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Editorial Results (free)

1. Few want Roe overturned, but abortion opinions vary widely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Arguments before the Supreme Court this week signaled that the conservative-leaning bench may dramatically limit abortion rights in the United States.

The decision whether to uphold Mississippi's 15-week abortion ban will determine the fate of the court's 1973 Roe v. Wade decision legalizing abortion and its 1992 ruling in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed Roe.

2. Swayman's 42 saves leads Bruins over Predators 2-0 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Jeremy Swayman made 42 saves, Jake DeBrusk and Brandon Carlo scored, and the Boston Bruins beat the Nashville Predators 2-0 Thursday night.

Swayman's shutout was his first of the season and third of the rookie's NHL career. After stopping 26 shots over the first two periods, Swayman was heavily tested in the third. Among his best saves in the final frame came when he denied Matt Duchene from the slot with the Predators on a power play.

3. Public health v. freedom of choice -

When the sun came up on the last Saturday in October, the Tennessee legislature had voted overwhelmingly along party lines to say that the state – not the federal government – will call the shots in dealing with COVID-19.

4. Supreme Court set to take up all-or-nothing abortion fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Both sides are telling the Supreme Court there's no middle ground in Wednesday's showdown over abortion. The justices can either reaffirm the constitutional right to an abortion or wipe it away altogether.

5. Rantanen's hat trick lifts Avalanche past Predators 6-2 -

DENVER (AP) — Mikko Rantanen changed positions, but not his game. He's still piling up the goals and assists.

Rantanen had a hat trick and an assist, Bo Byram scored in his return to the lineup, and the Colorado Avalanche beat the Nashville Predators 6-2 on Saturday night.

6. Many environmentalists back Biden's move to tap oil reserve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats and climate activists generally supported President Joe Biden's decision to release a record 50 million barrels of oil from America's strategic reserve, even as the move appeared to contradict his long-term vision of combating climate change.

7. Trenin snaps tie in 3rd period, Predators top Ducks 3-2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Yakov Trenin scored the tiebreaking goal in the third period and had an assist, Ryan Johansen added a goal and an assist, and the Nashville Predators beat the Anaheim Ducks 3-2 on Monday night.

8. GOP paints Biden's choice for bank regulator as radical -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to become one of the top banking regulators endured a contentious nomination hearing Thursday, with Republican senators warning she would nationalize the U.S. banking system and Democrats saying she's eminently qualified and would be tough overseer of Wall Street.

9. Biden choice for Justice antitrust post wins Senate approval -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to lead enforcement of competition laws at the Justice Department has won Senate approval as his administration pursues action against outsized market power it has condemned in several industries, including Big Tech, health care, airlines and agriculture.

10. EXPLAINER: Who has the Jan. 6 panel subpoenaed — and why? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection has issued almost three dozen subpoenas as it aggressively seeks information about the origins of the attack and what former President Donald Trump did — or didn't do — to stop it.

11. Duchene scores 2nd goal in OT, Predators top Blues 4-3 -

ST. LOUIS (AP) — Matt Duchene scored his second goal of the game 2:01 into overtime, giving the Nashville Predators a 4-3 victory over the St. Louis Blues on Thursday night.

Duchene's wrist shot beat goalie Jordan Binnington on the short side. It was the only shot Nashville had in overtime.

12. Biden bill includes boost for union-made electric vehicles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress are looking to give U.S. automakers with union employees the inside track on the burgeoning electric vehicle market, triggering vocal opposition from foreign trade partners and Republicans who worry that manufacturers in their home states will be placed at a competitive disadvantage.

13. Jeannot, Saros help hot Predators beat Stars 4-2 -

DALLAS (AP) — Rookie Tanner Jeannot had a goal and an assist, Juuse Saros stopped 25 shots, and the Nashville Predators beat the Dallas Stars 4-2 on Wednesday night.

Ryan Johansen, Matt Duchene and Colton Sissons also scored for the Predators, who are 6-1-1 in their last eight games. Sissons scored an empty-net goal from his own blue line with 43 seconds left after Dallas cut a 3-0 deficit to 3-2.

14. Biden asking Democrats do so much with so little in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rarely have the leaders of Congress been asked to do so much, with so little, as in navigating President Joe Biden's big domestic vision into law.

Reaching for FDR-style accomplishments with slimmer-than-ever Democratic majorities has been politically messy at best, arduous at worst, and about to become even more daunting for the president and his party.

15. Storied General Electric to split into 3 public companies -

The storied American company General Electric will divide itself into three public companies focused on aviation, healthcare and energy.

The company, founded in 1892, has refashioned itself in recent years from the sprawling conglomerate created by Jack Welch in the 1980s to a much smaller and focused entity. It was heavily damaged by the financial crisis.

16. No arm-twisting: Kerry says corporates back plan to cut CO2 -

GENEVA (AP) — A new project trumpeted by U.S. President Joe Biden in which companies underpin development of low-carbon technologies through their buying power amounts to a "big transformation," U.S. climate envoy John Kerry said Thursday.

17. Is it green, or forever toxic? Nuclear rift at climate talks -

SOULAINES-DHUYS, France (AP) — Deep in a French forest of oaks, birches and pines, a steady stream of trucks carries a silent reminder of nuclear energy's often invisible cost: canisters of radioactive waste, heading into storage for the next 300 years.

18. US files antitrust suit to stop major book publisher merger -

The Justice Department is suing to block a $2.2 billion book publishing deal  that would have reshaped the industry, saying consolidation would hurt authors and, ultimately, readers.

German media giant Bertelsmann's Penguin Random House, already the largest American publisher, wants to buy New York-based Simon & Schuster, whose authors include Stephen King, Hillary Clinton and John Irving, from TV and film company ViacomCBS.

19. Supreme Court questions controversial Texas abortion law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of the Supreme Court signaled Monday they would allow abortion providers to pursue a court challenge to the controversial Texas law that has virtually ended abortion in the nation's second-largest state after six weeks of pregnancy.

20. Supreme Court questions Texas law banning most abortions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of the Supreme Court signaled Monday they would allow abortion providers to pursue a court challenge to a Texas law that has virtually ended abortion in the nation's second-largest state after six weeks of pregnancy.

21. Paid leave's demise tough on backers in Manchin's home state -

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Jessi Garman, the mother of 3-year-old twin girls, has been searching for a job while also trying to have a third child with her husband, who's in the military. Optimistic that Congress finally would approve paid family medical leave, she thought the time seemed right.

22. Many progressives grudgingly accepting smaller economic bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Many progressives have started lining up behind an emerging social and environment bill that's neither as big nor bold as they wanted, constrained by an outnumbered but potent band of party moderates who've commanded disproportionate clout and curbed the measure's ambition.

23. Saros makes 28 saves as Predators down Sharks 3-1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Juuse Saros made 28 saves to lead the Nashville Predators to a 3-1 win over the San Jose Sharks on Tuesday night.

Matt Duchene, Filip Forsberg and Mikael Granlund scored for Nashville, winners of two straight.

24. Josi's 4-point game fuels Predators 5-2 victory over Wild -

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Roman Josi had a four-point game, Connor Ingram won his first NHL start, and the Nashville Predators beat Minnesota 5-2 Sunday night, snapping the Wild's season-opening four-game win streak.

25. House votes to hold Trump ally Steve Bannon in contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has voted to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena from the committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

26. Rangers beat Predators 3-1 on Lafrenière's third-period goal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Alexis Lafrenière scored with 9:07 remaining in the third period to lift the New York Rangers over the Nashville Predators 3-1 on Thursday night.

Filip Chytil and Barclay Goodrow also scored and Igor Shesterkin made 28 saves for New York, winners of three straight. Shesterkin has stopped 99 of 102 shots in those three games.

27. Predators score twice in third period, top Kings 2-1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Matt Duchene and Tanner Jeannot scored in the third period to give the Nashville Predators a 2-1 victory over the Los Angeles Kings on Tuesday night.

Predators goalie Juuse Saros made 25 saves for Nashville, while Anze Kopitar had the lone goal and Calvin Petersen made 29 saves for Los Angeles.

28. Biden's climate plan at risk, Dems scramble for alternatives -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a centerpiece of President Joe Biden's climate change strategy all but dashed, Democratic lawmakers headed to the White House Tuesday searching for new ways to narrow and reshape what had been his sweeping $3.5 trillion budget plan.

29. Biden's dilemma: Satisfying Manchin risks losing other Dems -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's Washington's enduring question: What does Joe Manchin want?

But increasingly the answer is crystal clear. The conservative West Virginia Democrat wants to dismantle President Joe Biden's proposed climate change strategies and social services expansion in ways that are simply unacceptable for most in his party.

30. District attorneys refuse to prosecute some GOP-led laws -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When Republican lawmakers in Tennessee blocked a policy to ease up on low-level marijuana cases, Nashville's top prosecutor decided on a workaround: He just didn't charge anyone with the crime.

31. Biden team asks Supreme Court to pause Texas abortion law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is asking the Supreme Court to block the Texas law banning most abortions, while the fight over the measure's constitutionality plays out in the courts.

32. Farmers, John Deere suppliers worry about strike's impact -

WATERLOO, Iowa (AP) — Farmers and Deere & Co. suppliers are worried about what the strike at the tractor maker's factories will mean for their livelihoods.

33. Supreme Court commission talks positively of shorter terms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A commission tasked with studying potential changes to the Supreme Court has released a first look at its review, a draft report that is cautious in discussing proposals for expanding the court but also speaks approvingly of term limits for justices.

34. Kerry says climate talks might miss target -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Crucial U.N. climate talks next month likely will end short of the global target for cutting coal, gas and oil emissions, U.S. climate envoy John Kerry says, after nearly a year of climate diplomacy that helped win deeper cuts from allies but has so far failed to move some of the world's biggest polluters to act fast enough.

35. Big boost for Social Security benefits as inflation rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Millions of retirees on Social Security will get a 5.9% boost in benefits for 2022. The biggest cost-of-living adjustment in 39 years follows a burst in inflation as the economy struggles to shake off the drag of the coronavirus pandemic.

36. Anti-vaccine chiropractors rising force of misinformation -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The flashy postcard, covered with images of syringes, beckoned people to attend Vax-Con '21 to learn "the uncensored truth" about COVID-19 vaccines.

Participants traveled from around the country to a Wisconsin Dells resort for a sold-out convention that was, in fact, a sea of misinformation and conspiracy theories about vaccines and the pandemic. The featured speaker was the anti-vaccine activist who appeared in the 2020 movie "Plandemic," which pushed false COVID-19 stories into the mainstream. One session after another discussed bogus claims about the health dangers of mask wearing and vaccines.

37. VUMC helps develop first COVID-19 pill -

U.S.-based pharmaceutical giant Merck& Co. is seeking authorization for the first oral antiviral pill to treat COVID-19, after a Vanderbilt University Medical Center clinical trial showed it cut the risk of hospitalization or death in half when given to high-risk people during infection.

38. From paints to plastics, a chemical shortage ignites prices -

In an economy upended by the coronavirus, shortages and price spikes have hit everything from lumber to computer chips. Not even toilet paper escaped.

Now, they're cutting into one of the humblest yet most vital links in the global manufacturing supply chain: The plastic pellets that go into a vast universe of products ranging from cereal bags to medical devices, automotive interiors to bicycle helmets.

39. Yellen warns delay in raising debt limit will slow economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen sounded an urgent call Tuesday for Congress to raise the government's borrowing limit, a day after Senate Republicans blocked consideration  of a bill that would have done so.

40. EPA completes rule to phase out gases used as refrigerants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In what officials call a key step to combat climate change, the Environmental Protection Agency is sharply limiting domestic production and use of hydrofluorocarbons, highly potent greenhouse gases commonly used in refrigerators and air conditioners.

41. 5 steps to level up your side hustle -

The pandemic isn't crushing the entrepreneurial spirit. It's fueling it.

People normally tied to a desk or working double shifts used lockdown to launch side hustles, often out of necessity. And some have turned those side gigs into full-fledged businesses.

42. Biden, world leaders try to hammer out next steps on climate -

Washington (AP) — President Joe Biden tried to hammer out the world's next steps against rapidly worsening climate change in a private, virtual session with a small group of other global leaders Friday, and announced a new U.S.-European pledge to cut climate-wrecking methane leaks.

43. Blowers, mowers and more: American yards quietly go electric -

For Jared Anderman, of Croton-on-Hudson, New York, switching from gasoline-powered tools to electric ones for lawn care was a no-brainer.

"I'm concerned about climate change and wanted tools that are more eco-friendly, and also quieter. I like listening to music when I do yardwork and this way I can enjoy music or a podcast while I work," he said. "I could never do that with gas-powered equipment."

44. Maverick Dem senators meeting with Biden on spending plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden was holding face-to-face meetings Wednesday with two moderate Democratic senators who have opposed the size of his signature social and environment package as the White House amped up its drive to win the unanimous Democratic support the huge plan will need to survive in the Senate.

45. US-built databases a potential tool of Taliban repression -

BOSTON (AP) — Over two decades, the United States and its allies spent hundreds of millions of dollars building databases for the Afghan people. The nobly stated goal: Promote law and order and government accountability and modernize a war-ravaged land.

46. Biden in New Orleans to see devastation caused by Ida -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — President Joe Biden could get his first glimpse at the destruction wrought by Hurricane Ida even before he landed in Louisiana on Friday, with blue tarps covering shredded roofs of houses and uprooted trees visible as Air Force One approached New Orleans.

47. Florida governor appeals ruling on masks in schools -

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has appealed a judge's ruling that the governor exceeded his authority by ordering school boards not to impose strict mask requirements on students to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

48. Biden message to battered Gulf Coast: 'We are here for you' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is calling for greater public resolve to confront climate change and help the nation deal with the fierce storms, flooding and wildfires that have beset the country as he makes a sojourn to hurricane-battered Louisiana on Friday.

49. As Ida leaves Gulf, analysts foresee modest economic damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With more than 1 million customers in Louisiana and Mississippi having lost power, Hurricane Ida is sure to take a toll on the energy, chemical and shipping industries that have major hubs along the Gulf Coast. But the impact on the overall U.S. economy will likely be modest so long as damage estimates don't rise sharply and refinery shutdowns are not prolonged, economists say.

50. Biden promise to strike extremists faces new Afghan reality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By promising to strike the extremists who killed 13 Americans and dozens of Afghans, President Joe Biden now confronts the reality of finding and targeting them in an unstable country without U.S. military and intelligence teams on the ground and no help from a friendly government in Kabul.

51. Kabul airport attack kills 60 Afghans, 12 US troops -

KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Two suicide bombers and gunmen attacked crowds of Afghans flocking to Kabul's airport Thursday, transforming a scene of desperation into one of horror in the waning days of an airlift for those fleeing the Taliban takeover. At least 60 Afghans and 12 U.S. troops were killed, Afghan and U.S. officials said.

52. Nashville Freedom Rider Ernest 'Rip' Patton dies at 81 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Ernest "Rip" Patton, a member of the Nashville Freedom Riders and civil rights leader, has died, the Freedom Rides Museum announced. He was 81.

Patton participated in the downtown Nashville civil rights sit-ins in 1960, a movement that eventually led to the desegregation of the city's lunch counters and other public spaces. A year later, he was among the first wave of Freedom Riders to arrive in Jackson, Mississippi, on a Greyhound bus intent on forcing the desegregation of interstate transportation facilities, said Dorothy Walker, director of the Montgomery, Alabama-based museum.

53. House passes bill bolstering landmark voting law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have passed legislation that would strengthen a landmark civil rights-era voting law weakened by the Supreme Court over the past decade, a step party leaders tout as progress in their quest to fight back against voting restrictions advanced in Republican-led states.

54. Crews scour debris for more victims after Tennessee floods -

WAVERLY (AP) — Crews with chainsaws and heavy equipment cleared their way through trees densely matted with vegetation, garbage and building debris Tuesday as searchers scoured a normally shallow creek for more flooding victims in rural Tennessee.

55. House to vote on bill bolstering landmark voting law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are poised to pass legislation Tuesday that would strengthen a landmark civil rights-era voting law weakened by the Supreme Court over the past decade, a step party leaders tout as progress in their quest to fight back against voting restrictions advanced in Republican-led states.

56. Crews scour debris for missing people after Tennessee floods -

WAVERLY (AP) — Crews with chainsaws and heavy equipment cleared their way through trees densely matted with vegetation, garbage and debris from homes Tuesday as searchers scoured a normally shallow creek for more flooding victims in rural Tennessee.

57. Pop-up restaurants might stick around as COVID sees resurgence -

Pop-up restaurants, many started as stopgap measures by struggling chefs and owners, may have staying power as consumers continue to embrace takeout and delivery and the delta variant threatens to make dining in less of an option.

58. Biden: Greater threats than Taliban-controlled Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden says even with the Taliban in power in Afghanistan, he sees a greater threat from outposts of al-Qaida and its affiliated groups in other countries, and that it was no longer "rational" to continue to focus U.S. military power there.

59. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

60. Biden: Troops will stay in Afghanistan to evacuate Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said he is committed to keeping U.S. troops in Afghanistan until every American is evacuated, even if that means maintaining a military presence there beyond his Aug. 31 deadline for withdrawal.

61. TVA plans to switch 1,200 vehicles to electric by 2030 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The nation's largest public utility plans to switch out 1,200 of its vehicles for electric ones by 2030, furthering its role in that market for a power supplier that also plans to help add charging stations across the region, the utility's top official said Wednesday.

62. White House: Taliban agree to allow civilian 'safe passage' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban have agreed to allow "safe passage" from Afghanistan for civilians hoping to join a U.S.-directed airlift from the capital, President Joe Biden's national security adviser said Tuesday, although a timetable for completing the evacuation of Americans, Afghan allies and possibly other civilians has yet to be worked out with the country's new rulers.

63. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefited Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

64. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefitted Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

65. Events -

Williamson Leads Exchange. Expand your network and build new business relationships. Lunch will not be provided. This is a members-only event. The Power Room at Williamson Inc., 4031 Aspen Grove Drive, Suite 630. Registration needed to attend. Wednesday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Information

66. Pandemic Olympics endured heat, and now a typhoon's en route -

TOKYO (AP) — First, the sun. Now: the wind and the rain.

The Tokyo Olympics, delayed by the pandemic and opened under oppressive heat, are due for another hit of nature's power: a typhoon arriving Tuesday morning that is forecast to disrupt at least some parts of the Games.

67. Texas, Oklahoma talk to SEC about joining league -

The last time Texas got a wandering eye for another conference it fueled a series of realignments in college sports that nearly killed the Big 12.

Texas is once again exploring free agency, stealing the headlines at the Southeastern Conference media days and cranking up speculation about another round of conference shuffling. And the Longhorns aren't alone in looking around.

68. Unvaccinated staff eyed in rising nursing home cases, deaths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lagging vaccination rates among nursing home staff are being linked to a national increase in COVID-19 infections and deaths at senior facilities in July, and are at the center of a federal investigation in a hard-hit Colorado location where disease detectives found many workers were not inoculated.

69. We have a winner! -

The first Tennessee State Fair was held at the Walnut Race Course in North Nashville in 1855. It was the same year poet Walt Whitman first published “Leaves of Grass,” Isaac Singer patented the sewing machine motor and Congress approved $30,000 to test camels for military use (clearly, that didn’t work out well).

70. Olympics, pandemic and politics: There's no separating them -

TOKYO (AP) — Over and over, year after year, the stewards of the Olympics say it: The Games aren't supposed to be political. But how do you avoid politics when you're trying to pull off an event of this complexity during a lethal and protracted pandemic?

71. 50-year war on drugs imprisoned millions of Black Americans -

Landscaping was hardly his lifelong dream. As a teenager, Alton Lucas believed basketball or music would pluck him out of North Carolina and take him around the world. In the late 1980s, he was the right-hand man to his musical best friend, Youtha Anthony Fowler, who many hip hop and R&B heads know as DJ Nabs.

72. Biden's 3rd trip to reddish Ohio pushes his economic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden just can't quit Ohio — even if it rejected him in last year's election.

The Democrat travels to Cincinnati on Wednesday to push his economic policies. It's the third visit of his presidency to Ohio, the only state he lost that he has visited multiple times.

73. Biden signs competition order targeting big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Friday targeting what he labeled anticompetitive practices in tech, health care and other parts of the economy, declaring it would fortify an American ideal "that true capitalism depends on fair and open competition."

74. 'Overdue': Biden sets Aug. 31 for US exit from Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden says the U.S. military operation in Afghanistan will end on Aug. 31, delivering an impassioned argument for exiting the nearly 20-year war without sacrificing more American lives even as he bluntly acknowledged there will be no "mission accomplished" moment to celebrate.

75. Amid growing frustration, White House pushes voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a call to "save American democracy," the Biden administration has unveiled new efforts to help protect voting rights amid growing complaints from civil rights activists and other Democrats that the White House has not done enough to fight attempts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

76. With McCain in mind, Sinema reaches for bipartisanship -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than for her shock of purple hair or unpredictable votes, Democratic Sen. Kyrsten Sinema is perhaps best known for doing the unthinkable in Washington: She spends time on the Republican side of the aisle.

77. US plans to make airlines refund fees if bags are delayed -

The Transportation Department will propose that airlines be required to refund fees on checked baggage if the bags aren't delivered to passengers quickly enough.

The proposal, if made final after a lengthy regulation-writing process, would also require prompt refunds for fees on extras such as internet access if the airline fails to provide the service during the flight.

78. NSA discloses hacking methods it says are used by Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. and British agencies disclosed on Thursday details of "brute force" methods they say have been used by Russian intelligence to try to break into the cloud services of hundreds of government agencies, energy companies and other organizations.

79. Africa's COVID-19 envoy blasts EU, COVAX over vaccine crisis -

NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — The African Union special envoy tasked with leading efforts to procure COVID-19 vaccines for the continent is blasting Europe as Africa struggles amid a crushing third surge of infections, saying Thursday that "not one dose, not one vial, has left a European factory for Africa."

80. Senators to watch as Dems debate changing filibuster rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Looming over Senate Democrats this year is a decision that could fundamentally change Congress: whether to change or eliminate the rules of the filibuster to enact President Joe Biden's agenda.

81. Election bill defeat revives fight over the filibuster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The filibuster is here to stay, for now.

And that's posing a challenge to President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress confronting a wall of Republican opposition led by Senate leader Mitch McConnell's "100%" focus on stopping their agenda.

82. Republicans point to inflation in bid to retake Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gas prices have whizzed past $3 per gallon in much of the nation. The cost of used cars and new furniture, airline tickets, department store blouses, ground beef and a Chipotle burrito are on the rise, too.

83. Why are Olympics going on despite public, medical warnings? -

TOKYO (AP) — Public sentiment in Japan has been generally opposed to holding the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics, partly based on fears the coronavirus will spike as almost 100,000 people — athletes and others — enter for both events.

84. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

...

85. SVP-Singer purchased by Platinum Equity -

SVP-Singer Holdings, Inc., with corporate headquarters in La Vergne, has reached a definitive agreement for Platinum Equity to acquire a controlling stake in the company along with its wholly owned subsidiaries.

86. Racial tensions simmer as Southern Baptists hold key meeting -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Race-related tensions within the Southern Baptist Convention are high heading into a national meeting next week. The election of a new SBC president and debate over the concept of systemic racism may prove pivotal for some Black pastors as they decide whether to stay in the denomination or leave.

87. 'A lot of anxiety' for Democrats as Biden agenda stalls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hopes for a big infrastructure investment are teetering. An ambitious elections and voting bill is all but dead. Legislation on police brutality, gun control and immigration has stalled out.

88. Automakers face a threat to EV sales: Slow charging times -

DETROIT (AP) — If the auto industry is to succeed in its bet that electric vehicles will soon dominate the roads, it will need to overcome a big reason why many people are still avoiding them: Fear of running out of juice between Point A and Point B.

89. Kirkland installed as TMA president -

Dr. Ronald “Ron” H. Kirkland, a board-certified otolaryngologist from Jackson, has been installed as the 167th president of the Tennessee Medical Association, the statewide professional association for more than 9,500 member physicians and their patients.

90. Carolina rallies, eliminates Preds with 4-3 Game 6 OT win -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Carolina Hurricanes finally figured out how to beat the Nashville Predators in overtime: Score quickly.

And now they're onto the second round.

Sebastian Aho scored his second goal of the game 1:06 into overtime and the Hurricanes advanced with a 4-3 comeback victory over the Nashville Predators on Thursday night in Game 6. It was their second straight overtime win to finish off the series with both winning goals scored within the first couple minutes.

91. Kennedy to lead new Sherrard group -

Nashville law firm Sherrard Roe Voigt & Harbison has launched a new health care services group focused on dentists, optometrists and veterinarians.

Cornell Kennedy, a partner at the firm, will head the group. Kennedy specializes in representing specialty health care providers by counseling them on various transactional matters that arise with running a practice. Some of those services include navigating providers through the process of startups, practice acquisitions, commercial lease review, drafting partnership agreements, employment agreements and negotiating equity buy-ins.

92. Staal scores in OT, lifts Hurricanes past Predators 3-2 -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Coach Rod Brind'Amour figured the puck would eventually have to bounce the right way for his Carolina Hurricanes.

Fittingly, his captain was ready when it did.

Jordan Staal scored off a rebound at 2:03 of overtime to give the Hurricanes a 3-2 come-from-behind victory over the Nashville Predators on Tuesday night, pushing Carolina to a 3-2 lead in the first-round playoff series.

93. Biden's solar ambitions collide with China labor complaints -

BEIJING (AP) — The Biden administration's solar power ambitions are colliding with complaints the global industry depends on Chinese raw materials that might be produced by forced labor.

A big hurdle is polysilicon, used to make photovoltaic cells for solar panels. The global industry gets 45% of its supply from Xinjiang, the northwestern region where the ruling Communist Party is accused of mass incarceration of minorities and other abuses. Other parts of China supply 35%. Only 20% comes from U.S. and other producers.

94. Tennessee moves to the forefront with anti-transgender laws -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Conservative lawmakers nationwide introduced a flurry of anti-LGBTQ bills this year, but no state's political leaders have gone further than Tennessee in enacting new laws targeting transgender people.

95. Preds beat Canes 4-3 in double OT again to tie series at 2-2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Nashville Predators are finding that neither a broken stick nor back-to-back double overtime games can stop them.

Not with the biggest crowds for an NHL game this season behind them and goalie Juuse Saros in net.

96. Sotomayor: Americans need to take critical look at policing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As communities nationwide are re-examining law enforcement practices, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor says Americans should think critically about how they want police to interact with citizens.

97. EXPLAINER: How Congress' Jan. 6 commission would work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent commission to study the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection would be modeled after a similar panel that studied the 9/11 terrorist attacks and has long been hailed as a bipartisan success.

98. 35 Republicans buck Trump, back study of Jan. 6 Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thirty-five House Republicans joined Democrats in voting to create a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol, risking the wrath of former President Donald Trump and flouting GOP leaders who condemned the proposal as unfairly partisan and unneeded.

99. House backs commission on Jan. 6 riot over GOP objections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted to create an independent commission on the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, sending the legislation to an uncertain future in the Senate as Republican leaders work to stop a bipartisan investigation that is opposed by former President Donald Trump.

100. Aho, Nedeljkovic lift Hurricanes past Predators, 3-0 -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Alex Nedeljkovic stayed composed and steady all night in net. It's a good thing the Carolina Hurricanes' penalty kill did, too.

That's why they are up 2-0 in their first-round playoff series on the Nashville Predators.