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Editorial Results (free)

1. Zelenskyy urges 'maximum' sanctions on Russia in Davos talk -

DAVOS, Switzerland (AP) — Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy called for "maximum" sanctions against Russia during a virtual speech Monday to corporate executives, government officials and other elites on the first day of the World Economic Economic gathering in Davos.

2. 'I can't see the light': War fuels surging prices in Europe -

MILAN (AP) — Edoardo Ronzoni inspects a construction site near Milan that he shut down in March as costs for materials skyrocketed. He can't complete a half-built roundabout at an intersection known for fender-benders because asphalt, cast-iron pipes and concrete are too expensive — prices exacerbated by Russia's war in Ukraine.

3. Musk wars with Twitter over his buyout deal - on Twitter -

Tesla CEO Elon Musk promised that taking over Twitter would enable him to rid the social media platform of its annoying "spam bots." Now he's arguing — without presenting any evidence — that there might be just too many of those automated accounts for the $44 billion deal to move ahead.

4. Ukraine cuts Russia gas at 1 hub, underlining risk to supply -

ZAPORIZHZHIA, Ukraine (AP) — Ukraine stopped the flow of Russian natural gas through one hub that feeds European homes and industry on Wednesday, while a pro-Kremlin official in a southern region seized by Russian troops said it would ask Moscow to annex it.

5. European Union moves forward in antitrust case against Apple -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Union stepped up its antitrust case against Apple on Monday, accusing the company of abusing its dominant position by limiting access to technologies allowing contactless payment.

6. Will Musk's hands-off ideal for Twitter have broad appeal? -

Coming up with $44 billion to buy Twitter was the easy part for Elon Musk. Next comes the real challenge for the world's richest person: fulfilling his promise to make Twitter "better than ever" as a lightly regulated haven for free speech.

7. Elon Musk buys Twitter for $44B and will privatize company -

Elon Musk reached an agreement to buy Twitter for roughly $44 billion on Monday, promising a more lenient touch to policing content on the platform where he promotes his interests, attacks critics and opines on social and economic issues to more than 83 million followers.

8. Tech leaders face threat of prison under new UK online bill -

LONDON (AP) — Tech bosses face criminal prosecution if they fail to comply with proposed British rules aimed at ensuring people are safe online, the U.K. government said Thursday as it unveiled the draft legislation in Parliament.

9. Russian airlines will keep planes leased from foreign firms -

The fate of hundreds of planes leased by Russian airlines from foreign companies grew murkier Monday after Russian President Vladimir Putin signed a law letting the airlines register those planes and continue flying them.

10. Russia's war spurs corporate exodus, exposes business risks -

LONDON (AP) — Car factories idled, beer stopped flowing, furniture and fashion orders ceased, and energy companies fled oil and gas projects.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has thrown business plans into disarray and forced a growing number of the world's best known brands — from Apple to Mercedes-Benz and BP — to pull out of a country that's become a global outcast as companies seek to maintain their reputations and live up to corporate responsibility standards.

11. Inflation in 19 nations using euro sets record for 4th month -

LONDON (AP) — Surging energy costs have driven inflation in Europe to another record high, raising questions about when the central bank should step in to ease the pain to people's wallets while Russia's invasion of Ukraine rattles the global economy.

12. Big tech grapples with Russian state media, propaganda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Russia's war in Ukraine  plays out for the world on social media, big tech platforms are moving to restrict Russian state media from using their platforms to spread propaganda and misinformation.

13. Russia eyes sanctions workarounds in energy, gold, crypto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The harsh sanctions imposed on Russia and the resulting crash of the ruble have the Kremlin scrambling to keep the country's economy running. For Vladimir Putin, that means finding workarounds to the Western economic blockade even as his forces continue to invade Ukraine.

14. Ruble plummets as sanctions bite, sending Russians to banks -

MOSCOW (AP) — Ordinary Russians faced the prospect of higher prices and crimped foreign travel as Western sanctions over the invasion of Ukraine sent the ruble plummeting, leading uneasy depositors to line up at banks and ATMs on Monday in a country that has seen more than one currency disaster in the post-Soviet era.

15. Wall Street reels then recovers after invasion of Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets shuddered Thursday and then swung wildly after Russia's invasion of Ukraine threatened to push the high inflation squeezing the global economy even higher.

Initially, stocks tumbled as prices surged for oil, wheat and other commodities on worries the conflict would disrupt global supplies. But the moves moderated as the day progressed, particularly after President Joe Biden said he wanted to limit the economic pain for Americans and announced new sanctions that fell short of what some had suggested.

16. France fines Google, Facebook millions over tracking consent -

LONDON (AP) — French regulators on Thursday fined Google and Facebook a total of more than 200 million euros ($226 million) for not making it as easy for people to opt out of online tracking as it is for them to accept it.

17. To grandmother's house or no? Omicron disrupts holiday plans -

Dave Fravel and his wife invited several relatives to their Cape Cod home for Christmas to share food, gifts and the togetherness they've longed for during the lonely days of the pandemic. They were also looking forward to a holiday sightseeing trip to New York City.

18. Omicron casts a new shadow over economy's pandemic recovery -

Just as Americans and Europeans were eagerly awaiting their most normal holiday season in a couple of years, the omicron variant has unleashed a fresh round of fear and uncertainty — for travelers, shoppers, party-goers and their economies as a whole.

19. UK competition watchdog orders Facebook to sell off Giphy -

LONDON (AP) — The United Kingdom's antitrust watchdog has blocked Facebook's acquisition of Giphy and ordered the social network to sell off the GIF-sharing platform, saying the deal hurts social media users and advertisers by stifling competition for animated images.

20. Key reason for supply shortages: Americans keep spending -

DETROIT (AP) — Take a step back from the picked-over store shelves, the stalled container ships and the empty auto showrooms, and you'll find a root cause of the shortages of just about everything.

21. Automakers step up pace on electric vehicle battery plants -

DETROIT (AP) — Global automakers and tech companies are stepping up the pace when it comes to building factories and prepare for what many believe will be a fast-moving transition from internal combustion engines to electric vehicles.

22. Google in court to appeal EU's 2018 Android antitrust case -

LONDON (AP) — Google headed to a top European Union court Monday to appeal a record EU antitrust penalty imposed for stifling competition through the dominance of its Android operating system.

The company is fighting a 2018 decision from the EU's executive Commission, the bloc's top antitrust enforcer, that resulted in the 4.34 billion-euro ($5 billion) fine — still the biggest ever fine Brussels has imposed for anticompetitive behavior.

23. Crushed by pandemic, conventions mount a cautious return -

In pre-COVID times, business events __ from small academic conferences to giant trade shows like CES __ routinely attracted more than 1 billion participants each year. The pandemic brought those global gatherings to a sudden halt, emptying convention centers and shuttering hotels.

24. Microsoft Exchange email hack was caused by China, US says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Monday blamed China for a hack of Microsoft Exchange email server software that compromised tens of thousands of computers around the world earlier this year.

25. Google delays plan to phase out Chrome ad-tracking tech -

LONDON (AP) — Google says it's delaying plans to phase out Chrome web browser technology that tracks users for ad purposes because it needs more time to develop a replacement system.

The tech giant said Thursday that its deadline to remove so-called third-party cookies will be pushed back to late 2023, nearly two years later than the initial timing of January 2022.

26. EXPLAINER: Just how vulnerable is the internet? -

BOSTON (AP) — An outage at a little-known firm that speeds up access to websites knocked a lot of top internet destinations offline on Tuesday, disrupting business and leisure for untold millions globally. The problem was quickly resolved. The company, Fastly, blamed a configuration error in its technology.

27. Huawei ex-exec on trial, accused of spying for China -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — Two men accused of spying for China went on trial Tuesday in the Polish capital of Warsaw: a Chinese citizen who is a former sales director of Huawei in Poland and a Polish cybersecurity expert.

28. How vaccine passports for global travel would work -

LONDON (AP) — Boarding pass, suitcase, passport and ... digital vaccination certificate?

Keen to avoid losing another summer of holiday revenue to the coronavirus pandemic, the European Union, some Asian governments and the airline industry are scrambling to develop so-called COVID-19 vaccine passports to help kickstart international travel.

29. Russia won't block Twitter, but partial slowdown to continue -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities on Monday backed away from threats to block Twitter, saying that the social media platform deleted most of the banned content identified by Moscow and expressed "readiness and interest in building a constructive dialogue."

30. Amazon wins EU court fight over $300 million tax ruling -

BRUSSELS (AP) — In the latest setback to European Union efforts to tackle corporate tax avoidance, a court on Wednesday annulled a ruling by the European Commission that a tax deal between Amazon and Luxembourg's government amounted to illegal state support.

31. Russia fines Twitter for not taking down calls to protest -

MOSCOW (AP) — A court in Moscow on Friday fined Twitter for not taking down calls encouraging minors to take part in unauthorized rallies, the latest in a series of moves against the social media giant that has been used to amplify dissent in Russia.

32. WeWork attempts to go public again, this time through a SPAC -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nearly two years after its attempted initial public offering of shares disintegrated, WeWork is going public in a merger with a special-purpose acquisition company.

WeWork is merging with BowX Acquisition, a SPAC, in a transaction that would value the embattled communal office-space company at $9 billion plus debt, the companies said in a joint statement Friday.

33. Uber to give UK drivers minimum wage, pension, holiday pay -

LONDON (AP) — Uber is giving its U.K. drivers the minimum wage, pensions and holiday pay, following a recent court ruling that said they should be classified as workers and entitled to such benefits.

34. Russia threatens to block Twitter in a month -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities said Tuesday they would block Twitter in a month if it doesn't take steps to remove banned content, a move that escalates the Russian government's drawn-out standoff with social media platforms that have played a major role in amplifying dissent in Russia.

35. Russia slows down Twitter, part of social media clampdown -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian authorities said Wednesday they are slowing down the speed of uploading photos and videos to Twitter over its failure to remove banned content — part of growing efforts to clamp down on social media platforms that have played a major role in amplifying dissent.

36. Vaccination 'passports' may open society, but inequity looms -

TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) — Violet light bathed the club stage as 300 people, masked and socially distanced, erupted in gentle applause. For the first time since the pandemic began, Israeli musician Aviv Geffen stepped to his electric piano and began to play for an audience seated right in front of him.

37. Microsoft, EU publishers seek Australia-style news payments -

LONDON (AP) — Microsoft is teaming up with European publishers to push for a system to make big tech platforms pay for news, raising the stakes in the brewing battle led by Australia to get Google and Facebook to pay for journalism.

38. GameStop's saga may be over; its effect on Wall Street isn't -

NEW YORK (AP) — The frenzy around GameStop's stock may have quieted down, but the outsized influence small investors had in the saga is likely to stick around.

No one expects another supernova like GameStop to happen again, where a band of smaller-pocketed investors helped boost a struggling company's stock 1,000% in two weeks. But the tools they employed can be used again and again, if those smaller investors stay connected on social media forums and if regulators don't change the rules to hinder them.

39. Digital siege: Internet cuts become favored tool of regimes -

LONDON (AP) — When army generals in Myanmar staged a coup last week, they briefly cut internet access in an apparent attempt to stymie protests. In Uganda, residents couldn't use Facebook, Twitter and other social media for weeks after a recent election. And in Ethiopia's northern Tigray region, the internet has been down for months amid a wider conflict.

40. UK strips Chinese state-owned TV channel of broadcast permit -

LONDON (AP) — U.K. regulators stripped China's state TV channel of its national broadcasting license on Thursday, after an investigation cited lack of editorial control and links to China's ruling Communist Party.

41. Panel overturns 4 Facebook content takedowns in first ruling -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook's quasi-independent oversight board issued its first rulings on Thursday, overturning four out of five decisions by the social network to take down questionable content.

The social media giant set up the oversight panel to rule on thorny issues about content on its platforms, in response to furious criticism about its inability to respond swiftly and effectively to misinformation, hate speech and nefarious influence campaigns.

42. Norway fines Grindr dating app $11.7M over privacy breach -

LONDON (AP) — Gay dating app Grindr faces a fine of more than $10 million from Norwegian regulators for failing to get consent from users before sharing their personal information with advertising companies, in breach of stringent European Union privacy rules.

43. Google threatens to pull search engine in Australia -

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Google on Friday threatened to make its search engine unavailable in Australia if the government went ahead with plans to make tech giants pay for news content.

44. EU, Britain to toughen rules, fines for tech giants -

LONDON (AP) — Big tech companies face hefty fines in the European Union and Britain if they treat rivals unfairly or fail to protect users on their platforms, in proposed regulations unveiled Tuesday by officials in Brussels and London.

45. After years grappling with Google, Europe has tips for US -

LONDON (AP) — The U.S. antitrust crackdown on Google might seem like deja vu for European Union regulators.

By U.S. standards, the Justice Department's move to sue Google this week for abusing its dominance in online search and advertising was a bold move. But it treads on ground already broken years before by EU officials in Brussels.

46. Google to pay $1 billion over 3 years for news content -

LONDON (AP) — Google will pay publishers $1 billion over the next three years for their content, the company's latest effort to defuse tensions over its dominance of the news industry.

The company said Thursday that it has signed agreements for its news partnership program with nearly 200 publications in Germany, Brazil, Argentina, Canada, the U.K. and Australia.

47. Uber gets 18-month London license after winning court appeal -

LONDON (AP) — Uber can keep operating in London for another year and a half after winning its appeal of a decision by the British capital's transit regulator not to renew its license.

The San Francisco-based ride-hailing company had challenged Transport for London's decision in late 2019 not to renew its operating license over safety concerns involving impostor drivers.

48. Facebook may have to stop moving EU user data to US -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook may be forced to stop sending data about its European users to the U.S., in the first major fallout from a recent court ruling that found some trans-Atlantic data transfers don't protect users from American government snooping.

49. 3 charged in massive Twitter hack, Bitcoin scam -

MIAMI (AP) — A British man, a Florida man and a Florida teen hacked the Twitter accounts of prominent politicians, celebrities and technology moguls to scam people around globe out of more than $100,000 in Bitcoin, authorities said Friday.

50. Twitter says hackers used phone to fool staff, gain access -

LONDON (AP) — Twitter says the hackers responsible for a recent high-profile breach used the phone to fool the social media company's employees into giving them access.

The company revealed a few more details late Thursday about the hack earlier this month, which it said targeted "a small number of employees through a phone spear-phishing attack."

51. Garmin fitness tracking service goes down, frustrating users -

LONDON (AP) — GPS device-maker Garmin's online fitness tracking service has gone down, leaving runners and cyclists struggling to upload data from their latest workouts.

Garmin Connect, an app and website that works with the company's popular line of fitness watches, remained out of service on Friday. The U.S. company had apologized for the disruption a day earlier, when it indicated the problem was more widespread and also affected its communications systems.

52. European countries slam US withdrawal from tech tax talks -

PARIS (AP) — European countries are slamming the Trump administration's withdrawal from negotiations over a major tax on big tech companies.

French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire, speaking on France Inter, called it a "provocation" and said France will still implement the tax regardless of the U.S. change of heart.

53. Cubicle comeback? Pandemic will reshape office life for good -

LONDON (AP) — Office jobs are never going to be the same.

When workers around the world eventually return to their desks, they'll find many changes due to the pandemic. For a start, fewer people will go back to their offices as the coronavirus crisis makes working from home more accepted, health concerns linger and companies weigh up rent savings and productivity benefits.

54. Here come COVID-19 tracing apps - and privacy trade-offs -

As governments around the world consider how to monitor new coronavirus outbreaks while reopening their societies, many are starting to bet on smartphone apps to help stanch the pandemic.

But their decisions on which technologies to use — and how far those allow authorities to peer into private lives — are highlighting some uncomfortable trade-offs between protecting privacy and public health.

55. European virus tracing apps highlight battle for privacy -

LONDON (AP) — Goodbye lockdown, hello smartphone.

As governments race to develop mobile tracing apps to help contain infections, attention is turning to how officials will ensure users' privacy. The debate is especially urgent in Europe, which has been one of the hardest-hit regions in the world, with nearly 140,000 people killed by COVID-19.

56. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

57. Virus casts a dark cloud over once-thriving home market -

BOSTON (AP) — When Rebeka McBride and her husband put their home in Washington state on the market in early March, the coronavirus outbreak was just taking hold in the United States. They managed to hold two open houses and a smattering of private viewings before accepting an offer.

58. Online grocery services struggle to meet spike in demand -

LONDON (AP) — A pandemic forcing everyone to stay home could be the perfect moment for online grocery services. In practice, they've been struggling to keep up with a surge in orders, highlighting their limited ability to respond to an unprecedented onslaught of demand.

59. EU proposes rules for artificial intelligence to limit risks -

LONDON (AP) — The European Union unveiled proposals Wednesday to regulate artificial intelligence that call for strict rules and safeguards on risky applications of the rapidly developing technology.

60. Google CEO calls for regulation of artificial intelligence -

LONDON (AP) — Google's chief executive called Monday for a balanced approach to regulating artificial intelligence, telling a European audience that the technology brings benefits but also "negative consequences."

61. Facebook bans deepfakes in fight against online manipulation -

LONDON (AP) — Facebook says it is banning "deepfake" videos, the false but realistic clips created with artificial intelligence and sophisticated tools, as it steps up efforts to fight online manipulation.

62. NATO researchers: Social media failing to stop manipulation -

LONDON (AP) — Social media companies are failing to stop manipulated activity, according to a report Friday by NATO-affiliated researchers who said they were easily able to buy tens of thousands of likes, comments and views on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Instagram.

63. Google wins case over reach of EU 'right to be forgotten' -

BRUSSELS (AP) — Google won a major case in the European Union on Tuesday, when the bloc's top court ruled that the U.S. internet giant doesn't have to extend the EU's "right to be forgotten" rules to its search engines outside the region.

64. Hong Kong stock exchange swoops in for London rival -

LONDON (AP) — The Hong Kong stock exchange wants to buy its London counterpart to create a company worth more than $70 billion that could shore up the U.K. capital's status as a global financial hub after Brexit.

65. Cryptocurrencies, digital tax top the agenda for G-7 meeting -

PARIS (AP) — Finance officials from the Group of Seven rich democracies will weigh risks from new digital currencies and debate how to tax tech companies like Google and Amazon when they meet this week in the Paris suburb of Chantilly.

66. Huawei calls on US to lift export restrictions -

SHENZHEN, China (AP) — The chairman of Huawei said Friday the Chinese tech giant has yet to see any benefit from President Donald Trump's promise to allow U.S. companies to sell some components to the company and called on Washington to remove it from a security blacklist.

67. Facebook limits livestreaming ahead of tech summit in Paris -

PARIS (AP) — Facebook toughened its livestreaming policies Wednesday as it prepared to huddle with world leaders and other tech CEOs in Paris to find ways to keep social media from being used to spread hate, organize extremist groups and broadcast terror attacks.

68. US abstains from global pledge to curb online violence -

PARIS (AP) — The White House is not endorsing a global pledge to step up efforts to keep internet platforms from being used to spread hate, organize extremist groups and broadcast attacks, citing respect for "freedom of expression and freedom of the press."

69. New French rules for Facebook? Zuckerberg likes the idea -

PARIS (AP) — France welcomed Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg to Paris on Friday with the threat of sweeping new regulations against his social media behemoth — and Zuckerberg himself called that proposal a good thing.

70. WikiLeaks' Assange arrested in London, faces US charge -

LONDON (AP) — A bearded and shouting Julian Assange was pulled from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London and hauled into court Thursday, the start of an extradition battle for the WikiLeaks founder who faces U.S. charges related to the publication of tens of thousands of secret government documents.

71. 'A monopoly on information': Russia closes grip on internet -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian lawmakers approved Thursday a bill that would expand government control over the internet and whose opponents fear heralds a new era of widespread censorship.

The bill would install equipment to route Russian internet traffic through servers in the country. That would increase the power of state agencies to control information and block messaging applications, while users would find it harder to circumvent government restrictions.

72. UK report finds technical risks in Huawei network gear -

LONDON (AP) — British cybersecurity inspectors said Thursday they found significant technical issues in Chinese telecom supplier Huawei's software that pose risks for the country's mobile networks.

73. Experts: US anti-Huawei campaign likely exaggerated -

Since last year, the U.S. has waged a vigorous diplomatic offensive against the Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, claiming that any nation deploying its gear in next-generation wireless networks is giving Beijing a conduit for espionage or worse.

74. US suffers setbacks in effort to ban Chinese tech company -

BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — The U.S. government's fight to ban Chinese tech giant Huawei from next-generation internet networks appears to be flagging.

The two sides faced off Tuesday at the world's biggest mobile technology trade fair, in Barcelona, Spain, where they sought to win over customers and governments.

75. China accuses Washington of trying to block development -

BEIJING (AP) — China's government on Monday accused the United States of trying to block its industrial development by alleging that Chinese mobile network gear poses a cybersecurity threat to countries rolling out new internet systems.

76. Apple CEO backs privacy laws, warns data being 'weaponized' -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The head of Apple on Wednesday endorsed tough privacy laws for both Europe and the U.S. and renewed the technology giant's commitment to protecting personal data, which he warned was being "weaponized" against users.

77. Major tech companies remove Alex Jones for hate, bullying -

NEW YORK (AP) — Major tech companies have begun to ban right-wing conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from their services, reflecting a more aggressive enforcement of policies against hate speech following protests on social media.

78. Trump wants China to reduce trade deficit by $200B by 2020 -

BEIJING (AP) — The Trump administration has asked China to reduce its trade deficit with the U.S. by $200 billion by the end of 2020, striking an assertive stance in talks aimed at averting a trade war between the world's two-largest economies.

79. Chinese exporters scramble to cope with Trump tariff hike -

BEIJING (AP) — Facing a possible U.S. tariff hike, one of China's biggest ball bearing makers, Cixin Group, is weighing plans to rush shipments to American customers before the increase makes its sales unprofitable.

80. Stocks surge as market escapes early plunge on trade fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — After an early jolt, stocks rallied and finished higher Wednesday as investors bet that back-and-forth tariff threats between the U.S. and China won't blossom into a bigger dispute that damages global commerce.

81. Stocks tumble on trade fears; S&P has worst week in 2 years -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks around the world plunged Friday as investors feared that a trade conflict between the U.S. and China, the biggest economies in the world, would escalate. A second day of big losses pushed U.S. stocks to their worst week in two years.

82. Without Toys R Us, 30,000 jobs, a black hole for toy makers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The demise of Toys R Us will have a ripple effect on everything from toy makers to consumers to landlords.

The 70-year-old retailer sought court approval Thursday to liquidate its remaining 735 stores, eliminating the jobs of some 30,000 employees while spelling the end for a chain known to generations of children and parents for its sprawling stores and Geoffrey the giraffe mascot.

83. Without Toys R Us, 30,000 jobs, a black hole for toy makers -

NEW YORK (AP) — The demise of Toys R Us will have a ripple effect on everything from toy makers to consumers to landlords.

The 70-year-old retailer is headed toward shuttering its U.S. operations, jeopardizing the jobs of some 30,000 employees while spelling the end for a chain known to generations of children and parents for its sprawling stores and Geoffrey the giraffe mascot.

84. US trading partners, businesses say tariffs will backfire -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to impose tariffs on aluminum and steel imports drew warnings Friday from businesses and U.S. trading partners that the measure could backfire, provoking a trade war without resolving the problems it's intended to address.

85. Losses for US stocks continue as industrials and banks slide -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are lower Thursday morning as losses from the previous day continue. Major indexes are off about 1 percent. Banks, industrial and technology companies are faring the worst. Companies including Hanesbrands, Yelp and Roomba maker iRobot are down sharply following disappointing quarterly reports, but Twitter is soaring after it reported a quarterly profit for the first time. Bond prices are falling and yields are rising.

86. Casino mogul Steve Wynn resigns amid sex misconduct claims -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Facing investigations by gambling regulators and allegations of sexual misconduct, billionaire casino mogul Steve Wynn has stepped down as chairman and CEO of the resorts bearing his names.

87. Bitcoin futures soar amid frenzy over virtual currency -

CHICAGO (AP) — Bitcoin's debut on a major U.S. exchange is a hit so far, with the price of the first-ever futures contract for the virtual currency rising 16 percent.

The futures contract that expires in January was up $2,440 to $17,900 Monday afternoon on the Chicago Board Options Exchange. Trading began Sunday, and the price rose as high as $18,850, according to data from the CBOE.

88. Google buys HTC's Pixel team in $1.1B bet on devices -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Google is biting off a big piece of device manufacturer HTC for $1.1 billion to expand its efforts to build phones, speakers and other gadgets equipped with its arsenal of digital services.

89. US stocks edge higher; bond yields fall following Fed -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stock indexes inched further into record territory Wednesday after AT&T, Boeing and others joined the parade of big companies reporting stronger profits than analysts expected. Stocks that pay big dividends were particularly strong after the Federal Reserve took a pause in its slow-moving campaign to lift interest rates, as Treasury yields sank lower.

90. Cyberattack wave ebbs, but experts see risk of more -

LONDON (AP) — The "ransomware" cyberattack that has hit companies and governments around the world ebbed in intensity on Monday, though experts warned that new versions of the virus could emerge.