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Editorial Results (free)

1. Digital dilemma: How will US respond to Sony hack? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The detective work blaming North Korea for the Sony hacker break-in appears so far to be largely circumstantial, The Associated Press has learned. The dramatic conclusion of a Korean role is based on subtle clues in the hacking tools left behind and the involvement of at least one computer in Bolivia previously traced to other attacks blamed on the North Koreans.

2. Top November 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top November 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

3. N Korea-linked Sony hack may be costliest ever -

NEW YORK (AP) — The unprecedented hack of Sony Pictures which a U.S. official says is linked to North Korea may be the most damaging cyberattack ever inflicted on an American business.

The fallout from the hack that exposed a trove of sensitive documents, and this week escalated to threats of terrorism, forced Sony to cancel release of the North Korean spoof movie "The Interview." The studio's reputation is in tatters as embarrassing revelations spill from tens of thousands of leaked emails and other company materials.

4. Senators to NFL: Drop 'blackout' rule or we might -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators from both parties warned the National Football League Thursday to get rid of a 4-decade-old TV "blackout" rule or risk congressional action to restrict the league's lucrative antitrust exemption, which allows NFL teams to negotiate radio and television broadcast rights together.

5. Senators to NFL: Drop 'blackout' rule or we might -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators from both parties are urging the National Football League to get rid of a rule that bars home games from being televised in a local market if they have not sold out.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal and John McCain say the NFL's "blackout" rule is unfair to fans who have helped the league reap billions of dollars in revenue from broadcast rights to games that are among the most-watched programs on TV.

6. Paulson: AIG bailout designed to be punishment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 2008 government bailout of American International Group Inc. was specifically designed to punish the insurance giant, former Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson said in U.S. court Monday.

7. Is it really time to relax lending standards? -

Just when you thought it was safe to believe in the wisdom of the system, they pull this.

Back in 2008, when the Great Recession made its way into Middle Tennessee and the area began to feel the pain that other regions had endured for several years, the financial world collapsed.

8. Democrats reframe debate on health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One of the most vulnerable Senate Democrats is standing by his vote for President Barack Obama's health care law, a fresh sign that the unpopular mandate may be losing some of its political punch.

9. Lawmakers face long to-do list, uncertain success -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A gridlocked Congress failed to do the big things: overhauling the nation's immigration system, reforming the loophole-cluttered tax code and stiffening background checks on gun buyers. Now it's time to see whether it can just do the basics.

10. Senate Dems, GOP woo female voters for this fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic and Republican Senators are pouring significant time and energy into pursuing female voters, a coveted prize in the Nov. 4 elections.

Wednesday's Senate vote on contraception legislation is the latest example of Democrats' win-by-losing strategy, which forces Republicans to vote on sensitive matters that might rile women this fall.

11. Veterans health spending doubles in Senate bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Spending on veterans' health care could double in three years under the Senate's solution to the long waits experienced by thousands seeking medical care at VA hospitals and clinics, according to congressional budget experts.

12. Court: Children older than 21 go to back of visa line -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court ruled Monday that immigrant children who waited for years with their parents to obtain visas still have to go to the back of the line when they turn 21.

13. Senate moves toward vote on VA health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is moving forward on a compromise bill to help veterans avoid long waits to see a doctor and make it easier to fire administrators who falsify records to cover up long wait times.

14. Senate to take up new VA bill after scandal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Details of a refashioned bill to address the problems plaguing the federally run veterans' health care system have been released by its sponsor, the chairman of the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee.

15. Jindal to headline Tennessee Sen. Johnson's fundraiser -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee state Sen. Jack Johnson is tapping yet another potential presidential candidate to headline his annual fundraising barbeque this summer.

16. Sen. Paul: Give Caterpillar award for tax strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Caterpillar Inc. executives defended a tax strategy Tuesday that has saved the manufacturing giant billions in U.S. taxes. They got support from Republican senators, including one who said the company deserves an award.

17. Big or small, spending-cut efforts hit roadblocks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The budget gurus in Congress have failed for years to find a grand bargain to reduce the government's long-term debt, so this year they decided to go small. Just 1 percentage point would be shaved from the annual cost-of-living increase in military pensions for veterans under age 62.

18. Congress skeptical about plan to shrink military -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration's push for a smaller, nimbler military must now face the scrutiny of a Congress that has spent years battling the Pentagon's vision for a new security strategy.

19. Senate sends farm bill to Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has given its final approval to a sweeping five-year farm bill that provides food for the needy and subsidies for farmers.

Ending years of political battles, the Senate on Tuesday sent the measure to President Barack Obama, who is expected to sign it. The Senate passed the bill 68-32.

20. Obama proposes new limits on NSA phone collections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, President Barack Obama on Friday called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing such records. Still, he defended the nation's spying apparatus as a whole, saying the intelligence community was not "cavalier about the civil liberties of our fellow citizens."

21. New prospects in 2014 for an immigration overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — His agenda tattered by last year's confrontations and missteps, President Barack Obama begins 2014 clinging to the hope of winning a lasting legislative achievement: an overhaul of immigration laws.

22. Congress does little of consequence, except argue -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it a steady diet of gridlock, with "Green Eggs and Ham" on the side.

Congress did not pass White House-backed immigration or gun control legislation in 2013. Or raise the minimum wage. Or approve many other items on President Barack Obama's agenda.

23. Bipartisan budget agreement clears Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress sent President Barack Obama legislation Wednesday scaling back across-the-board cuts on programs ranging from the Pentagon to the national park system, adding a late dusting of bipartisanship to a year more likely to be remembered for a partial government shutdown and near-perpetual gridlock.

24. Budget bill moves toward final passage in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan budget bill that would ease some but not all of painful budget cuts that would otherwise slam the Pentagon and domestic agencies passed a pivotal test in the Senate on Tuesday.

25. Obama's gatekeeper now point man on health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House chief of staff Denis McDonough was ready to vent.

"I've had too much humble pie," he fumed, striding into a top aide's West Wing office. "That was the last slice. I'm full."

26. Lawmakers look to sanctions if Iran deal falters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers are making contingency plans for what happens if — or when — the nuclear accord with Iran falls apart.

Congress is out of town through the end of the month, but lawmakers are already weighing their options for how to address the deal with Iran, in which Tehran agrees to a six-month pause in its nuclear program in exchange for eased sanctions worth $7 billion. Lawmakers from both parties are skeptical the agreement will prod Tehran to give up its nuclear ambitions and say they will be waiting with even harsher punishment if Iran proves an untrustworthy partner.

27. Defense bill caught in Congress' political divide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For 51 years of war and peace, Republicans and Democrats rallied around a bill to pay the troops, buy ships and aircraft and set military policy.

Last week, the Senate couldn't even agree on votes.

28. Senate OKs gay rights bill banning discrimination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has approved a bill outlawing workplace discrimination against gay, bisexual and transgender Americans.

The vote reflected the nation's rapidly evolving attitude toward gay rights nearly two decades after Congress rejected same-sex marriage. The final tally was 64-32.

29. Senate blocks Obama picks for judge, housing posts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans blocked President Barack Obama's nominees to lead an influential federal court and a housing agency on Thursday, despite Democratic warnings of a return to last summer's partisan brawl over who wields power in the Senate.

30. Boehner's jam: Caucus loves but won't follow him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress' debt-and-spending breakthrough crystalized a political contradiction.

House Republicans refuse to let their supposed leader, Speaker John Boehner, steer them toward big policy decisions, leaving him to endure repeated public embarrassments. Yet they rally around Boehner as much as ever, affirming his hold on the speakership Wednesday even as they choked down a Democratic-crafted bill to reopen the government, lift the debt ceiling and give Republicans only a few small concessions.

31. Government open again, Obama bemoans damage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government unlocked its doors Thursday after 16 days, with President Barack Obama saluting the resolution of Congress' bitter standoff but lambasting Republicans for the partial shutdown that he said had damaged the U.S. economy and America's credibility around the world.

32. Deal reached to avoid default and open government -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate leaders announced last-minute agreement Wednesday to avert a threatened Treasury default and reopen the government after a partial, 16-day shutdown. Congress raced to pass the measure by day's end.

33. New House GOP plan as debt-limit deadline nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Time growing desperately short, House Republicans pushed for passage of legislation late Tuesday to prevent a threatened Treasury default, end a 15-day partial government shutdown and extricate divided government from its latest brush with a full political meltdown.

34. Analysis: Republicans get opposite of stated goals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans insisted they wanted to shut down the nation's 3-year-old health care overhaul, not the government. They got the opposite, and now struggle to convince the public that responsibility for partial closure of the federal establishment lies with President Barack Obama and the Democrats.

35. McCain: Partisanship in DC is worst he has seen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Staring at the specter of a partial government shutdown, Sen. John McCain says he's never seen anything like the harsh partisanship pervading much of Washington politics.

36. Anti-shutdown bill advances; big fight still looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Unanimous but far from united, the Senate advanced legislation to prevent a partial government shutdown on Wednesday, the 100-0 vote certain to mark merely a brief pause in a fierce partisan struggle over the future of President Barack Obama's signature health care law.

37. McConnell won't support Cruz on Senate test vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a break with tea party-aligned Senate conservatives, Republican leader Mitch McConnell announced Monday he will not vote to block legislation aimed at preventing a partial government shutdown, even though Democrats intend to rewrite it to restore funds needed to keep the nation's three-year-old health care law in existence.

38. No surprises for Alexander and GOP incumbents -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Faced with a potentially serious primary challenger, Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander was not about to sit back and wait.

The former two-term governor locked down endorsements, banked more than $3 million and linked arms with popular Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky and former GOP presidential contender Mike Huckabee. When conservative state Rep. Joe Carr announced he would challenge Alexander, the senator's team was ready.

39. GOP moderates push back on tea party spending cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Midway between the 2012 and 2014 election campaigns, moderate Republican conservatives are beginning to foment a revolt of their own — a backlash to anti-spending tea party shrillness as budget cuts begin to significantly shrink defense and domestic programs.

40. Immigration bill critics focus on health law delay -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For many House conservatives, President Barack Obama's decision to delay a central provision of his health care law has emerged as a major arguing point — not against that law but in opposition to immigration legislation.

41. Pentagon to bear brunt of upcoming budget cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A second, deeper round of automatic federal budget cuts is on its way, and it's going to hit the Pentagon hard.

Already reeling from a $34 billion budget blow this year due to deficit-driven spending reductions known as sequestration, the Defense Department would feel an additional $20 billion punch in 2014. All told, the Pentagon's budget for next year would be cut by about 10 percent below levels approved just six months ago.

42. Obama challenges GOP to accept corporate tax deal -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) — Seeking to ease Washington gridlock, President Barack Obama on Tuesday challenged Republicans to accept a new fiscal deal to cut corporate tax rates in exchange for more government spending on jobs programs.

43. Anxiety brews among immigration supporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supporters of far-reaching immigration legislation fear they're losing the message war and say an all-out campaign is needed from business groups and other outside advocates with ties to House Republicans to turn it around.

44. Dems pin immigration hopes on GOP's Ryan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats doggedly pursuing a far-reaching immigration bill are counting on help from Republican Rep. Paul Ryan, Mitt Romney's running mate last year and an unlikely candidate for delivering the centerpiece of President Barack Obama's second-term agenda.

45. Senate steps back from brink on nominations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate stepped away from the brink of a meltdown on Tuesday, clearing the way for confirmation of several of President Barack Obama's nominees long blocked by Republicans, agreeing to quick action on unnamed others and finessing a Democratic threat to overturn historic rules that protect minority-party rights.

46. Boehner sees will to act on immigration in House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker John Boehner said Thursday the "vast majority" of House Republicans believe they need to deal with immigration, but that they'll take a methodical, step-by-step approach and won't be held to any deadlines.

47. GOP rejects comprehensive approach on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are embracing a step-by-step approach to immigration, in contrast to the sweeping plan passed by the Senate and backed by the White House. But they're offering neither specifics nor a timetable — nor any mention of possible citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country unlawfully.

48. Immigration bill faces uncertain future in House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The immigration debate is shifting to the Republican-led House, where lawmakers have shown little appetite for the large-scale, comprehensive approach their Senate colleagues embraced last week.

49. Immigration focus on House after Senate OKs bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attention is shifting to the House and its conservative majority after the Senate passed a landmark immigration bill opening the door to U.S. citizenship to millions while pouring billions of dollars into securing the border with Mexico.

50. Budget office view boosts Senate immigration bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supporters of a far-reaching immigration bill in the Senate see fresh momentum from a report by the Congressional Budget Office that says the measure would boost the economy and reduce federal deficits by billions of dollars.

51. US gov't collecting huge number of phone records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is secretly collecting the telephone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order, according to the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee. The Obama administration is defending the National Security Agency's need to collect such records, but critics are calling it a huge over-reach.

52. US gov't collecting huge number of phone records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government is secretly collecting the telephone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order, according to the chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee. The Obama administration is defending the National Security Agency's need to collect such records, but critics are calling it a huge over-reach.

53. Events -

Christian Scholars Conference. John Dean, former White House counsel for President Richard Nixon and key witness for the prosecution before the Senate Watergate Committee and the Watergate trials, will be one of three keynote speakers at the 33rd annual Thomas H. Olbricht Christian Scholars’ Conference (CSC), to be held through Saturday. Dean will speak on “The Ethical Legacy of Watergate” at 10:45 a.m., Saturday, June 8, in Collins Alumni Auditorium. A book-signing will follow at 12:15 p.m.

54. Bipartisan bill would remake immigration system -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. immigration system would undergo dramatic changes under a bipartisan Senate bill that puts a new focus on prospective immigrants' merit and employment potential, while seeking to end illegal immigration once and for all by creating legal avenues for workers to come here.

55. Lawmakers ready to unveil immigration deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of senators is almost ready to share with colleagues and voters an immigration overhaul crafted over several months.

The so-called Gang of Eight is finishing up the final details and is planning to unveil the proposed legislation on Tuesday. Even before the measure gets its first public airing, its authors were defending the program that would provide a pathway to citizenship for the 11 million individuals in this country who came illegally or overstayed their visit.

56. AP source: Immigration bill could exclude many -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan immigration bill soon to be introduced in the Senate could exclude hundreds of thousands of immigrants here illegally from ever becoming U.S. citizens, according to a Senate aide with knowledge of the proposals.

57. Critics revive past promises to knock Obama budget -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Advocates for seniors say President Barack Obama is breaking his promise to protect Social Security, while conservatives say he is breaking his promise not to raise taxes on the middle class.

58. Tentative farm workers deal in immigration talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A tentative deal has been reached between agriculture workers and growers, a key senator said Tuesday, smoothing the way for a landmark immigration bill to be released within a week.

59. Raucous debate on immigration to get under way -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators writing a comprehensive immigration bill hope to finish their work this week, opening what's sure to be a raucous public debate over measures to secure the border, allow tens of thousands of foreign workers into the country and grant eventual citizenship to the estimated 11 million people living here illegally.

60. Immigration deal at hand, focus turns to details -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Big business and big labor have settled on a political framework for an immigration overhaul. Now, the lawmakers writing bipartisan legislation need to resolve the nitty-gritty — and keep their parties' political flanks mollified.

61. Obama: Immigration bill could pass by summer -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama pressed for swift action on a sweeping immigration bill Wednesday, saying last-minute obstacles are "resolvable" and predicting Congress could pass historic legislation by the end of the summer.

62. Government fiscal outlook improving, but only for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite constant budget wrangling and finger-pointing by the nation's policy-makers, the government's short-term fiscal outlook isn't all that bad. It's actually getting better — at least for now.

63. Obama presses on with GOP charm offensive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama pressed on with his Republican charm offensive Thursday, holding a White House lunch with House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan in an effort to soften the ground for potential talks on a long-term deficit reduction deal.

64. Efforts to avoid gov't shutdown move to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Efforts to stave off a late March government shutdown shifted to the Senate after House Republicans swiftly passed legislation to keep federal agencies running, while also easing some of the effects of $85 billion in budget cuts.

65. Obama says no smart way to let budget cuts kick in -

NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) — No progress to report in efforts to stave off looming government-wide spending cuts, President Barack Obama on Tuesday singled out for praise the few Republicans who say they're open to aspects of his approach, seeking to turn up the heat on GOP leaders ahead of Friday's deadline.

66. Obama offering immigration plan as backup -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is downplaying its draft immigration proposal as merely a backup plan if lawmakers don't come up with an overhaul of their own. It won't be necessary, Republican and Democratic lawmakers alike are telling the Obama administration.

67. Senate, White House struggle over Hagel impasse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats and the White House struggled to break an impasse Thursday over Chuck Hagel's nomination as secretary of defense, with Republicans blocking speedy confirmation of their former colleague and Vietnam combat veteran.

68. FACT CHECK: Overreaching in State of Union speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama did some cherry-picking Tuesday night in defense of his record on jobs and laid out a conditional path to citizenship for illegal immigrants that may be less onerous than he made it sound.

69. White House: Hagel will win Senate confirmation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday dismissed criticism of Chuck Hagel's hesitant congressional testimony and insisted that it expects the Senate to confirm him as defense secretary.

One day after Hagel was roughed up in a grueling confirmation hearing, White House spokesman Jay Carney said Hagel did a "fine job" and the Obama administration would be stunned if Republicans tried to block the nomination of a decorated Vietnam combat veteran and former two-term GOP senator.

70. Republicans face a balancing act on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans face a delicate balancing act as they embrace an unprecedented shift in their views on immigration reform — and no one better exemplifies the potential risks and rewards than Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida.

71. GOP lawmakers see automatic cuts as leverage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Driven by frustration over deficits and debt, Republican conservatives are pushing a politically risky move to permit painfully large automatic spending cuts to strike the Pentagon and domestic programs alike in an effort to force Democrats into making concessions on the budget.

72. Senators reach agreement on immigration reform -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of leading senators has reached agreement on the principles for a sweeping overhaul of the nation's immigration laws, including a path to citizenship for the 11 million illegal immigrants already in this country.

73. Hagel pick test of Senate on presidential choices -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the middle of a bitter fight over a Republican president's nominee for defense secretary, a former White House occupant pleaded with senators to give the president his choice for the Pentagon job.

74. Critics complain Sandy aid tied to other projects -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conservatives and watchdog groups are mounting a "not-so-fast" campaign against a $50.7 billion Superstorm Sandy aid package that Northeastern governors and lawmakers hope to push through the House this coming week.

75. NRA says Congress will not pass weapons ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Vice President Joe Biden finalizes a package of recommendations for the president to curb gun violence, the National Rifle Association predicted that Congress is likely to block any new laws that would ban assault weapons.

76. Santorum takes up fight against Hagel nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican opposition to Chuck Hagel as the next defense secretary swelled from inside and outside the Senate Thursday as a former Senate colleague launched a campaign to block his nomination.

77. Some urge Boehner: let Dems pass fiscal cliff bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In case the public weren't frustrated enough over Congress' failure to resolve the "fiscal cliff," consider this: lawmakers probably could enact a compromise quickly and easily if Republican leaders let Democrats provide most of the votes.

78. On foreign policy, Kerry is Obama's good soldier -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Sen. John Kerry stands tall as President Barack Obama's good soldier.

The Massachusetts lawmaker has flown to Afghanistan and Pakistan numerous times to tamp down diplomatic disputes, spending hours drinking tea and taking walks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai or engaging in delicate negotiations in Islamabad.

79. Kerry, Hagel front-runners to lead State, Defense -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic Sen. John Kerry, who unsuccessfully sought the presidency in 2004 and has pined for the job of top diplomat, vaulted to the head of President Barack Obama's short list of secretary of state candidates after U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice suddenly withdrew from consideration to avoid a contentious confirmation fight with emboldened Republicans.

80. Russian trade, human rights bill heads to Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Russian trade and human rights bill cleared Congress and headed for President Barack Obama's signature Thursday, opening up new export opportunities for American businesses but antagonizing relations with Russia over its treatment of dissidents.

81. Fiscal cliff offers hint at more defense cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans' "fiscal cliff" counteroffer to President Barack Obama hints at billions of dollars in military cuts on top of the nearly $500 billion that the White House and Congress backed last year, and even the fiercest defense hawks acknowledge that the Pentagon faces another financial hit.

82. Analysis: Obama aims high but doesn't gloat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama walked a narrow path between ambition and realism, defiance and accommodation when he addressed reporters for the first time since winning a hard-fought election that gives him four more years to carve his place in history.

83. Knoxville News Sentinel ends presidential endorsements -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The Knoxville News Sentinel has ended a decades-old tradition of endorsing presidential candidates, saying it no longer has any special access to the candidates.

Editor Jack McElroy said in a column (http://bit.ly/WpA2Ec) published Sunday it was a difficult decision.

84. Analysis: Presidential debate to set tone for race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As millions of Americans watch, President Barack Obama and challenger Mitt Romney will be chasing opposite goals in their first debate. The key for Obama is to sit on his narrow lead without mishap, while Romney's challenge is to shake up the race and connect with voters.

85. New ID laws could delay outcome of close election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential election is Nov. 6, but it could take days to figure out the winner if the vote is close. New voting laws are likely to increase the number of people who have to cast provisional ballots in key states.

86. Gas prices unlikely to fall as fast as oil -

Not so fast. That's the message for drivers hoping a recent drop in oil prices will soon show up at the gas station.

Oil has dropped $9 per barrel, or 9.1 percent, in less than two weeks. Gas prices tend to lag changes in oil, but experts don't expect a significant move lower until the middle of October.

87. Top residential real estate transactions for August 2012 -

August 2012 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

88. Hagerty to go on leave to work for Romney campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Bill Hagerty is stepping away from his role as commissioner of the Economic and Community Development Department to work for Republican Mitt Romney's presidential campaign.

Hagerty will serve a member of the campaign's presidential readiness team in Washington. He held a similar role in Sen. John McCain's presidential campaign four years ago.

89. Senate fails to approve cybersecurity legislation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate failed Thursday to pass legislation to protect the U.S. electrical grid, water supplies and other critical industries from cyberattack and electronic espionage, despite dire warnings from top national security officials about the potential for devastating assaults on American computer networks.

90. Immigrants prove big business for prison companies such as CCA -

MIAMI (AP) — The U.S. is locking up more illegal immigrants than ever, generating lucrative profits for the nation's largest prison companies, and an Associated Press review shows the businesses have spent tens of millions of dollars lobbying lawmakers and contributing to campaigns.

91. Defense official: Cuts hit warfighters, weapons -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Warfighters heading to Afghanistan would receive less training while the Navy would be forced to buy fewer ships if lawmakers fail in the next five months to come up with an alternative deficit-reduction plan, a Pentagon official said Wednesday.

92. GOP senators launch tour warning of defense cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans warning of the devastating impact from looming defense cuts will hit four presidential battleground states next week, ratcheting up the political pressure on President Barack Obama even though Congress endorsed the reductions.

93. Report: 2M jobs lost if automatic cuts kick in -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Automatic cuts in federal spending will cost the economy more than 2 million jobs, from defense contracting to border security to education, if Congress fails to resolve the looming budget crisis, according to an analysis released Tuesday.

94. State corporate campaign spending limits rejected -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Monday turned away a plea to revisit its 2-year-old campaign finance decision in the Citizens United case and instead struck down a Montana law limiting corporate campaign spending.

95. Senate bill brings some big changes to farm policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Briefly putting election-year politics aside, the Senate on Thursday moved toward strong approval of legislation assuring that farmers hit by bad times will be protected and that millions of others hurt by the bad economy won't go hungry.

96. GOP senators won't say if Obama plan is amnesty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to President Barack Obama's new immigration policy, Senate Republicans are quite sure they don't like it. They just don't want to say if it amounts to amnesty, at least not yet, while they await guidance on the politically charged issue from presidential candidate Mitt Romney.

97. Senate panel approves $631 billion defense bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel has approved a $631 billion defense budget for next year, the same amount that President Barack Obama proposed for the military.

Sens. Carl Levin of Michigan and John McCain of Arizona announced Thursday that the Armed Services Committee had completed its closed-door work on the bill. The final amount puts the bill at odds with a House-passed measure that is $4 billion more.

98. Dimon survives votes on pay, chairmanship -

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — The CEO of JPMorgan Chase survived a shareholder push Tuesday to strip him of the title of chairman of the board, five days after he disclosed a $2 billion trading loss by the bank.

99. Obama, Romney star power shines on businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Call it the Obama effect: A presidential visit can be good advertising for restaurants and businesses.

Vermilion in Alexandria, Va., is one of the most recent establishments in the spotlight after President Barack Obama and his wife, Michelle, dined there on Valentine's Day.

100. Democrats in GOP-leaning House races may aid Obama -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Republican-leaning areas in states vital to President Barack Obama's re-election prospects are drawing top-tier Democratic congressional candidates who, even if they lose, could help turn out the vote and boost Obama's chances of winning a second term.