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Editorial Results (free)

1. Postal union accepts reform, quashes US walkout threat -

GENEVA (AP) — Nearly 150 countries reached a compromise Wednesday that will keep the United States in the world's largest union of postal operators, following a threat by the Trump administration to quit unless it got its way.

2. Global postal union meets amid Trump threat to pull US out -

GENEVA (AP) — The effects of President Donald Trump's standoff with China could soon be coming to a post office near you — and higher shipping rates for some types of mail are the likely outcome.

The Trump administration is threatening to pull the United States out of the 145-year-old Universal Postal Union, complaining that some postal carriers like China's aren't paying enough to have foreign shipments delivered to U.S. recipients.

3. Markets tumble on growing tariffs rift between US, China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and China escalated their 13-month trade war Friday, sending financial markets tumbling and intensifying worries about the health of the global economy.

Trump answered a new round of trade sanctions from China by promising a still-secret response, joking about the market plunge and saying he had "hereby ordered" American companies to look for alternatives to operating there.

4. Trump dismisses worries of recession, says economy is strong -

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump dismissed concerns of recession on Sunday and offered an optimistic outlook for the economy after last week's steep drop in the financial markets.

5. Mexican officials try to stave off tariffs at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mexican and U.S. officials met late into the day Tuesday at the White House trying to stave off President Donald Trump's threatened tariffs on all Mexican goods flowing into the United States.

6. US companies are in line of fire of tariffs aimed at Mexico -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's surprise threat to impose escalating tariffs on Mexican imports jolted industry leaders throughout the U.S. economy Friday, sparked opposition even from usual Trump allies and set the stage for American consumers to face higher prices.

7. Resumption of high-level US-China trade talks raises hopes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. and China resumed high-levels talks Thursday aimed at easing a trade standoff that has unnerved global investors and clouded the outlook for the world economy.

The talks opened as a Chinese delegation led by Vice Premier Liu He sat down with a U.S. team led by Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Larry Kudlow, a key White House economic adviser, and Peter Navarro, a White House trade adviser.

8. US, China resume trade talks in Washington ahead of deadline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and China resume talks Tuesday aimed at ending a fight over Beijing's technology ambitions ahead of a deadline for a massive U.S. tariff hike.

The White House said that meetings between mid-level delegations will begin in Washington following talks last week in Beijing that U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said "made headway" on key issues.

9. Trump, German auto executives meet at White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and executives from Germany's biggest automakers discussed the companies' investments in the U.S. on Tuesday as trade tensions with the Europeans and Trump's threat to impose tariffs on foreign cars sold here loomed overhead.

10. Global trade is at stake as Trump and Xi come face to face -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear President Donald Trump tell it, he was made for a moment like this: A high-stakes face-off. A ticking clock. A cagey adversary.

The man who calls himself a supreme dealmaker will have the opportunity this week to put himself to the test. The question is whether he can defuse a trade war with China that is shaking financial markets and threatening the global economy — and perhaps achieve something approximating a breakthrough.

11. Canada relieved trade deal done, won't forget Trump attacks -

TORONTO (AP) — U.S. President Donald Trump vowed to make Canada pay after Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said he wouldn't be bullied in trade talks. Trump called Trudeau "weak" and "dishonest." He threatened tariffs on cars and slapped them on steel.

12. Farmers fret and wait as US-China trade war escalates -

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Many anxious American farmers are delaying purchases and investment while hoping for a truce in a U.S.-China trade war that has left their crops at a competitive disadvantage overseas.

13. Trump's tariffs: What they are and how they will work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — So is this what a trade war looks like?

The Trump administration and China's leadership have imposed tens of billions of dollars in tariffs on each other's goods. President Donald Trump has proposed slapping duties on, all told, up to $550 billion if China keeps retaliating and doesn't cave in to U.S. demands to scale back its aggressive industrial policies.

14. Why they fight: US and China brawl over high technology -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To understand why the United States and China stand on the brink of a trade war, consider the near-death experience of American Superconductor Corp.

15. Trump softens trade stance toward China and raises optimism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump de-escalated a confrontation with China on Wednesday, dropping plans to impose strict limits on Chinese investment in U.S. technology companies and instead urging Congress to strengthen existing laws that apply to all foreign countries.

16. Trump softens trade stance toward China and raises optimism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump de-escalated a confrontation with China on Wednesday, dropping plans to impose strict limits on Chinese investment in U.S. technology companies and instead urging Congress to strengthen existing laws that apply to all foreign countries.

17. Mnuchin dismisses reports of tech restrictions on China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials are denying reports that the United States is readying limitations this week on Chinese investment in American technology companies and high-tech exports to China. But the White House itself earlier announced plans to unveil the restrictions by Saturday.

18. Stocks skid as trade worries pull technology companies lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks skidded Monday as investors grew concerned that technology companies could be pulled into the broadening trade dispute between the U.S. and China. Indexes in Europe and Asia also fell.

19. Courting Putin, Trump jolts the West with a nationalist bent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Donald Trump presses ahead with plans for a summer summit with Russia's Vladimir Putin, the U.S. president is jolting relationships with some of America's longest and strongest allies. Amid concerns over Trump's apparent desire to be cozy with the Russian leader, he is pursuing increasingly nationalistic foreign and trade policies and delivering scathing personal attacks on traditionally friendly leaders who don't share his views.

20. Trump raises risk of economically harmful US-China trade war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and China edged closer Tuesday to triggering the riskiest trade war in decades, a fight that could weaken the world's two largest economies, unsettle relations between Beijing and Washington and crimp global growth.

21. Trump takes more swipes at Canada after arrival in Singapore -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took more swipes at Canada and its prime minister over trade issues as he settled in for a summit with North Korea in Singapore, contending that "Fair Trade is now to be called Fool Trade if it is not Reciprocal."

22. Trump's bid to help Chinese firm draws fire but raises hopes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A long-running dispute between American regulators and Chinese telecom company ZTE may have handed President Donald Trump some unexpected leverage in avoiding a trade war with Beijing.
Trump's tweet Sunday that he was working with President Xi Jinping of China to put ZTE "back into business, fast" after U.S. sanctions threatened ZTE's existence and 70,000 Chinese jobs caught many trade-watchers by surprise.
"Too many jobs in China lost," Trump tweeted. "Commerce Department has been instructed to get it done!"
The overture came just as Vice Premier Liu He is flying to Washington for talks aimed at heading off a mutually harmful battle between the world's two biggest economies and just before U.S. companies plan to plead during three days of hearings for a resolution to the dispute.
Trade analysts say it is highly unusual for a president to intercede in a case brought by the Commerce Department and to mix regulatory sanctions with trade negotiations. But they also note that Trump's offer to rescue ZTE, which makes cellphones and other telecommunications equipment, has the potential to clear the way for progress.
"It's a way to unlock negotiations," said Wendy Cutler, a former U.S. trade negotiator specializing in Asia and now vice president at the Asia Society Policy Institute.
The United States has proposed imposing tariffs on up to $150 billion in Chinese products to punish Beijing for forcing American companies to hand over technology in exchange for access to the Chinese markets. In retaliation, Beijing is threatening tariffs on $50 billion in U.S. products.
"Trump's tweet creates an atmosphere where there's more hope for reaching an agreement on trade," said David Dollar, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a former official at the World Bank and the U.S. Treasury Department.
The United States also needs China's support as it prepares for talks with North Korea that are intended to persuade the Pyongyang regime to abandon nuclear weapons.
Commerce and ZTE last year settled charges that the Chinese company sold sensitive telecommunications equipment to Iran and North Korea in violation of U.S. sanctions. ZTE agreed to plead guilty and pay about $1 billion in fines.
Last month, Commerce accused ZTE of violating the agreement and blocked ZTE from importing American components for seven years. The department said ZTE had misled regulators: Instead of disciplining all employees involved in the sanctions violations, Commerce said, ZTE paid some of them full bonuses and then lied about it.
The seven-year ban was tantamount to a death sentence for ZTE.
"It was basically going to put them out of business," Dollar said. "They rely on American technology."
Last week, the company announced that it was halting operations.
Early this month, a high-level U.S. delegation — including Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, top American trade negotiator Robert Lighthizer and White House adviser Peter Navarro — traveled to Beijing to address the trade dispute. There, they heard an outcry about U.S. regulators putting ZTE out of business.
"They were a little bit blindsided," said Paul Triolo, a technology specialist at the Eurasia Group consultancy. "The Chinese reaction was pretty vociferous. ... The U.S. government shooting down the No. 2 telecommunications supplier in China at this sensitive time — it didn't look good."
Now, analysts see the outlines of a potential deal: In return for Trump's lifeline to ZTE, Beijing might agree to buy more U.S. products or take other steps to shrink America's gaping trade deficit with China — $337 billion last year.
The Wall Street Journal reported Monday that the two countries were in talks about such a potential swap: The U.S. would spare ZTE, and Beijing would drop plans to impose tariffs on U.S. farm products. Neither the White House nor the Commerce Department would comment.
The ZTE case also drives home how entwined the U.S. and Chinese economies are. The Commerce sanctions didn't just imperil ZTE; they also hurt the American companies that sell components to the Chinese company.
And so investors breathed a sigh of relief after Trump's tweet, buying stock Monday in Maynard, Massachusetts-based optical components maker Acacia Communications, which last year collected 30 percent of its revenue from ZTE; San Jose-based optical communications company Oclaro; and Sunnyvale, California-based fiber optic cable manufacturer Finisar.
Still, critics charged that Trump shouldn't have intervened in the legal case against ZTE.
"This would be a truly awful deal for the U.S," Derek Scissors, a China specialist at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, wrote in a blog post. "If the accusations last year and last month are accurate, ZTE violated Iran sanctions, then further attempted to deceive the U.S. government."
Xi "would be using barriers against American agriculture to blackmail the Trump administration into accepting ZTE's behavior," Scissors said.
Trump has thrust trade policy to the center of his agenda. In addition to sparring with China, his team is in talks to rewrite the North America Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada.
The timing of the NAFTA negotiations is tight: House Speaker Paul Ryan has said Congress must have an agreement by Thursday to have any hope of approving it this year.
___
Follow Paul Wiseman on Twitter at https://twitter.com/PaulWisemanAP

...

23. Trump wants China to reduce trade deficit by $200B by 2020 -

BEIJING (AP) — The Trump administration has asked China to reduce its trade deficit with the U.S. by $200 billion by the end of 2020, striking an assertive stance in talks aimed at averting a trade war between the world's two-largest economies.

24. US delays decision on tariffs for EU, prolonging uncertainty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government will take another 30 days to decide whether to impose tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum from the European Union, Canada and Mexico, extending a period of uncertainty for businesses in those regions.

25. "To hell with it": Trump increasingly weary of staff advice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The speech was written. A cast of relatable Americans with emotional stories was standing by to reinforce the message. But President Donald Trump was in no mood to play along.

"The hell with it," Trump said, recounting the scene with his aides to a West Virginia crowd last week, Trump tossed the staff-prepared remarks on tax cuts in the air and ducked as the paper fluttered to the floor. "I said, 'This is boring, come on.' Tell it like it is."

26. Trump seeks to ease fears of trade fight with China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Investors across the globe are bracing for uncertain markets as President Donald Trump tries to downplay fears of a trade dispute between the U.S. and China, suggesting that Beijing will ease trade barriers "because it is the right thing to do" and that the economic superpowers can settle the escalating conflict.

27. Trump, China escalate trade dispute as markets tumble -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unwilling to yield, President Donald Trump and China's government escalated their trade clash Friday, with Beijing vowing to "counterattack with great strength" if Trump follows through on threats to impose tariffs on an additional $100 billion in Chinese goods.

28. Trump readies tariff plan rollout, exempting Mexico, Canada -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After a week of hints and uncertainty, President Donald Trump said Thursday he would soon announce tariffs on imported steel and aluminum but would offer temporary exemptions to Canada and Mexico. He suggested Australia and "other countries" might also be spared, a shift that could soften the international blow amid threats of retaliation by trading partners.

29. Ryan wants Trump to take 'surgical approach' on trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Worried about economic ramifications, House Speaker Paul Ryan called on President Donald Trump to back away from his plan for broad international tariffs, arguing Tuesday that a "more surgical approach" would help avert a potentially dangerous trade war.

30. Trump, Canada's Trudeau talk trade and NAFTA in phone call -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a remarkably public confrontation, House Speaker Paul Ryan and other Republican allies of President Donald Trump are pleading with him to back away from his threatened international tariffs, which they fear could spark a dangerous trade war. Trump retorted: "We're not backing down."

31. Trump links tariff relief for Canada, Mexico to NAFTA talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Monday that North American neighbors Canada and Mexico will get no relief from his new tariffs on steel and aluminum imports unless a "new and fair" free trade agreement is signed.

32. White House: No exemptions from steel, aluminum tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration appears unbowed by broad domestic and international criticism of his planned import tariffs on steel and aluminum, saying Sunday that the president is not planning on exempting any countries from the stiff duties.

33. Trump says he won't back down on tariffs plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Monday that he's "not backing down" on his plan to impose stiff tariffs on imported steel and aluminum despite anxious warnings from House Speaker Paul Ryan and other congressional Republicans of a possible trade war.

34. Trump: "Trade wars are good, and easy to win" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday insisted "trade wars are good, and easy to win," a bold claim that prompted threats of retaliation against U.S. exports like blue jeans and motorcycles.

35. Trump to impose tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Determined to protect vital American industries, President Donald Trump declared Thursday that he will impose tariffs on steel and aluminum imports, dramatically raising the possibility of a trade showdown with China and other key trading partners.

36. Trump to target trade abuses with executive orders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump talked tough on trade on the campaign trail, vowing to renegotiate a slew of major deals and to label China a currency manipulator on "Day One." Now his administration appears to be taking a more cautious approach.

37. US trade deficit jumps to 5-year high of $48.5 billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit jumped in January to the highest level in nearly five years as a flood of mobile phones and other consumer products widened America's trade gap with China. The result underscores the challenges facing President Donald Trump in fulfilling a campaign pledge to reduce America's trade deficits.

38. White House trade adviser: Deficit undermines US security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reducing America's huge trade deficits would deliver stronger economic growth and improve national security, the White House trade adviser said, in a speech that underscored the Trump administration's harsh view of recent U.S. trade policies.

39. Trump advisers' tax credit plan for infrastructure has risks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has promised to revitalize America's aging roads, bridges, railways and airports, but a plan put forward by his economic advisers relies on a transportation financing scheme that hasn't been tried before and comes with significant risks.

40. Trump names lawyer Lighthizer as top trade rep -

NEW YORK (AP) — President-elect Donald Trump announced Tuesday he will nominate lawyer Robert Lighthizer as U.S. trade representative, picking an experienced trade official who has questioned the conservative movement's commitment to free trade.

41. Trump picks China hawk to lead new White House trade council -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In another sign that he intends to shake up relations with China, President-elect Donald Trump named economist Peter Navarro to lead a newly created White House council on trade.

42. Stocks slip further as retailers lead US indexes lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are lower Thursday morning as retailers slide. Bed Bath & Beyond is down after posting weak sales, while e-commerce company Alibaba is down after regulators again sanctioned the company for sales of counterfeit goods. Without a lot of major news before the holidays, investors are scrutinizing a handful of company earnings. Software company Red Hat is falling after reporting weak results.

43. Report: Trump proposals would add $5.3 trillion to debt -

DENVER (AP) — A new analysis from a nonpartisan group finds that Donald Trump's latest tax proposals would increase the federal debt by $5.3 trillion over the next decade, compared with $200 billion if Hillary Clinton's ideas were enacted. The Trump campaign disputed the findings.