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Editorial Results (free)

1. AP FACT CHECK: Trump myths on dipping oil prices, cold snaps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is wrong when he suggests global warming can't be happening if it's really cold outside.

He points to a "brutal and extended cold blast" in the Eastern U.S. during Thanksgiving week and wonders aloud to his Twitter followers, "Whatever happened to Global Warming?" In fact, he is confusing short-term weather patterns with longer-term climate change. A scientific report put out Friday by his own administration rejects as folly any notion that a particular plunge in temperatures can cast doubt on whether Earth is warming.

2. A US privacy law could be good for Google - but bad for you -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is taking the first steps toward setting national rules governing how companies use consumers data — although one of its goals might be to prevent states from enacting stronger privacy protections of their own.

3. Senate panel to hear from internet execs on privacy policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is hoping Congress can come up with a new set of national rules governing how companies can use consumers' data that finds a balance between "privacy and prosperity."

4. Trump to nominate economist Nellie Liang for Fed board seat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is set to nominate former Federal Reserve economist Nellie Liang to the central bank's board of governors, tapping an official who played a key role at the Fed in dealing with the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis.

5. Election security bill backers say delay helps Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just two months before the midterm elections, bipartisan legislation to try to prevent foreign hacking into U.S. election systems is stalled in Congress as the White House and some Republicans worry it could exert too much federal control over the states.

6. Trump intends to sign Mexico deal in 90 days, Trade Rep says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has notified Congress that he plans to sign a trade agreement with Mexico — and Canada, if it is willing — in 90 days, U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said Friday.

7. Trump says he won't compromise with Canada in NAFTA deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has said privately that he won't make compromises with Canada in high-stakes talks to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement.

Trump's remarks raised doubts about whether the two countries can quickly reach a deal to keep Canada in the 24-year-old trading bloc, along with the United States and Mexico.

8. US-China trade talks end with no breakthrough -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and Chinese negotiators ended two days of meetings Thursday without breaking a deadlock over trade that has unnerved financial markets and disrupted global commerce.

The delegations "exchanged views on how to achieve fairness, balance and reciprocity in the economic relationship," Lindsay Walters, a White House spokeswoman, said in a statement. She did not mention further talks.

9. Charles Koch warns Trump trade war could trigger recession -

COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Billionaire industrialist Charles Koch warned Sunday that Trump administration trade policies could trigger a recession.

The conservative activist lashed out at the Republican president's brewing international trade war as hundreds of donors gathered for a private retreat in the Colorado mountains.

10. Trump slams rate increases by independent Federal Reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday cast aside concerns about the Federal Reserve's independence, saying he was "not happy" with the Fed's recent interest rate increases.

Trump told CNBC in an interview: "I don't like all of this work that we're putting into the economy and then I see rates going up."

11. Court confirmation process likely to follow Gorsuch playbook -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican game plan for selecting the next member of the Supreme Court was ready to go even before longtime Justice Anthony Kennedy made his retirement announcement this week.

12. Auto executives to meet with Trump on gas mileage standards -

Executives from 10 auto companies will meet with President Donald Trump and cabinet officials on Friday to discuss the administration's plan to reduce gas mileage and pollution requirements enacted during the Obama administration.

13. China raises tariffs on US pork, fruit in trade dispute -

BEIJING (AP) — China raised import duties on a $3 billion list of U.S. pork, apples and other products Monday in an escalating dispute with Washington over trade and industrial policy.

The government of President Xi Jinping said it was responding to a U.S. tariff hike on steel and aluminum. But that is just one facet of sprawling tensions with Washington, Europe and Japan over a state-led economic model they complain hampers market access, protects Chinese companies and subsidizes exports in violation of Beijing's free-trade commitments.

14. President Trump goes after a favorite target, Amazon -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump took another shot at Amazon.com Thursday, tweeting that the online retailer pays "little or no taxes" and that it uses the U.S. Postal Service as "their Delivery Boy."

15. What swamp? Lobbyists get ethics waivers to work for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his appointees have stocked federal agencies with ex-lobbyists and corporate lawyers who now help regulate the very industries from which they previously collected paychecks, despite promising as a candidate to drain the swamp in Washington.

16. What swamp? Lobbyists get ethics waivers to work for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his appointees have stocked federal agencies with ex-lobbyists and corporate lawyers who now help regulate the very industries from which they previously collected paychecks, despite promising as a candidate to drain the swamp in Washington.

17. Trump Jr.'s foreign policy speech in India boosts concerns -

NEW DELHI (AP) — As criticism mounted that the American president's eldest son was pushing an ethics boundary by making a foreign policy speech at an Indian business summit, conference organizers hurriedly changed the speech's title.

18. Potholes ahead for Trump's upcoming public works proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration will soon release its long-anticipated public works plan, trying to fulfill a campaign pledge but set to fall short of some ambitious goals.
As a candidate, Donald Trump promised to generate at least $1 trillion in infrastructure spending. As president, he is relying on state and local governments to pony up a significant share of the total.
Trump told mayors at the White House this week that he would present his proposal after Tuesday's State of the Union address.
"We're also working to rebuild our crumbling infrastructure by stimulating a $1 trillion investment, and that'll actually probably end up being about $1.7 trillion," Trump said.
Officials said Washington's commitment will be far smaller — and the benefits contingent in large part on state and local support.
The administration's plan calls for $200 billion in federal spending over 10 years, according to a six-page summary reviewed by The Associated Press.
The summary, widely and unofficially disseminated in the capital, is a snapshot of the administration's thinking. While details may change, the broad outlines are expected to remain the same, according to officials familiar with the document. They spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the internal document.
Half the money would go to grants for transportation, water, flood control, cleanup at some of the country's most polluted sites and other projects.
States, local governments and other project sponsors could use the grants for no more than 20 percent of the cost. That's consistent with comments from administration officials that they want to use federal dollars as incentives, and that most of rest of the money would come from other sources.
The summary also includes $14 billion over 10 years for current programs that use taxpayer money to attract private investment or lower financing costs.
White House spokeswoman Lindsay Walters said Trump and his team "are ready to work with Congress to move legislation forward quickly. America shouldn't have to wait any longer for better infrastructure."
Congress, however, is already bogged down on immigration and the budget, so the prospects seem slim for approving major new spending before the November elections.
One uncertainty is whether project sponsors could combine grant money with other federal sources such as highway and transit aid programs.
Transit agencies generally count on the federal government for half the cost of major construction projects, and federal dollars can make up as much as 80 percent of some highway projects.
One of the largest projects is the New York-New Jersey Gateway program, which includes building a $13 billion rail tunnel under the Hudson River. The states want Washington to pay half, but they are getting the cold shoulder from the Transportation Department.
Public works spending was viewed as a potential area of bipartisan compromise when Trump took office. But first came efforts to repeal the Obama-era health plan and overhaul taxes.
One-quarter of the expected total, $50 billion, would go toward rural projects — transportation, broadband, water, waste, power, flood management and ports. That is intended to address criticism from some Republican senators that the administration's initial emphasis on public-private partnerships would do little to help rural, GOP-leaning states.
Under such financing ventures, private investors generally put up much of the construction costs in exchange for a share of revenue after the project is completed. Toll roads are the most common example.
But rural areas usually don't generate enough traffic to make toll roads or other public work projects profitable.
Past attempts to designate infrastructure dollars in ways that favor either rural or urban areas have often prompted political fights.
The administration is not saying where it expects to find the $20 billion a year to pay for the plan, beyond unspecified budget cuts.
The new budget proposal, due next month, is expected to mirror the blueprint from last year, when the new administration proposed cutting billions from programs that benefit state and local government services, particularly urban centers.
Local officials say those shortfalls would make it more difficult to come up with the infrastructure spending Trump is counting on.
The plan also is silent on what the administration would do about the Highway Trust Fund, which finances most highway and transit projects. It is forecast to go broke in 2021.
Requiring states and localities to pick up 80 percent of the cost of highway projects, as the Trump plan proposes, is a fundamental shift of responsibility for infrastructure away from the federal government, said Chris Spear, president of the American Trucking Associations.
"You are now asking states to pick up the lion's share," he said. "That's not going to sell."

...

19. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

20. Tax package would ease hit to residents of high-tax states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Republicans on Tuesday were speeding toward an agreement on a massive tax package that would ease the hit on Americans living in high-tax states and appease corporations that could have lost precious tax breaks.

21. Admin says big revenue from GOP tax plan; analysts less rosy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican tax plan will deliver a swift adrenaline shot to the economy that will send hundreds of billions pouring into federal tax coffers, the Trump administration asserts in a new analysis. But nonpartisan analysts make a less rosy projection of new revenue from the tax legislation now before Congress.

22. Trump to pitch tax plan; Treasury offers rosy estimate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday will try to sell the American people on an unpopular Republican tax overhaul that his administration claims will generate a large part of $1.8 trillion in new revenue — a figure that a top Democratic lawmaker dismissed as "fake math."

23. Report: Trump-tied lobbyists cash in on their connections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The day after the presidential election, the Washington lobbying firm Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck touted its Republican team's "significant relationships ... with those who will steer the incoming Trump administration." It highlighted Marc Lampkin, managing partner of its Washington office and a Trump fundraiser.

24. Trump says he's 'fairly close' to deal on young immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Thursday said he was "fairly close" to a deal with congressional leaders to preserve protections for young immigrants living illegally in America but he's insisting on "massive border security" as part of any agreement.

25. Trump trashes media, cheers wins at $10 million fundraiser -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican donors paid $35,000 apiece to hear familiar a message from President Donald Trump: The media, particularly CNN, keep trying to take him down, and yet Republicans just keep on winning elections. He noted with pride that his party had won four special elections this year.

26. Campaigner-in-chief: Trump's politicking raises ethics flags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely five months into office, President Donald Trump keeps taking time out from governing to run for re-election.

On Wednesday night, he'll attend his first 2020 campaign fundraiser, rubbing elbows with some of the Republican Party's top donors on familiar turf: his own hotel down the street from the White House. He's already spent five evenings on the road at political rallies, always in states that supported him in November and always in front of an audience of thousands of fans who are screened and selected by his campaign aides.

27. No tapes: Trump says he didn't record meetings with Comey -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday on Twitter that he "did not make" and doesn't have any recordings of his private conversations with ousted former FBI Director James Comey.

28. White House grants 14 ethics waivers to staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michael Catanzaro, a former oil and gas lobbyist, can help shape the Trump administration's energy policies. Shahira Knight can weigh in on retirement matters even though she previously worked for Fidelity, a financial company specializing in retirement services.

29. White House grants 14 ethics waivers to staff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Michael Catanzaro, a former oil and gas lobbyist, can help shape the Trump administration's energy policies. Shahira Knight can weigh in on retirement matters even though she previously worked for Fidelity, a financial company specializing in retirement services.

30. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for Dec. 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

31. Top Middle Tennessee residential real estate transactions for November 2015 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

32. Top Middle Tennessee residential real estate transactions for August 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, August 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

33. Top 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

34. Top September 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top September 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

35. Top Middle Tennessee residential real estate transaction for first half of 2014 -

January through June 2014 residential real estate transactions of $500,000 or more for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

36. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for February 2014 -

Top February 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

37. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for 2013 -

Top 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

38. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for Oct. 2013 -

Top October 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

39. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for March 2013 -

Top March 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

40. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for 2012 -

Top 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

41. Top residential sales for July, 2012 -

July 2012 real estate trends for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford and Wilson counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.