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Editorial Results (free)

1. Wiseman Ashworth names Marsicano, Bills members -

Michele T. Marsicano and Anthony C. Bills have been named members at Wiseman Ashworth Law Group.

Marsicano heads the firm’s Health Care Operations and Behavioral Health Practice Group, working collaboratively with health care providers and institutions, families, agencies and the courts. She also regularly advocates for physicians and health care institutions before the Health Related Boards, as well as in court.

2. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

3. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for October 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Secours looks to stars in praise of scouts who discovered them -

Willie Mays – or at least recounting the day she met and filmed the man some say is the greatest baseball player ever – makes Molly Secours light up.

Actually, almost anything about baseball makes her happy.

5. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for August 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

6. Stay out of the attic. It’s a dangerous up there -

Last week, word spread that a woman who was walking about her attic had fallen through the ceiling and onto the floor below. She experienced a mean fall that injured several vertebrae and opened a gash in her scalp that required several staples to close.

7. Right vs. far right: State Republicans itching for a fight -

A rift within the Tennessee Republican party, whether a tempest in a teapot or the early signs of implosion, isn’t likely to hit the big tent party hard at the polls this fall.

But make no mistake, there is some trouble in paradise.

8. Larger-than-life Nashville politician Hooker dead at 85 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A family friend said larger-than-life Nashville political figure John Jay Hooker Jr., who spent his last days fighting to make physician-assisted suicide legal in Tennessee, died on Sunday at 85.

9. For gadfly Hooker, cancer is 'a jolt' but also opportunity -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The ups and downs of John Jay Hooker are the stuff of Nashville legend.

Friend of Muhammad Ali, socialite, lawyer who moved in the Kennedys' circle, Hooker also lost businesses, millions of dollars and high-profile political campaigns. In his later years, he has earned the moniker gadfly, mostly for losing battles, and seemed to be fading into irrelevance.

10. Hooker asks Tennessee high court to take up aid-in-dying case -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A former Democratic gubernatorial nominee who is terminally ill is asking the Tennessee Supreme Court to take up the question of whether he has a constitutional right to die with the aid of a doctor.

11. Judge rules against Hooker in bid for legalizing assisted suicide -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A Nashville judge has ruled against John Jay Hooker, who is terminally ill and wants to die by assisted suicide.

Hooker has terminal cancer and has doctors who have expressed a willingness to prescribe him a lethal dosage of painkillers.

12. From Banner to bankruptcy -

More than 17 years after the Nashville Banner ceased publication, another chapter in the story – perhaps the last – has been written in Winchester’s Eastern District bankruptcy court with the final disposition of Irby C. Simpkins Jr.’s Chapter 7 case.

13. Hooker fights for right to die on his terms -

John Jay Hooker, a household name in Middle Tennessee if nowhere else, is suffering from stage 4 metastatic cancer with weeks, not months to live.

Known for his flamboyant character, elaborate costumes and a history of running for public office in Tennessee (and never winning), Hooker has a reputation for fighting on and on. Whether it’s in the courtroom, the General Assembly or on the public stage, he has always liked being in the spotlight and being in control.

14. Hooker files lawsuit challenging Tennessee euthanasia law -

NASHVILLE (AP) - John Jay Hooker has worked for Robert F. Kennedy, run for Tennessee governor and now, while facing terminal cancer, hopes to reverse Tennessee's approach to assisted suicides.

The 84-year-old Nashville attorney, businessman and political candidate filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Davidson County Chancery Court against a law that makes it a felony for a doctor or another person to assist in someone's death, The Tennessean reports (http://tnne.ws/1HfTbNn).

15. Changing state constitution no easy task -

Amending Tennessee’s Constitution isn’t as rare as it was in the state’s first 200 years, and yet it remains a tough, drawn-out task, even if the most popular process, the legislative method, is used.

16. Hooker seeks ruling on Tennessee ballot measure votes -

NASHVILLE (AP) - As if Tennessee's lengthy process for amending the state constitution weren't complicated enough, independent gubernatorial candidate John Jay Hooker is now raising concerns that the method for counting the votes does not pass constitutional muster.

17. Criminal charges recommended for Ramsey, Harwell -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A grand jury in Nashville on Friday recommended criminal charges be filed against the Republican speakers of the Tennessee House and Senate for failing to appoint an adequate number of women and minorities to a commission that decides whether Tennessee's appeals judges keep their jobs.

18. Court refuses to rehear case on judge selection in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A special state Supreme Court panel has refused to rehear a case that challenged the constitutionality of the way Tennessee selects its judges.

John Jay Hooker, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks its judges, asked the court to rehear the case after it ruled against him last month.

19. Court upholds retention elections for judges -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A special state Supreme Court panel ruled Monday that Tennessee's current retention election system for appellate court judges does not violate the state constitution.

The decision stems from a lawsuit filed in 2012 by John Jay Hooker of Nashville, a former Democratic candidate for governor who has long been a foe of the way Tennessee picks and retains appellate court judges.

20. Judge rules judicial evaluation commission invalid -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A Nashville judge ruled on Tuesday that the panel that evaluates Tennessee's appellate judges is invalid because it does not have enough female members.

According to state law, the Judicial Performance Evaluation Commission is supposed to have about the same percentage of women and minority members as the state's population as a whole. But while Tennessee's population is roughly 52 percent women and 48 percent men, the commission is made up of two women and seven men, meaning women make up only about 22 percent of the panel.

21. Panel opens applications for Tennessee judicial vacancies -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The application process for upcoming judicial vacancies on two Tennessee courts is underway again after Gov. Bill Haslam created a new panel to vet applicants.

Haslam last week signed an executive order creating the Governor's Commission for Judicial Appointments. It largely mirrors the state's Judicial Nominating Commission, which lawmakers allowed to expire in June.

22. Bill to allow governor to select appellate judges -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A proposal to amend the state constitution to allow the governor to appoint appellate judges is headed for a vote on the Senate floor.

The measure sponsored by Sen. Brian Kelsey, a Germantown Republican and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, passed the committee 8-1 on Tuesday and is being scheduled for a full Senate vote.

23. Haslam picks 3 for special Supreme Court panel -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Gov. Bill Haslam has selected three people to serve on a special state Supreme Court panel to hear a lawsuit concerning the state's system for selecting appeals court judges.

This selection comes after three justices he picked recused themselves last month. Initially, all the sitting Tennessee Supreme Court justices recused themselves from the case.