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Editorial Results (free)

1. US economy: Plenty of growth, not enough workers or supplies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is sparking confusion and whiplash almost as fast as it's adding jobs.

Barely more than a year after the coronavirus caused the steepest economic fall and job losses on record, the speed of the rebound has been so unexpectedly swift that many companies can't fill jobs or acquire enough supplies to meet a pent-up burst of customer demand.

2. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

3. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

4. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

5. Landlords are getting squeezed between tenants, lenders -

NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to sympathetic figures, landlords aren't exactly at the top of the list. But they, too, have fallen on hard times, demonstrating how the coronavirus outbreak spares almost no one.

6. US layoffs still high, but so is skepticism on jobless data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of Americans seeking unemployment benefits dipped last week to a still-high 840,000, evidence that layoffs remain elevated seven months into the pandemic recession.

7. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

8. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

9. US is expected to report a record-breaking economic plunge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Having endured what was surely a record-shattering slump last quarter, the U.S. economy faces a dim outlook as a resurgent coronavirus intensifies doubts about any sustained recovery the rest of the year.

10. As restaurants endure economic losses, others feel pain, too -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Restaurants helped revive the U.S. economy after the Great Recession of 2007-2009.

This time? Don't count on it. As the nation struggles to rebound from a now-resurgent coronavirus, restaurants seem much less likely to deliver an economic boost. They've suffered a heavy blow from lockdowns and occupancy restrictions, and it's unclear how readily Americans will return en masse to dining out.

11. Virus testing, tracking still plagued by reporting delays -

ATLANTA (AP) — As part of the plan to restart its season next month, the NBA is preparing to test hundreds of players, coaches and others for the coronavirus each night inside a "basketball bubble" — a space at the Disney complex near Orlando, Florida, with extra protection against the disease.

12. House to pass changes to business virus aid subsidy program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is moving to pass a bipartisan measure to modify a new "paycheck protection" program for businesses that have suffered COVID-related losses, giving them more flexibility to use federal subsidies for other costs and extending the program for four additional months.

13. House casts proxy votes in pandemic, Republicans have doubts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It was a day for the history books on Capitol Hill: For the first time, House lawmakers voted by proxy, an unprecedented move to avoid the risks of travel to Washington during the pandemic.

14. History in the making as House is poised for proxy voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a day that's shaping up as one for the history books: For the first time, House lawmakers intend to vote by proxy, a move to avoid the risk of travel to Washington during the pandemic.

15. Congress shifts attention to overhauling small-business aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deadlocked over the next big coronavirus relief bill, Congress is shifting its attention to a more modest overhaul of small-business aid in hopes of helping employers reopen shops and survive the pandemic.

16. Risk of reopening US economy too fast: A W-shaped recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the coronavirus erupted in the United States, it triggered quarantines, travel curbs and business shutdowns. Many economists predicted a V-shaped journey for the economy: A sharp drop, then a quick bounce-back as the virus faded and the economy regained health.

17. Many small businesses say loans won't get them to rehire -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some small businesses that obtained a highly-coveted government loan say they won't be able to use it to bring all their laid-off workers back, even though that is exactly what the program was designed to do.

18. IMF: Global economy will suffer worst year since Depression -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Beaten down by the coronavirus outbreak, the world economy in 2020 will suffer its worst year since the Great Depression of the 1930s, the International Monetary Fund says in its latest forecast.

19. Small biz rescue off to spotty start; some banks not ready -

NEW YORK (AP) — The federal government's relief program for small businesses is off to a slow start Friday, with only some businesses able to apply and several banks either not accepting applications or seeing long waits to do approvals.

20. Q&A: How to get aid for a small business hit by virus crisis -

NEW YORK (AP) — Millions of small business owners will be turning to the government, seeking help for an individual and nationwide cataclysm, the economic devastation caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

21. Urgent question from small businesses: When will aid arrive? -

NEW YORK (AP) — When will the money arrive?

That's the urgent question for small business owners who have been devastated by the coronavirus outbreak. They're awaiting help from the $2 trillion rescue package signed into law Friday. But with bills fast coming due, no end to business closings and an economy that's all but shut down, owners are worried about survival.

22. Layoffs spike in US, Europe as virus shuts businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just a couple of weeks ago, Erika Vega hoped her temp job at a cafeteria would soon become permanent. But instead, the viral outbreak shut down the building where she worked and left her wondering where her next paycheck will come from.

23. Small businesses face devastation as damage from virus grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — A restaurant owner wonders how she can stay in business if she can't sell food and drink.

A hair salon operator shuts down to protect his clients and employees.

A photographer who expected to take pictures at an Ivy League school has lost that work now that classes have moved online and campus events are cancelled.

24. Coronavirus forces small businesses to rethink strategies -

NEW YORK (AP) — Renee and Michael Brown planned to open a third location for their coffee company — and put their plans on hold when the coronavirus hit.

25. Weathering the stock markets: one investor's strategy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Buy and hold — and don't sell when the stock market plunges.

That's the strategy many market pros use, and it has served me well through more than three decades as an investor — and as a financial journalist who needed to know daily what was happening in the markets. I've stuck with that strategy through gyrations as bad or even worse than what we've seen the past two weeks.

26. Business owners contend with threat, reality of coronavirus -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rachel Sklar planned to go to the big South by Southwest film, media and music gathering in Austin, Texas, this month, but changed her mind as cases of coronavirus started appearing in the U.S. She was scheduled to speak at the annual event and expected to recruit new members for her businesswomen's organization, TheLi.st.

27. Small businesses embrace wellness to help retain staffers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Every month, the 30 staffers at Chris Boehlke's public relations firm each get $100 to pay for anything that contributes to their wellness. And not just for typical expenditures like gym memberships or yoga classes.

28. US small businesses are getting upbeat news on the economy -

Small business owners have received some upbeat news on the economy this month.

Retail sales figures released Friday showed that consumers were inspired by unseasonably warm weather to spend on their homes in January, but that overall sales growth was modest. The Commerce Department reported a 0.3% gain last month following a 0.2% gain in December.

29. Signs point up for small manufacturers, home remodelers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Recent economic indicators point to an easier time ahead for small manufacturers and companies in the home remodeling industry.

A decline in the home repair and remodeling market that began in the first quarter of 2019 is projected to end with the third quarter of this year, according to researchers at Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies. The center forecasts fourth-quarter spending on repairs and renovations will rise 1.5% from year-earlier levels.

30. Want to sell on Amazon? Businesses must weigh pros, cons -

NEW YORK (AP) — While many small manufacturers and retailers believe Amazon is the place to be, Lyris Autran is forgoing the opportunity.

Autran wants to keep the prices on her leashes, bowls and other products for dogs competitive. It costs money to sell on Amazon.com — a 15% fee on each sale and additional charges for shipping — and that would force her to raise prices. So she sells solely on her website, Dylan & Rainey.

31. 2020 brings higher labor costs for small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners have plenty of changes to deal with as 2020 begins — higher labor costs for many companies, and some owners will discover that they have to comply with new laws that aren't on the books in their own states.

32. Entrepreneurs upbeat about hiring, researchers find -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although many small businesses struggle to find staffers to fill their open positions, many entrepreneurs with recently launched companies intend to create jobs within a few years.

That's one of the findings of a study by researchers at Babson College in Wellesley, Massachusetts. The study, based on surveys of approximately 3,000 people in the U.S. during 2018, found that 87% of entrepreneurs with young companies expect to employ workers during the next five years, and 38% expect to have six or more workers. Seventeen percent said they expected to have 20 or more workers in five years.

33. Indie booksellers persevere despite Amazon, rising costs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Pete Mulvihill has felt optimistic enough about selling books that he bought a third bookstore within the past two months.

"The industry is much better than it was — the last four to five years have been pretty healthy," says Mulvihill, who owns three Green Apple Books and Browser Books shops in San Francisco. The stores have survived the devastation the independent book business suffered after Amazon.com began selling books online and at lower prices in 1995.

34. Small business hiring slow, likely to remain so, reports states -

NEW YORK (AP) — Two reports last week show that small business hiring still lags behind the strong job growth reported at larger companies, and that owners are unlikely to increase their staffs significantly in 2020.

35. As McDonald's CEO learned, workplace romance can be perilous -

NEW YORK (AP) — Workplace couples are often romanticized — think Bill and Melinda Gates or Michelle and Barack Obama. But when the relationship involves two people with unequal power, it can also be fraught with peril, especially in the #MeToo era.

36. Market for small businesses cools further, report says -

NEW YORK (AP) — The market for small businesses cooled further during the third quarter as fallout from trade wars made companies look less appealing to buyers.

That's the finding of a quarterly report analyzing small business sales released by BizBuySell.com, an online marketplace for companies. BizBuySell.com counted 2,454 small businesses sold during July-September, down 8.6% from 2,685 sold in the same period last year. That followed declines of 9.6% in the second quarter, 6.5% in the first quarter and 6% during the last three months of 2018.

37. Rising home prices, falling sales hurting small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many small companies tied to the housing market are seeing a slowdown in business, one that's forecast to continue well into 2020.

Reports on home sales, the home remodeling market and sales of furniture and home furnishings show the spreading fallout from rising prices for houses and apartments.

38. Europe's specialty food makers brace for US tariffs -

MILAN (AP) — European producers of premium specialty agricultural products like French wine, Italian Parmesan and Spanish olives are facing a U.S. tariff hike due Friday with a mix of trepidation and indignation at being dragged into a trade war they feel they have little to do with.

39. Survey: Manufacturers, retailers less optimistic -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small manufacturers and retailers are losing confidence in the national economy yet remain upbeat about their own prospects.

That's the finding of a third quarter survey of 1,000 companies released last week by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and MetLife. Sixty-three percent of manufacturing companies surveyed were optimistic about the economy, down from 69% in a second quarter survey. Fifty-three percent of retailers were optimistic, down from 59%.

40. Trump order on China will hurt us, small businesses say -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although President Donald Trump has told U.S. companies to stop dealing with China, small business owners say complying would hurt, even devastate them.

If Vanessa Topper can't work with a manufacturer in China, "I'm going to have to fold a quarter of my business," she says.

41. Beware of tax scam emails and phone calls, IRS warns -

NEW YORK (AP) — Months after business owners and other taxpayers have filed their returns with the IRS, thieves try to scam people out of money or personal information.

Although scammers operate year-round, the IRS says they step up their activities in the summer, when taxpayers can expect to hear from the agency with questions about returns filed during March and April. Thieves typically use phone calls or emails that sound or look official, and that can sound threatening. The scammers' hope is that people will believe it's really a call from the IRS or that they'll click on a link in the email, allowing cyberthieves to invade their devices and steal personal information.

42. Weaker home sales expected to be drag on remodeling market -

NEW YORK (AP) — Weaker home sales trends are expected to contribute to a sharp slowing in the home remodeling market.

That's the conclusion of a report by Harvard University's Joint Center for Housing Studies. The quarterly report forecasts that spending by homeowners for renovations, expansions and repairs will drop to an annual growth rate of 0.4% by the second quarter of next year from a projected 6.3% in the current quarter.

43. Trade wars cool market for small businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — The market for small businesses cooled for the third straight quarter during the spring as tariffs from the trade war with China made some sellers and buyers uneasy about making a deal.

44. Businesses, watching economy, play it safe with hiring -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners, their eye on the economy, are playing it even safer when it comes to hiring.

A U.S. Chamber of Commerce-MetLife survey released last week found that 28% of small businesses plan to increase their staffs in the next year, down slightly from 29% in the first quarter. The survey, taken between early April and early May, found that hiring was likely to be weaker in some industries; for example, 24% of retailers said the plan to hire, down significantly from 30% three months earlier. That is a likely response to slowing consumer spending. Manufacturers, however, are looking to hire — 35% said they'd create jobs versus 28% in the first quarter.

45. Businesses showing discontent with Trump's trade policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's aggressive and wildly unpredictable use of tariffs is spooking American business groups, which have long formed a potent force in his Republican Party.

Corporate America was blindsided last week when Trump threatened to impose crippling taxes on Mexican imports in a push to stop the flow of Central American migrants into the United States.

46. Market for small businesses appears waning, survey says -

NEW YORK (AP) — The boom market in small businesses appears to have reached its peak and is now waning.

That's the finding of a quarterly survey of brokers and advisers who help owners and buyers complete sales of small and mid-size businesses. The survey was conducted by researchers at Pepperdine University's Graziadio School of Business and two industry groups, the International Business Brokers Association and the M&A Source.

47. Can a business owner require staffers to get vaccinated? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners worried about the spread of measles may want to be sure their staffers have been vaccinated, but before issuing any orders, they should speak with a labor law attorney or human resources consultant.

48. Time for businesses to set up employee retirement plans? -

NEW YORK (AP) — With 2019 more than one-third over, small business owners without employee retirement plans may want to consider starting one before more time passes.

Businesses get tax deductions for the contributions they make to employee plans, and contributions can be as high as $56,000 per employee for 2019. Plans vary in terms of their complexity and cost to set up. And the IRS offers flexibility for when contributions must be made — it's OK, for example, to make a contribution in 2019 for the 2018 tax year, up until the due date of the owner's tax return. That means owners who filed for extensions of this year's March or April filing deadlines still have time to make contributions and get a deduction for last year. And it's still possible to create one type of plan known as a SEP.

49. State of small business more mixed than administration says -

NEW YORK (AP) — As Small Business Week approaches, the nation's smallest companies in the aggregate are by many accounts doing fairly well. They're not, however, thriving en masse in direct response to Trump administration and Republican policies.

50. Slower manufacturing likely drag on small business optimism -

NEW YORK (AP) — The growing evidence of a slowdown in manufacturing is likely contributing to the dip in small business optimism that began early in the year.

Reports this month from the government and an industry group point to a drop in manufacturing activity. While the manufacturing sector is a relatively small part of the gross domestic product — the government has estimated it at 11.4 percent in the third quarter of last year — most manufacturers are small businesses as are service companies that do business with them.

51. Expectations of weaker economy unites small business owners -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although small businesses vary widely in terms of size, industry and issues, they do appear to be generally united by a growing uneasiness about the economy.

Several surveys and economic reports released in recent weeks show that company owners have more trust in their businesses than the national or local economy, and that they're running their businesses more conservatively in response to uncertainty about overall business conditions.

52. Small business hiring lags behind larger companies, ADP says -

NEW YORK (AP) — New reports from payroll company ADP show that small businesses are lagging behind larger companies in hiring, a trend that's not expected to change anytime soon.

ADP's monthly report on small business employment released last week showed companies with up to 49 employees created 63,000 jobs during January. That's down from an upwardly revised 107,000 in December. ADP counts the jobs at its small business customers in compiling its report.

53. Survey: Small business owners upbeat, looking to expand -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners are upbeat, looking to expand and worrying less about financial concerns like health costs.

That's the finding of a survey of 1,067 owners released last week by Bank of America. The survey shows owners are optimistic about the short and long term. Fifty-seven percent said they expect their revenue to increase in the next 12 months, and 56 percent have plans to increase business over the next five years. Two-thirds said they're planning to expand in the coming year.

54. Even small companies may be able to cut Amazon-like deals -

NEW YORK (AP) — A company doesn't need to be as big as Amazon to get a good deal on real estate.

Whether a small business wants to buy or rent, it may have leverage with landlords or local governments to get breaks on rent or taxes. It's especially doable if a company can be a drawing card that helps boost local commerce or has significant job creation plans. The key is often to look for real estate in an area that needs an economic boost.

55. Rising rates, slowing home sales expected to hurt remodelers -

NEW YORK (AP) — General contractors and other small businesses in the home remodeling industry can expect revenue to slow in 2019, the result of rising mortgage rates and sluggish home sales.

56. IRS issues guidance on deductibility of business meals -

NEW YORK (AP) — The IRS is making it simpler for business owners to deduct the cost of meals with customers and clients.

The agency last week issued guidance for the deductibility of food and meals under the tax law enacted in December. The law eliminated a long-standing deduction for business entertainment expenses like tickets to shows and sporting events. But it left some confusion about whether company owners could deduct the cost of taking clients or staffers to a restaurant.

57. Despite strong economy, small business owners stay cautious -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although the economy is strong and consumers are optimistic, many small business owners are holding fast to their cautious approach to expansion.

The government's latest estimate of second-quarter economic growth, released last week, showed that the gross domestic product grew at an annual rate of 4.2 percent. Meanwhile, the Conference Board's consumer confidence index rose to an 18-year high last month.

58. Food truck evolution: Owners strategize as novelty wears off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Starting a food truck to sell tacos or barbecue on downtown streets may seem easy or fun, but owners are finding they need more sophisticated plans now that the novelty has worn off.

59. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

60. Retailers hope for certainty as Supreme Court hears tax case -

NEW YORK (AP) — Retailers are hoping for a resolution this year from the Supreme Court, which hears arguments Tuesday in a decades-old dispute: Whether companies must collect sales tax on items sold in a state where they don't have a store or other building.

61. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

62. Some Walmart employees get raises, others to lose their jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — For some Walmart employees, the day brought news of a pay raise. Others learned they were out of a job.

Walmart said Thursday that it is boosting its starting salary for U.S. workers and handing out bonuses. The announcement came as the company also confirmed it is closing dozens of Sam's Club warehouse stores — a move that a union-backed group estimated could cost thousands of jobs.

63. 5 things small business owners should know about tax bills -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners are awaiting details of a reported Republican deal in principle on a tax overhaul, the details of which could come soon.

The deal, which would reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of the tax bill, may answer the question of which business owners will pay lower taxes, and how much of a break they'll get. Both bills have raised the possibility that many owners, including professionals like accountants and consultants, wouldn't see a tax cut.

64. As health premiums rise, small businesses seek alternatives -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small businesses are getting notices about their premium and coverage changes for 2018, and some are making adjustments because of that.

The changes vary depending on the state where a company is located, how many employees it has and how comprehensive its insurance is. But many owners are facing rate increases of double-digit percentages or dramatically reduced coverage — or both.

65. Small retailers aim for emotional ties big chains may lack -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some smaller retailers will tug at shoppers' heartstrings during the holidays, trying to create an emotional experience or connection that a big national chain might not provide.

Store owners are going well beyond the usual holiday decorations and music. Among their plans: Parties where the focus is fundraising rather than profits, events with other stores to encourage shoppers to visit them all, and personal services like merchandise deliveries. The retailers are betting that their efforts — which for some are a year-round strategy — will keep customers shopping long after the holiday season.

66. Women who own businesses find bank loans harder to get -

NEW YORK (AP) — Getting a bank loan is still a struggle for many women who own businesses.

Kirsten Curry has had three rejections in the past six months and is waiting to hear from a fourth bank. Curry, owner of Seattle-based Leading Retirement Solutions, has applied to national banks, a regional bank and a credit union. The problem is that her 8-year-old retirement advisory firm lost money last year as it invested in technology to help it expand. Although revenue has consistently risen and her company has no debt, her expenses last year were a red flag.

67. SBA head sees businesses held back by lack of loans, workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Six months into her tenure as head of the Small Business Administration, Linda McMahon sees a split among small business owners — they are increasingly optimistic, she says, but many are held back by their inability to get loans or find the right workers for jobs that are staying open.

68. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

69. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for June 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

70. Small businesses in clean energy sector still hope for best -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners who install solar panels or help customers use clean energy don't seem fazed by President Donald Trump's plan to withdraw the U.S. from the Paris climate accord, saying they expect demand for their services will still keep growing.

71. When small stores go out of business, owners ask: Now what? -

NEW YORK (AP) — When small or independent retailers post "Going Out of Business" signs, many ask themselves, now what? That may mean trying again — or forging ahead on a completely different career path.

72. Culture shock: Business owners see need to change their ways -

NEW YORK (AP) — The results of a staff survey jolted Alex Slater into realizing how drastically his business needed a culture change.

About half the 19 employees at his Clyde Group public relations firm said they planned to leave in one to two years, and rated the environment as "average" or "needs improvement." No one agreed with the statement: "I am adequately compensated."

73. Trump's budget priorities set small businesses strategizing -

NEW YORK (AP) — The priorities laid out in President Donald Trump's budget message have some small business owners strategizing how they might benefit from a big boost in defense spending, and others thinking about how to make up for revenue they could lose to cuts in grant programs and subsidies.

74. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for February 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

75. Big thaw? Looks like small businesses ending hiring freeze -

NEW YORK (AP) — The hiring freeze at small businesses looks like it's finally thawing.

Recruiting is picking up after being dormant at many companies even years after the recession. The factors behind companies' decisions to hire vary, with some anticipating a big revenue kick from the Trump administration's spending plans for defense and infrastructure. Other are responding to trends such as consumers' shift to online shopping, which means more jobs at internet retailers. And some hires are at companies whose customers are suffering from anxiety in the early days of the new administration.

76. Entrepreneurs: Health law changes may mean finding new jobs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stay in business for yourself or go back to working for someone else?

That's the choice some small business owners and freelancers are worried they may have to make, depending on what changes Congress makes in the health care law.