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Editorial Results (free)

1. Tougher IRS enforcement central to Dem economic package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than a decade of mostly losing out, the Internal Revenue Service may finally get the cash infusion it's long wanted in the economic package that Democrats are working furiously to push through Congress before their August break.

2. Zimbabwe debuts gold coins as legal tender to stem inflation -

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe has launched gold coins to be sold to the public in a bid to tame runaway inflation that has further eroded the country's unstable currency.

The unprecedented move was announced Monday by the country's central bank, the Reserve Bank of Zimbabwe, to boost confidence in the local currency.

3. Long lines are back at US food banks as inflation hits high -

PHOENIX (AP) — Long lines are back at food banks around the U.S. as working Americans overwhelmed by inflation turn to handouts to help feed their families.

With gas prices soaring along with grocery costs, many people are seeking charitable food for the first time, and more are arriving on foot.

4. Wallowing in Watergate 50 years later: A political quiz -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For half a century, every major Washington scandal started with some form of this question: Is this another Watergate?

Watergate spawned an all-purpose suffix. If "gate" were appended to misdeeds it was controversy of first rank.

5. 'Will we do our duty?' Cheney lays her legacy on the line -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Liz Cheney has been thinking lately about her great-great-grandfather, a man who fought for the Union in the Civil War, as the House committee investigating the Jan. 6, 2021, U.S. Capitol insurrection prepares to launch a prime-time hearing of its work.

6. Events -

Free Business Consulting @ Cowork Inc. Feeling overwhelmed by your small business? Take advantage of free small business consulting from John Meese and Danny Coleman of Cowork Inc., thanks in part to TN Placemakers and the Maury Alliance. Get free advice and resources on marketing, operations, finance and more. 610 N. Garden St., Basement Level, Columbia. Wednesday, 10 a.m.-noon. Information: https://columbia.cowork.space/events

7. Flight attendants' union supports Frontier-Spirit merger -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The largest union for U.S. flight attendants threw its support Tuesday behind Frontier Airlines' proposal to buy Spirit Airlines after it reached a deal with Frontier on how to combine cabin crews at the two carriers.

8. Parton, Eminem, Richie get into Rock Hall of Fame -

Eminem, Lionel Richie, Carly Simon, Eurythmics, Duran Duran and Pat Benatar have been inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, a list that also includes Dolly Parton, who initially resisted the honor.

9. Australian central bank hikes rate for 1st time in 11 years -

CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia's central bank on Tuesday lifted its benchmark interest rate for the first time in more than 11 years. The cash rate rose from 0.1% to 0.35% in a move potentially damaging to a government that will seek reelection on May 21.

10. EXPLAINER: What's next now that Twitter agreed to Musk bid? -

Twitter's acceptance of Elon Musk's roughly $44 billion takeover bid brings the billionaire Tesla CEO one step closer to owning the social media platform.

The deal is expected to close sometime this year. But before that, shareholders still have to weigh in, as well as regulators in the U.S. and in countries where Twitter does business, before the deal is completed.

11. Elon Musk buys Twitter for $44B and will privatize company -

Elon Musk reached an agreement to buy Twitter for roughly $44 billion on Monday, promising a more lenient touch to policing content on the platform where he promotes his interests, attacks critics and opines on social and economic issues to more than 83 million followers.

12. Biden announces heavy artillery, other weapons for Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden pledged an additional $1.3 billion Thursday for new weapons and economic assistance to help Ukraine in its strong but increasingly difficult battle against the Russian invasion, and he promised to seek much more from Congress to keep the guns, ammunition and cash flowing.

13. Electric Avenue sale shocking; interest rates curbing frenzy -

If a person decided to rock down to Electric Avenue in order to buy a home, said person might be shocked to find the cost of Electric had jumped even more than the price of gasoline.

Last week, Robert Drimmer – often referred to as Robbie – listed and sold 1503 Electric Avenue, getting $1.2 million for the 2,758-square-foot home.

14. Miami's crypto craze on full display at bitcoin conference -

Thousands of cryptocurrency enthusiasts are gathering in Miami as the city builds its reputation as one of the key locations to develop the blockchain technology despite its underdog status.

Dozens of companies are using the Bitcoin 2022 conference running Wednesday through Saturday as a venue to network, pitch ideas and share announcements.

15. US strikes harder at Putin, banning all Russian oil imports -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Striking harder at Russia's economy, President Joe Biden on Tuesday ordered a ban on Russian oil imports in retaliation for Vladimir Putin's onslaught in Ukraine. The major trade action, responding to the pleas of Ukraine's embattled leader, thrust the U.S. out front as Western nations seek to halt Putin's invasion.

16. Republican 'unforced errors' threaten path to Senate control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the prospect of a red wave grows, a series of Republican missteps including recruiting stumbles, weak fundraising and intense infighting is threatening the GOP's path to the Senate majority.

17. Russia eyes sanctions workarounds in energy, gold, crypto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The harsh sanctions imposed on Russia and the resulting crash of the ruble have the Kremlin scrambling to keep the country's economy running. For Vladimir Putin, that means finding workarounds to the Western economic blockade even as his forces continue to invade Ukraine.

18. Analysis: Putin's war imperils global security arrangements -

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — It was the tale of two Vladimirs — one noble, grim and stubbornly open to peace; the other angry, threatening and bellicose — on a day that seemed to presage the demise of the security architecture, consensus and arrangements that have kept Europe and the world, for the most part, stable and secure for three-quarters of a century.

19. Legislators seek to negate what Old Hickory fixed -

Perhaps it’s asking too much for Tennessee lawmakers to have an awareness and appreciation of the past, since many don’t seem to have much of a grasp on the present. Still, you’d think they might have a certain familiarity with events involving Tennessee’s favorite White House occupant.

20. Metro breaks record for construction permits -

As growth continues throughout Davidson County, Metro Nashville Codes and Building Safety Administration issued more than 14,600 building permits in 2021 valued at nearly $5.5 billion, a $900 million increase compared to 2021.

21. EXPLAINER: Microsoft's Activision buy could shake up gaming -

Microsoft stunned the gaming industry when it announced this week it would buy game publisher Activision Blizzard for $68.7 billion, a deal that would immediately make it a larger video-game company than Nintendo.

22. Hurdles ahead for city’s political convention hopes -

Having made it a couple of weeks into 2022 without any major new attacks on democracy (fingers crossed), let us briefly turn our attention to 2024 politics: How does the prospect of tens of thousands of ardent Republicans or Democrats swarming through Nashville strike you?

23. COVID-expanded child tax credit benefit nears lapse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's one of the most far-reaching of all the federal aid programs launched during the COVID-19 pandemic — up to $300 per child going directly into the bank accounts of families on the 15th of every month.

24. Senate passes bill easing way for debt limit increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate moved ahead Thursday with legislation that would create a one-time, fast-track process for raising the debt limit, overcoming a Republican filibuster and likely averting another last-minute rush to avoid a devastating federal default.

25. 2 Louisiana insurance companies fail after Hurricane Ida -

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Insurance companies operating in Louisiana will be charged at least $100 million to pay the claims of two failed property insurers who went belly up in Hurricane Ida's aftermath. But the cost of dealing with the insolvent insurers ultimately will fall on the state after companies recoup the dollars through a series of tax credits.

26. Ford, GM profits fall as sales drop due to chip shortage -

DETROIT (AP) — The global computer chip shortage cut into third-quarter profits at both Ford and crosstown rival General Motors, with both companies having to temporarily close factories, pinching supplies on dealer lots.

27. From paints to plastics, a chemical shortage ignites prices -

In an economy upended by the coronavirus, shortages and price spikes have hit everything from lumber to computer chips. Not even toilet paper escaped.

Now, they're cutting into one of the humblest yet most vital links in the global manufacturing supply chain: The plastic pellets that go into a vast universe of products ranging from cereal bags to medical devices, automotive interiors to bicycle helmets.

28. 5 steps to level up your side hustle -

The pandemic isn't crushing the entrepreneurial spirit. It's fueling it.

People normally tied to a desk or working double shifts used lockdown to launch side hustles, often out of necessity. And some have turned those side gigs into full-fledged businesses.

29. Biden meets with Democrats as $3.5T plan faces party split -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Time growing shorter, President Joe Biden launched meetings Wednesday with House and Senate Democrats as Congress worked to bridge party divisions over his big "build back better" agenda ahead of crucial voting deadlines.

30. Democrats tie government funding to debt bill, GOP digs in -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic congressional leaders backed by the White House say they will push ahead with a vote to fund the government and suspend the debt limit, all but daring Republicans who say they will vote against it despite the risk of a fiscal crisis.

31. Democrats face heavy lift on Biden agenda as GOP stands by -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress must fund the government in the next 10 days, or risk a federal shutdown.

Raise the nation's borrowing limit, or default on its debt.

All this while lawmakers are laboring to shoulder President Joe Biden's massive $3.5 trillion "build back better" agenda through the House and Senate.

32. McConnell unmoved on debt limit, risking turmoil for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has been enlisting one emissary after another to convince Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to help raise the federal debt limit.

It's not working.

33. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

34. 50-year war on drugs imprisoned millions of Black Americans -

Landscaping was hardly his lifelong dream. As a teenager, Alton Lucas believed basketball or music would pluck him out of North Carolina and take him around the world. In the late 1980s, he was the right-hand man to his musical best friend, Youtha Anthony Fowler, who many hip hop and R&B heads know as DJ Nabs.

35. In poorest countries, surges worsen shortages of vaccines -

KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Hati Maronjei once swore he would never get a COVID-19 shot, after a pastor warned that vaccines aren't safe.

Now, four months after the first batch of vaccines arrived in Zimbabwe, the 44-year-old street hawker of electronic items is desperate for the shot he can't get. Whenever he visits a clinic in the capital, Harare, he is told to try again the next day.

36. Runaway market slows, still ahead of record 2020 pace -

Middle Tennessee real estate unit sales increased 24% in May compared to May 2020, Greater Nashville Realtors figures show. With inventory as low as it is, there are those who might wonder how these sales could occur.

37. Bruised but unbowed, meme stock investors are back for more -

NEW YORK (AP) — After feeling the thrill of victory early this year by singlehandedly causing GameStop's stock to soar — only to get crushed when it quickly crashed back to earth — armies of smaller-pocketed and novice investors are back for more.

38. Sellers cashing out, heading to lakes, beaches, mountains -

Where have all the sellers gone? Long time passing. Actually, it’s a fairly recent phenomenon that has large numbers of Middle Tennesseans cashing out of the real estate frenzy and going far, far away to work remotely.

39. California giving $116 million to people who get virus shots -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California is giving away the country's largest pot of vaccine prize money — $116.5 million — in an attempt to get millions more inoculated before the most populous state fully reopens next month.

40. Biden's corporate tax plan takes aim at income inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From John Kennedy to Ronald Reagan to Donald Trump, American presidents have taken aim at corporate America's tax-avoidance schemes before — and mostly missed.

41. $4M deal struck over fraud claims against pain firm, owners -

NASHVILLE (AP) — State and federal authorities announced Wednesday that they have reached a $4.1 million settlement in a civil case that made claims of Medicaid and Medicare fraud against a now-shuttered pain clinic company and several of its owners, including a former state senator.

42. House panel votes to advance bill on slavery reparations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel advanced a decades-long effort to pay reparations to the descendants of slaves by approving legislation Wednesday that would create a commission to study the issue.

It's the first time the House Judiciary Committee has acted on the legislation. Still, prospects for final passage remain poor in such a closely divided Congress. The vote to advance the measure to the full House passed 25-17 after a lengthy and often passionate debate that stretched late into the night.

43. Ready to buy a home? The trick is finding or affording one -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Nathan Long and Lili Chin have struck out so far in their four-month search to find an affordable home in the Los Angeles area — a cold streak that threatens to mess up their anniversary plans.

44. Survey: ADs raise worries about women's college sports -

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — To hear many of those in charge of Division I programs tell it, the state of play for women's sports could get worse, not better, under proposals that would put more money in the pockets of some college athletes.

45. Fed's Powell: Recovery incomplete, higher inflation unlikely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell underscored the U.S. economy's ongoing weakness Tuesday in remarks that suggested that the Fed sees no need to alter its ultra-low interest rate policies anytime soon.

46. Cost of a single Bitcoin exceeds $50,000 for first time -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — The seemingly unstoppable rise of Bitcoin continued Tuesday with the cost of a single unit of the digital currency rising above $50,000 for the first time.

The same Bitcoin just one year ago would have cost you $10,000. The price is up almost 200% in the last three months alone.

47. How a leading anti-Trump group ignored a crisis in its ranks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Last June, the Lincoln Project was on a high. Led by several prominent former Republican consultants, its slickly produced ads attacking President Donald Trump made it perhaps the best known of the so-called Never Trump organizations.

48. The Rutledge secures space in Four Seasons -

The Rutledge will open its second location at Four Seasons Hotel and Private Residences Nashville in a 13,000-square-foot space on the ground floor of the First Avenue development across from the Ascend Amphitheater.

49. Biden's US revives support for WHO, reversing Trump retreat -

GENEVA (AP) — The United States will resume funding for the World Health Organization and join its consortium aimed at sharing coronavirus vaccines fairly around the globe, President Joe Biden's top adviser on the pandemic said Thursday, renewing support for an agency that the Trump administration had pulled back from.

50. Vaccine rollout hits snag as health workers balk at shots -

The desperately awaited vaccination drive against the coronavirus in the U.S. is running into resistance from an unlikely quarter: Surprising numbers of health care workers who have seen firsthand the death and misery inflicted by COVID-19 are refusing shots.

51. Fiat Chrysler, Peugeot shareholders approve merger -

MILAN (AP) — Shareholders of Fiat Chrysler and PSA Peugeot voted Monday to merge and create the world's fourth-largest auto company which, its architects hope, can more readily take on an enormous technological shift in the industry.

52. Auld lang syne: New Year brings final UK-EU Brexit split -

LONDON (AP) — Like a separated couple still living together, Britain and the European Union spent 2020 wrangling and wondering whether they can remain friends.

On Thursday, the U.K. is finally moving out. At 11 p.m. London time — midnight at EU headquarters in Brussels — Britain will economically and practically leave the the 27-nation bloc, 11 months after its formal political departure.

53. Nashville bombing spotlights vulnerable voice, data networks -

The Christmas Day bombing in downtown Nashville led to phone and data service outages and disruptions over hundreds of miles in the southern U.S., raising new concerns about the vulnerability of U.S. communications.

54. Poor countries face long wait for vaccines despite promises -

NEW DELHI (AP) — With Americans, Britons and Canadians rolling up their sleeves to receive coronavirus vaccines, the route out of the pandemic now seems clear to many in the West, even if the rollout will take many months. But for poorer countries, the road will be far longer and rougher.

55. Penguin to buy Simon & Schuster, create publishing giant -

BERLIN (AP) — German media giant Bertelsmann said Wednesday that its Penguin Random House division is buying rival Simon & Schuster in a megadeal that would reshape the U.S. publishing industry.

56. Tyson suspends Iowa plant managers amid virus betting claim -

IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — Tyson Foods suspended top officials at its largest pork plant on Thursday and launched an investigation into allegations that they bet on how many workers would get infected during a widespread coronavirus outbreak.

57. Control of Senate at stake as Trump's allies face Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Control of the Senate is a razor-close proposition in Tuesday's election, as Republicans fight to retain their majority against a surge of Democratic candidates confronting the president's allies across a vast political map.

58. Probe: Ex-Maury hospital worker stole $798K in supplies -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee comptroller's office says a former hospital worker stole at least $798,200 in medical supplies from the facility.

According to the comptroller's investigation, former Maury Regional Medical Center supply chain department system coordinator Tommy John Riker was indicted this spring on theft and money laundering charges for incidents from April 2017 through September 2019.

59. How Trump plowed through $1B, losing cash advantage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's sprawling political operation has raised well over $1 billion since he took the White House in 2017 — and set a lot of it on fire.

Trump bought a $10 million Super Bowl ad when he didn't yet have a challenger. He tapped his political organization to cover exorbitant legal fees related to his impeachment. Aides made flashy displays of their newfound wealth — including a fleet of luxury vehicles purchased by Brad Parscale, his former campaign manager.

60. Trump, Biden go on offense in states they're trying to flip -

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — President Donald Trump and Democratic rival Joe Biden went on offense over the weekend as both campaigned in states they are trying to flip during the Nov. 3 election, just over two weeks away.

61. GOP megadonor Sheldon Adelson, wife finance anti-Biden group -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican megadonor Sheldon Adelson and his wife have given $75 million to a new super PAC that is attacking Democratic nominee Joe Biden, an investment made amid GOP concern that President Donald Trump's campaign is flailing and might not be able to correct course.

62. Pandemic hammers small businesses vital to economic recovery -

WINCHESTER, Va. (AP) — In a normal year, hundreds of book lovers would have descended on Winchester this summer for Shenandoah University's annual children's literature conference.

Some would have made their way to Christine Patrick's bookshop downtown. Winchester Brew Works would have rolled out kegs this month for Oktoberfest revelers. The Hideaway Café, occupying a prime location at the corner of Cork and Loudoun streets, would be advertising its monthly Divas Drag Show.

63. Dickinson Wright named top law firm by Captive -

Dickinson Wright PLLC has been named “Law Firm of the Year” by both Captive Review (@Captivereview #USCaptiveAwards) and Captive International.

The inaugural US Captive Awards by Captive International honor the best-in-class providers across the full spectrum of disciplines active in the captive insurance industry. The awards were based on feedback received from the captive industry, and in particular from readers of Captive International. Honorees will be featured in a forthcoming Captive International publication.

64. Senate Democrats' fundraising success puts GOP on defensive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Buoyed by massive fundraising success, Democratic Senate candidates are mounting a push in Republican states that few would have thought possible just a few months ago, placing continued GOP control of the chamber at risk.

65. Trump's task: Resetting campaign that GOP fears is slipping -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is running out of time to recover from a series of self-inflicted setbacks that have rattled his base of support and triggered alarm among Republicans who fear the White House is on the verge of being lost to Democrat Joe Biden.

66. How Bloomberg's $100 million Florida bet may shape campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When billionaire Mike Bloomberg ended his presidential campaign in March, he pledged to spend "whatever it takes" to help Democrats defeat President Donald Trump. Less than two months before the election, he's finally coming through.

67. Biden, flush with cash, boosts ad spending in battlegrounds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's massive campaign war chest was supposed to finance an onslaught of attacks that would destroy Joe Biden's chance of winning in November.

But after months of profligate spending, the attacks did little to diminish the Democratic nominee's standing. Trump's formidable cash advantage has evaporated. And it is Biden who over the past month has outspent Trump by nearly double, advertising data shows.

68. Scarcity of key material squeezes medical mask manufacturing -

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Rachel Spray is still grieving the loss of her fellow nurse who died after being exposed to the novel coronavirus at Kaiser Permanente Fresno Medical Center. Now, as she stands in front of the gleaming glass and concrete hospital, she says she "dreads going in there" and fears she'll be next.

69. Scarcity of key material squeezes medical mask manufacturing -

FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — Rachel Spray is still grieving the loss of her fellow nurse who died after being exposed to the novel coronavirus at Kaiser Permanente Fresno Medical Center. Now, as she stands in front of the gleaming glass and concrete hospital, she says she "dreads going in there" and fears she'll be next.

70. Business owners tap into savings to withstand pandemic -

New York (AP) — When the coronavirus outbreak forced cruise lines to cancel trips to Alaska, it wiped out Midgi Moore's tour business, leaving her with thousands of dollars in deposits to refund.

Moore's company, Juneau Food Tours, didn't have enough cash on hand. So, she withdrew $30,000 from her retirement account — a painful decision for a 56 year old starting to look forward to the day when she can stop working.

71. Biden raises over $360 million in August, shattering record -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden raised $364 million in August, a record sum that will give him ample resources to compete in the final two months of the campaign against President Donald Trump.

72. Nashville relaxing restrictions on events, bars, party buses -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nashville is relaxing some of its virus restrictions after seeing a slow-down in the spread of COVID-19.

Mayor John Cooper announced Thursday that beginning Sept. 1, venues may hold weddings, funerals and similar events at one-third capacity or 125 people, whichever is fewer. The venues are required to follow social distancing guidelines and guest must wear masks while standing, Cooper said during a video news conference. Those planning larger events will be allowed to submit plans to the director of public health for review.

73. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's baseless claim of 'deep state' at FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is leveling unfounded attacks on his Food and Drug Administration and distorting the science on effective treatments for COVID-19.

Heading this week into the Republican National Convention, he asserted that the agency is slow-walking vaccines and treatments for the coronavirus in a bid to undermine his November reelection effort. There's no evidence of that, and one of his former FDA commissioners on Sunday rejected the accusation as groundless.

74. Watchdog: Census lacks door knockers needed for 2020 count -

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The U.S. Census Bureau is short by more than 25% of the door knockers needed for the 2020 census, according to its watchdog agency, and it's about to let go of its least productive census takers.

75. Hank Williams Jr., Marty Stuart to join Country Hall of Fame -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Hank Williams Jr., Marty Stuart and songwriter Dean Dillon are the newest inductees to the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Announced by the Country Music Association on Wednesday, Williams, who often is referred to as Hank Jr. or the nickname Bocephus, will join his father, country legend Hank Williams Sr., in the Hall of Fame's rotunda.

76. Boy Scouts victims committee targets Tennessee property transfers -

DOVER, Del. (AP) — The official committee representing sexual abuse survivors in the Boy Scouts of America bankruptcy is asking a judge to void real estate transfers by a local Boy Scouts council in Tennessee, saying they violated court restrictions on sales or transfers of BSA assets.

77. Endangered GOP senators are driving force for virus deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A small but singularly influential group is a driving force for an agreement on a stalled coronavirus relief bill: endangered Senate GOP incumbents who need to win this fall if Republicans are going to retain control of the majority.

78. With loan money gone, restaurants are at mercy of coronvirus -

NEW YORK (AP) — The check has arrived and beleaguered restaurant owners across America are looking down on their empty wallets.

Government covronavirus loans in the spring helped eating establishments rehire laid-off employees and ride out the pandemic's initial surge and wave of shutdown orders.

79. Extra $600 in jobless aid set to lapse as talks deadlock -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A deadlocked Senate on Thursday exited Washington for the weekend without acting to extend a $600 per-week expanded jobless benefit that has helped keep both families and the economy afloat as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to wreak havoc on the country.

80. Stakes rise for virus talks as jobless aid lapses, GDP drops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Frustrated negotiators of a massive coronavirus relief bill face heightened pressure with Thursday's brutal economic news and the rapidly approaching lapse in a $600 per-week expanded jobless benefit that has helped prop up consumer demand.

81. As virus aid talks stalemate, Trump scorns help for cities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday dismissed Democratic demands for aid to cash-strapped cities in a new coronavirus relief package and lashed out at Republican allies as talks stalemated over assistance for millions of Americans. Another lawmaker tested positive for the virus.

82. Wealthy donors pour millions into fight over mail-in voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deep-pocketed and often anonymous donors are pouring over $100 million into an intensifying dispute about whether it should be easier to vote by mail, a fight that could determine President Donald Trump's fate in the November election.

83. Ann Taylor owner files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy -

NEW YORK (AP) — The operator of Ann Taylor and Lane Bryant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Thursday, the latest retailer to do so during the pandemic.

Mahwah, New Jersey-based Ascena Retail Group Inc., which operates nearly 3,000 stores mostly at malls, had been dragged down by debt and weak sales for years.

84. Flashpoints emerge as lawmakers negotiate new virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bipartisan Capitol Hill talks have only just begun on a sweeping renewal of coronavirus legislation, but areas of likely agreement — and flashpoints of discord — are becoming apparent as the package starts to take shape.

85. New Yorkers ditching city for elbow room fuel housing boom -

If the outbreak roars back in New York City, Anil and Joyce Lilly will not be sheltering again in their Bronx apartment. They just bought a house an hour north in the Hudson Valley.

86. Biden eyes GOP supporters while Trump focuses on his base -

In the four months since Joe Biden effectively won the Democratic presidential nomination, he has focused on consolidating the party's divergent and often warring factions. As the closing stretch of the campaign nears, that effort will expand to include Republicans disaffected with President Donald Trump.

87. Some taxpayers face a desperate wait for refunds -

As a 58-year-old woman on disability, Robin Short of Wallingford, Connecticut, relies on her tax refund to catch up on bills. She filed her return electronically in February, opting for direct deposit so she could get her $773 refund quickly.

88. China moves vast trade fair online, but few buyers follow -

BEIJING (AP) — Standing in front of shelves laden with colorful backpacks, a saleswoman promoted bags on the Canton Trade Fair's website without knowing whether anyone was watching as the world's biggest sales event opened in cyberspace to avoid the coronavirus pandemic.

89. Top Davidson County residential sales for May 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

90. From boom to bust to survival mode -

Three months ago there was no doubt that Andy Mumma was one of Nashville’s brightest hospitality stars, and 2020 was set to be one of his best years ever.

His flagship Barista Parlor coffee shop in East Nashville was about to celebrate eight years in business, and his Tiki bar, Chopper, was approaching its first anniversary. His roasting company and Barista Parlor locations in Golden Sound, Germantown and Marathon Village were thriving. Later this year he was set to open locations at the airport, at the new W Hotel downtown and at Sylvan Supply in West Nashville.

91. Trump tells Senate GOP to 'be tough' on Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump implored Senate Republicans to "be tough" on Democrats heading into the fall election, touting his own poll numbers against rival Joe Biden during a free-wheeling private lunch on Capitol Hill.

92. GOP senators give Democrats' $3T relief bill a cold shoulder -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a more than $3 trillion coronavirus aid package, a sweeping effort with $1 trillion for states and cities, "hazard pay" for essential workers and a new round of cash payments to individuals.

93. Pelosi unveils $3T virus bill, warns inaction costs more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi unveiled a more than $3 trillion coronavirus aid package Tuesday, providing nearly $1 trillion for states and cities, "hazard pay" for essential workers and a new round of cash payments to individuals.

94. Start thinking bankruptcy now, not later -

If you’ve lost your job or struggle to pay your debt, you may need to file for bankruptcy. If that’s the case, you should ignore some common financial advice and start thinking defensively.

95. Pelosi pushes new virus package as McConnell hits "pause" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pressed ahead Tuesday with the next coronavirus  aid, a sweeping package that is expected to be unveiled soon even as the House stays closed while the Senate reopens in the pandemic.

96. Pelosi: States, cities seek $1T to avert layoffs from virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday state and local governments are seeking up to $1 trillion for coronavirus  costs, a stunning benchmark for the next aid package that's certain to run into opposition from Senate Republicans.

97. Virus, stalled economy raise Democratic hopes to take Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bullock was the lame-duck governor of solidly red Montana, fresh off a failed Democratic presidential bid, when he pivoted and announced he'd challenge Republican Sen. Steve Daines for his seat.

98. Music industry mainstay Knox Phillips dies in Memphis -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Knox Phillips, the son of renowned music producer Sam Phillips and an enthusiastic ambassador of Memphis music who worked on records by Jerry Lee Lewis, Willie Nelson and John Prine during more than 50 years in the industry, has died. He was 74.

99. Community Foundation awards 15 more grants -

The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee has announced 15 additional grants of $592,000 to nonprofits and organizations helping victims affected by the March 3 tornadoes, including those in the Nashville area and in Putnam County.

100. Real estate adapts to life with virus -

It’s business as usual – in some ways – at Wagon Wheel Title and Escrow in East Nashville. In other ways it is anything but.

The COVID-19 pandemic has rattled the real estate industry, causing multiple disruptions, changing business practices, adding new technologies, putting loans in jeopardy and canceling deals just as they were about to close as jobs are lost or income curtailed.