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Editorial Results (free)

1. Decision: Nashville -

Next month’s Metro mayoral runoff election pits two Nashville natives with long connections to the state and city and long family histories of public service.

Incumbent Nashville Mayor David Briley remembers when the now-closed Becker’s Bakery was possibly the top draw along what’s now known as 12 South.

2. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for second quarter 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

3. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for second quarter 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for June 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

5. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for May 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

6. We need to know who’s a ‘D,’ who’s an ‘R’ in local races -

The Metro election arrives in about six weeks, the absolute most momentous Metro election since – well, since the last one, I guess. Some 100-plus candidates are running for one office or another.

7. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for April 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, April 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

8. Tennessee House OKs bill to penalize voter signup groups -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee could penalize some paid voter registration groups with fines for too many faulty signups and criminal charges for violating new requirements under a proposal passed by the House on Monday.

9. Tennessee House advances 'secular humanism' bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee House on Monday advanced legislation prohibiting the state from funding health care facilities that offer abortions with state tax dollars based on the argument that support for abortion is tied to secular humanism.

10. Tennessee bill would allow adoption groups to turn away gays -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are working to become the latest state to ensure faith-based adoption agencies can refuse to place children with gay parents and other families because of their religious beliefs with facing any penalties.

11. Tennessee resolution praises King, denounces racism -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee House lawmakers on Wednesday unanimously adopted a resolution praising Martin Luther King Jr.'s life while also promising to fight racism.

12. Resolution denouncing neo-Nazis resurfaces in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Nashville lawmaker is once again backing a resolution denouncing neo-Nazis and white nationalists after similar proposals failed to gain traction in the Tennessee Legislature last year.

13. Blue wave? State Democrats more likely up a creek -

Tennessee Democrats are hoping a “blue wave” will wash across the Volunteer State this fall and help them regain a number of seats lost over the last decade. Republicans are banking on red voters to crush any wave by capitalizing on the popularity of President Donald Trump when November arrives.

14. Midstate transit future is paved with tired ideas -

Will it be trains, planes or automobiles? If you ask state Rep. William Lamberth, Davidson County voters gave a resounding answer on the future of mass transit in this region. Based on their overwhelming defeat of an early May referendum, they don’t want to raise taxes for mass transit, preferring to be more like Atlanta and Los Angeles and less like New York.

15. 440 Parkway: Can’t live with it, can’t live without it -

Hated dodging potholes on 440 Parkway? How much would you hate doing without the entire roadway for 10 months?

That’s one possibility the Tennessee Department of Transportation is considering for early next year when work begins to rebuild – not repave – the 7-mile stretch from below ground level up.

16. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

17. Fall Creek Falls project leaves destructive trail -

The Fall Creek Falls Inn and Conference Center will soon be in ruins like the livelihoods of the state employees who worked there.

Fewer than half the state employees who worked at the inn found new state jobs after it closed in early April. Some are working for nearly half the pay, and some had to move away from Van Buren County or drive long distances to keep a job with the state.

18. Lawmakers see conspiracy in UT Board alterations, approve anyway -

It’s not that hard to light a fire under some state lawmakers, but the University of Tennessee FOCUS Act raised blood pressure considerably in the House of Representatives before barely passing with 51 votes.

19. Davy Crockett’s fine, but let’s not get carried away -

The Tennessee General Assembly is making some monumental decisions these days – literally. Not only is the Legislature prepared to put a statue of Tennessee folk hero Davy Crockett in front of the State Capitol, replacing obscure Nashville politician Edward Carmack, it’s also likely to erect a monument, or memorial, to unborn children in the ongoing battle against abortion.

20. Clemmons: UT football fiasco at heart of Haslam's plan to shrink Board -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to shake up the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees is getting blitzed by legislators, some contending it’s linked to the hiring of the Tennessee Vols football coach.

21. Customer-focused government not always a pleaser -

Gov. Bill Haslam is fond of saying government should run more like a business, and during his eighth and final State of the State address he invoked the term “customer-focused” at least twice in a victory lap.

22. Anti-abortion ‘heartbeat’ bill now focuses on ultrasound -

One attempt to severely restrict abortions fell by the wayside this week in the state Legislature, but another measure is being introduced to defund abortion clinics in Tennessee.

By necessity, Rep. Micah Van Huss turned his “heartbeat bill” into an ultrasound reporting bill after failing to find the support to pass his proposal in a subcommittee.

23. Anti-abortion ‘heartbeat’ bill now focuses on ultrasound -

By necessity, Rep. Micah Van Huss turned his “heartbeat bill” into an ultrasound reporting bill after failing to find the support to pass his proposal in a subcommittee.

Van Huss (R-Jonesborough) amended his legislation prohibiting abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected and instead will give pregnant women the opportunity to have an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion.

24. Tennessee finds itself locked into a bad deal -

State Rep. John Ray Clemmons makes no secret about his disdain for private prisons in Tennessee.

Not only is he concerned about a Comptroller’s Office audit showing CoreCivic’s Trousdale Turner Correctional Center skating by with fewer staff than required, especially for critical posts, he says the Department of Correction is violating the spirit of state law by contracting with four counties to run more than the one minimum-security or medium-security prison allowed in Tennessee.

25. Tennessee Democrats take aim at net neutrality on state level -

Legislation designed to reverse a federal decision repealing net neutrality regulations is surfacing in the General Assembly, an effort to maintain Tennesseans’ open access to the internet.

Sponsored by Rep. John Ray Clemmons and Sen. Lee Harris, both Democrats, the legislation would enable the state and individual consumers to take legal action against internet providers if they create levels of service by charging consumers more for certain websites, service speeds or information.

26. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

27. Fall Creek Falls: Sound plan or political payback -

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year! Now go find a job. That’s the message the state of Tennessee is sending nearly 60 employees at Fall Creek Falls State Park at this joyous holiday season.

Rather than outsource jobs and the renovation of park’s inn, a proposal vehemently opposed by state workers and numerous legislators, the Department of Environment and Conservation is opting to take a different route, one that means closing the old inn for 18 to 24 months in April 2018 and building a new one.

28. Democrats look to Bredesen to run, reinvigorate party -

Tennessee Democrats are canvassing the state to find candidates at every political level, but their next star is a well-known veteran who has people of all political stripes holding their breath.

Phil Bredesen, the former mayor of Nashville and a two-term governor, could alter the landscape of Tennessee politics if he enters the race for U.S. Senate to fill the void by departing Republican Sen. Bob Corker in 2018.

29. There’s Bredesen, and then there’s ... -

Murfreesboro resident Jon Santee woke up “a different person” on Nov. 9, 2016, the day after Donald Trump won the U.S. presidency.

“I saw something that in my time I thought was pretty much unfathomable at a top political level,” says Santee, a 41-year-old father of four who works in the IT field.

30. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for September 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for September.

31. Outsourcing by any other name still not so sweet -

Outsourcing is starting to become a four-letter word in state government. Gov. Bill Haslam’s administration told lawmakers during a summer study session it’s giving up on privatization of state parks, including a plan to hire a company to raze the inn at Fall Creek Falls and build a new one, at a cost of more than $22 million, then take over the keys and the profits.

32. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for July 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

33. Micromanaging Nashville is Job 1 for Legislature -

Metro Nashville is used to getting hammered by the Legislature’s Republicans. Nearly every time the Metro Council tries to come up with a solution to growing problems, conservatives in the General Assembly swoop in and save the rest of the state from Music City’s attempts to better handle its success.

34. Senate punts on Nashville-only short-term rentals bill -

A day after the House targeted Nashville with a tough bill on short-term rentals, the Senate deferred action on legislation blocking the Metro Council from enacting any prohibitions.

The Senate Finance, Ways and Means Committee postponed a bill by Sen. John Stevens until January 2018, ending the debate this year on a measure singling out Davidson County efforts to restrict short-term rentals such as Airbnb.

35. Bill making it harder for cities to restrict guns passes House -

Legislation making it easier for Tennessee cities to be sued over gun restrictions eased through the House on Wednesday even though it would allow those filing lawsuits to claim triple attorney fees.

36. Unworried about constitutionality, House passes 20-week abortion ban -

The House of Representatives turned back questions about the constitutionality of legislation limiting abortions after 20 weeks and passed it overwhelmingly Wednesday morning.

In a 68-18 vote and with groups protesting in the State Capitol, the House approved a bill prohibiting abortion of a viable fetus except in a medical emergency and requiring testing to determine if a woman is at least 20 weeks pregnant.

37. Most legislators urging slowdown in outsourcing state jobs -

A majority of Tennessee’s legislators are asking the state to hold up on a facilities management outsourcing contract with Jones Lang LaSalle.

Seventy-five of the General Assembly’s 132 members, 17 in the Senate and 58 in the House, have signed a letter to Terry Cowles, director of the Office of Customer Focused Government, asking the office to slow down on outsourcing so it can “study and understand the effect” on public services, the economy and state employees.

38. Tearful end for non-citizen tuition relief bill -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari grew so emotional she couldn’t speak. On the verge of tears, the Memphis Democrat started to talk about a high school from her Shelby County district with a large number of undocumented immigrant students.

39. GOP happy to ‘wait and see’ on Medicaid expansion -

Republicans say ho, Democrats say go. In the wake of Trumpcare’s congressional crash, states such as Kansas and North Carolina are joining the majority of the nation in expanding Medicaid rolls.

40. Democrats looking for GOP help to derail outsourcing efforts -

Legislative Democrats are calling on Republicans to join them in passing a slate of bills to combat Gov. Bill Haslam’s outsourcing plans for everything from state parks to facilities management at universities.

41. JLL gets contract to manage statewide campuses -

The Tennessee Department of General Services is set to award a statewide contract for facility management services to Jones Lang LaSalle, a company that already handles 10 percent of state office space and estimates a 15.9 percent savings if all higher education institutes participate.

42. Haslam criticized for renewing Fall Creek Falls outsourcing plan -

State Sen. Lee Harris is criticizing Gov. Bill Haslam’s decision to renew an outsourcing plan for development and operations at Fall Creek Falls State Park, calling it a move to bolster profits for a private company.

43. Guard promotes attorney to brigadier general -

Kurt Winstead, a founding member of the Nashville law firm Rudy Winstead Turner, PLLC, has been promoted to brigadier general in the Tennessee National Guard.

Winstead began his career with the Tennessee National Guard in 1990 when he was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Judge Advocate General Corp. His first assignment was as the judge advocate general for the 194th Engineer Brigade, now headquartered in Jackson. Throughout his more than 26 years of service, Winstead has served in numerous assignments culminating as the senior staff judge advocate at the Joint Force Headquarters in Nashville.

44. Outsourcing win more about turf than trends -

As Fall Creek Falls folks celebrate a state decision to postpone park privatization, the question is whether public opposition or failure to follow long-standing state protocol led to the plug-pulling.

45. Heartbeat bill hits hurdle -

NASHVILLE – State Rep. Micah Van Huss’ “heartbeat bill” ran into an unlikely opponent this week: Tennessee Right to Life.

The legislation would prohibit abortions once a heartbeat is detected by ultrasound in a fetus, usually at six to eight weeks, a measure Van Huss is sponsoring to severely restrict abortions, except in cases when the mother’s life is in jeopardy.

46. Outsourcing, rising rates worry Fall Creek Falls fans -

Dunlap resident Kathy Gilbert opposes privatization of Fall Creek Falls on a number of fronts.

If a vendor comes in to run the state park, as planned by the Haslam Administration, she’s worried about the possible loss of jobs or pay and benefits by state employees, the funneling of revenue to private investors and the raising of rates at the state park’s lodge when it’s rebuilt, potentially making it less affordable for families to visit.

47. Democrats Kyle, Clemmons offer alternative transportation plan -

Memphis state Sen. Sara Kyle and Nashville Rep. John Ray Clemmons are pushing a plan to raise fuel taxes for transportation funding similar to Gov. Haslam’s, though it also would give local governments more options for bringing in their own money for mass transit.

48. Online tax lawsuit could bring unintended consequences -

Cumberland Transit owner Allen Doty isn’t sure if a rule requiring major out-of-state retailers to collect Tennessee sales taxes will create more equity for his shop.

But Doty, who has been selling everything from bicycles to kayaks and camping gear for 34 years in Nashville, is definitely tired of people shopping in his store for hours, snapping a picture of shoes they like, then going home and buying them online “just to avoid sales tax.”

49. Tax hikes, cuts both eyed as Legislature reconvenes -

The 110th General Assembly is set to convene on Jan. 10 with unfinished business from previous sessions likely to dominate debate. Here’s a look at some of the hottest topics expected to arise.

50. New year, new resolutions for legislators -

Some Tennesseans recall the days when the state Legislature met every other year and wonder if it should revert to that schedule. Considering the General Assembly pushes most of its work into three and a-half months, it might be worth a try.

51. Outsourcing mystery: Millions in projected savings, no specifics -

The Haslam Administration is forging ahead with plans to nab a statewide facilities services contractor after an outside analysis backed up a study showing estimated cost savings of more than $35 million a year at Tennessee universities.

52. Refugee lawsuit proceeds despite political upheaval -

Tennessee is going “full speed ahead” in a challenge of the federal Refugee Resettlement Program despite threats by President-elect Donald Trump to dismantle it or, at the least, stop the flow of refugees from terrorist-linked countries.

53. US companies see grim outlook in Cuba despite Obama opening -

HAVANA (AP) — For a while Saul Berenthal and Horace Clemmons were the seventy-something poster boys of U.S.-Cuba detente.

54. BlueCross BlueShield bombshell leaves insurance seekers in bind -

Nashville resident Jennifer Murray is caught in the snare of uncertainty looming over Tennessee health insurance coverage. Self-employed as a health care consultant, the single 48-year-old bought individual coverage through BlueCross BlueShield Tennessee’s marketplace plans each year since the Affordable Care Act took effect in 2014. The company offered the widest range of physicians, and its insurance was accepted in most places.

55. Jane Doe’s outing gives new life to Durham scandal -

Like sands through the hour glass, these are the days of our Legislature’s lives.

When General Assembly candidates run for office, they talk of high ideals such as reforming education, creating jobs, saving tax dollars and stifling sexual offenders, even restricting abortion, adopting a state rifle or making the Holy Bible Tennessee’s state book.

56. Rising premiums, Insure Tennessee tie vexes legislators -

State Rep. Ron Travis is perplexed. On one hand, the Republican from Dayton is concerned with escalating premiums for Tennesseans participating in the insurance marketplace, worried costs are increasing to the point people simply can’t afford health insurance.

57. Facing $60M penalty, Tennessee repeals underage DUI law -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee lawmakers on Wednesday repealed an underage drunken driving law that threatened to cost the state $60 million in road money by running afoul of federal zero-tolerance standards.

58. Matlock the ‘truth,’ ‘justice’ candidate for House speaker -

Republican state Rep. Jimmy Matlock insists his quest for the House Speaker’s post is not a challenge of Beth Harwell’s leadership.

But it’s clear he sees a need for change.

59. Task force’s health plan promising, includes many ‘ifs’ -

A 3-Star Healthy Task Force appointed to propose a method for catching Tennesseans in a health-care coverage gap is taking a politically safe road to reach the same goal as Insure Tennessee.

Yet the route, a TennCare expansion with “triggers” and “circuit breakers,” holds so much uncertainty it’s hard to figure out if the panel will find its destination.

60. Soto shrugs off ‘snub’ by state lawmakers -

Conexión Américas Executive Director Renata Soto doesn’t dwell on the state Senate’s rejection of a resolution honoring her as chair of the National Council of La Raza.

“I forgot about that already,” Soto says, laughing in a recent interview.

61. Outsourcing savings estimates strain ‘credulity’ -

Terry Cowles flashes a photo of ceiling lamp fixtures on the screen and tells state legislators a vendor’s state Capitol team used its electrical training to remove, repair and reinstall fixtures, saving taxpayers $15,500.

62. Insure Tennessee: In like a lion, out with a committee -

What started with a roar is ending with a whimper. On the first day of the 2016 legislative session, dozens of Insure Tennessee supporters rallied, shouted and sang songs outside the House chamber.

63. Muslim video issued by GOP lawmaker draws ire from Democrats -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Three Democrats are demanding that a Republican state lawmaker be disciplined after she distributed a video on Muslims that the General Assembly's legal offices have said is so inflammatory that it could be viewed as religious discrimination.

64. Tennessee AG: Transgender bathroom bill could be costly -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's attorney general says a transgender bathroom bill that is moving through the state Legislature could put the state's federal education funding at risk. If he's right, it could jeopardize more than $1.2 billion in federal money for K-12 and higher education.

65. Tennessee bill would allow counselors to deny services -

NASHVILLE (AP) - A bill that would allow mental health counselors to turn patients away based on the counselors' religious beliefs and personal principles has passed in the House in Tennessee, the latest state to introduce measures that opponents say legalize discrimination against gays, bisexuals and transgender people.

66. Bill to allow guns bans in ticketed venues fails in House -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill seeking to allow Tennessee cities to ban guns from being carried at ticketed events has failed in a House subcommittee.

The Republican-controlled Civil Justice Subcommittee voted 3-2 along party lines on Wednesday to kill the measure sponsored by Democratic Rep. John Ray Clemmons and supported by the Tennessee Association of Chiefs of Police.

67. House kills bill requiring rear-facing car seats up to age 2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) - The state House Transportation Committee on Tuesday voted to kill a bill seeking to raise the mandatory age for toddlers to ride in rear-facing car seats from 1 to 2.

Democratic Rep. John Ray Clemmons of Nashville said his bill was aimed at bringing Tennessee up to date with recommendations of physicians and auto manufacturers, and ensuring that "kids up to the age of 2 - whose necks and bones have not fully developed - are protected."

68. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for February 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

69. Proposed update to car seat rules pulled back for debate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — An effort to update Tennessee's car seat rules that had been headed for Gov. Bill Haslam's signature was pulled back for renewed debate in the House on Tuesday over questions about whether it would increase the age that children would be required to ride in booster seats.

70. ‘Fearless’ Stewart embraces battles with supermajority -

Democratic state Rep. Mike Stewart lives on the front lines of the Tennessee General Assembly. As chairman of the House Democratic Caucus with 26 members, Stewart could employ a bunker mentality, but instead has chosen to take the fight to the other side of the aisle.

71. Rare wins for Democrats on guns, outsourcing -

Legislative Democrats got a chance to beat their chests a little bit after a proposal to allow guns in the state Capitol and Legislative Plaza failed, and they hope to do the same with outsourcing.

72. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for January 2016 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

73. Haslam, colleges agree to outside review of outsourcing plan -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam's administration announced Wednesday that it has agreed with higher education leaders to have an outside group review the Republican's privatization plan for building maintenance at Tennessee's public colleges and universities.

74. Minority leader Harris confident even on wrong side of supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

In his second legislative session, the Senate Minority leader says Democrats, though small in number, are making “inroads” while he continues to focus on improving neighborhoods from downtown Memphis to Millington.

75. Impatient Clemmons anxious for minority voice to be heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

76. Is state takeover of troubled schools a $100M failure? -

Armed with a Vanderbilt University study showing Shelby County schools that were taken over by the state’s Achievement School District are showing little to no improvement, Memphis legislators are nearly ready to kill the experiment.

77. Refugees, higher education, privatization on tap for new session -

State Sen. Ken Yager isn’t quite ready for the state of Tennessee to reclaim the Refugee Resettlement Program from Catholic Charities.

“I’m not advocating that. I am advocating a little bit more accountability and closer review of the funding,” says Yager, a Kingston Republican who chaired a December joint meeting of Senate and House State and Local Government committees.

78. GOP uninterested in reconsidering Insure Tennessee -

It’s going to take a Christmas miracle for Insure Tennessee to make it into anyone’s stocking this year.

As the 2016 session of the General Assembly approaches in early January, Republicans are showing no support for the plan Gov. Bill Haslam offered for a special session in early 2015.

79. Tennessee to spend millions on new DUI campaign -

NASHVILLE (AP) — After nixing an anti-DUI ad campaign that garnered criticism, the Tennessee Department of Transportation is paying millions on another attempt to educate the public about highway safety.

80. Tennessee AG says state can't refuse Syrian refugees -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State Attorney General Herbert Slatery says in a legal opinion that federal law prevents Tennessee from refusing entry of Syrian refugees.

In the opinion released Monday, Slatery notes that through the supremacy clause of the U.S. Constitution, federal law pre-empts any rules the state seems to put into place on refugees.

81. If fear is the goal, terrorists have won in Tennessee -

The terrorists who struck Paris three weeks ago succeeded in more than killing and wounding hundreds of people. Their attack is pitting Americans against each other in how to respond, and Tennessee politicians are no exception.

82. Bipartisan brakes for governor’s privatization push -

Plans to put Tennessee’s real estate and government operations in the hands of private business are much further along than Gov. Bill Haslam would like people to think.

A master of downplaying big issues, Haslam says he’s simply looking for ways to make government run more efficiently and save money.

83. Is state’s role to provide a service or turn a profit? -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam appears to be on the brink of privatizing state government. But he won’t be able to do it without a battle, especially from university unions and Democratic lawmakers.

84. Dems introduce bill to allow gun ban at sports, music venues -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Two Democrats are introducing legislation to allow all firearms to be banned at major sports and music venues.

Senate Minority Leader Lee Harris of Memphis and state Rep. John Ray Clemmons of Nashville say their bill would create an exemption to the new state law that bans local governments from prohibiting people with handgun carry permits to be armed in parks.

85. Tennessee legislators want more regulation of abortion clinics -

NASHVILLE (AP) - State legislators said Wednesday they want to give the Health Department more authority to track how fetal tissue is disposed of after abortions.

Sen. Mike Bell, R-Riceville, who presided over a joint hearing of the Government Operations Committee, said the Health Department is making required inspections of abortion clinics but there could still be illegal tissue sales going on without the inspectors' knowledge.

86. Democrats push for reconsideration of guns in parks bill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's new guns in parks law could make it more difficult — and dangerous — for officers to do their jobs, two law enforcement representatives said Thursday at an event to urge reconsideration of the bill.

87. ‘The Fighting 26’ Democrats work to stay relevant -

Sometimes Tennessee Democrats must feel like a tree that falls in the forest: Does anyone hear them?

When Democratic legislative leaders called for a special session this summer on Insure Tennessee, Gov. Bill Haslam’s market-based plan to use federal dollars to catch 280,000 working people in a coverage gap, they found themselves alone.

88. Top residential real estate transactions for April 2015 -

Top residential real estate transactions, April 2015, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

89. Will Tennessee Republicans ever be truly happy? -

Why aren’t Tennessee Republicans happier? With the GOP so dominant in the Tennessee General Assembly and losses so rare – on the Hill or in elections – the party’s lawmakers should be jubilant with this year’s session. But it’s never enough.

90. Restrictions for Tennessee's 7 abortion clinics head to governor -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Legislation that would place licensing restrictions on all seven of Tennessee's abortion clinics was overwhelmingly approved by state lawmakers Tuesday and sent to the governor, who's expected to sign them into law.

91. Anti-abortion legislation finds little resistance -

Buoyed by passage of Amendment 1 last fall, legislation restricting abortions is starting to roll – with relative ease – through the General Assembly.

Rep. Susan Lynn, R-Mt. Juliet, and Rep. Matthew Hill, R-Jonesborough, began the push recently with measures backed by Gov. Bill Haslam, House Speaker Beth Harwell, Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and the Republican ranks. Their bills couldn’t even draw enough resistance to require a roll-call vote.

92. Top January 2015 residential real estate transactions -

Top January 2015 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

93. Top December 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top December 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

94. Top 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

95. House Dems elect Fitzhugh, Stewart to leadership -

NASHVILLE (AP) - House Democrats have re-elected Rep. Craig Fitzhugh of Ripley as minority leader and named Rep. Mike Stewart of Nashville as caucus chairman.

96. State Sen. Stacey Campfield loses seat in primary -

NASHVILLE (AP) — After losing his seat in Thursday's election primary, Republican Sen. Stacey Campfield posted a blog that simply said "that was fun" and featured a YouTube video of Frank Sinatra singing "My Way."

97. GOP lawmakers in tight Tennessee primary races -

NASHVILLE (AP) - More than two dozen incumbent Republican and Democratic state lawmakers face challengers in Thursday's primary elections, and several could swing on narrow margins.

Of the 25 incumbents, probably the most contentious races involve Republicans, who control the Tennessee General Assembly.

98. Corizon selects Johnson as chief medical officer -

Corizon, a provider of correctional health care solutions, has appointed Calvin B. Johnson, M.D., M.P.H., as its new chief medical officer.

99. Saint Thomas names Elliott to leadership post -

Saint Thomas Health has named Jennifer Elliott, RN, vice president of Clinical Operations and chief nursing officer for Saint Thomas West Hospital and Saint Thomas Midtown Hospital.

100. Top Midstate commercial real estate transactions for Sept. 2013 -

Top September 2013 commercial real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.