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Editorial Results (free)

1. Roe 'settled' law? Justices' earlier assurances now in doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — During his confirmation to the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh convinced Sen. Susan Collins that he thought a woman's right to an abortion was "settled law," calling the court cases affirming it "precedent on precedent" that could not be casually overturned.

2. Fall will test leaders' ability to keep Congress on rails -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Year-end pileups of crucial legislation and the brinkmanship that goes with them are normal behavior for Congress. This autumn, lawmakers are barreling toward battles that are striking for the risks they pose to both parties and their leaders.

3. Senate parliamentarian deals blow to Dems' immigration push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats can't use their $3.5 trillion package bolstering social and climate programs for their plan to give millions of immigrants a chance to become citizens, the Senate's parliamentarian said, a crushing blow to what was the party's clearest pathway in years to attaining that long-sought goal.

4. As flights resume, plight of Afghan allies tests Biden's vow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Evacuation flights have resumed for Westerners, but thousands of at-risk Afghans who had helped the United States are still stranded in their homeland with the U.S. Embassy shuttered, all American diplomats and troops gone and the Taliban now in charge.

5. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

6. Three senators test positive for COVID in breakthrough cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three senators said Thursday they have tested positive for COVID-19 despite being vaccinated, a high-profile collection of breakthrough cases that comes as the highly infectious delta variant spreads rapidly across the United States.

7. Biden's judges: More diverse and more of them -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With no Supreme Court opening to slow them, President Joe Biden and Senate Democrats are putting judges on federal trial and appellate courts at a much faster clip than any of Biden's recent predecessors, including former President Donald Trump.

8. Biden pitches huge budget, says Dems will 'get a lot done' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden made a quick foray to the U.S. Capitol hunting support for his multitrillion-dollar agenda of infrastructure, health care and other programs, a potential landmark achievement that would require near-unanimous backing from fractious Democrats.

9. Top Davidson County residential sales for second quarter 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

10. 'Blindsided' GOP senators put infrastructure deal in doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Livid and "blindsided" over President Joe Biden's refusal to sign a bipartisan infrastructure deal without passage of his broader priorities, Republican senators Friday were frantically considering options as the future of the sweeping compromise appeared in doubt.

11. Paid in full? Biden, GOP struggle over infrastructure costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional negotiators and the White House appear open to striking a roughly $1 trillion deal on infrastructure. But they are struggling with the hard part — how to pay for it.

12. Dems eye $6T plan on infrastructure, Medicare, immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are eyeing a $6 trillion infrastructure investment plan that goes far beyond roads and bridges to include core party priorities, from lowering the Medicare eligibility age to 60 and adding vision and hearing benefits to incorporating a long-running effort to provide legal status for certain immigrants, including "Dreamers."

13. Bipartisan infrastructure group swells to 21 senators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan senators' group working on a $1 trillion infrastructure compromise more than doubled in size to 21 members Wednesday, a key threshold that gives momentum to their effort as President Joe Biden returns from overseas at a pivotal time for his big legislative priority.

14. Senate set to elevate judge on Biden's high court short list -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is expected Monday to narrowly confirm the first appellate court judge of President Joe Biden's tenure, elevating a judge with strong prospects of landing on the president's short list should a Supreme Court should a vacancy arise.

15. GOP senators set summer deadline on Congress' policing bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers should reach a bipartisan deal on revamping policing procedures by early summer or abandon the effort, Republicans said Wednesday, a day after George Floyd's family used visits to the White House and the Capitol to prod lawmakers to act.

16. GOP purged Cheney for 'unity,' but Trump bent on retribution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican leaders insisted that purging Trump critic Rep. Liz Cheney from their ranks was necessary to unify the party ahead of next year's midterm elections.

But former President Donald Trump, who celebrated Cheney's ouster by calling her a "bitter, horrible human being," has made clear he has no interest in putting the hostilities behind him as he continues to seek vengeance and lie about the 2020 election.

17. House GOP ousts Trump critic Liz Cheney from top post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans ousted Rep. Liz Cheney from her post as the chamber's No. 3 GOP leader on Wednesday, punishing her after she repeatedly rebuked former President Donald Trump for his false claims of election fraud and his role in fomenting the Jan. 6 Capitol attack.

18. Biden's agenda: What can pass and what faces steep odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out a long list of policy priorities in his speech to Congress — and some are more politically plausible than others.

The two parties are working together in some areas, including on changes to policing and confronting the rise of hate crimes against Asian Americans. But Republicans are likely to block other Democratic initiatives on immigration and voting rights.

19. GOP leaders diverge on Trump, putting party in limbo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One by one, the Republican leaders of Congress have made the trip to Mar-a-Lago to see Donald Trump.

Kevin McCarthy visited after the deadly Jan 6 Capitol insurrection, counting on the former president's help to win back control of the House in 2022. The chair of the Senate Republican campaign committee, Rick Scott, stopped by to enlist Trump in efforts to regain the Senate. Lindsey Graham goes to play golf.

20. White House says it's working on access to migrant centers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House press secretary Jen Psaki declined to provide a specific date for when the media will get access to Border Patrol facilities temporarily holding thousands of migrant children seeking to live in the United States, but said Sunday the Biden administration was committed to transparency and "we're working to get that done as soon as we can."

21. Haaland OK'd at Interior, 1st Native American Cabinet head -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Monday confirmed New Mexico Rep. Deb Haaland as interior secretary, making her the first Native American to lead a Cabinet department and the first to lead the federal agency that has wielded influence over the nation's tribes for nearly two centuries.

22. Leading Senate Dem says outlook bleak on immigration bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A leader of Senate Democrats' drive to help millions of immigrants become citizens cast severe doubt on its prospects Monday, as one of President Joe Biden's early priorities seemed in danger of running aground in a Congress his own party controls.

23. With virus aid in sight, Democrats debate filibuster changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With President Joe Biden on the verge of his first big legislative victory, a key moderate Democrat says he's open to changing Senate rules that could allow for more party-line votes to push through other parts of the White House's agenda such as voting rights.

24. Pelosi says bipartisan panel should investigate Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that a proposed commission to study what went wrong in the deadly Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol must be "strongly bipartisan" and have the power to subpoena witnesses, similar to a commission that studied the 9/11 terrorist attacks and spurred major reforms in the intelligence community and beyond.

25. Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that Congress will establish an independent, Sept. 11-style commission to look into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol.

26. Trump looks to reassert himself after impeachment acquittal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump took in the win at Mar-a-Lago, surrounded by friends and family. His lawyers celebrated with hugs and smiles. One joked, "We're going to Disney World!"

Now acquitted in his second Senate impeachment trial, Trump is preparing for the next phase of his post-presidency life. Feeling emboldened by the trial's outcome, he is expected to reemerge from a self-imposed hibernation at his club in Palm Beach, Florida, and is eyeing ways to reassert his power.

27. Trial highlights: Harrowing footage, focus on Trump's words -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats opened their first day of arguments in former President Donald Trump's impeachment trial with searing footage of the U.S. Capitol riot as they painted Trump as an "inciter in chief" who systematically riled up his supporters and falsely convinced them the election had been stolen, culminating in the deadly attack.

28. Trump rejects Dems' request to testify at impeachment trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats on Thursday asked Donald Trump to testify under oath for his Senate impeachment trial, challenging him to respond to their charge that he incited a violent mob to storm the Capitol. A Trump adviser said the former president won't testify.

29. Trump names 2 lawyers to impeachment defense team -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump announced a new impeachment legal defense team just one day after it was revealed that he had parted ways with an earlier set of attorneys with just over a week to go before his Senate trial.

30. Democrat floats Trump censure as conviction grows unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine said Wednesday that he's discussing with colleagues whether a censure resolution to condemn former President Donald Trump for his role in the deadly Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol could be an alternative to impeachment, even as the Senate proceeds with a trial.

31. GOP largely sides against holding Trump impeachment trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — All but five Senate Republicans voted in favor of an effort to dismiss Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial on Tuesday, making clear a conviction of the former president for "incitement of insurrection" after the deadly Capitol siege on Jan. 6 is unlikely.

32. Trump impeachment to go to Senate Monday, triggering trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday that she will send the article of impeachment against Donald Trump to the Senate on Monday, triggering the start of the former president's trial on a charge of incitement of insurrection over the deadly Capitol Jan. 6 riot.

33. McConnell seeks to push Trump impeachment trial to February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell is proposing to push back the start of Donald Trump's impeachment trial to February to give the former president time to prepare and review his case.

34. Pelosi vows action on impeachment trial: 'We must do it' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are pushing for a quick impeachment trial for Donald Trump over the riots at the Capitol, arguing a full reckoning is necessary before the country — and the Congress — can move on.

35. Graham says he hopes Trump stays Republican Party leader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina says he hopes Donald Trump will continue to be the leader of the Republican Party after his election defeat and second impeachment.

36. Democrats build impeachment case, alleging 'dangerous crime' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The lead prosecutor for President Donald Trump's historic second impeachment began building his case for conviction at trial, asserting on Sunday that Trump's incitement of the mob that stormed the U.S. Capitol was "the most dangerous crime" ever committed by a president against the United States. A Senate trial could begin as soon as this week, just as Democrat Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president.

37. Timing of Trump trial uncertain as Pelosi gives no clues -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi offered no clues Friday on her plans to send President Donald Trump's impeachment to the Senate for trial, but made it clear that Democrats intend to move swiftly on Joe Biden's legislative priorities, including funding for coronavirus vaccines and relief aid.

38. EXPLAINER: What's next after House impeachment vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Now that the House has impeached President Donald Trump for the second time, Speaker Nancy Pelosi must figure out the best strategy for arguing the case before the Senate.

Senate rules say the trial must start soon after the chamber receives the article of impeachment, which charges "incitement of insurrection" after an angry mob of Trump's supporters invaded the Capitol last week. But Pelosi has not said when the House will deliver it.

39. Delta, United, Alaska: No guns in luggage for DC flights -

Airlines and airports say they are stepping up security before next week's presidential inauguration, with Delta, United and Alaska saying they will prohibit passengers flying to the Washington area from putting guns in checked bags.

40. Enduring 2nd impeachment, Trump stands largely silent, alone -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His place in the history books rewritten, President Donald Trump endured his second impeachment largely alone and silent.

For more than four years, Trump has dominated the national discourse like no one before him. Yet when his legacy was set in stone on Wednesday, he was stunningly left on the sidelines.

41. EXPLAINER: What's next after House impeachment vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has been impeached by the House days before leaving office, becoming the first American president to be impeached twice.

The previous three impeachments — those of Presidents Andrew Johnson, Bill Clinton and Trump — took months before a final vote, including investigations in the House and hearings. This time it only took a week after Trump encouraged a crowd of his supporters who attacked the U.S. Capitol.

42. McConnell open to convicting Trump in impeachment trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pointedly did not rule out that he might eventually vote to convict the now twice-impeached President Donald Trump, but he also blocked a quick Senate impeachment trial.

43. Trump impeached after Capitol riot in historic second charge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House for a historic second time, charged with "incitement of insurrection" over the deadly mob siege of the U.S. Capitol in a swift and stunning collapse of his final days in office.

44. McConnell blocks quick Trump trial, unsure how he'll vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Wednesday blocked a quick Senate impeachment trial for President Donald Trump  but did not rule out that he might eventually vote to convict the now twice-impeached president .

45. EXPLAINER: How Trump's 2nd impeachment will unfold -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is expected to impeach President Donald Trump for his encouragement of supporters who stormed the U.S. Capitol, a vote that would make him the first American president to be impeached twice.

46. Enduring 2nd impeachment, Trump stands largely silent, alone -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His place in the history books rewritten, President Donald Trump endured his second impeachment largely alone and silent.

For more than four years, Trump has dominated the national discourse like no one before him. Yet when his legacy was set in stone on Wednesday, he was stunningly left on the sidelines.

47. Analysis: A GOP reckoning after turning blind eye to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the heart of the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol was a lie, one that was allowed to fester and flourish by many of the same Republicans now condemning President Donald Trump for whipping his supporters into a frenzy with his false attacks on the integrity of the 2020 election.

48. Stay or go? After Trump-fueled riot, aides debate early exit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A steady stream of Trump administration officials are beating an early path to the exits as a protest against the deadly siege of the U.S. Capitol this week even as others wrestling with the stay-or-go question conclude that they owe it to the public to see things through to the end.

49. Trump finally faces reality — amid talk of early ouster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With 12 days left in his term, President Donald Trump has finally bent to reality amid growing talk of trying to force him out early, acknowledging he'll peacefully leave after Congress affirmed his defeat.

50. Somber Senate unites to reject election challenges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sober, shaken Senate returned to its hallowed chamber Wednesday night to slap away a frivolous election challenge, but its secondary purpose seemed to be to rise from the wreckage of a shocking day in which they were forced to flee the Capitol by a mob of supporters of President Donald Trump.

51. Biden win confirmed after pro-Trump mob storms US Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress confirmed Democrat Joe Biden as the presidential election winner before dawn Thursday after a violent mob loyal to President Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday in a stunning attempt to overturn the election, undercut the nation's democracy and keep Trump in the White House.

52. Rare GOP rebuff of Trump in last days of chaotic Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is ending a chaotic session like few others, a two-year political firestorm that started with the longest federal government shutdown in U.S. history, was riven by impeachment and a pandemic, and now closes with a rare rebuff by Republicans of President Donald Trump.

53. McConnell warns GOP off Electoral College brawl in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fending off a messy fight that could damage Republicans ahead of Georgia Senate runoffs, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell warned fellow GOP senators not to join President Donald Trump's extended assault on the Electoral College results.

54. Turning the page? Republicans acknowledge Biden's victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than a month after the election, top Republicans finally acknowledged Joe Biden as the next U.S. president, a collapse in GOP resistance to the millions of voters who decisively chose the Democrat. Foreign leaders joined the parade, too, including Russia's Vladimir Putin.

55. GOP leader McConnell finally acknowledges Biden won election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell congratulated Democrat Joe Biden as president-elect on Tuesday, saying the Electoral College "has spoken."

The Republican leader's statement, delivered in a speech on the Senate floor, ends weeks of silence over President Donald Trump's defeat. It came a day after electors met and officially affirmed Biden's election win.

56. Trump says Barr resigning, will leave before Christmas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr, one of President Donald Trump's staunchest allies, is departing amid lingering tension over the president's baseless claims of election fraud and the investigation into President-elect Joe Biden's son.

57. Optimism growing for COVID relief bill as pressure builds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Optimism about delivering long-sought COVID-19 relief is building on Capitol Hill after additional rank-and-file lawmakers voiced support for a bipartisan, middle-of-the-road plan taking shape in the Senate and as top congressional leaders connected on the topic for the first time in months.

58. Political fight brewing over Biden's WH budget chief nominee -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the Office of Management and Budget is quickly emerging as a political battle that could disrupt his efforts to swiftly fill out his administration.

59. GOP increasingly accepts Trump's defeat — but not in public -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Kamala Harris returned to the Senate this week for the first time as vice president-elect, her Republican colleagues offered their congratulations and Sen. Lindsey Graham greeted her with a fist bump.

60. GOP increasingly accepts Trump's defeat — but not in public -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When Kamala Harris returned to the Senate this week for the first time as vice president-elect, her Republican colleagues offered their congratulations and Sen. Lindsey Graham greeted her with a fist bump.

61. Twitter: 300,000 tweets flagged over election disinformation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEO of Twitter says the social media site flagged some 300,000 tweets as part of efforts to combat disinformation in the period around the 2020 election between President Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden.

62. Facebook, Twitter CEOs facing questions on election measures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel has summoned the CEOs of Facebook and Twitter to defend their handling of disinformation in the 2020 election between President Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden. But the senators are deeply divided by party over the integrity and results of the election itself.

63. Facebook, Twitter CEOs to be pressed on election handling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The CEOs of Facebook and Twitter are being summoned before Congress to defend their handling of disinformation in the 2020 presidential election, even as lawmakers questioning them are deeply divided over the election's integrity and results.

64. A few cracks but no big GOP break with Trump on Biden's win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The most powerful Republicans in Washington are standing firmly behind President Donald Trump and his unsupported claims of voter fraud for now, but new cracks emerged among GOP leaders elsewhere who believe it's time to treat Democrat Joe Biden like the president-elect he is.

65. Graham giving $1M to help Georgia's GOP senators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, who was just reelected in South Carolina, says he's donating $1 million of his campaign money to help two GOP senators win runoff races in neighboring Georgia.

66. Trump, who never admits defeat, mulls how to keep up fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump never admits defeat. But he faces a stark choice now that Democrat Joe Biden has won the White House: Concede graciously for the sake of the nation or don't — and get evicted anyway.

67. Romney: Trump's election fraud claim wrong, 'reckless' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Key Republican lawmakers, including 2012 presidential nominee Mitt Romney, on Friday slammed President Donald Trump's unsubstantiated claim that Democrats are trying to "steal" the election. But some GOP leaders struck a more neutral tone — and others urged the White House to fight.

68. Senate control hangs in balance with a few races undecided -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Control of the Senate  hung in the balance Thursday, a cliffhanger after Republicans trounced Democratic challengers in crucial states but failed to lock down the seats needed to retain their tenuous majority.

69. Election splits Congress, GOP bolstered as Democrats falter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The election scrambled seats in the House and Senate but ultimately left Congress much like it began, deeply split as voters resisted big changes despite the heated race at the top of the ticket for the White House.

70. Democrats' Senate drive halted by GOP; key races undecided -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats faced increasingly long odds as the battle for Senate control hangs in balance, and Republicans brushed back multiple challengers to protect their majority. Still, it was too soon for the GOP to declare victory.

71. Democrats' Senate drive halted by GOP, but control teeters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats had a disappointing night in the battle for Senate control, but it was too soon for Republicans to take a victory lap Wednesday, although they brushed back multiple challengers to protect their now teetering majority.

72. Control of Senate at stake as Trump's allies face Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Control of the Senate is a razor-close proposition in Tuesday's election, as Republicans fight to retain their majority against a surge of Democratic candidates confronting the president's allies across a vast political map.

73. GOP tries to save its Senate majority, with or without Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are fighting to save their majority, a final election push against the onslaught of challengers in states once off limits to Democrats but now hotbeds of a potential backlash to President Donald Trump and his allies on Capitol Hill.

74. In South, most Black Senate candidates since Reconstruction -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — In the battle for control of the U.S. Senate this year, the Deep South is fielding more Black candidates than it has since Reconstruction.

In South Carolina, Jaime Harrison is raising a previously unfathomable amount of money in what has become a competitive fight to unseat one of the more powerful Republicans in the Senate. He's joined by Raphael Warnock in neighboring Georgia, the leading Democrat in a crowded field running for the seat held by an appointed Republican. Mike Espy and Adrian Perkins, meanwhile, are launching spirited bids for the Senate in Mississippi and Louisiana, respectively.

75. Barrett confirmed by Senate for Supreme Court, takes oath -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Amy Coney Barrett was confirmed to the Supreme Court late Monday by a deeply divided Senate, with Republicans overpowering Democrats to install President Donald Trump's nominee days before the election and secure a likely conservative court majority for years to come.

76. Biden goes on offense in Georgia while Trump targets Midwest -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One week until Election Day, Joe Biden is going on offense, heading Tuesday to Georgia — which hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992 — and pushing into other territory where President Donald Trump was once expected to easily repeat his wins from four years ago.

77. GOP senators power Barrett toward high court confirmation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Overpowering Democratic opposition, Senate Republicans are set to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, approving President Donald Trump's nominee a week before Election Day and securing likely conservative court dominance for years to come.

78. Democrats ask Pence to skip Barrett vote over COVID-19 risk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A deeply torn Senate is set to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court, but Democratic leaders are asking Vice President Mike Pence to stay away from presiding over Monday's session due to potential health risks after his aides tested positive for COVID-19.

79. Senate GOP marches ahead on Barrett over Democrats' blockade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is poised for a rare weekend session as Republicans race to put Amy Coney Barrett on the Supreme Court  and cement a conservative majority before Election Day despite Democratic efforts to stall President Donald Trump's nominee.

80. Parties' late spending on Senate races shows GOP's jeopardy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans and Democrats are unleashing millions in eleventh-hour spending to contest Senate seats in states that read like a list of reliable GOP strongholds: Alaska. Arizona. Georgia. Iowa. Kansas. Montana. South Carolina. Texas.

81. GOP-led Senate panel advances Barrett despite Dems' boycott -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans powered past a Democratic boycott Thursday to advance Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court  nomination to the full Senate, keeping President Donald Trump's pick on track for confirmation before Election Day.

82. GOP-led Senate panel advances Barrett despite Dems' boycott -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans powered past a Democratic boycott Thursday to advance Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court  nomination to the full Senate, keeping President Donald Trump's pick on track for confirmation before Election Day.

83. AP Explains: What's next for the Supreme Court nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett is speeding toward confirmation, with a majority of the Senate supporting her and a final vote expected Monday. She could be sworn in as a justice almost immediately, just a week before the election.

84. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on virus, taxes, Bidens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back fully campaigning after COVID-19 sidelined him, President Donald Trump returned to familiar form, spreading a litany of falsehoods.

Over the weekend, he asserted yet again the virus was "rounding the corner" when it isn't, misrepresented Democratic rival Joe Biden's tax proposals and resurrected unfounded claims about Biden and the business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden, in Ukraine.

85. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on virus, taxes, Bidens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back fully campaigning after COVID-19 sidelined him, President Donald Trump returned to familiar form, spreading a litany of falsehoods.

Over the weekend, he asserted yet again the virus was "rounding the corner" when it isn't, misrepresented Democratic rival Joe Biden's tax proposals and resurrected unfounded claims about Biden and the business dealings of his son, Hunter Biden, in Ukraine.

86. GOP, Dems hope SCOTUS fight bolsters Senate prospects -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For Republicans, the nomination fight over Amy Coney Barrett is a chance to seal conservative control of the Supreme Court for decades. For some GOP senators, it's also a lifeline they hope will preserve their political careers and their party's control of the chamber in November's elections.

87. Senate Judiciary sets Oct. 22 vote on Barrett's nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee convened on Thursday set an Oct. 22 vote on Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court nomination as Republicans race to confirm President Donald Trump's pick before the Nov. 3 election.

88. Barrett keeps Democrats, Trump at bay in Senate hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Over and over, Amy Coney Barrett said she'd be her own judge if she's confirmed to the Supreme Court. But she was careful not to take on the president who nominated her and sought to create distance between herself and her past personal positions, writings on controversial subjects and even her late mentor.

89. Takeaways: Pardon power, silent mics on Barrett's final day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett faced a second day of questions Wednesday from the Senate Judiciary Committee as Democrats kept up their focus on health care three weeks before the Nov. 3 presidential election.

90. Barrett tells doubtful Dems she'd keep open mind on court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett presented herself Friday in her final round of Senate confirmation questioning as a judge with a conservative approach and deeply held personal and religious beliefs but committed to keeping an open mind in rulings on the court.

91. Barrett back on Capitol Hill for senators' final questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett returns to Capitol Hill for a third day of confirmation hearings as senators dig deeper into the conservative judge's outlook on abortion, health care and a potentially disputed presidential election — the Democrats running out of time to stop Republicans pushing her quick confirmation.

92. Takeaways: Barrett is reticent as Dems focus on health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett faced her first day's worth of questions Tuesday from Republicans and Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, and it was a calmer affair than other recent confirmation hearings.

93. AP FACT CHECK: Lindsey Graham revises history on Obamacare -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The senator leading Supreme Court confirmation hearings Tuesday launched into revisionist history on "Obamacare," implying it was designed to help Democratic states like California, New York and Massachusetts while doling out less to states like his, South Carolina.

94. Barrett refuses to commit to recusal in election cases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett batted back Democrats' skeptical questions on abortion, gun rights and election disputes in lively Senate confirmation testimony Tuesday, insisting she would bring no personal agenda to the court but would decide cases as they come.

95. Senate Democrats' fundraising success puts GOP on defensive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Buoyed by massive fundraising success, Democratic Senate candidates are mounting a push in Republican states that few would have thought possible just a few months ago, placing continued GOP control of the chamber at risk.

96. Barrett to face senators on health care, legal precedent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Amy Coney Barrett will face senators' questions over her approach to health care, legal precedent and even the presidential election during a second day of confirmation hearings on track to lock in a conservative court majority for years to come.

97. Takeaways: Coronavirus at center of Supreme Court hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus won't surrender the national stage to anyone — not to President Donald Trump, Judge Amy Coney Barrett or majority Republicans holding the power to confirm nominees to the Supreme Court.

98. Dem challenger in SC Senate race raises record $57 million -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina Democrat Jaime Harrison has shattered congressional fundraising records, bringing in $57 million in the final quarter for his U.S. Senate campaign against Republican incumbent Lindsey Graham as the GOP tries to retain control of the chamber in the Nov. 3 election.

99. Graham's last stand? Senator leads Barrett court hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina is wielding the gavel in the performance of his political life.

Once a biting critic of President Donald Trump, the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman on Monday launched confirmation hearings for Judge Amy Coney Barrett in a bid to seal a 6-to-3 conservative majority on the Supreme Court. Hanging in the balance could be the future of government health care during a coronavirus pandemic that's claimed more than 214,000 American lives. And Graham's own career appears in jeopardy like never before.

100. Health care is focus as Barrett Supreme Court hearing opens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats branded Supreme Court  nominee Amy Coney Barrett a threat to Americans' health care during the coronavirus pandemic Monday at the start of a fast-tracked hearing that Republicans are confident will end with Barrett's confirmation to replace the late  Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg before Election Day.