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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks end September down 9.3%, worst month since March 2020 -

Wall Street closed out a miserable September on Friday with the S&P 500's worst monthly skid since March 2020, when the coronavirus pandemic crashed global markets.

The benchmark index ended the month with a 9.3% loss and posted its third straight losing quarter. It's now at its lowest level since November 2020 and is down by more than a quarter since the start of the year.

2. Wall Street drops back to lowest since 2020 as fear returns -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are back to falling on Wall Street as worries about a possible recession and rising bond yields put the squeeze back on markets. The S&P 500 fell 2.1% Thursday, reaching its lowest level since late 2020. The washout erased the index's gains in a big rally the day before. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.5% and the Nasdaq lost 2.8%. For markets to really turn higher, analysts say investors will need to see a break from the high inflation that's swept the world. That hasn't arrived yet, and even more data arrived Thursday showing the opposite.

3. Apple Inc will manufacture iPhone 14 in India -

NEW DELHI (AP) — Apple Inc. will make its iPhone 14 in India, the company said on Monday, as manufacturers shift production from China amid geopolitical tensions and pandemic restrictions that have disrupted supply chains for many industries.

4. Wall Street ends lower as global central banks raise rates -

Stocks closed lower on Wall Street, deepening their losses for the week, as central banks around the world raised interest rates to fight inflation. The S&P 500 fell 0.8% Thursday. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell about half as much, and the Nasdaq composite lost 1.4%. Central banks in Europe and Asia increased rates a day after the Federal Reserve made another big rate hike and signaled more were on the way. The goal is to cool down economies by making it more expensive to borrow money. The yield on the 2-year Treasury, which tends to follow expectations for Fed action, rose significantly.

5. Hooker leads Tennessee over Ball State, 59-10 -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — Hendon Hooker threw for 222 yards and two touchdowns and ran for two more scores to lead Tennessee to a 59-10 season-opening victory over Ball State Thursday night.

Hooker, in his second year as the Volunteers' starter after transferring from Virginia Tech, had 211 yards passing by halftime along with a 38-0 lead. Eight different receiver caught passes in the first 30 minutes. He was replaced by Joe Milton midway through the third quarter.

6. Stocks sink after Fed's Powell says rates will stay high -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending sharply lower after the head of the Federal Reserve dashed Wall Street's hopes that it may soon ease up on rate hikes in its effort to tame inflation. The S&P 500 lost 3.4% Friday, its biggest drop in two months, after Jerome Powell said the Fed will likely need to keep interest rates high enough to slow the economy for some time in order to beat back the high inflation sweeping the country. Tech stocks led the way lower, pulling the Nasdaq composite down even more. Higher rates help corral inflation, but they also hurt asset prices.

7. Wall Street hits 3-month high as inflation cools -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied to three-month highs on Wall Street Wednesday as investors welcomed a government report showing that inflation cooled more than expected last month.

The encouraging inflation update sparked speculation that the Federal Reserve may not have to remain as aggressive about hiking interest rates as feared. The central bank has been raising rates in an effort to slow the economy in the hopes of stamping out inflation, but that risks bringing on a recession if the Fed moves too aggressively.

8. US-China ties on a precipice after Pelosi visit to Taiwan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S.-China relations are teetering on a precipice after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi's visit to Taiwan.

Pelosi received a rapturous welcome in Taipei and was applauded with strong bipartisan support in Washington, despite the Biden administration's misgivings. But her trip has enraged Beijing and Chinese nationalists and will complicate already strained ties even after her departure.

9. US ambassador to Japan warns of Chinese economic coercion -

TOKYO (AP) — The United States is working with Japan and other likeminded countries to counter China's efforts to use its economic might to force political change around the world, the U.S. ambassador to Japan said Tuesday in an interview with The Associated Press.

10. Biden, Xi could meet in person, US official says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and China's Xi Jinping are exploring meeting in person, a senior administration official said after the leaders spent more than two hours on Thursday talking through the future of their complicated relationship, with tension over Taiwan once again emerging as a flashpoint.

11. Stocks end lower as Wall Street braces for big hike in rates -

Stocks capped another shaky day on Wall Street with more losses Wednesday, after a highly anticipated report on inflation turned out to be even worse than expected.

The S&P 500 ended 0.4% lower, its fourth consecutive drop, after tumbling as much as 1.6% earlier. The Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 0.7%, while the Nasdaq composite dropped 0.2%, erasing nearly all of an early 2.1% loss.

12. Solidarity behind Ukraine's Russia fight atop summit agendas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back-to-back world leader summits in Europe this weekend will focus on uniting Western nations behind Ukraine in its fight against Russia's invasion and overcoming Turkey's opposition to NATO membership for Finland and Sweden.

13. Feds search Trump-era official's home, subpoena GOP leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal agents searched a former top Justice Department official's home and seized records from key Republicans in at least four states linked to Donald Trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election, in what were clear signs that authorities are ramping up their investigation of associates of the former president.

14. Wall Street rallies in relief after Fed's assurance on rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied Wednesday following the Federal Reserve's sharpest hike to interest rates since 1994, and its later assurance that such mega-hikes would not be common.

The S&P 500 climbed 54.51, or 1.5%, to 3,789.99 after whipping through roller-coaster trading immediately following the Fed's announcement. In equally topsy-turvy trading, Treasury yields eased in the bond market after Chair Jerome Powell seemed to soothe the market's fears about an overly aggressive Fed by implying more modest rate increases may be coming later this year.

15. Biden announces program offering discounted internet service -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden announced Monday that 20 internet companies have agreed to provide discounted service to people with low incomes, a program that could effectively make tens of millions of households eligible for free service through an already existing federal subsidy.

16. Eastbound and down to teen truck drivers -

The American Trucking Association sounded an alarm in October concerning the nation’s “historic high” truck driver shortage, estimating that an additional 80,000 drivers were needed to meet freight demands.

17. Ukrainians evacuate Kyiv suburbs amid deepening crisis -

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Residents of the bombarded suburbs of Ukraine's capital snaked their way across the slippery wooden planks of a makeshift bridge that provided the only way to escape Russian shelling, amid renewed efforts Wednesday to rescue civilians from besieged cities.

18. Wall Street reels then recovers after invasion of Ukraine -

NEW YORK (AP) — Markets shuddered Thursday and then swung wildly after Russia's invasion of Ukraine threatened to push the high inflation squeezing the global economy even higher.

Initially, stocks tumbled as prices surged for oil, wheat and other commodities on worries the conflict would disrupt global supplies. But the moves moderated as the day progressed, particularly after President Joe Biden said he wanted to limit the economic pain for Americans and announced new sanctions that fell short of what some had suggested.

19. Tough sanctions loom against Russia, effectiveness uncertain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After the threat of sweeping sanctions didn't deter Russia's attack on Ukraine, U.S. Treasury Department officials and their counterparts in Europe now face the task of carrying through on their vow to make Russia's economy and its elites pay a price.

20. Stocks end higher, still log worst month since March 2020 -

Stocks notched broad gains Monday, but still posted their worst monthly loss since the early days of the pandemic, as Wall Street closes a tumultuous January wracked by worries that imminent interest-rate hikes will make everything in markets more challenging.

21. A key inflation gauge rose 5.8% in 2021, most in 39 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A measure of prices that is closely tracked by the Federal Reserve rose 5.8% last year, the sharpest increase since 1982, as brisk consumer spending collided with snarled supply chains to raise the costs of food, furniture, appliances and other goods.

22. Taxpayers face overloaded IRS as filing season opens Monday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Count 30-year-old Ethan Miller among that subset of Americans who are actually eager to file their taxes once income tax filing season opens on Monday.

The financial planner who lives in Silver Spring, Maryland, is looking forward to claiming the new deductions that will come from buying a home. He also wants to get a jump on a tax season that promises to bring lots of extra headaches and delays for filers this year.

23. China's Xi rejects 'Cold War mentality,' pushes cooperation -

GENEVA (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping called Monday for greater world cooperation against COVID-19 and pledged to send an additional 1 billion doses of vaccine to other countries, while urging other powers to discard a "Cold-War mentality" at a time of rising geopolitical tensions — a veiled swipe at the United States.

24. Markets 2021: Stocks soar, IPOs explode, crypto goes wild -

Wall Street delivered another strong year for investors in 2021, as a resurgence in consumer demand fueled by the reopening of the global economy pumped up corporate profits.

As of Dec. 22, the S&P 500 had risen 25%, its third-straight annual increase. Along the way, the benchmark index set 67 all-time highs.

25. Supply shortages and emboldened workers: A changed economy -

Employees at a fast-food restaurant in Sacramento, California, exasperated over working in stifling heat for low wages, demanded more pay and a new air conditioner — and got both.

Customer orders poured in to an Italian auto supplier, which struggled to get hold of enough supplies of everything from plastic to microchips to meet the demand.

26. Key reason for supply shortages: Americans keep spending -

DETROIT (AP) — Take a step back from the picked-over store shelves, the stalled container ships and the empty auto showrooms, and you'll find a root cause of the shortages of just about everything.

27. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

28. Crushed by pandemic, conventions mount a cautious return -

In pre-COVID times, business events __ from small academic conferences to giant trade shows like CES __ routinely attracted more than 1 billion participants each year. The pandemic brought those global gatherings to a sudden halt, emptying convention centers and shuttering hotels.

29. Heupel's debut ends in Tennessee's 38-6 win -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — If Tennessee head coach Josh Heupel's offense is going to work, its got to start on the ground.

The Volunteers' 38-6 season-opening win over Bowling Green on Thursday night was a perfect example of how the first-year coach's up-tempo attack can function on all cylinders.

30. Strong jobs report sends most stocks, bond yields higher -

Wall Street capped a choppy week of trading Friday with broad gains, which helped push the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrial Average to new highs.

The S&P 500 rose 0.2%, a day after setting another all-time high. Every major index notched a weekly gain after slipping last week.

31. Bone McAllester Norton adds Meredith in Sumner -

Bone McAllester Norton PLLC has hired Brandon Meredith, a University of Memphis Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law alumnus, as the firm’s newest attorney at its Sumner County office. Meredith joins Bone McAllester Norton with 13 years of legal experience at Phillips and Ingrum in Gallatin.

32. Top Davidson County residential sales for May 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

33. EU threatens to freeze huge investment deal with China -

BRUSSELS (AP) — The European Parliament warned China on Thursday it won't ratify a long-awaited business investment deal as long as sanctions against European Union legislators remain in place.

EU lawmakers adopted a resolution in which they condemned "the baseless and arbitrary sanctions" imposed by Beijing on European individuals and institutions in March.

34. Biden to spotlight electric vehicle future he sees for US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is putting the spotlight Tuesday on the electric vehicle future he envisions for the United States, as a way to tackle climate change and create jobs.

Biden is touring Ford's Electric Vehicle Center, a new factory being built on the grounds of the automaker's massive Rouge complex in Dearborn, Michigan.

35. McDonald's raising US workers' pay in company-owned stores -

McDonald's is raising pay at 650 company-owned stores in the U.S. as part of its push to hire thousands of new workers in a tight labor market.

The fast-food giant is the latest restaurant chain to announce pay raises. Chipotle said Monday it will raise workers' pay to an average of $15 per hour by the end of June. Darden Restaurants, the owner of Olive Garden and other chains, said it March that it will guarantee workers $12 per hour including tips by 2023.

36. AP source: Biden to tap Emanuel for ambassador to Japan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is expected to nominate former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to serve as the U.S. ambassador to Japan, according to a person familiar with the president's decision.

37. US recovery from pandemic recession is showing momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Powered by consumers and fueled by government aid, the U.S. economy is achieving a remarkably fast recovery from the recession that ripped through the nation last year on the heels of the coronavirus and cost tens of millions of Americans their jobs and businesses.

38. Jobs are make-or-break argument for Biden in climate plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House is bringing out the billionaires, the CEOs and the union executives Friday to help sell President Joe Biden's climate-friendly transformation of the U.S. economy at his virtual summit of world leaders.

39. World leaders pledge climate cooperation despite other rifts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The leaders of Russia and China put aside their raw-worded disputes with U.S. President Joe Biden on Thursday long enough to pledge international cooperation on cutting climate-wrecking coal and petroleum emissions in a livestreamed summit showcasing America's return to the fight against global warming.

40. Biden aims for momentum as US returns to climate fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is convening a coalition of the willing, the unwilling, the desperate-for-help and the avid-for-money for a global summit Thursday aimed at rallying the world's worst polluters to move faster against climate change.

41. Most US stocks rise, indexes end mixed as earnings kick off -

NEW YORK (AP) — Most U.S. stocks rose on Wednesday, but indexes petered out to a mixed finish as momentum weakened following an encouraging start to what's expected to be a thunderous earnings reporting season.

42. Top Davidson County residential sales for March 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

43. Why the pandemic left long-term scars on global job market -

Esther Montanez's housecleaning job at the Hilton Back Bay in Boston was a lifeline for her, a 31-year-old single mother with a 5-year-old son.

The pay was steady and solid — enough to pay her bills and still have money left over to sock away for a savings account for her child. Montanez liked her co-workers and felt pride in her work.

44. Stocks drift lower on Wall Street; yields continue to ease -

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday, giving back some of their big gains from a day earlier.

The S&P 500 fell 0.8% after earlier flipping between small gains and losses. A day before, the benchmark index had leaped 2.4% for its best performance since June. Technology and internet stocks accounted for much of the selling, a reversal from a day earlier.

45. Biden's $15 wage proposal: Job killer or a boon for workers? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's effort to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour could provide a welcome opportunity for someone like Cristian Cardona, a 21-year-old fast food worker. Cardona would love to earn enough to afford to move out of his parents' house in Orlando, Florida, and maybe scrape together money for college.

46. Activists fear Biden's commitment to higher minimum wage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Union activist Terrence Wise recalls being laughed at when he began pushing for a national $15 per hour minimum wage almost a decade ago. Nearly a year into the pandemic, the idea isn't so funny.

47. Around the globe, virus cancels spring travel for millions -

FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — They are the annual journeys of late winter and early spring: Factory workers in China heading home for the Lunar New Year; American college students going on road trips and hitting the beach over spring break; Germans and Britons fleeing drab skies for some Mediterranean sun over Easter.

48. GameStop soars again; Wall Street bends under the pressure -

Another bout of selling gripped the U.S. stock market Friday, as anxiety mounts over whether the frenzy behind a swift, meteoric rise in GameStop and a handful of other stocks will damage Wall Street overall.

49. Stocks close higher in holiday shortened week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed slightly higher on Christmas Eve, as investors went into the holiday weekend not bothered by President Donald Trump's threat not to sign a major economic stimulus package approved by Congress this week.

50. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

51. US stocks slide from records as wait continues for Congress -

Wall Street capped a solid week of gains on a down note Friday as the wait drags on to see if Congress can reach a deal to send more cash to struggling workers and businesses.

The S&P 500 fell 0.4%, a day after it and other major indexes returned to record heights. The decline snapped a three-day winning streak for the benchmark index, but it still notched a 1.3% weekly gain that more than made up its prior week's loss.

52. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

53. Biden to pick Buttigieg as transportation chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is expected to pick former South Bend, Indiana, mayor Pete Buttigieg to head the Transportation Department, according to three people familiar with the plans.

54. China orders removal of 105 apps, including TripAdvisor -

HONG KONG (AP) — Companies including the Chinese arm of TripAdvisor Inc. have been ordered by regulators to overhaul their mobile phone apps in what the Chinese government said is a crackdown on pornography and other improper content.

55. Biden picks Fudge for housing, Vilsack for USDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden made two key domestic policy picks, selecting Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge as his housing and urban development secretary and former Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to reprise that role in his administration, according to five people familiar with the decisions.

56. Top Davidson County residential sales for November 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

57. More record highs for stocks as hopes grow for economic aid -

Wall Street closed out a solid week for stocks Friday with more record highs as traders took a discouraging jobs report as a sign that Congress will finally move to deliver more aid for the pandemic-stricken economy.

58. Joe Biden weighs Rahm Emanuel for transportation secretary -

CHICAGO (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is considering former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, a substantial and somewhat divisive figure in Democratic Party politics, to serve as his transportation secretary.

59. Dow returns to record, S&P 500 adds to its on vaccine hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose to a record Monday for the first time in nine months, riding a swell of optimism that a vaccine may soon control the coronavirus and the economic destruction it's caused.

60. Rally fades on Wall Street, pulling indexes below records -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks closed mostly higher on Wednesday, helped by big technology stocks, but news of tighter restrictions in New York State helped dent an earlier rally.

The S&P 500 closed up 27.13 points, or 0.8%, to 3,572.66. The technology-heavy Nasdaq composite, meanwhile, rose by 2%.

61. Future of business travel unclear as virus upends work life -

Brian Contreras represents the worst fears of the lucrative business travel industry.

A partner account executive at a U.S. tech firm, Contreras was used to traveling frequently for his company. But nine months into the pandemic, he and thousands of others are working from home and dialing into video conferences instead of boarding planes.

62. Global rally fades, but investors' hopes remain for economy -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks downshifted on Tuesday, a day after their powerful worldwide rally, but optimism remained high that the global economy may still be headed for a return to normal.

It was the second straight day that rising hopes for a COVID-19 vaccine pushed investors to reorder which stocks they see winning and losing, and the continuing revamp left the majority of U.S. stocks higher but indexes mixed. Treasury yields and oil, meanwhile, held onto their big gains from a day earlier or added some more amid strengthened confidence in the economy.

63. Americans pivot from red-hot Trump to Biden's seasoned cool -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a crystallizing moment at the last presidential debate, Donald Trump and Joe Biden fielded a question about people of color who live alongside chemical plants and oil refineries that seem to be making them sick.

64. Stocks close a blistering week, even as uncertainty lingers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street took a breather Friday after a blistering rally that gave the market its biggest weekly gain since April and indicated investors see plenty of benefits from more gridlock in Washington.

65. Tech losses drive Wall Street down again, ending grim week -

Wall Street closed out another punishing week Friday with the S&P 500 posting its first back-to-back monthly loss since the pandemic first gripped the economy in March.

The S&P 500 dropped 1.2% and ended the week with a 5.6% loss, its worst in seven months. Sharp drops in big technology stocks drove much of the selling, reflecting worries that expectations built too high for some of the market's biggest stars, including Apple and Amazon. Investors have bid up shares in those and other Big Tech companies this year, anticipating they would deliver strong profits, but their latest results and uncertain outlooks left traders wanting.

66. Stocks fall on Wall Street as coronavirus spreads in Europe -

U.S. stock indexes erased much of their early losses and closed modestly lower Thursday, extending the S&P 500's losing streak to a third day.

The S&P 500 fell 0.2% after having been down 1.4%. Technology, health care and communications stocks accounted for most of the selling, outweighing slight gains in banks and elsewhere in the market.

67. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

68. Wall Street falls, S&P 500 down 1.2% as global markets swoon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street slumped Monday as markets tumbled worldwide on worries about the pandemic's economic pain, though the S&P 500 had pared its losses by the end of the day.

The drops began in Asia as soon as trading opened for the week, and they accelerated in Europe on worries about the possibility of tougher restrictions there to stem rising coronavirus counts. In the U.S., stocks and Treasury yields weakened, while prices sank for oil and other commodities that a healthy economy would demand.

69. Wall Street slumps as Big Tech once again leads decliners -

Another slide in technology companies helped pull stocks lower on Wall Street Thursday, extending losses from the day before.

The S&P 500 lost 0.8% after having been down 1.7% earlier. The selling was widespread, with eight of the 11 sectors that make up the benchmark index ending the day lower. The sectors that include Amazon, Facebook and Apple took the heaviest losses.

70. US stocks turn lower again as a wild trading week continues -

Technology and energy companies led a broad sell-off on Wall Street Thursday that wiped out nearly all of the market's gains from a strong rally the day before.

The S&P 500 lost 1.8% after having been up briefly by 0.8% in the early going. The slide cut deeply into the benchmark index's 2% gain on Wednesday. The latest gyrations follow a wild stretch where the S&P 500 careened from its worst three-day slump since June to its best day in nearly three months.

71. Microsoft: Russia GRU hackers target U.S. campaigns, parties -

BOSTON (AP) — The same Russian military intelligence outfit that hacked the Democrats in 2016 has attempted similar intrusions into the computer systems of more than 200 organizations including political parties and consultants, Microsoft said Thursday.

72. S&P 500 shakes off a bumpy start, pushes to another record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks were mixed on Wall Street Tuesday, but gains were strong enough for tech companies and other pockets of the market to carry the S&P 500 to its fourth straight gain and another record high.

73. US stocks join global rally amid COVID treatment hopes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks plowed higher on Wall Street Monday, as hopes for a COVID-19 treatment and vaccine had investors looking ahead to the possibility of a healthier economy that has shed the virus.

74. Gains for tech stocks nudge S&P 500 even closer to record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street nudged a bit higher on Monday, and the S&P 500 teased even closer to its record high.

The benchmark index rose 9.14 points, or 0.3%, to 3,381.99. Earlier in the day, it briefly crossed above its record closing level of 3,386.15, which was set on Feb. 19 before the pandemic  shut down businesses worldwide and created the worst recession in decades. It's the third time in the last four trading days the index has risen above that record, only to fade later in the day.

75. Wall Street keeps rallying; S&P 500 back within 2% of record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street's big rally keeps rolling, and the S&P 500 rose for a fourth straight day Wednesday to sit just 1.7% below its record.

The S&P 500 climbed 21.26 points, or 0.6%, to 3,327.77, echoing gains for stocks across Europe and Asia. If the U.S. market has just a few more days like that, it will erase the last of the historic losses it's taken since February because of the coronavirus pandemic and the recession it caused.

76. McDonald's to require masks at all U.S. restaurant locations -

NEW YORK (AP) — McDonald's says it will be requiring customers to wear face coverings when entering its U.S. restaurants as the number of new virus cases continue to surge in many states.

The move, announced Friday, will be in effect on Aug. 1.

77. Alibaba-backed Ant Group to go public in Shanghai, Hong Kong -

Alibaba-backed Ant Group to go public in Shanghai, Hong Kong

By ZEN SOO AP Technology Writer

HONG KONG (AP) — Ant Group, the online payments arm of e-commerce giant Alibaba Group, announced plans Monday for an initial public stock offering that could become the world's biggest since the coronavirus pandemic began.

78. Markets swell around the world; Nasdaq sets another record -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied worldwide on Monday as investors bet that the economy can continue its dramatic turnaround despite all the challenges ahead.

The S&P 500 rose 1.6%, following up on similar gains in Europe and Asia, and clawed back to within 6.1% of its record set in February. The headliner was China's stock market, which leaped 5.7% for its biggest gain since 2015, when it was in the midst of a bubble bursting. Treasury yields also ticked higher in a signal of growing optimism after reports showed improvements in the U.S. and European economies.

79. India bans TikTok, other Chinese apps amid border standoff -

NEW DELHI (AP) — Indian TikTok users awoke Tuesday to a notice from the popular short-video app saying their data would be transferred to an Irish subsidiary, a response to India's ban on dozens of Chinese apps amid a military standoff between the two countries.

80. Top Davidson County residential sales for May 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

81. Auto workers' tenuous return a ray of hope in jobs crisis -

DETROIT (AP) — Defying a wave of layoffs that has sent the U.S. job market into its worst catastrophe on record, at least one major industry is making a comeback: Tens of thousands of auto workers are returning to factories that have been shuttered since mid-March due to fears of spreading the coronavirus.

82. Tech stocks keep rallying, help keep Wall Street steady -

Wall Street was split on Monday, as continued gains for technology and health care stocks helped cover up for more prevalent losses elsewhere.

The S&P 500 ended the day at a virtual standstill, up just 0.52 points at 2,930.32, despite a lot of movement going on underneath. It rallied back from an earlier loss of 0.9% in the morning.

83. Wall Street dips to week's first loss despite tech's efforts -

Stocks fell on Wall Street Wednesday, sending the market to its first loss in three days, after more depressing data rolled in on the devastation sweeping the global economy.

The S&P 500 dropped 0.7%, and three out of four stocks in the index sank. But the market's losses would have been much worse if not for continued gains for technology stocks. Momentum for Microsoft, Apple and other tech stocks has proven to be nearly unstoppable this year, even in the face of the coronavirus pandemic, and more gains for them almost singlehandedly kept Wall Street steady for much of Wednesday's trading.

84. Stocks charge higher on hopes for progress in fighting virus -

Stocks around the world whipped higher Wednesday, riding a wave of optimism on encouraging data about a possible treatment for COVID-19.

The upswell of hope was so strong that investors completely sidestepped a report showing the outbreak drove the U.S. economy to its worst quarterly performance since the Great Recession. The S&P 500 vaulted 2.7% higher and extended a rally that's brought the U.S. stock market to the brink of its best month in 45 years.

85. Pandemic job actions offer hope for renewed labor movement -

Jordan Flowers never thought he would become a labor leader. Then the coronavirus forced him to risk his life every time he clocked in.

The robotics operator at Amazon's Staten Island warehouse helped lead one of the first walkouts at the site — a protest over the company's lack of protective equipment. A month later, even after Amazon scrambled to provide masks and gloves and check employees' temperatures, workers continue conducting scattered walkouts to protest what they say are still-risky conditions in warehouses where workers have had the virus.

86. Stocks up worldwide as governments eye reopening economies -

With governments making moves toward letting businesses reopen, stocks rallied worldwide on Monday to kick off a busy week for markets.

From Rome, Georgia, to Rome, Italy, companies are watching as politicians detail plans to ease up on restrictions that were meant to slow the coronavirus pandemic but also erased businesses and jobs. Retail chains, cruise lines and other businesses whose profits hinge on people stepping outside their homes jumped to some of Monday's biggest gains. The S&P 500 climbed 1.5%.

87. US restaurants expect big changes when their doors reopen -

The days of standing shoulder-to-shoulder at a bar or sharing a meal at a table for 10 are gone for now — and could take a long time to return even after the coronavirus pandemic ends.

U.S. restaurants are thinking ahead to a time when their dining room doors reopen to a changed world. Owners say there may be physical differences, like masked waiters, disposable menus or fewer tables so patrons can sit farther apart. There will be signs explaining cleaning procedures and glass dividers to protect cashiers. Disinfectant wipes might sit next to napkin dispensers.

88. Stocks sink following grim data on economic hit from virus -

NEW YORK (AP) — Selling swept Wall Street Wednesday after a dismal lineup of reports made clear how historic the coronavirus crunch has been for the economy.

Markets are already bracing for what's forecast to be the worst downturn since the Great Depression, but Wednesday's data was even more dispiriting than expected, including a record drop for U.S. retail sales. Adding to the gloom: More banks made moves in anticipation that households and companies will be forced to default on billions of dollars of debt as businesses remain shut and millions of workers lose their jobs.

89. Stores try to stay relevant while their doors are closed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Long before there was a global coronavirus pandemic, brick-and-mortar retailers struggled to get people to walk through their doors instead of shopping online.

Now those retailers are faced with an even more Herculean task: how to stay on people's minds — and more importantly their pocketbooks — when many of their store doors are closed.

90. Dow has best day since 1933 as Congress nears deal on aid -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged to its best day since 1933 as Congress and the White House neared a deal on Tuesday to inject nearly $2 trillion of aid into an economy ravaged by the coronavirus.

91. Dow dives 2,997 points on fears virus will cause recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. stock market plunged more than 12% Monday for its worst day in more than three decades as voices from Wall Street to the White House said the coronavirus is likely dragging the economy into a recession.

92. Stocks nosedive on Wall Street, triggering trading halt -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks dropped 8% in the first minutes of trading Monday on Wall Street and triggered another temporary halt to trading as huge swaths of the economy come closer to shutting down, from airlines to restaurants. Emergency actions taken by the Federal Reserve late Sunday to prop up the economy and get financial markets running smoothly again may have raised fears even further, some investors said.

93. WHO declares that virus crisis is now a pandemic -

ROME (AP) — Expressing increasing alarm about mounting infections, the World Health Organization declared Wednesday that the global coronavirus crisis is now a pandemic.

Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, who heads the U.N. agency, said the WHO is "deeply concerned by the alarming levels of spread and severity" of the outbreak. He also expressed concern about "the alarming levels of inaction."

94. Mask-clad Chinese workers cautiously return to the office -

BEIJING (AP) — Riding the subway for the first time after weeks of working remotely from home, Zhuang Xue felt a sense of calm, outfitted in a blue surgical mask and protective goggles as she headed for the office.

95. Businesses struggle to fix supply chains disrupted by virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chinese authorities are struggling to strike a delicate balance between containing a viral outbreak and restarting the world's second-biggest economy after weeks of paralysis.

As the death toll from the newly named COVID-19 illness topped 1,000, global supply chains remained widely disrupted for the businesses across the world that have built deep connections to China.

96. US declares emergency, new entry restrictions due to virus -

Washington (AP) — The United States on Friday declared a public health emergency because of a new virus that hit China and has spread to other nations.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar also announced that President Donald Trump will temporarily bar entry to the U.S. of foreign nationals believed to be a risk of transmitting the virus. The new restrictions begin Sunday afternoon.

97. US advises no travel to China, where virus deaths top 200 -

BEIJING (AP) — The U.S. advised against all travel to China as the number of cases of a worrying new virus spiked more than tenfold in a week, including the highest death toll in a 24-hour period reported Friday.

98. More airlines drop flights to China as deadly virus spreads -

BANGKOK (AP) — British Airways halted all flights to China and American Airlines suspended Los Angeles flights to and from Shanghai and Beijing as efforts to contain a new and deadly virus intensifies.

99. US stocks close lower amid jitters over virus outbreak -

Banks led a slide in U.S. stocks Tuesday as a virus outbreak in China rattled global markets, prompting investors to shift assets into bonds and defensive sector companies.

The sell-off snapped a three-day winning streak by the S&P 500. The benchmark index ended last week at an all-time high.

100. US, China deal aims to simmer long-running trade tensions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump signed a trade agreement Wednesday with China that is expected to boost exports from U.S. farmers and manufacturers and is aimed at lowering tensions in a long-running dispute between the economic powers.