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Editorial Results (free)

1. 50 years later, musicians still find magic in Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ -

“Sonic fairy dust” is a phrase stuck in my head the last few days as I returned to “Abbey Road.”

It’s an apt assessment that I adopted from one of the folks I interviewed, music masters of various degrees, who generally genuflected while agreeing the album – which has just been released in a remastered/remixed version for its golden anniversary – was “sprinkled with sonic fairy dust.”

2. GE cash flow picture, and its outlook, is improving -

One year into the job at General Electric, there are signs that CEO Larry Culp's plan to transform General Electric into a sleeker company is paying off.

3. Uncertainties escalate for Fed as it weighs another rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve finds itself in an unusually delicate spot as it considers how much more to try to stimulate an economy that's still growing and adding jobs but also appears vulnerable.

4. Sanders, Warren stockpile millions more than 2020 rivals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren don't just lead the Democratic presidential primary in fundraising. They've stockpiled millions more than their rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden, who burned through money at a fast clip over the past three months while posting an anemic fundraising haul.

5. Mayor-elect inherits fight with state comptroller -

Nashville Mayor-elect John Cooper, who campaigned on a platform of restoring order to Metro’s finances, is inheriting a file of correspondence from the Tennessee comptroller’s office concerning how the city manages cash and what will happen to its 2020 budget without a key revenue source – privatized parking – which Cooper has said he won’t allow.

6. The rain in Nashville falls mainly in your basement -

Albert Hammond had a big hit with a song he co-wrote called “It Never Rains in Southern California.’’ Maybe not in California, but in Nashville, it rains and it rains all year. In February, the rain topped the charts with 12.55 inches, the most the city has seen in its history in that month.

7. Tia Rose finds her dream at Twin Kegs: ‘Dive bar with great food’ -

Dark brown eyes and hair showcasing her Italian heritage, the namesake of Rosie’s International Famous Twin Kegs scans her business, where she promises Woodbine’s (and she hopes Nashville’s) best burger-and-beer selection.

8. Facing calls for resignation, Acosta defends Epstein deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Insisting he got the best deal he could at the time, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta on Wednesday defended his handling of a sex-trafficking case involving now-jailed financier Jeffrey Epstein as Acosta tried to stave off intensifying Democratic calls for his resignation.

9. ‘Roadhouse Rambler’ gets late start on country dream -

The Roadhouse Rambler – a guitar leaning against the nearest wall – looks across the kitchen table in the tidy home his phone company career helped buy. His smiling eyes wander back to dusty Oklahoma.

10. AP FACT CHECK: Trump on NKorea, wages, climate; Dem misfires -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Straining for deals on trade and nukes in Asia, President Donald Trump hailed a meeting with North Korea's leader that he falsely claimed President Barack Obama coveted, asserted a U.S. auto renaissance that isn't and wrongly stated air in the U.S. is the cleanest ever as he dismissed climate change.

11. 'Why not now?' for slavery reparations, House panel is told -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers on Wednesday held the first congressional hearing in more than a decade on reparations, spotlighting the debate over whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves in the United States.

12. The legends who made 'endangered' Music Row are gone -

More than a decade and a half ago I took a beloved poet, picker, prophet and pilgrim down to “Music City Row,” as he likes to refer to that stretch of Nashville. He hadn’t been there really for 30 years, and he lamented what he saw. Or didn’t see.

13. Before CMA Fest, ‘Nashville,’ the Titans or Preds, there was Hee Haw -

Nashville’s road to prominence didn’t begin with the ongoing demolition of historic buildings and gutting of neighborhoods. It began 50 years ago with animated dancing pigs and a braying donkey, plenty of big boobs – like Junior Samples and Gunilla Hutton’s – in a “Kornfield,” the greatest country comedians and musicians and guests like Johnny Cash, Mickey Mantle, Ray Charles, Ethel Merman, Garth Brooks and Billy Graham.

14. No end seen to struggle as Mississippi flood enters month 4 -

HOLLY BLUFF, Miss. (AP) — Larry Walls should have been out working in his fields last week. Instead, his John Deere tractor is parked on high ground, just beyond the reach of the ever-encroaching floodwaters in the southern Mississippi Delta.

15. Out with the old: Treasured antique mall saying goodbye -

The “77 Sunset Strip” board game makes me smile, even as I’m immersed in commercial death throes while wandering the sprawling building on Eighth Avenue South where yet another longtime business – one where 73-year-old owner Pat Morris has toiled day and night to create something special – is going to close.

16. Escalating trade war causing anxiety in America's heartland -

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — When President Donald Trump began talking about tariffs in 2017, Upper Midwest soybean farmer Jamie Beyer suspected that her crop could become a weapon. Two years later, she and her family are watching the commodity markets on an hourly basis as an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China creates turmoil in rural America.

17. Jack’s white sauce wins top barbecue prize -

Music City White Sauce, a specialty at Jack’s Bar-B-Que, has won first place at the National Barbecue & Grilling Association Awards.

The annual awards recognize the commercial side of barbecue.

18. Full text of Mueller's questions and Trump's answers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Robert Mueller's 448-page investigative report into allegations of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election includes 23 unredacted pages of Mueller's written questions and Donald Trump's written responses, the only direct exchange between the special counsel's office and the president.

19. NFL Draft a gold (aluminum, actually) mine for King David -

After smiling at the white-haired stranger, King David lowers the top half of his body into a dark-green dumpster a few feet outside Nissan Stadium – the ultimate field of dreams for those whose egos are being massaged by single-minded politicians during the three-day NFL Draft rodeo and bacchanalia.

20. Trump cracks down on Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela -

CORAL GABLES, Fla. (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday intensified its crackdown on Cuba, Nicaragua and Venezuela, rolling back Obama administration policy and announcing new restrictions and sanctions against the three countries whose leaders national security adviser John Bolton dubbed the "three stooges of socialism."

21. US to allow lawsuits over properties seized by Castro's Cuba -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration on Wednesday opened the door for lawsuits against foreign firms operating on properties Cuba seized from Americans after the 1959 revolution.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said he won't renew a bar on litigation that has been in place for two decades, meaning that lawsuits can be filed starting on May 2 when the current suspension expires. The decision could affect dozens of Canadian and European companies to the tune of tens of billions of dollars in compensation and interests.

22. Democrats raise $75M so far, signaling a drawn-out fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates raised about $75 million during the first quarter of the 2020 election, a lackluster sum spread out across more than a dozen campaigns that signals a drawn-out battle likely lies ahead.

23. Events -

Nashville Comedy Festival. The festival, which runs through Sunday, features some of the funniest comedians in the world at different locations around the city. The 2019 line-up includes popular comedians like Jay Leno, Jeff Foxworthy, Sebastian Maniscalco, Ali Wong, Jim Jefferies, Rhett & Link, Tom Segura, John Crist, Nate Bargatze, Doug Loves Movies, Cody Ko, Noel Miller, Janeane Garofalo, Rita Rudner and 85 South. Information

24. Investors hail Lyft shares in IPO, see profits down the road -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Lyft's shares soared as the company went public Friday, giving investors their first chance to bet on the future of the ride-hailing industry.

The stock opened at $87.24, up 21 percent from its offering price of $72. It closed at $78.29, up 8.7 percent, giving the company a $27 billion valuation.

25. Events -

Youth Job Fair. The summer Youth Job Fair is for YOUTH (ages 15 & up) who are seeking summer employment in Gallatin for summer, part time, seasonal, after school, etc. American Job Center, 1598 Green Lea Blvd., Gallatin. Thursday, 3-7 p.m. Information: 615-452-4000.

26. Venezuela is key topic between Trump and Caribbean leaders -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The political and economic crisis in Venezuela tops the agenda of President Donald Trump's meeting Friday with leaders from the Caribbean, a region that has been far from united in joining the U.S. call for the ouster of President Nicolas Maduro.

27. Congress' inaction endangers black lung fund -

COEBURN, Va. (AP) — Former coal miner John Robinson's bills for black lung treatments run $4,000 a month, but the federal fund he depends on to help cover them is being drained of money because of inaction by Congress and the Trump administration.

28. Lawyers for Tennessee lawmakers, feds clash in refugee case -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Attorneys for Tennessee lawmakers and the U.S. government clashed Tuesday in a hearing over the federal government's refugee resettlement program.

A 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals three-judge panel in Cincinnati heard the oral arguments as attorneys for the Republican-led Tennessee General Assembly hope to upend a March 2018 ruling that tossed out their lawsuit.

29. Tennessee kills bill allowing campaign cash for child care -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee legislative panel has spiked a bill allowing candidates to use their campaign funds to pay for child care.

The House Elections and Campaign Finance Subcommittee killed the proposal on Wednesday.

30. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for February 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

31. Lyft reveals big growth but no profits as it readies for IPO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Lyft revealed that it is growing quickly ahead of its initial public offering but continues to bleed money and may struggle to turn a profit, according to a federal filing.

The company released its financial details for the first time on Friday, giving the public a glimpse into its performance before deciding whether to buy into the ride-hailing phenomenon.

32. Comps not always a good guide for pricing a home -

Located slightly into Williamson County, the house at 2492 Old Natchez Trace sold last week for $805,000, which was $55,000 more than list price. Well, $55,000 more than the latest list price. It had previously been listed for $955,000.

33. GE sells biopharma unit for $21 billion -

BOSTON (AP) — General Electric is selling its biopharma business to Danaher Corp. for $21.4 billion as it continues to sell off chunks of a once sprawling conglomerate.

The biopharma unit, part of GE Life Sciences, generated revenue of about $3 billion last year. Danaher said after tax benefits, the deal will have a price tag that is closer a $20 billion. The mostly-cash transaction is expected to close in the fourth quarter of this year.

34. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for January 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, January 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

35. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

36. Big donors on the sidelines in early days of 2020 primary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential primary is jolting to life without a traditional mainstay: the big money donor class. More specifically, their contribution checks.

With as many as two dozen Democrats potentially running for the White House and no immediate front-runner, the money race in the early days of the primary is largely frozen, according to fundraisers. Though some donors have a preferred candidate, others who are spending are spreading their money across the field to hedge their bets. More often, donors are staying on the sidelines until the contours of the primary take shape.

37. Cohen says he rigged online polls for Trump in 2014, 2015 -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's estranged former lawyer acknowledged Thursday that he paid a technology company to rig Trump's standing in two online polls before the presidential campaign.

38. Group backing private Medicare is funded by insurance giants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A group gaining influence in Washington as a champion for Medicare beneficiaries is bankrolled by major health insurance companies that are trying to cash in on private coverage offered through the federal health insurance program.

39. Hertz, Clear partner to speed rentals with biometric scans -

Biometric screening is expanding to the rental car industry.

Hertz said Tuesday it is teaming up with Clear, the maker of biometric screening kiosks found at many airports, in an effort to slash the time it takes to pick up a rental car. Clear hopes it will lead more travelers to its platform, which has 3 million members in the U.S.

40. US to ease oil drilling controls protecting imperiled bird -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration moved forward Thursday with plans to ease restrictions on oil and natural gas drilling, mining and other activities across millions of acres in the American West that were put in place to protect an imperiled bird species.

41. GM slashes thousands of jobs in tech shift -

DETROIT (AP) — Even though unemployment is low, the economy is growing and U.S. auto sales are near historic highs, General Motors is cutting thousands of jobs in a major restructuring aimed at generating cash to spend on innovation.

42. Carlene Carter finally home, ready for a pony -

Carlene Carter doesn’t resemble the scarred survivor who occupies part of her soul as she sits on the sun-drenched porch overlooking a rented corner of East Nashville and welcomes her fourth husband, Joe Breen – a Julliard-trained classical singer, filmmaker, Broadway veteran and soap opera actor – as he returns from a neighborhood stroll with their two rescue mutts.

43. GOP fight over leadership after November vote to be messy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Win or lose in the race for the majority, House Republicans are at risk of plunging into a messy leadership battle after the November election, with the party lacking a clear heir apparent to take the place of House Speaker Paul Ryan.

44. Can Tennessee history spur neighborhood renaissance? -

Leaving the new Tennessee State Museum in the rearview mirror for a few minutes, I decide to dodge off Jefferson Street and try to catch up with the pedestrian who I later discover is a retired chief petty officer. “We ran the Navy,” he tells me, proudly.

45. Do real men really need soft, sweet-smelling beards? -

The business of men’s grooming is on the rise in Nashville, growing not from the hair on top of the head, but from the hair in front of it.

Beards have sprouted on many former baby-faced gents and the nests of facial hair have become more acceptable, if not downright trendy. Nashville, for a variety of reasons, has a slew of new businesses – both brick-and-mortar and online shops – taking advantage of this rise in the number of men who have decided to stop shaving.

46. Sears' bankruptcy will have ripple effect, not all of it bad -

NEW YORK (AP) — Sears' Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing will have ripple effects on everything from landlords to suppliers to workers.

Many vendors, which had already enforced stricter payment terms on Sears, are refusing to ship merchandise to stores. The company will further shrink its workforce, which has already been reduced to 68,000 as of the bankruptcy filing from 90,000 earlier this year.

47. New Tesla chair must rein in CEO Musk at key moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It won't be an easy job.

Whoever becomes the new chairman of Tesla Motors will face the formidable task of reining in Elon Musk, the charismatic, visionary chief executive with an impulsive streak, while also helping Musk achieve his dream of turning Tesla into a profitable, mass-market producer of environmentally-friendly electric cars.

48. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for August 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

49. ‘They keep coming and I can’t get them out’ -

When officers do hourly security checks at the Loudon County Jail, they’re often walking into a potent brew of danger.

Officially, the jail’s capacity is 91 inmates. But the actual population runs between 170 and 180 on average and was up to 210 inmates at one point this summer.

50. Isbell wins 3 Americana Awards; Prine is artist of the year -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Folk singer-songwriter John Prine won artist of the year for the second time in a row at the Americana Music Honors and Awards on Wednesday, while Jason Isbell took home three awards, including album of the year.

51. Stars' bars transform Lower Broadway -

Luke Bryan wants you to bite his sushi. Really. The progenitor of the bro-country movement invites all comers to his Lower Broadway bar and restaurant – Luke’s 32 Bridge Food + Bar – to see what he has to offer that may be different from the delicacies and/or bar food fans and diners can find at the more than half-dozen country star-fronted restaurants that have mushroomed on Lower Broadway.

52. Lloyd finds success playing the long game -

Sitting at a Greek restaurant and spooning raisins and brown sugar into 10:30 a.m. oatmeal, Bill Lloyd – one of Nashville’s nicest guys – gets only slightly sentimental when pondering the long road traveled since he was at the top of the charts, opening for heroes like Roy Orbison.

53. Merger cancellation pushes Rite Aid into uncertain future -

Rite Aid shares plunged Thursday as the company headed into an uncertain future after calling off its merger with the grocer Albertsons.

Analysts and retail insiders questioned the drugstore chain's prospects after it ended a planned takeover by Albertsons before Rite Aid shareholders could vote on it. That vote also faced shaky prospects due to opposition from shareholders and influential proxy advisory firms.

54. Tesla CEO's buyout bid raises eyebrows, legal concerns -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Tesla CEO Elon Musk is seeking relief from the pressures of running a publicly held company with a $72 billion buyout of the electric car maker, but he may be acquiring new headaches with his peculiar handling of the proposed deal.

55. Rite Aid, Albertsons call off merger deal ahead of vote -

Rite Aid and the grocer Albertsons called off an agreement to become a single company with the deal facing shaky prospects in a shareholder vote.

Shares of the drugstore chain plunged after markets opened Thursday.

56. Trump: Sanctions reinstated against Iran for 'WORLD PEACE' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. sanctions that kicked in early Tuesday against Iran are meant to pressure Tehran's government into retreating from its support for international terrorism, its military activity in the Middle East and its ballistic missile and nuclear-related programs, President Donald Trump's national security adviser said.

57. Financial fruit: Apple becomes 1st trillion-dollar company -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Apple has become the world's first publicly traded company to be valued at $1 trillion, the financial fruit of stylish technology that has redefined what we expect from our gadgets.

58. US stock indexes end unevenly after day of listless trading -

U.S. stock indexes capped a day of listless trading with a mixed finish Monday, as gains by banks and technology companies were offset by losses in other sectors.

Bond yields rose, pointing to a pickup in interest rates on consumer loans, which helped drive bank shares higher. Technology stocks also posted solid gains, adding to the sector's market-leading showing this year. Alphabet, Google's parent company, surged in aftermarket trading after it reported its latest quarterly results.

59. AP Exclusive: Billionaires fuel US charter schools movement -

SEATTLE (AP) — Dollar for dollar, the beleaguered movement to bring charter schools to Washington state has had no bigger champion than billionaire Bill Gates.

The Microsoft co-founder gave millions of dollars to see a charter school law approved despite multiple failed ballot referendums. And his private foundation not only helped create the Washington State Charter Schools Association, but has at times contributed what amounts to an entire year's worth of revenues for the 5-year-old charter advocacy group.

60. Bridgestone donates $1M to Maplewood program -

Bridgestone Americas, Inc., a subsidiary of Bridgestone Corporation, has now donated $1 million in in-kind donations to Maplewood High School’s Automotive Training Center since it opened in 2015.

61. Another wave of sales leaves GE a vastly changed company -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric Co. is shrinking again, becoming a mere shadow of the globe-spanning conglomerate that it was before the Great Recession.

GE said Tuesday that it will spin off its health-care business and sell its interest in Baker Hughes, which provides drilling services to oil and gas companies.

62. Design Within Reach to open June 23 -

The Gulch is welcoming furniture studio Design Within Reach, retailer of authentic modern furniture and accessories, with a grand opening on June 23.

Studio in The Gulch is an 8,000-square-foot facility representing the company’s first-ever physical presence in the Nashville market.

63. Seattle to repeal homeless-aid tax after Amazon objects -

SEATTLE (AP) — Amazon balked, and Seattle is backing down. City leaders said they plan to repeal a tax on large companies such as Amazon and Starbucks as they face mounting pressure from businesses, an about-face just a month after unanimously approving the measure to help pay for efforts to combat a growing homelessness crisis.

64. Charter schools regroup after big California election loss -

Charter school supporters are deciding where to direct their considerable resources after pouring money into the California governor primary to support a longtime ally who failed to move on to November's election.

65. Trump to campaign in Nashville today to thwart Dems' US Senate bid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Diving into the midterm elections, President Donald Trump is seeking to build a stable of Republicans who will help promote his agenda and serve as a check on Democrats aiming to win majorities in Congress.

66. General Electric continues transformation; $11B rail deal -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric will tie its train engine division to the railroad equipment maker Wabtec in deal worth about $11 billion as GE CEO John Flannery continues to break off parts of the conglomerate.

67. Hope for US-China trade progress sends stocks jumping -

NEW YORK (AP) — Industrial and technology companies led stocks to solid gains Monday after the U.S. and China appeared to make significant progress in trade talks. That helped ease concerns among investors that the world's two biggest economies might be headed for a trade war.

68. Sarah Cannon launches new collaboration -

Sarah Cannon Development Innovations has announced a new strategic collaboration with Pivotal, a European contract research organization.

The partnership will expand access to novel immunotherapies in early phase clinical trials in Europe.

69. Subban the villain? Doesn’t bother him a bit -

It plays out like clockwork in nearly every NHL arena outside Nashville.

Predators defenseman P.K. Subban takes the ice for the first time, touches the puck and – immediately – boos reign down.

70. Tennessee’s economy at risk in this battle of wills -

In an escalating back and forth over trade, Tennessee farmers like John Neal Scarlett are caught in the middle, worrying if politicians are keeping their best interests at heart when talking tough on trade issues.

71. Trump calls for border legislation using 'nuclear option' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump continued to rage over immigration Monday, calling on Congress to pass border legislation using the "Nuclear Option if necessary."

Trump tweeted that the U.S. must build a border wall, but argued that "Democrats want No Borders, hence drugs and crime!" He also said that a deal to help "Dreamer" immigrants is "dead because the Democrats didn't care or act."

72. Secours looks to stars in praise of scouts who discovered them -

Willie Mays – or at least recounting the day she met and filmed the man some say is the greatest baseball player ever – makes Molly Secours light up.

Actually, almost anything about baseball makes her happy.

73. Roles reduced, Kushner and Ivanka Trump's fate uncertain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They spent their first year in Washington as an untouchable White House power couple, commanding expansive portfolios, outlasting rivals and enjoying unmatched access to the president. But Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump have undergone a swift and stunning reckoning of late, their powers restricted, their enemies emboldened and their future in the West Wing uncertain.

74. ‘Neon Angel’ still clinging to Nashville dream -

She’s adjusted her dreams of stardom a bit as calendar pages fly by, but this woman with the young heart and thick, red hair holds onto her Gretsch guitar and proclaims: “I am the Neon Angel.”

75. Grocery retailer Albertsons to buy drugstore chain Rite Aid -

The privately held owner of Safeway, Vons and other grocery brands is plunging deeper into the pharmacy business with a deal to buy Rite Aid, the nation's third-largest drugstore chain.

Albertsons Companies is offering either a share of its stock and $1.83 in cash or slightly more than a share for every 10 shares of Rite Aid. A deal value was not disclosed in a statement released Tuesday by the companies.

76. Kerr finds winding path to success in Music City -

Les Kerr, purveyor of what he calls “hillbilly blues Caribbean rock ’n’ roll” in a town where faux-cowboy music and lusty songs about pickup trucks reign, leans back in a chair in his “music room/office” and noodles with the 1975 Ovation guitar his grandfather gave him as a high school graduation present.

77. Banker/singer Howard a hit in business, on stage -

Frank Howard sits in a chair while a woman he thinks is Vietnamese works on his feet.

I had tracked him down – and he is a dear friend, I should admit – to talk about his pending retirement from his 35 years of work for various banks around town. He began that career as a repo man and worked his way up to senior vice president at First American. He’s finishing up his stellar financial career at Pinnacle, where he’s an associate in the collections department.

78. Cobbler’s life: Moving, adapting, passing it along -

The lanky, country bassist knows cowboy boots demonstrate both the soles and the soul of his craft, so he’s not going to entrust them to just any old shoe repairman.

Soft-spoken cobbler Troy Horner’s walrus mustache rises along with his slight smile when the Nashville Cat and his wife – arms filled with boots – push their way into Peabody Shoe Repair at the back of a non-descript, U-shaped Thompson Lane strip center that’s easiest found by using the Mattress King sign as your landmark.

79. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

80. Amid Amazon competition, Westfield malls sold for $15.7B -

PARIS (AP) — The owner of Westfield shopping centers is being bought by French property investor Unibail-Rodamco for $15.7 billion as shop retailers struggle to keep up with the move to online sites like Amazon.

81. House conservatives show openness to bill averting shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hard-right House conservatives signaled an openness Wednesday to backing a short-term spending bill this week, raising the odds that Congress will pass the measure and prevent a partial government shutdown on Saturday.

82. Derided by critics, trickle-down economics gets another try -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Does money roll downhill? In their drive to cut taxes, President Donald Trump and congressional Republicans are betting it does.

Behind their legislation is a theory long popular among conservatives: Slash taxes for corporations and rich people, who will then hire, invest and profit — and cause money to trickle into the pockets of ordinary Americans. The White House says the plan's corporate tax cut alone would eventually raise average household incomes by $4,000 a year.

83. Light at the end of GE's tunnel? Lighting, more, may be gone -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Electric slashed its dividend in half and will attempt to vastly narrow its focus to three key sectors — aviation, health care and energy — as the conglomerate with early ties to Thomas Edison considers shedding even its historic lighting business.

84. NHL or juniors: Girard’s strange dilemma -

It was at a Predators team dinner prior to the start of this season that Nashville coach Peter Laviolette focused the spotlight on his 19-year-old rookie. Having heard Samuel Girard might have singing talent, Laviolette decided to have some fun with the youngster, calling on him for an impromptu performance in front of teammates.

85. House set to pass $36.5B for hurricane, wildfire relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is on track to backing President Donald Trump's request for billions more in disaster aid, $16 billion to pay flood insurance claims and emergency funding to help the cash-strapped government of Puerto Rico stay afloat.

86. Many in country music mum over gun issues after Vegas deaths -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When singer Meghan Linsey first started her country duo Steel Magnolia, a partnership with the National Rifle Association was suggested as a way to grow their audience.

The proposal, which she refused, was a commonplace example of how intertwined gun ownership is with country music.

87. Doubts arise on whether corporate tax cut would boost growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For President Donald Trump, what's good for General Motors is great for American workers. Same for Boeing. And AT&T. Not to mention small businesses.

Trump insists that slashing the corporate tax rate from 35 percent to as low as 15 percent would free up valuable cash. Companies would use the money to boost investment, increase employees' pay, accelerate hiring and speed economic growth. What's more, corporations that now keep trillions overseas to avoid U.S. taxes would bring the money home. American companies could better compete with rivals based in countries with lower tax rates.

88. As stocks set highs, investors still worry about next crash -

NEW YORK (AP) — What is the sound of a stock market at a record high and nobody buying it?

Even with stocks in the midst of one of their best-ever runs, investors are on pace to pull more money out of U.S. stock funds than they put in for the third straight year and the eighth in the last 10 years.

89. John Prine takes home artist of the year at Americana Awards -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Folk singer songwriter John Prine was awarded the artist of the year, while one of his protégés, country singer Sturgill Simpson, took home album of the year at the Americana Honors and Awards show.

90. John Prine takes home artist of the year at Americana Awards -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Folk singer songwriter John Prine was awarded the artist of the year, while one of his protégés, country singer Sturgill Simpson, took home album of the year at the Americana Honors and Awards show.

91. Joy, lament mark impending closure of International Market -

Roosting at the International Market on Belmont Boulevard, Chris Gantry laments that this landmark restaurant across the street from his apartment is one more signal that his beloved “NashLantis” – a mystical city that drew wild-eyed artists like him 50 years ago – soon will disappear.

92. Senate passes $15B disaster aid measure, debt limit increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday overwhelmingly backed a $15.3 billion aid package for victims of Harvey, nearly doubling President Donald Trump's emergency request, and including a deal between Trump and Democrats to increase America's borrowing authority and fund the government.

93. House overwhelmingly passes $7.9 billion Harvey aid bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed $7.9 billion in Hurricane Harvey disaster relief as warring Republicans and Democrats united behind help for victims of that storm as an ever more powerful new hurricane bore down on Florida.

94. Seller of Army equipment: 'I didn't try to hide anything' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than $1 million in weapons parts and sensitive military equipment was stolen out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and sold in a vast black market, some of it to foreign buyers through eBay, according to testimony at a federal trial this week.

95. 'Easy money' made selling Army weapons stolen by Ft. Campbell soldiers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than $1 million in weapons parts and sensitive military equipment was stolen out of Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and sold in a vast black market, some of it to foreign buyers through eBay, according to testimony at a federal trial this week.

96. XMI hires vice president, managing director of financial operations -

XMI, a provider of business process management services for entrepreneurial, high growth businesses, has added Joshua Farber, MBA, CPA, as vice president and managing director of financial operations.

97. Cash family: Keep Johnny's name away from 'hateful ideology' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The children of Johnny Cash are asking white supremacists and other hate groups not to wear or use the country singer's name or image.

98. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for July 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

99. Glen Campbell said goodbye to his life, career through music -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Glen Campbell was a rare entertainer who got to say goodbye to his life and career in every way he knew how.

100. Reaction to the death of superstar entertainer Glen Campbell -

NEW YORK (AP) — Reaction to the death of superstar entertainer Glen Campbell:

"I'm very broken up to hear about my friend Glen Campbell. An incredible musician and an even better person. I'm at a loss. Love & Mercy." — Brian Wilson, via Twitter