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Editorial Results (free)

1. Holiday season defines winners and losers in retail -

NEW YORK (AP) — The 2018 holiday season turned out to be a mixed bag for retailers, with some of them defying a gloomy government report in December that raised concerns that shoppers were hunkering down everywhere.

2. Report finds problems with student loan servicing, oversight -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nine companies and organizations tasked with servicing the accounts of the nation's 30 million student loan borrowers repeatedly failed to do their jobs properly over a period of years and their regulator neglected to hold them responsible, a new report finds.

3. Financial watchdog proposes rollback of payday lending rules -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's federal financial watchdog said Wednesday that it plans to roll back most of its consumer protections governing payday lenders.

The move is a major win for the payday lending industry, which argued the government's regulations could kill off a large chunk of its business. It's also a big loss for consumer groups, who say payday lenders exploit the poor and disadvantaged with loans that have annual interest rates as much as 400 percent.

4. State Dept tells diplomats to go back to work with pay -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department on Thursday instructed all U.S. diplomats in Washington and elsewhere to return to work next week with pay, saying it had found money for their salaries at least temporarily despite the ongoing government shutdown.

5. Pelosi says Trump 'silent' on postponing State of the Union -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says President Donald Trump has yet to respond to her request that he postpone his State of the Union address until the government is reopened so workers can be paid for providing security for the grand Washington tradition.

6. GOP dismisses suggestion that State of Union be postponed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A grand Washington ritual became a potential casualty of the partial government shutdown as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi asked President Donald Trump to postpone his Jan. 29 State of the Union speech. She cited concerns about whether the hobbled government can provide adequate security, but Republicans cast her move as a ploy to deny Trump the stage.

7. Trump economists knowledge shutdown is drag on economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shutdown pressure on President Donald Trump mounted Wednesday as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi called on him to delay his State of the Union address and his own economists acknowledged the prolonged standoff was having a greater economic drag than previously thought.

8. AP Exclusive: Gov't questions unfair student loan practices -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the nation's largest student loan servicing companies may have driven tens of thousands of borrowers struggling with their debts into higher-cost repayment plans.

That's the finding of a Department of Education audit of practices at Navient Corp., the nation's third-largest student loan servicing company.

9. Banks could face tighter scrutiny under Rep. Maxine Waters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Come January, the banking industry is going to be on Rep. Maxine Waters' time.

With Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives, the California representative is expected to become chairwoman of the powerful House Financial Services Committee, which oversees the nation's banking system and its regulators.

10. Tech and health care lead US stock surge after midterms -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied Wednesday as investors were relieved to see that the U.S. midterm elections went largely as they expected they would. Big-name technology and consumer and health care companies soared as the S&P 500 index closed at its highest level in four weeks.

11. Ravens pile up team-record 11 sacks against former coach -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Baltimore Ravens swarmed around their new defensive coordinator, Don "Wink" Martindale, celebrating after a game that will go down in the record books.

Getting 11 sacks along with a shutout against the man Martindale replaced makes this mark even sweeter.

12. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for September 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

13. Teachers union sues student loan servicer Navient -

NEW YORK (AP) — The American Federation of Teachers filed a lawsuit Wednesday against Navient, one of the country's largest student loan servicing companies, alleging that it failed to guide eligible borrowers through a critical student loan forgiveness program.

14. Nation's top student loan official resigns in protest -

NEW YORK (AP) — The government's top official overseeing the $1.5 trillion student loan market resigned in protest on Monday, citing what he says is the White House's open hostility toward protecting the nation's millions of student loan borrowers.

15. Senate panel approves Trump's nominee for consumer watchdog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee on Thursday approved Kathy Kraninger as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as Republicans overlooked the protests of Democrats who said President Donald Trump's nominee is unqualified to lead the consumer watchdog.

16. Wells Fargo to pay $2.1 billion for role in housing bubble -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Wednesday to pay a $2.1 billion fine to settle allegations it misrepresented the types of mortgages it sold to investors during the housing bubble that ultimately led to the 2008 financial crisis.

17. Trump's pick to run consumer watchdog faces skeptical Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Trump's nominee to take over the nation's consumer watchdog agency exasperated some Democrats with vague answers at a Senate hearing Thursday, but Kathy Kraninger appears to be on her way to getting confirmed later this year.

18. Trump's pick to run consumer watchdog faces skeptical Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kathy Kraninger, President Donald Trump's nominee to take over the nation's watchdog for banks, credit cards and payday lenders, made her public debut in front of the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday, where she is facing extremely hostile questioning from Senate Democrats.

19. Watchdog says Education Dept. stonewalls student loan suit -

NEW YORK (AP) — The nation's consumer watchdog agency is accusing the Education Department of impeding a lawsuit that could potentially bring financial relief to millions of student loan borrowers.

20. Fed gives OK to 32 of 35 biggest US banks to raise dividends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve has given the OK to 32 of the 35 biggest banks in the U.S. to raise their dividends and buy back shares, judging their financial foundations sturdy enough to withstand a major economic downturn.

21. Alexa, I can trust you with my checkbook, right? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Hey Alexa, what's my bank account balance?

Big banks and financial companies have started to offer banking through virtual assistants — Amazon's Alexa, Apple's Siri, and Google's Assistant — in a way that will allow customers to check their balances, pay bills and, in the near future, send money just with their voice. And with the rapid adoption of Zelle, a bank-to-bank transfer system, it soon could be possible to send money to friends or family instantly with voice commands.

22. Group that advises gov't watchdog is disbanded, members say -

NEW YORK (AP) — The head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau dissolved a group of outside experts that acts as an important sounding board for the watchdog agency on economic and financial issues as well as policy.

23. Wells Fargo fined $1B for mortgage, auto lending abuses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo will pay $1 billion to federal regulators to settle charges tied to misconduct at its mortgage and auto lending business, the latest punishment levied against the banking giant for widespread customer abuses.

24. Goldman reports 26 percent surge in profits, helped by taxes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Investment bank Goldman Sachs said Tuesday that its first quarter profits rose by 26 percent, helped by a lower tax bill and a surge in market volatility.

The Wall Street bank earned $2.83 billion, or $6.95 a share, compared with $2.26 billion, or $5.15 a share, in the same period a year earlier. The results topped analysts' forecasts, who were looking for Goldman to earn $5.58 a share, according to FactSet.

25. Mulvaney says consumer watchdog is still doing its job -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mick Mulvaney faced criticism Wednesday from House Democrats of his actions as acting head of the nation's consumer financial watchdog, while Republicans praised him as a responsible steward of a bureau they've long considered too independent and powerful.

26. As interest rates rise, banks are paying more for deposits -

NEW YORK (AP) — Slowly, but surely, being a saver is paying off again.

For years after the recession, banks paid next to nothing on deposits — much to the detriment of savers everywhere. Now, banks have increased lending and need more deposits, so they're willing to pay higher interest rates.

27. As interest rates rise, banks are paying more for deposits -

NEW YORK (AP) — Slowly, but surely, being a saver is paying off again.

For years after the recession, banks paid next to nothing on deposits — much to the detriment of savers everywhere. Now, banks have increased lending and need more deposits, so they're willing to pay higher interest rates.

28. As interest rates rise, banks are paying more for deposits -

NEW YORK (AP) — Slowly, but surely, being a saver is paying off again.

For years after the recession, banks paid next to nothing on deposits — much to the detriment of savers everywhere. Now, banks have increased lending and need more deposits, so they're willing to pay higher interest rates.

29. Big banks score win with scrapping of consumer dispute rule -

NEW YORK (AP) — Call it a win for "the swamp." President Trump and Republicans in Congress handed Wall Street banks a big victory by effectively killing off a politically popular rule that would have allowed consumers to band together to sue their banks.

30. Business execs shunned Trump panels before he disbanded them -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump had pushed many of America's top corporate leaders to the breaking point with his inability to decisively condemn white supremacists — so they huddled on an 11:30 a.m. conference call Wednesday.

31. Federal regulator moves to mostly ban arbitration clauses -

NEW YORK (AP) — A federal agency tasked with looking out for consumers moved Monday to broadly ban the use of mandatory arbitration clauses, setting up a likely showdown with Republicans who oppose the change and want more control over the bureau in general.

32. Wells Fargo ups sales practices settlement to $142 million -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wells Fargo agreed Friday to expand a recently settled class-action lawsuit by an additional $32 million as well as extend claims for fraudulent accounts that may have been opened going back to 2002.

33. Major changes coming to how your credit score is calculated -

NEW YORK (AP) — The math behind your credit score is getting an overhaul, with changes big enough that they might alter the behavior of both cautious spenders as well as riskier borrowers.

Most notably for those with high scores: Abiding by the golden rule of "don't close your credit card accounts" may now hurt your standing. On the other side, those with low scores may benefit from the removal of civil judgments, medical debts and tax liens as factors.

34. Wells claws back $75 million from top execs in sales scandal -

NEW YORK (AP) — An investigation into sales practices at Wells Fargo released Monday has blamed the bank's top management for creating an "aggressive sales culture" that led to a scandal involving millions of unauthorized accounts being opened.

35. Events -

Eat Green for Tennessee. A group of 39 community-minded Nashville restaurants and 18 Chattanooga restaurants will raise awareness and donate a percentage of today’s sales to The Land Trust for Tennessee in support of its work protecting local farms and Tennessee’s natural landscapes. Participating Nashville restaurants include: 12 South Tap Room, 360 Bistro, 5th & Taylor, Adele’s, Arnold’s Country Kitchen, Bagel Face Bakery, Burger Up (12 South), Butchertown Hall, The Capitol Grille, Chago’s Cantina, City House, Dozen Bakery, FLIP Burger, Frothy Monkey, Grays on Main, Holland House, Josephine, Kayne Prime, Las Paletas, Lockeland Table, Merchant’s, Miel, Moto, Noelle, Paradise Park, The Perch, Pharmacy Burger, Porter Road Butchers, Prima, Pub5, Puckett’s (Leiper’s Fork), Rolf & Daughters, Saint Anejo, Taco Mamacita, Tavern, Two Ten Jack, Virago, Whiskey Kitchen, Wild Cow. Information: www.LandTrustTN.org/egt

36. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for Dec. 2013 -

Top December 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

37. Top residential real estate transactions of December 2012 -

Top December 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.