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Editorial Results (free)

1. Risky move: Biden undercuts WH executive privilege shield -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a risky move by President Joe Biden that could come back to haunt him — and future presidents — in the hyperpartisan world of Washington politics.

Democrat Biden has agreed to a request from Congress seeking sensitive information on the actions of his predecessor Donald Trump and his aides during the Jan. 6 insurrection, though the former president claims the information is guarded by executive privilege.

2. Menzie named president of Cumberland Trust -

Cumberland Trust, an independent trust company, has named Jennie Menzie president and elected her to its board of directors. Menzie will serve as president, chief operating officer and corporate counsel.

3. US economy: Plenty of growth, not enough workers or supplies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is sparking confusion and whiplash almost as fast as it's adding jobs.

Barely more than a year after the coronavirus caused the steepest economic fall and job losses on record, the speed of the rebound has been so unexpectedly swift that many companies can't fill jobs or acquire enough supplies to meet a pent-up burst of customer demand.

4. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

5. AP-NORC poll: Virus, economy swamp other priorities for US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Containing the coronavirus outbreak and repairing the economic damage it has inflicted are the top priorities for Americans as Joe Biden prepares to become the 46th president of the United States, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

6. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

7. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

8. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

9. Many small businesses say loans won't get them to rehire -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some small businesses that obtained a highly-coveted government loan say they won't be able to use it to bring all their laid-off workers back, even though that is exactly what the program was designed to do.

10. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tale about Romney unrest, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing an impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook to defend himself: blasting the inquiry as illegal, attacking his investigators and critics alike, and deriding the whistleblower process as all-but-rigged.

11. AP FACT CHECK: Trump untruths on Ukraine, impeachment fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A whistle blew, an impeachment inquiry swung into motion and the president at the center of it all rose defiantly to his own defense, not always in command of the facts.

A CIA officer, in a complaint filed under federal whistleblower protections that preserve anonymity, alleged President Donald Trump abused his office in pressing for a Ukrainian investigation of a Democratic rival, Joe Biden. That revelation persuaded Democrats to move ahead with an inquiry that could produce articles of impeachment. Trump has reacted with anger, with weekend tweets that made the groundless accusation that Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, the Intelligence Committee chairman taking the lead in the impeachment review , criticized him "illegally."

12. Consumers could be collateral damage if Trump expands tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For many Americans, President Donald Trump's trade war may soon get very real. His administration is preparing to extend 25% tariffs to practically all Chinese imports not already hit with duties. That's roughly an additional $300 billion worth of products, ranging from pacifiers and flashlights to billiard balls and golf carts.

13. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

14. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

15. 5 things small business owners should know about tax bills -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners are awaiting details of a reported Republican deal in principle on a tax overhaul, the details of which could come soon.

The deal, which would reconcile differences in the House and Senate versions of the tax bill, may answer the question of which business owners will pay lower taxes, and how much of a break they'll get. Both bills have raised the possibility that many owners, including professionals like accountants and consultants, wouldn't see a tax cut.

16. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for June 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

17. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for February 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

18. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for August 2013 -

Top August 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

19. Cliff negotiations: Higher rates or fewer tax breaks _ what's worse? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the fiscal cliff wars, a pivotal battle is raging between Democrats demanding to raise revenue by boosting tax rates on the nation's highest earners and Republicans insisting on eliminating deductions and other tax breaks instead. Which is better for the economy? Analysts say it depends.