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Editorial Results (free)

1. Did ‘people back home’ really sway no votes on Bible? -

I thought about skipping church Sunday and playing golf. After listening to the House of Representatives’ debate on the Bible bill, I could probably skip church for a month and still be in good standing.

2. Legislature votes to reduce, eventually eliminate Hall tax -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The Tennessee Legislature on Friday passed a measure that would reduce and eventually eliminate the Hall tax on investment income.

The Hall tax imposes a general levy of 6 percent on investment income, with some exceptions. Lawmakers agreed to reduce it down to 5 percent before eliminating it completely. They intend to pass future legislation reducing it by 1% each year before eliminating it completely by 2022.

3. Robots are taking Tennessee’s jobs -

MTSU student Nathan Simpkins found the perfect major when the university started its mechatronics engineering program in 2013, a pursuit practically guaranteeing him a high-paying job in an increasingly automated manufacturing industry.

4. Tennessee passes resolution to sue feds over refugees -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A resolution that would direct Tennessee to sue the federal government over its refugee resettlement program passed Tuesday in the state Legislature.

The measure was approved in the Senate after lawmakers agreed to a change that would allow a private law firm to file a lawsuit on behalf of Tennessee if the state attorney general refuses to sue. It stipulates that the use of the private firm could not cost taxpayers.

5. Tennessee lawmakers lure us in with momentary sanity, and then ... -

Just when it appears the Tennessee Senate is made up of sensible people – as evidenced by the killing of de-annexation legislation – the body is changing course with a Bible-thumping measure.

6. I-440: An $8 million ‘cheap fix’ gone bad -

Author and photographer Jerry Park clocked many miles crossing the state in his Ford Flex while working on his book Slow Roads Tennessee: A Photographic Journey Down Timeless Byways.

Some roads were good, filled with charm and beauty. Others, not so much. But no matter how old or unmaintained the road, Park never found one worse to drive on than the bypass near his own Richland neighborhood – I-440.

7. Bill to make Bible Tennessee's state book heads to governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Derided by critics as everything from unconstitutional to sacrilegious, Tennessee lawmakers nevertheless plowed ahead with designating the Holy Bible as the state's official book.

Sponsors argue the bill seeks to honor the historical significance of the Bible in Tennessee's history rather than serving as a government endorsement of religion.

8. Dickerson keep his balance as a Republican in blue Davidson -

To call Sen. Steve Dickerson a maverick might be an understatement. An oddity as a Republican in the Davidson County legislative delegation, Dickerson doesn’t quite fit in with the blue hue of Nashville voters or red-state Republicans who dominate the General Assembly.

9. Can GOP keep grasp on success Ramsey built? -

As much as Tennessee Republicans want to put a happy face on the departure of Senate Speaker and Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey, holding it together in the wake of his departure will be an awesome task.

Even Ramsey says it will be hard for his successor – most likely longtime Sen. Randy McNally – to maintain the same control over the Republican Caucus and keep factions from fighting over direction and control of the Upper Chamber, where it holds a 28-5 advantage against Democrats.

10. Tennessee Senate passes bill to make lawsuit losers pay -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The state Senate passed a bill that would force people who sue state employees or elected officials to pay legal fees if they fail in a lawsuit.

Supporters say the bill would prevent frivolous lawsuits from being filed and save taxpayers money. Opponents argue that it would discourage people from bringing legitimate claims against officials, especially sexual harassment claims.

11. Tennessee Republican leaders want McNally to replace Ramsey -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Leading Senate Republicans are discussing plans to make Sen. Randy McNally of Oak Ridge the new lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

McNally, who chairs the Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee, would replace Ron Ramsey, who is both the current lieutenant governor and Senate speaker. Ramsey, a Republican from Blountville, announced last week that he would not seek re-election.

12. ‘I’m the steak’ Norris carries Haslam’s agenda, except ... -

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris refers to himself as a “meat and potatoes” legislator. The four-term Republican senator from Collierville, a self-described policy wonk, is considering a run for governor in 2018. But if the race boils down to charisma, he says the media will have to determine if he has enough to win the top office.

13. Bipartisan skeptics doubt Haslam’s outsourcing plans -

Poor timing and questionable numbers: That’s how legislators are viewing a business justification plan for outsourcing facilities management across Tennessee.

The Office of Customer Focused Government tells state senators, if all departments opt in, the state could save $35.8 million by the second year of a contract under study for building operations and services – without laying off state workers or cutting pay and benefits.

14. Higher-ed shuffle stokes fears of UT-TSU merger -

Anthony Joshua, who moved to Nashville from Madison, Wisconsin, to attend Tennessee State University, says he’s worried his historically black institution could be in for serious change – for the worse.

15. Haslam takes issue with lawmakers ordering refugee lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam on Tuesday took issue with a move by fellow Republicans in the Legislature to order the state attorney to sue the federal government over the refugee resettlement program in Tennessee.

16. Senate votes to direct AG to sue over refugee settlement -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The state attorney general would be directed to mount a legal challenge to the federal refugee resettlement program in Tennessee under a resolution approved by the Senate on Monday.

17. Senate to vote on directing AG to challenge refugee program -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A resolution directing Tennessee's attorney general to mount a legal challenge to the federal refugee resettlement program is headed for a vote in the state Senate.

The Senate Finance Committee voted 9-1 on Tuesday to advance the measure sponsored by Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville. The measure would have the General Assembly hire its own lawyer if Attorney General Herbert Slatery were to decline to get involved.

18. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for January 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, January 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

19. Harwell: Durham scandal won't affect gubernatorial decision -

NASHVILLE (AP) - House Speaker Beth Harwell said Tuesday that the scandal surrounding a Republican lawmaker who has gone on hiatus amid sexual harassment allegations shouldn't damage her prospects as a serious gubernatorial candidate in Tennessee.

20. Cutting taxes, school choice, tort reform drive Sen. Kelsey -

State Sen. Brian Kelsey calls himself “a proud conservative who likes to get results.”

Based on his legislative record as a Republican state representative and senator from Germantown, he is doing both without exactly toeing the tea party line but bolstered by a GOP supermajority in the House and Senate.

21. Complex path to higher-ed reform -

Only half a year after taking on the presidency of Motlow State Community College, Anthony Kinkel is trying to keep his eye on the pea.

The task of running one of the state’s fastest-growing community colleges is becoming increasingly complex, and it has nothing to do with thousands more students enrolling to take advantage of free tuition through the Tennessee Promise scholarship program.

22. Bid to adjust Tennessee Senate schedule leads to grumbling -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Some state Senate Republicans are grumbling about an effort to have the upper chamber's committees meet on an additional day during the upcoming legislative session, saying the change would allow less time to attend receptions and to prepare for other meetings.

23. Measure increasing seat belt fines among new Tennessee laws -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Motorists in Tennessee who don't buckle up could face stiffer fines under one of many new Tennessee laws taking effect Friday.

The tougher seat belt law increases the fine for first-time offenders from $10 to $25 and from $20 to $50 for repeat offenders.

24. Refugees, higher education, privatization on tap for new session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

“I’m not advocating that. I am advocating a little bit more accountability and closer review of the funding,” says Yager, a Kingston Republican who chaired a December joint meeting of Senate and House State and Local Government committees.

25. Autonomy comes with risk for state’s universities -

Tennessee officials are lauding Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure higher education in an effort to meet his goals for the Drive to 55.

The FOCUS Act proposed recently by the Republican governor to make sure 55 percent of Tennesseans hold a degree or postsecondary certificate by 2025 promises to launch a new era for the state’s colleges and universities.

26. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions for October 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, October 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

27. Haslam: Decide road priorities before talking funding -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is calling on state lawmakers to decide on Tennessee's priorities on future road projects before resolving the politically tricky issue of finding a way to pay for them.

28. Haslam tries to jumpstart support for road funding increases -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Armed with a new $5.3 billion wish list for statewide road projects, Gov. Bill Haslam embarked on another tour Monday seeking to jumpstart support among deeply skeptical lawmakers for boosting transportation funding in Tennessee.

29. Weaker-than-usual AFC South is there for the taking -

Some team has to win the AFC South. League rules require it, even if no team truly deserves to go to the playoffs.

It was proven last year when the Carolina Panthers won the NFC South with a not-so-tidy 7-8-1 record, a mark that required four consecutive wins to reach.

30. Top Middle Tennessee commercial real estate transactions for August 2015 -

Top commercial real estate transactions, August 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

31. Haslam opens door to gas tax delay but warns of backlog -

MURFREESBORO (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam is opening the door to putting off a gas tax increase in an election year, but warns that officials need to stop "kidding ourselves" about Tennessee's growing list of unfunded road projects.

32. Is state’s role to provide a service or turn a profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

33. More Tennessee lawmakers come out against gas tax hike in 2016 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Add the chairman of the state Senate transportation committee to the list of opponents of raising Tennessee's gas tax in 2016.

Republican Sen. Jim Tracy of Shelbyville, who heads the transportation panel in the upper chamber, said Tuesday that there isn't enough time to put together a comprehensive road funding proposal for the upcoming legislative session.

34. Tennessee lawmakers speak out against gas tax amid Haslam tour -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam is bringing his transportation funding road show to Nashville on Thursday amid increasing skepticism among fellow Republicans in the Legislature about the need to raise Tennessee's gas tax.

35. With no real rival, state Republicans attack their own -

Republicans are sitting in Tennessee’s political catbird seat, but that doesn’t keep them from flying off in different directions.

Elected political leaders of the same stripe found themselves at odds this year over the Bible as a state book, Common Core education standards and Insure Tennessee, Republican Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to catch 280,000 people in a medical coverage gap.

36. Haslam implements security measures at military sites -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam says temporary security measures have been implemented after a gunman in Chattanooga, Tennessee, killed five U.S. troops last week.

The governor said in a news release that the Tennessee National Guard on Monday temporarily repositioned its soldiers in storefront recruiting locations to local National Guard armories.

37. Obama urges bipartisanship in Medicaid expansion effort -

NASHVILLE (AP) — President Barack Obama said Wednesday that he'd like to see "some good sense spring forth" as Tennessee lawmakers try to work out their differences and expand Medicaid in a state he touted as having a history of bipartisanship.

38. Senate calls on House to do flag salute amid Tennessee logo flap -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A flap over a new logo being introduced by Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is providing an opportunity for the state Senate to renew calls that the House recite a special pledge to the Tennessee flag.

39. Tennessee’s most powerful politician -

Senate Speaker and Lieutenant Gov. Ron Ramsey laughs at the notion he’s changed since being elected to the Legislature 23 years ago, that he’s lost touch with the common man or become “arrogant” as lieutenant governor of Tennessee.

40. Top residential real estate transactions for April 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, April 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

41. Too much Mr. Nice Guy? Haslam struggles to exert influence -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam was riding high. He swept all 95 counties in his re-election bid, then his peers picked him to be chairman of the Republican Governors Association.

But that momentum came to a crashing halt just days into a special legislative session he called in February, when lawmakers unceremoniously rejected Haslam's signature proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans.

42. Senate passes bill requiring citizenship test to graduate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee students would have to pass a partial version of the U.S. citizenship and immigration services' civic test before getting a high school diploma under legislation headed for Gov. Bill Haslam's consideration.

43. Tennessee plan to make Bible 'official' book derailed -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The Bible usually unites Republicans in conservative Tennessee, but lately it is proving to be - as an epistle writer put it - more powerful and sharper than a double-edged sword.

Legislators here are deeply divided over a proposal to make the holy text an official state book, with some saying it's far too sacred to be trivialized like the state fruit (tomato), the state amphibian (Tennessee cave salamander) and several state songs ("Tennessee Waltz" and "Rocky Top").

44. Tennessee House votes to make Bible official state book -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee state House ignored serious constitutional concerns — and the wishes of Republican leaders in the Statehouse— in voting to make the holy Bible the official state book.

45. Effort to make the Bible Tennessee's official book bogs down -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A proposal from a Republican lawmaker and former pastor to declare the Bible the official book of Tennessee is running into stiff opposition from top members of his own party, while the state attorney general is calling it unconstitutional.

46. AG says Bible can't be official Tennessee book -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill seeking to make the Bible the official book of Tennessee would violate separation of church and state provisions in the federal and state constitutions, state Attorney General Herbert Slatery said in a legal opinion Monday.

47. Rape kit legislation headed to governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Legislation that creates a protocol for the collection of sexual-assault evidence kits is headed to the governor for his consideration.

The measure was unanimously approved 32-0 in the Senate and 97-0 in the House on Monday. Republican Gov. Bill Haslam will review the proposal when it reaches his desk.

48. Guns-in-parks bill likely headed to conference committee -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee lawmakers anticipate that a special committee will be needed to work out differences in a proposal that would allow people with handgun-carry permits to be armed in all of the state's parks - including greenways, playgrounds and sports fields.

49. Bill that would make Bible official state book of Tennessee advances -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Despite concerns that giving the holy Bible the same status as a salamander is a little tawdry and could be unconstitutional, Tennessee lawmakers are forging ahead with plans to make it the official state book - something at least two other states have failed to do.

50. Bill to make Bible official state book of Tennessee advances -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey says he opposes a measure to make the Bible the official state book of Tennessee.

51. House votes to take Tennessee Capitol complex off guns bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The House voted Monday to remove the Tennessee Capitol from a bill to expand the areas where people with handgun carry permits can be armed, a move supported by Republican Gov. Bill Haslam.

52. Legislators find reasons to deny in-state tuition -

La Vergne High School graduate Cesar Bautista, who has lived in Tennessee since he was 8 years old, is among a group of students who’ve been here most of their lives but are still forced to pay out-of-state college tuition because they don’t have legal status.

53. Battle of the band(width): Fast, available Internet more important than state vs. FCC game in legislature -

Joyce Coltrin’s business is wandering in Bradley County’s technological wilderness. And it’s likely to remain there – because of legal threats – until the General Assembly changes state law.

54. 5 lawmakers to watch in Insure Tennessee special session -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As Gov. Bill Haslam's Insure Tennessee proposal to cover 280,000 low-income people heads into a special legislative session Monday, here are five lawmakers who are playing key roles in the debate.

55. Haslam wraps up statewide tour, names Senate sponsor -

MURFREESBORO (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam has finally found a Senate sponsor for his Insure Tennessee proposal just days before the start of a special legislative session to take up the matter.

Haslam said Thursday that Republican Sen. Doug Overbey of Maryville agreed to carry the measure after Senate Republican leader Mark Norris of Collierville declined his usual role of handling the governor's legislation.

56. Both sides dig in for Insure Tennessee special session -

Battle lines have been drawn for a Feb. 2 special session of the state Legislature to determine the fate of Gov. Bill Haslam’s Insure Tennessee proposal, which would use federal funds to catch some 280,000 working people falling through a health insurance coverage gap.

57. Branches of state government join in anti-hunger campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Officials from all branches of Tennessee government are joining in a campaign against hunger.

Members of the Tennessee General Assembly, the governor's cabinet, the Tennessee Supreme Court and the state's constitutional officers will help pack about 50,000 meals for food banks across Tennessee today.

58. Fellow Republicans reluctant about Haslam's health proposal -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's plan to offer health coverage to more than 200,000 low-income Tennesseans is getting a tepid response from fellow Republicans in the Legislature - so much so, that he has yet to find a Senate sponsor for his proposal.

59. Panel hears testimony on EPA regulations -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A Tennessee Republican senator has joined lawmakers in other states who have filed legislation that seeks to curtail federal regulation.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville discussed the resolution on Tuesday during a special joint committee meeting on the effect of Environmental Protection Agency regulations in Tennessee.

60. Harwell defeats tea-party challenge for speaker -

NASHVILLE (AP) - House Speaker Beth Harwell decisively defeated a tea-party challenge from Rep. Rick Womick on Wednesday to win the Republican nomination for another term in charge of the lower chamber of the Tennessee General Assembly.

61. Haslam presses ahead on Medicaid expansion talks -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam says he's still in talks over finding a way to expand Medicaid in Tennessee despite pushback from fellow Republicans in the state Legislature.

The governor said in a conference call with reporters after meetings with bond rating agencies in New York on Thursday that he wants to find a solution that is acceptable both to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and to largely skeptical lawmakers in Tennessee, who must approve any deal under a law passed earlier this year.

62. Gov. Haslam's Medicaid talk draws GOP criticism -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam's suggestion this week that he may soon submit a proposal for Medicaid expansion in Tennessee received some blowback from a fellow Republican leader in the Legislature on Friday.

63. Lawmakers discuss Common Core compromise proposal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State lawmakers are considering compromise legislation that would delay the testing component for Tennessee's Common Core education standards for one year.

Last month, a broad coalition of Republican and Democratic House members passed a bill seeking to delay further implementation of the new standards for two years. It also seeks to delay the testing component for the standards for the same amount of time.

64. Haslam free tuition plan garners praise, concern -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam's signature proposal this year, a program that would cover a full ride at two-year colleges for any high school graduate, appears on track to pass as lawmakers enter the waning days of the legislative session. The details, however - including how to pay for this perk in the years to come - remain scattered.

65. Tax cuts = less revenue? Basic math hits home -

With Tennessee having collected $176 million less in taxes than expected, Gov. Bill Haslam finds himself in a tight spot.

The budget situation is bad enough that Haslam has declared this might not be the best year to cut taxes. You know it’s bad when a Republican doesn’t want to cut taxes.

66. Senate passes Medicaid legislative approval bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Senate on Thursday voted to require Gov. Bill Haslam to secure legislative approval for any potential deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee despite the Republican governor's repeated assurances that he would first seek their OK for any arrangement.

67. Senate passes Medicaid legislative approval bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A proposal that requires Gov. Bill Haslam to secure legislative approval for any potential deal to expand Medicaid in Tennessee has passed the Senate even though the Republican governor has already said he would consult with lawmakers.

68. Norris to chair Council of State Governments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris is among two southerners leading the Council of State Governments this year.

69. Leadership has its price as Norris navigates busy session -

Many people who like problem solving usually tackle a tough crossword, or maybe Sudoku.

Mark Norris opted for politics.

“I like serving people as well as finding solutions to problems, so that led me to the legal profession,” says Norris, who currently serves as state Senate Majority Leader, and represents District 32 in West Tennessee.

70. Lawmakers seek compromise on school voucher bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Lawmakers trying to decide on a limited school voucher program in Tennessee or a broader one say they're close to reaching an agreement on legislation.

Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville is carrying a proposal for Republican Gov. Bill Haslam that's limited to students from low-income families attending the bottom 5 percent of failing schools. He had that measure withdrawn last year when Senate Republicans sought to expand to a larger number of children.

71. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for January 2013 -

Top January 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

72. Lawmakers reconvene for 108th General Assembly -

NASHVILLE (AP) - State lawmakers on Tuesday reconvened the 108th Tennessee General Assembly in a legislative session that is expected to feature debates over creating a school voucher program and whether to allow supermarkets to sell wine.

73. Amazon sales tax law among those taking effect -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A law that could boost the state's revenue is among those taking effect on Jan. 1, as are statutes that govern concussions in school-age athletes and workforce development.

Starting Wednesday, Amazon.com will begin collecting sales tax in Tennessee. Under a deal struck with the administration of former Gov. Phil Bredesen, Amazon was absolved from collecting the state sales tax. Customers were responsible for paying them on their own to the state Department of Revenue.

74. Panel recommends extending annexation moratorium -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A state panel has recommended extending a moratorium on municipal annexations while a study on the practice continues.

The Commercial Appeal (http://bit.ly/1k86QO3) reports the Tennessee Advisory Commission on Intergovernmental Relations unanimously approved the recommendation, which would put off annexations of residential or farm land until 2015. The moratorium, which was enacted last year, does not apply to commercial and industrial property.

75. Top commercial Midstate real estate transactions for June 2013 -

Top June 2013 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

76. Haslam unswayed by celebrities opposing 'ag-gag' -

SMYRNA (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam said Tuesday he was not swayed by celebrities opposing a bill that would make it a crime to video record animal abuse if it isn't turned over to law enforcement authorities within 48 hours.

77. TN GOP says infighting typical of supermajority -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republicans, positioned to make major changes to state law with the governorship and a supermajority in the General Assembly, ended the session with some high-profile measures derailed by infighting.

78. 108th General Assembly adjourns for year -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The 108th Tennessee General Assembly adjourned on Friday, the first time in 45 years that lawmakers have finished as early as April in the first year of a session.

Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey had set an adjournment goal of April 18, but he didn't seem upset finishing a day later.

79. Top Midstate commercial real estate transactions for March 2013 -

Top March 2013 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

80. Measure to let cities form school systems advances -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Legislation that would clear the way for cities to begin forming municipal school systems is needed to continue education reform in Tennessee, proponents of the measure said Monday.

81. Tennessee animal abuse reporting bill hits Senate snag -

NASHVILLE (AP) - An effort to require animal abuse whistleblowers to quickly submit damning evidence to law enforcement has hit a snag in the state Senate over questions about the true intentions of the bill.

82. Focus on education bills in final days of session -

NASHVILLE (AP) — As the 108th Tennessee General Assembly draws to a close, state lawmakers are hoping to push through education proposals that include creating a state panel to authorize charter schools for five counties and a measure that would clear the way for cities to begin forming municipal school systems.

83. Welfare penalty for parents dead this session -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The sponsor of a proposal to dock the welfare payments of parents whose children fail school refused to listen to a little girl opposing the measure Thursday, saying she was being used as a prop.

84. Welfare penalty for parents dead this session -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The sponsor of a proposal to dock the welfare payments of parents whose children fail school refused to listen to a little girl opposing the measure Thursday, saying she was being used as a prop.

85. Georgia senator opposed to border resolution cheered -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee lawmakers gave rousing applause to welcome a Georgia senator who opposed a resolution calling for redrawing the border between the two states.

Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville introduced Republican Sen. Jeff Mullis of Chickamauga, Ga., during a floor session on Wednesday.

86. Charter panel bill stalls in Senate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Lawmakers questioned a proposal to create a special panel to authorize charter schools in several Tennessee counties during debate at the state Legislature Tuesday, while a nonprofit group criticized the governor's decision to withdraw his school voucher program.

87. Haslam voucher bill dead this session -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Republican leader carrying Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to create school vouchers in Tennessee said he's decided to let it die this session because he's tired of the "gamesmanship."

88. 'All or nothing' on Haslam school voucher bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris said Tuesday that lawmakers will either have to approve Gov. Bill Haslam's approach to a school voucher program in Tennessee or face the measure being withdrawn for the year.

89. Senate OKs virtual school measure -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to tighten enrollment requirements at privately run online schools has passed the Senate.

The measure guided by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was approved 27-2 on Thursday.

90. Senate OKs virtual school measure -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to tighten enrollment requirements at privately run online schools has passed the Senate.

The measure guided by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was approved 27-2 on Thursday.

91. Bill to tighten online school enrollment delayed -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to tighten enrollment requirements at privately run online schools in Tennessee has been delayed in the Senate.

The measure guided by Republican Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris of Collierville was put off until Thursday.

92. Haslam's school voucher bill delayed -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State Republicans are trying to decide between two competing proposals that would create a school voucher program in Tennessee.

Gov. Bill Haslam's measure had been scheduled to be heard Wednesday in the Senate Education Committee, but was delayed for two weeks.

93. Supermarket wine opponents contribute heavily -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Contributions totaling more than $364,000 have poured into lawmakers' campaign accounts over the past two years from liquor wholesalers, package stores and the beer industry — three groups that have traditionally opposed changing state law to allow wine to be sold in supermarkets.

94. Supermarket wine bill clears panel by single vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A proposal to allow wine to be sold in Tennessee supermarkets and convenience stores scored its first legislative victory on Tuesday after years of frustration.

The Senate State and Local Government Committee voted 5-4 to advance the bill that would allow cities and counties to hold referendums next year to decide whether to expand wine sales beyond the state's nearly 600 licensed liquor stores.

95. Top residential real estate transactions of December 2012 -

Top December 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

96. Kyle wants GOP Senate caucus meetings open -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The top Democrat in the state Senate is calling on Republicans to make the upper chamber of the General Assembly subject to open government laws, saying he wants to see more transparency in government.

97. CapWealth names Venable president, COO -

Independent investment advisory firm CapWealth Advisors LLC has selected Phoebe J. Venable to be its president and chief operating officer.

98. More spotlight, please -

Before the legislature boosted funding for Tennessee’s state film incentive program in early May, a number of movies with stories rooted in locations throughout Middle Tennessee were shot elsewhere.

99. House Democrats keep top leadership in place -

NASHVILLE (AP) — House Democrats and Senate Republicans voted Wednesday to keep their top leadership in place.

Democratic Rep. Mike Turner of Nashville overcame a challenge from Rep. Johnny Shaw of Bolivar to maintain his chairman seat, and Rep. Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley was re-elected as minority leader without opposition.

100. Top residential real estate transactions for August 2012 -

August 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.