting between Russians and President Donald Trump's campaign, and the Republican chairman of that panel says he wants to release transcripts from closed-door interviews with Trump's son and others.

64. Social media firms urged to do more to fight Moscow meddling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers demanded answers Wednesday from leading social media companies about why they haven't done more to combat Russian interference on their sites, and said congressional action might be needed in response to what one Democrat called "the start of cyberwarfare" against American democracy.

65. CIA watchdog nominee scolded for lack of preparation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's nominee to be the CIA's independent watchdog has told Congress that he's never read the Senate's so-called torture report, an exhaustive, classified report of the agency's treatment of terror suspects after 9/11.

66. Trump targets Senate intel committee over Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is criticizing the Senate intelligence committee over its investigation into possible collusion between Russia and associates of the Trump campaign.

Trump said on Twitter Thursday: "Why Isn't the Senate Intel Committee looking into the Fake News Networks in OUR country to see why so much of our news is just made up-FAKE!"

67. Senate panel moves bill to deter foreign meddling in US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is moving forward with legislation to combat cyberattacks and deter foreign interference amid an investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

The bill approved by the Senate intelligence committee 14-1 Thursday will now move to the Senate floor. According to the panel, the legislation would ensure the intelligence community is well-positioned to detect cyberattacks, strengthen information-sharing with states to protect voting systems and "send a message to Moscow that we will not accept their aggressive actions."

68. Reports say Mueller probe now examining possible obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel appointed to investigate Russian influence in the 2016 presidential campaign is now examining whether President Donald Trump tried to obstruct justice, it has been reported.

69. Senators to ask about Trump pushback on Russia investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day before a Senate panel hears former FBI Director James Comey's first public account of his dramatic firing, lawmakers will question senior members of President Donald Trump's national security team about surveillance law and are expected to ask whether the president has tried to influence ongoing investigations into Russia's election meddling and possible coordination with the Trump campaign.

70. Russia-Trump campaign contacts a concern, ex-CIA chief says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former CIA Director John Brennan told Congress Tuesday he personally warned Russia last summer against interfering in the U.S. presidential election and was so concerned about Russian contacts with people involved in the Trump campaign that he convened top counterintelligence officials to focus on it.

71. GOP concerns on Trump and Comey pose threat to their agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several Republican senators are questioning the timing of President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey. But even as the issue emerges as a potential distraction from the GOP's legislative agenda, most are dismissing Democratic calls for a special counsel, and their hand-wringing looks unlikely to lead to any concrete action.

72. Comey sought more Russia probe resources before firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the days before his firing by President Donald Trump, FBI Director James Comey told U.S. lawmakers he had asked the Justice Department for more resources to pursue the bureau's investigation into Russia's interference in last year's presidential election, three U.S. officials said Wednesday.

73. Republicans question Trump's firing of FBI director -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a dozen Republican senators voiced concerns Wednesday over President Donald Trump's firing of FBI Director James Comey, in a series of statements suggesting the GOP was not yet prepared to close ranks behind its president. But most Republicans also refused to embrace Democratic calls for a special counsel and it was not clear their hand-wringing would result in any action.

74. AP Analysis: Trump thrusts US presidency into perilous area -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With his shocking dismissal of FBI Director James Comey, Donald Trump is propelling the presidency into rarely traversed territory.

His surprise announcement Tuesday flouts decades of presidential deference to the nation's top law enforcement agency and its independence. It earns Trump the dubious distinction of being the first president since Richard Nixon to fire the official overseeing an investigation involving the commander in chief. And it cements a clear pattern of a man willing to challenge — in dramatic fashion — the institutions created to hold the president accountable.

75. Trump defends Comey firing, says both parties will thank him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump defended his firing of FBI Director James Comey, asserting in a flurry of tweets Wednesday that Republicans and Democrats "will be thanking me." Trump did not mention any effect the firing might have on the probe into contacts between his 2016 campaign and Russia.

76. Senate hearing to focus on Russian disinformation tactics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some tactics Russia used to meddle in last year's presidential election would give shivers to anyone who believes in American democracy, the Senate intelligence committee's top Democrat says.

77. Kushner, taking new White House role, faces rare scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jared Kushner has been a power player able to avoid much of the harsh scrutiny that comes with working in the White House. But this week he's found that even the president's son-in-law takes his turn in the spotlight.

78. Tech companies move to target terrorist propaganda online -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook, Microsoft, Twitter and YouTube are joining forces to more quickly identify the worst terrorist propaganda and prevent it from spreading online.

The new program announced Monday would create a database of unique digital "fingerprints" to help automatically identify videos or images the companies could remove.

79. Obama's trade agenda set to face House Democrats' objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans pushed White House-backed trade legislation toward committee approval on Thursday despite strong objections by Democrats demanding stronger labor and environmental standards as well as a ban on currency manipulation by Asian nations.

80. Obama's trade agenda set to face House Democrats' objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans pushed White House-backed trade legislation toward committee approval on Thursday despite strong objections by Democrats demanding stronger labor and environmental standards as well as a ban on currency manipulation by Asian nations.

81. Senate leaders propose extending NSA phone records storage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Weeks before a key surveillance law expires, Senate Republicans have introduced a bill that would allow the National Security Agency to continue collecting the calling records of nearly every American.

82. Some GOP want tax credits in health alternative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A small, influential group of Republicans in search of a replacement health care law intends to propose tax credits to help lower-income individuals and families purchase insurance, while simultaneously jettisoning the controversial coverage requirement in the current law, officials said Wednesday.

83. Lawmakers face long to-do list, uncertain success -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gridlocked Congress failed to do the big things: overhauling the nation's immigration system, reforming the loophole-cluttered tax code and stiffening background checks on gun buyers. Now it's time to see whether it can just do the basics.

84. Senate blocks Dems' bill boosting vets' benefits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Senate on Thursday derailed Democratic legislation that would have provided $21 billion for medical, education and job-training benefits for the nation's veterans. The bill fell victim to election-year disputes over spending and fresh penalties against Iran.

85. Senate heads toward showdown vote on veterans bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Democratic bill enhancing health care, education and job-training benefits for veterans faces an uphill climb as the Senate approaches a showdown vote on the $21 billion legislation.

86. Vets benefits bill should win initial Senate vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate seemed ready Tuesday to vote preliminary approval of a sprawling Democratic bill expanding health, education and other benefits for veterans. But the election-year measure faced conservative opposition and an uncertain fate as Republicans try to make it smaller and find ways to pay for it.

87. J. Alexander’s promotes Hagler to AVP, controller -

J. Alexander’s LLC, operator of J. Alexander’s restaurants and Stoney River Legendary Steak restaurants, has promoted Jessica Hagler to assistant vice president and controller.

88. Conservative group presses McConnell on health law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A conservative group is launching a radio ad challenging Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to oppose any money for President Barack Obama's health care law even if it means triggering a government shutdown.

89. Tricky obstacles ahead to averting shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There hasn't been a government shutdown in nearly two decades, but top lawmakers on Capitol Hill are finding trickier-than-usual obstacles in their path as they try to come up with must-do legislation to keep federal agencies running after Sept. 30.

90. Senate set to finish work on student loan deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Borrowing for tuition, housing and books would be less expensive for college students and their parents this fall but the costs would start climbing almost immediately under a deal the Senate was poised to pass Wednesday.

91. Senators ready to restore lower college loan rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are ready to offer students a better deal on their college loans this fall, but future classes could see higher interest rates.

The Senate could vote as early as Thursday on a bipartisan compromise that heads off a costly increase for returning students.

92. Senators try again to lower student loan rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators are back to the starting line in their search for a compromise that would reduce interest rates on student loans after being spooked by the $22 billion price tag that accompanied a potential deal.

93. Deal emerging on student loans, talks continue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An emerging deal to lower interest rates on student loans took shape Thursday, offering Democrats promises that interest rates would not reach 10 percent and giving Republicans a link between borrowing terms and the financial markets.

94. Student loan deal seems on edge of falling apart -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to keep interest rates on new student loans from doubling appeared to be falling apart Wednesday as the Democratic leader of the Senate declared a bipartisan proposal unacceptable.

95. Obama presses on with GOP charm offensive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama pressed on with his Republican charm offensive Thursday, holding a White House lunch with House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan in an effort to soften the ground for potential talks on a long-term deficit reduction deal.

96. Efforts to avoid gov't shutdown move to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to stave off a late March government shutdown shifted to the Senate after House Republicans swiftly passed legislation to keep federal agencies running, while also easing some of the effects of $85 billion in budget cuts.

97. Narrow 'fiscal cliff' bargain gains currency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hopes dimming for a wide-ranging bargain, the White House and many congressional Republicans are setting their sights on a more modest deal that would extend current tax rates for most Americans, raise rates for top earners and leave other, vexing issues for the new year.

98. Top residential real estate transactions for September 2012 -

September 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

99. Top residential real estate transactions for August 2012 -

August 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

100. Claim of Romney taxes theft a puzzling whodunit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Assuming it's not a hoax, the purported theft of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's tax returns has all the trappings of a high-tech whodunit: a politically themed burglary, a $1 million demand in hard-to-trace Internet currency, password-protected data and a threat to reveal everything in three more weeks. But can it be believed?