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Editorial Results (free)

1. House votes to hold Trump ally Steve Bannon in contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has voted to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena from the committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

2. House set to recommend contempt charges against Bannon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is voting Thursday on whether to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena from the committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

3. House panel probing 1/6 riot seeks host of Trump-era records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the January insurrection at the U.S. Capitol is demanding a trove of records from federal intelligence and law enforcement agencies, showing the sweep of the lawmakers' review of the deadly attack by a mob of Donald Trump supporters.

4. House passes $3.5T Biden blueprint after deal with moderates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Striking a deal with moderates, House Democratic leaders have muscled President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar budget blueprint over a key hurdle, ending a risky standoff and putting the party's domestic infrastructure agenda back on track.

5. House passes bill bolstering landmark voting law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have passed legislation that would strengthen a landmark civil rights-era voting law weakened by the Supreme Court over the past decade, a step party leaders tout as progress in their quest to fight back against voting restrictions advanced in Republican-led states.

6. Pelosi deal with moderates set to ease Biden budget standoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Striking a deal with moderates, House Democratic leaders are set Tuesday to muscle President Joe Biden's multitrillion-dollar budget blueprint over a key hurdle, in a compromise designed to end a risky standoff and put the party's domestic infrastructure agenda back on track.

7. Peyton's Place is Hall of Fame, with Woodson, Megatron -

CANTON, Ohio (AP) — Peyton's Place is now in Canton at the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

The only five-time NFL MVP and a two-time Super Bowl winner who left the game five years ago with a slew of passing records was enshrined Sunday night with other members of the class of 2021. The stadium rocked with cheers from fans in Colts blue or Broncos orange — the two franchises he took to the top — when Manning was introduced.

8. Evictions expected to spike as federal moratorium ends -

BOSTON (AP) — Evictions, which have mostly been on pause during the pandemic, are expected to ramp up on Monday after the expiration of a federal moratorium as housing courts take up more cases and tenants are locked out of their homes.

9. 'We have to get it right,' Dem vows as Jan. 6 probe begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Bennie Thompson, didn't realize the severity of the Jan. 6 insurrection until his wife called him.

10. Pressured by allies, Biden escalates fight for voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will lay out the "moral case" for voting rights as he faces growing pressure from civil rights activists and other Democrats to combat efforts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

11. Watchdog: 2 Trump EPA appointees defrauded agency of $130K -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two high-ranking Trump political appointees at the Environmental Protection Agency engaged in fraudulent payroll activities — including payments to employees after they were fired and to one of the officials when he was absent from work — that cost the agency more than $130,000, a report by an internal watchdog says.

12. In break with Trump, House GOP forms group on climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Utah Rep. John Curtis says he's tired of hearing that Republicans — his party colleagues — don't care about climate change or slowing global warming.

13. House panel pushes legislation targeting Big Tech's power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel pushed ahead Wednesday with ambitious legislation that could curb the market power of tech giants Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple and force them to sever their dominant platforms from their other lines of business.

14. Top Davidson County commercial sales for May 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

15. Bradley names Jacques Nashville managing partner -

Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has named Lauren B. Jacques managing partner of the firm’s Nashville office. She succeeds Lela M. Hollabaugh, who has served as the Nashville office managing partner since 2015. Hollabaugh will continue as a litigation partner in the Nashville office.

16. Amid threats to members, House to vote on new security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Colorado Rep. Jason Crow, a former Army Ranger who served three tours in Iraq and Afghanistan, says it took time for him to stop constantly scanning his environment for threats when he returned from war 15 years ago. But after the violent insurrection at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, he says he's picked the habit up again.

17. Hearing on Jan. 6 violence exposes stark partisan divisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans sought to shift the narrative on the violent Jan. 6 insurrection during a congressional hearing Wednesday, with some painting the Trump supporters who stormed the building as patriots who have been unfairly harassed, as Democrats clashed with the former Pentagon chief while drilling into the government's unprepared response.

18. How companies rip off poor employees — and get away with it -

Already battered by long shifts and high infection rates, essential workers struggling through the pandemic face another hazard of hard times: employers who steal their wages.

When a recession hits, U.S. companies are more likely to stiff their lowest-wage workers. These businesses often pay less than the minimum wage, make employees work off the clock, or refuse to pay overtime rates. In the most egregious cases, bosses don't pay their employees at all.

19. Nashville civil rights veterans see hope for future -

NASHVILLE (AP) — On April 20, 1960, the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., stood at a podium at Fisk University and said he had come to Nashville "not to bring inspiration, but to gain inspiration from the great movement that has taken place in this community."

20. 'Red' states on U.S. electoral map lagging on vaccinations -

SAVANNAH, Georgia (AP) — With coronavirus shots now in the arms of nearly half of American adults, the parts of the U.S. that are excelling and those that are struggling with vaccinations are starting to look like the nation's political map: deeply divided between red and blue states.

21. No. 2 House Republican says GOP would act against Gaetz -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The No. 2 House Republican leader said Wednesday that party leaders would "take action" against Rep. Matt Gaetz if the Justice Department formally moves against the Florida lawmaker, who is under federal investigation for alleged sex trafficking.

22. Tennessee community organizer to primary Cooper -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee community organizer Odessa Kelly announced Monday that she will challenge U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper in the 2022 Democratic primary.

23. Bill to aid US publishers vs. Google, Facebook rises again -

A congressional effort to bolster U.S. news organizations in negotiations with Big Tech has supporters hoping that third time's the charm.

The bill, the Journalism Competition and Preservation Act, was introduced in March for the third time since 2018. Its odds of passage may have improved in a Democrat-run Congress that's working on overhauling antitrust laws.

24. Centrist Democrats flex muscles, create headaches for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A moderate Democratic senator from West Virginia is suddenly one of the most powerful people in Washington.

Sen. Joe Manchin has had multiple one-on-one phone calls with President Joe Biden. He can send the White House into a tailspin with a single five-minute interview or three-sentence statement. And he may have already derailed some of the administration's policy priorities and a Cabinet nominee.

25. Impeachment isn't the final word on Capitol riot for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's acquittal at his second impeachment trial may not be the final word on whether he's to blame for the deadly Capitol riot. The next step for the former president could be the courts.

26. Greene regrets 'words of the past' without explicit apology -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Embattled Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, facing a House vote to strip her of committee assignments, said Thursday that she regrets some "words of the past," but she did not explicitly apologize for her racist and violent rhetoric.

27. US boosting vaccine deliveries amid complaints of shortages -

Answering growing frustration over vaccine shortages, President Joe Biden announced that the U.S. is ramping up deliveries to hard-pressed states over the next three weeks and expects to provide enough doses to vaccinate 300 million Americans by the end of the summer or early fall.

28. Vaccine appointments canceled amid confusion over supply -

An increasing number of COVID-19 vaccination sites around the U.S. are canceling thousands of appointments because of vaccine shortages in a rollout so rife with confusion that even the new CDC director admitted she doesn't know exactly how many shots are in the pipeline.

29. Russian hack of US agencies exposed supply chain weaknesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The elite Russian hackers who gained access to computer systems of federal agencies last year didn't need to painstakingly break one-by-one into the networks of each department in order to cause havoc.

30. States report vaccine shortages and cancel appointments -

NEW YORK (AP) — The push to inoculate Americans against the coronavirus is hitting a roadblock: A number of states are reporting they are running out of vaccine, and tens of thousands of people who managed to get appointments for a first dose are seeing them canceled.

31. Justice Dept. won't charge Sen. Burr over stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Richard Burr said Tuesday that the Justice Department has told him it will not prosecute him over stock sales made during the coronavirus pandemic, ending an insider trading investigation that led him to at least temporarily step aside from a powerful committee chairmanship last year.

32. Harris prepares for central role in Biden's White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kamala Harris will make history on Wednesday when she becomes the nation's first female vice president — and the first Black woman and the first woman of South Asian descent to hold that office. But that's only where her boundary-breaking role begins.

33. Capitol rioters included highly trained ex-military, cops -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump's supporters massed outside the Capitol last week and sang the national anthem, a line of men wearing olive-drab helmets and body armor trudged purposefully up the marble stairs in a single-file line, each man holding the jacket collar of the one ahead.

34. Pence defies Trump, affirms Biden's win -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Mike Pence defied President Donald Trump early Thursday morning as he affirmed President-elect Joe Biden's November victory, putting an end to Trump's futile efforts to subvert American democracy and overturn the results of the election.

35. EXPLAINER: How Congress will count Electoral College votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wednesday's congressional joint session to count electoral votes could drag late into the night as some Republicans plan to challenge Democrat Joe Biden's victory in at least six states.

36. After a tumultuous 2020, Black leaders weigh next steps -

DETROIT (AP) — As a barrier-breaking year draws to a close, there's one undeniable fact: the strength of Black political power.

Black voters were a critical part of the coalition that clinched President-elect Joe Biden's White House bid. The nation will swear in its first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent as vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, who herself may be a leading presidential candidate in four years. And as the global push for racial justice continues, Congress is set to welcome several new Black, progressive freshmen next year.

37. Trump's legacy: He changed the presidency, but will it last? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The most improbable of presidents, Donald Trump reshaped the office and shattered its centuries-old norms and traditions while dominating the national discourse like no one before.

38. Family behind OxyContin attests to its role in opioid crisis -

Two of the owners of the company that makes OxyContin acknowledged to a congressional committee on Thursday that the powerful prescription painkiller has played a role in the national opioid crisis but stopped short of apologizing or admitting wrongdoing.

39. Watchdog faults VA chief over handling of sex assault report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Confronted with a sexual assault allegation at a veterans hospital, Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert Wilkie repeatedly sought to discredit the congressional aide who made the complaint and his staff worked to spread negative information about her while ignoring known problems of harassment at the facility, according to an investigative report released Thursday.

40. Biden's pick to head OMB brings experience, Twitter enemies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Neera Tanden has delighted in labeling Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell as "Moscow Mitch"; in the wake of the acrimonious vote to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, she cuttingly dismissed Maine Republican Sen. Susan Collins as "the worst."

41. Americans face new COVID-19 restrictions after Thanksgiving -

Americans returning home from Thanksgiving break faced strict new coronavirus measures around the country Monday as health officials brace for a disastrous worsening of the nationwide surge because of holiday gatherings over the long weekend.

42. GM walks away from stake in electric vehicle maker Nikola -

NEW YORK (AP) — General Motors will not be taking a stake in the electric vehicle company Nikola which announced Monday that it would scuttle one of its marquee vehicles, an electric and hydrogen-powered pickup.

43. Criminal probe, legal fights await Trump after White House -

A few miles south of the namesake tower where Donald Trump began his run for president, New York prosecutors are grinding away at an investigation into his business dealings that could shadow him long after he leaves office in January.

44. House Dems nominate Pelosi as speaker to lead into Biden era -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats nominated Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday as the speaker to lead them into Joe Biden's presidency, and shortly afterward she seemed to suggest that these would be her final two years in the post.

45. Harshbarger wins Tennessee's open House race -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Diane Harshbarger on Tuesday won an open U.S. House seat in northeastern Tennessee, while incumbents held onto the state's remaining eight congressional seats.

The first-time political candidate defeated Democratic candidate Blair Walsingham in a congressional district that has been represented by Republicans since the Civil War. Notably, the win means a woman will join Tennessee's nine-member U.S. House delegation, which had been previously dominated by men.

46. AP News Guide: A look at Tennessee's election -

NASHVILLE (AP) — With all eyes on the presidential election, the biggest race in Tennessee remains the open U.S. Senate seat now that Republican incumbent Sen. Lamar Alexander is retiring as his term ends. A handful of U.S. House and legislative seats also remain competitive in the GOP-dominant state. Here is a summary of those races on the ballot:

47. AP-NORC poll: Americans critical of Trump handling of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than three weeks from Election Day, majorities of Americans are highly critical of President Donald Trump's handling of both the coronavirus pandemic and his own illness, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

48. AP-NORC poll: Americans critical of Trump handling of virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Less than three weeks from Election Day, majorities of Americans are highly critical of President Donald Trump's handling of both the coronavirus pandemic and his own illness, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

49. Biden's low-key campaign style worries some Democrats -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — The final stretch of a presidential campaign is typically a nonstop mix of travel, caffeine and adrenaline. But as the worst pandemic in a century bears down on the United States, Joe Biden is taking a lower key approach.

50. Democrats to redraft virus relief in bid to jump-start talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are going back to the drawing board on a huge COVID-19 relief bill, paring back the measure in an attempt to jump-start negotiations with the Trump administration.

51. Report: Death penalty cases show history of racial disparity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black people have been overrepresented on death rows across the United States and killers of Black people are less likely to face the death penalty than people who kill white people, a new report found.

52. Whistleblower's claims on Russian interference fit pattern -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A whistleblower's allegation that he was pressured to suppress intelligence about Russian election interference is the latest in a series of similar accounts involving former Trump administration officials, raising concerns the White House risks undercutting efforts to stop such intrusions if it plays down the seriousness of the problem.

53. Progressive challengers' year: 3 wins and some close calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Progressives trying to shove Congress to the left by competing in this year's Democratic primaries ousted three moderate incumbents, won other victories and established themselves as a force that's not going away.

54. AP FACT CHECK: Is Trump's America great again or hellscape? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican National Convention begged this question: Why are President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters describing the state of his union as a hellscape?

It was perhaps the central paradox for voters wondering what to believe in the rhetoric, because it defied logic to believe it all. Are Americans living in a dystopia or in an America made great again by Trump?

55. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, GOP distort on health care, vote fraud, more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump made a dizzying array of misleading claims about voting fraud and health care as fellow Republicans opened their convention with speeches distorting the agenda of his Democratic rival, Joe Biden.

56. Jim Bakker gets PPP loans during legal fight on fraud claims -

When the U.S. government extended pandemic hardship loans to thousands of religious institutions, Jim Bakker and Morningside USA, his ministry in Blue Eye, Missouri, were among the most high-profile recipients.

57. Trump's vision of American greatness at center of convention -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans will aim to recast the story of Donald Trump's presidency when they hold their national convention, featuring speakers drawn from everyday life as well as cable news and the White House while drawing a stark contrast with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

58. Biden ally Clyburn brings civil rights legacy to DNC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In October 1960, a young James Clyburn gathered with other students and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as frustrations mounted over civil rights protests in what was becoming a tumultuous, dangerous year.

59. Bridgestone donates 10,000 face coverings -

Bridgestone Americas Inc. has donated 10,000 face coverings to Boys & Girls Clubs of Middle Tennessee.

The face coverings, which were donated as part of the “TN Strong Mask Movement” initiated by Gov. Bill Lee’s Economic Recovery Group in June, are child-sized to accommodate the more than 57,000 youth who participate in Club services across the state each year.

60. Lawmakers grill 4 Big Tech CEOs but don't land many blows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional lawmakers finally got a chance to grill the CEOs of Big Tech over their dominance and allegations of monopolistic practices that stifle competition. But it's unclear how much they advanced their goal of bringing some of the world's largest companies to heel.

61. Barr defends aggressive federal response to protests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr defended the aggressive federal law enforcement response to civil unrest in America as he testified for the first time before the House Judiciary Committee, pushing back against angry, skeptical Democrats who said President Donald Trump's administration is unconstitutionally suppressing dissent.

62. Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis lies in state at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a solemn display of bipartisan unity, congressional leaders praised Democratic Rep. John Lewis as a moral force for the nation in a Capitol Rotunda memorial service rich with symbolism and punctuated by the booming, recorded voice of the late civil rights icon.

63. Pelosi, others hail John Lewis as 'conscience' of Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a solemn display of bipartisan unity, congressional leaders praised the late Democratic Rep. John Lewis as a moral force for the nation on Monday in a Capitol Rotunda ceremony rich with symbolism and punctuated by the booming, recorded voice of the late civil rights icon.

64. House Democrats try to check Trump's pardon power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are trying to rein in President Donald Trump's clemency powers on Thursday as they advance legislation that would discourage pardons for friends and family and prevent presidents from pardoning themselves.

65. Democrats urge action on voting rights as tribute to Lewis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mourning the death of civil rights hero John Lewis, Democrats are urging the Senate to take up a bill of enduring importance to Lewis throughout his life: protecting and expanding the right to vote.

66. Kanye West? The Girl Scouts? Hedge funds? All got PPP loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's small business lending program has benefited millions of companies, with the goal of minimizing the number of layoffs Americans have suffered in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Yet the recipients include many you probably wouldn't have expected.

67. As party leaders age, progressive Black Democrats take stage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Yearning for change, a group of progressive Black Democratic congressional hopefuls is rushing toward the national stage, igniting rank-and-file enthusiasm in a party dominated by aging white leaders.

68. Barr to testify as Democrats examine DOJ politicization -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr will testify before the House Judiciary Committee for the first time next month, the Justice Department said Wednesday, as two of his employees testified that he has politicized the department and allowed special treatment for Roger Stone, a friend of President Donald Trump.

69. Trump eyes racial equality debate through economic lens -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In his comments since George Floyd died, President Donald Trump has shared lots of opinions about the need for "law and order," about fighting crime and the dangerous ideas of the "liberal left." When it comes to addressing racism, not so much.

70. Brands weigh in on national protests over police brutality -

As thousands of protesters take to the streets in response to police killings of black people, companies are wading into the national conversation but taking care to get their messaging right.

Netflix's normally lighthearted Twitter account took on a more somber tone on Saturday: "To be silent is to be complicit. Black lives matter. We have a platform, and we have a duty to our Black members, employees, creators and talent to speak up." That got retweeted over 216,000 times and "liked" over a million times.

71. Tennessee Floyd protests result in arrests, curfews -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Nearly 50 people were arrested over the weekend in Tennessee, while many businesses saw property damaged and public buildings vandalized across the state during peaceful protests that turned violent in response to the death of George Floyd.

72. History in the making as House is poised for proxy voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a day that's shaping up as one for the history books: For the first time, House lawmakers intend to vote by proxy, a move to avoid the risk of travel to Washington during the pandemic.

73. US closes probes into 3 senators over their stock trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has closed investigations into stock trading by Sens. Dianne Feinstein of California, Kelly Loeffler of Georgia and Jim Inhofe of Oklahoma, according to people familiar with notifications sent to the senators. The senators came under scrutiny for transactions made in the weeks before the coronavirus sent markets downhill.

74. Ex-Trump lawyer Michael Cohen released from US prison -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's longtime personal lawyer and fixer Michael Cohen was released from federal prison Thursday to serve the remainder of his sentence at home, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press.

75. Trump threatens funds for states easing voting in pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to hold up federal funds for two election battleground states that are trying to make it easier and safer to vote during the coronavirus pandemic. He backed away from that threat but stuck with his unsupported claim that widespread voting by mail promotes "a lot of illegality."

76. Trump threatens funds for states easing voting in pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to hold up federal funds for two election battleground states that are trying to make it easier and safer to vote during the coronavirus pandemic.

77. Reporter sues Memphis over exclusion from media list -

MEMPHIS (AP) — A journalism advocacy group has filed a federal lawsuit on behalf of a reporter in Memphis, Tennessee, who alleges she has been excluded from a media advisory list in retaliation for her coverage of the city.

78. 'We've been ignored': Nursing homes plead for more testing -

NEW YORK (AP) — After two months and more than 10,000 deaths that have made the nation's nursing homes some of the most terrifying places to be during the coronavirus crisis, most of them still don't have access to enough tests to help control outbreaks among their frail, elderly residents.

79. Tennessee church sues to hold drive-in services -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee church is challenging a local ban on drive-in church services, joining a growing list of lawsuits seeking to push back against limitations on religious gatherings that have been enacted to help prevent the spread of coronavirus.

80. No plan in sight: Test troubles cloud Trump recovery effort -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States is struggling to test enough people to track and control the spread of the novel coronavirus, a crucial first step to reopening parts of the economy, which President Donald Trump is pushing to do by May 1.

81. Trump gives governors options on how to reopen the economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has given governors a road map for recovering from the economic pain of the coronavirus pandemic, laying out "a phased and deliberate approach" to restoring normal activity in places that have strong testing and are seeing a decrease in COVID-19 cases.

82. Federal prisons struggle to combat growing COVID-19 fears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When a federal correction officer geared up for duty recently at a Florida prison complex, he added an N95 mask amid coronavirus fears. He has a sister who had an organ transplant and an elderly mother at home.

83. Debate takeaways: Bernie bruised but not broken -

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Democrats held their final debate before the South Carolina presidential primary and the critical Super Tuesday contests that follow three days later.

Here are some key takeaways.

84. Trump pardons ex-San Francisco 49ers owner DeBartolo Jr. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Tuesday pardoned Edward DeBartolo Jr., the former San Francisco 49ers owner convicted in a gambling fraud scandal who built one of the most successful NFL teams in the game's history.

85. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's exaggerations on Roger Stone sentence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the Justice Department's handling of the legal case of his confidant, Roger Stone.

He's suggesting rampant bias in the department's initial recommendation to a federal court that Stone be sentenced between seven and nine years in prison, claiming that all four prosecutors are former members of special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia team. That's not true.

86. Amazon wants to question Trump over losing $10B contract bid -

Amazon wants President Donald Trump to submit to questioning over the tech company's losing bid for a $10 billion military contract.

The Pentagon awarded the cloud computing project to Microsoft in October. Amazon later sued, arguing that Trump's interference and bias against the company harmed Amazon's chances.

87. Inside impeachment: How an 'urgent' tip became 'high crimes' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The night before the whistleblower complaint that launched President Donald Trump's impeachment was made public, Democrats and Republicans on the House Intelligence Committee crammed into the same room to get a first look at the document.

88. Comey: 'Real sloppiness' in Russia probe but no misconduct -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Director James Comey acknowledged Sunday that a Justice Department inspector general report identified "real sloppiness" in the surveillance of a former Trump campaign aide and said he was wrong to have been "overconfident" about how the Russia investigation was handled.

89. Impeachment trial: Trump wants drama, but GOP wants it over -

Washington (AP) — Donald Trump wants more than acquittal. He wants vindication.

With impeachment by the House appearing certain, the president has made clear that he views the next step, a trial in the GOP-controlled Senate, as his focus. The president sees the senators not just as a jury deciding his fate, but as partners in a campaign to discredit and punish his Democratic opponents. His Senate allies aren't so sure that's a good idea.

90. Impeachment takeaways: History lessons, partisan feuds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The next phase of the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump moved to the House Judiciary Committee on Wednesday with public hearings featuring professors of law who discussed the constitutional origins of Congress' impeachment power.

91. Rosenstein said he was 'horrified' at how Comey was fired -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told the FBI he was "angry, ashamed, horrified and embarrassed" at the way James Comey was fired as FBI director, according to records released Monday.

92. AP FACT CHECK: Trump stretches in assailing witnesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Tuesday accused witnesses at the House impeachment hearings of spreading word-of-mouth information about matters they have no knowledge of themselves. But the testimony of Lt. Col Alexander Vindman and Jennifer Williams did not come from a rumor mill.

93. Coal giant Murray Energy seeks bankruptcy protection -

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A major U.S. coal mining company is seeking bankruptcy protection, despite a flurry of regulatory breaks that its CEO pushed for — and received — from the Trump administration.

94. Trump bars envoy's testimony, escalating impeachment fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump intensified his fight with Congress Tuesday over the Democrats' impeachment investigation, as the administration blocked a U.S. diplomat from testifying behind closed doors about the president's dealings with Ukraine. House committee chairmen said they would subpoena the envoy to force him to appear.

95. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for August 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

96. Tennessee's Cooper joins call for impeachment inquiry of Trump -

NASHVILLE (AP) — U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper is abandoning previous misgivings by calling for the House to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

97. House chairman: Whistleblower complaint may involve Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's director of national intelligence is refusing to turn over to Congress a whistleblower complaint that reportedly concerns Trump making an unspecified promise to a foreign leader. It's a matter of urgent concern, the intelligence community's inspector general said.

98. Gerrymandering’s cure: Vote supporters out -

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said federal courts won’t rule on cases involving political gerrymandering, voters who don’t like the way their legislative districts are drawn will have to turn to state courts or to the gerrymandered legislatures themselves to change things.

99. Coal billionaire Cline killed in helicopter crash -

NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Billionaire coal entrepreneur Chris Cline, who worked his way out of West Virginia's underground mines to amass a fortune and become a major Republican donor, was killed in a helicopter crash along with six other Americans, his lawyer's office confirmed on Friday.

100. John Dean calls Mueller report 'road map' for Trump probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Dean, a star witness during Watergate who helped bring down the Nixon presidency, testified Monday that special counsel Robert Mueller has provided Congress with a "road map" for investigating President Donald Trump.