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Editorial Results (free)

1. Coal giant Murray Energy seeks bankruptcy protection -

CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A major U.S. coal mining company is seeking bankruptcy protection, despite a flurry of regulatory breaks that its CEO pushed for — and received — from the Trump administration.

2. Trump bars envoy's testimony, escalating impeachment fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump intensified his fight with Congress Tuesday over the Democrats' impeachment investigation, as the administration blocked a U.S. diplomat from testifying behind closed doors about the president's dealings with Ukraine. House committee chairmen said they would subpoena the envoy to force him to appear.

3. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for August 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Tennessee's Cooper joins call for impeachment inquiry of Trump -

NASHVILLE (AP) — U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper is abandoning previous misgivings by calling for the House to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

5. House chairman: Whistleblower complaint may involve Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's director of national intelligence is refusing to turn over to Congress a whistleblower complaint that reportedly concerns Trump making an unspecified promise to a foreign leader. It's a matter of urgent concern, the intelligence community's inspector general said.

6. Gerrymandering’s cure: Vote supporters out -

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has said federal courts won’t rule on cases involving political gerrymandering, voters who don’t like the way their legislative districts are drawn will have to turn to state courts or to the gerrymandered legislatures themselves to change things.

7. Coal billionaire Cline killed in helicopter crash -

NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — Billionaire coal entrepreneur Chris Cline, who worked his way out of West Virginia's underground mines to amass a fortune and become a major Republican donor, was killed in a helicopter crash along with six other Americans, his lawyer's office confirmed on Friday.

8. John Dean calls Mueller report 'road map' for Trump probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Dean, a star witness during Watergate who helped bring down the Nixon presidency, testified Monday that special counsel Robert Mueller has provided Congress with a "road map" for investigating President Donald Trump.

9. Heritage Medical Associates names CEO -

Heritage Medical Associates has hired James Shill as CEO. Shill brings more than 25 years of health care leadership experience to his new role.

Most recently, he served as CEO of Ferguson Medical Group, a multispecialty physician group with locations throughout southeast Missouri. Before that, he held leadership positions with multiple health care organizations in Alaska, including the state’s largest locally-owned medical clinic.

10. A hefty donation to Trump's inaugural comes under scrutiny -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Real estate mogul Franklin Haney contributed $1 million to President Donald Trump's inaugural committee and all he's got to show for the money is the glare of a federal investigation.

11. Trump moves to escalate the investigation of intel agencies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has directed the U.S. intelligence community to "quickly and fully cooperate" with Attorney General William Barr's investigation of the origins of the multiyear probe of whether his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia.

12. FirstBank's Ayers receives 2019 Horatio Alger Award -

FirstBank Executive Chairman of the Board Jim Ayers was formally inducted into the Horatio Alger Association of Distinguished Americans during recent ceremonies honoring the achievements of 13 prominent Americans.

13. Pelosi tries to tamp down impeachment fervor among Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared Wednesday that President Donald Trump is "engaged in a cover up," but she tamped down some Democrats' rush toward an impeachment inquiry, telling lawmakers during a closed meeting to be persistent but patient in their showdown with the White House.

14. Vocal Democrats pressing Pelosi as impeachment talk swells -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Democrats are calling — and more loudly — for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying.

15. Cohen claims Trump lawyer shaped false statement to Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former fixer, Michael Cohen, told Congress it was Trump's personal attorney, Jay Sekulow, who suggested he tell lawmakers that the negotiations for Trump Tower Moscow ended in January 2016, even though they continued for months after that.

16. All by himself: Amash alone among GOP on impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He was known in the Michigan statehouse as "Mr. No" for voting against some Republican legislation. But now in Congress, on the question of whether President Donald Trump should be impeached, Rep. Justin Amash is the lone Republican saying "Yes."

17. Baker Donelson makes Douse a shareholder -

Baker Donelson has elected 11 new shareholders across the firm, including Chris Douse in the Nashville office.

Douse is a member of the firm’s Corporate Finance & Securities Group, where he focuses his practice on mergers and acquisitions, public and private equity and debt offerings, corporate governance, commercial finance and other general business law matters.

18. House Democrats wrestle with White House over investigations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The struggle between House Democrats and the Trump administration over investigations intensified as a former White House official defied a subpoena and the Treasury Department ignored a deadline for providing President Donald Trump's tax returns.

19. The Latest: Report says officials blocked Trump's efforts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller says President Donald Trump's efforts to influence the Russia investigation "were mostly unsuccessful," but that was because the people surrounding the president "declined to carry out orders to accede to his requests."

20. White House official cites problems in security clearances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A career official in the White House security office says dozens of people in President Donald Trump's administration were granted security clearances despite "disqualifying issues" in their backgrounds, including concerns about foreign influence, drug use and criminal conduct.

21. Leadership Nashville hires new executive director -

Leadership Nashville has named local entrepreneur and civic leader Evette White as its next executive director. White will succeed Jerry Williams, who is retiring effective June 30 after 25 years of service.

22. Avenatti hit with Nike extortion claims, other charges -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A year ago, Michael Avenatti's star was rising as the combative, media-savvy lawyer representing porn actress Stormy Daniels in her legal battles against President Donald Trump.

He hammered the president as a regular fixture on cable news and baited and bashed critics on Twitter while flirting with his own run for the White House.

23. In Dems' 'Medicare for All' battle cry, GOP sees '20 weapon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "Medicare for All" has become catnip for Democratic presidential candidates and many lawmakers, yet Republicans prepping for next year's congressional races are also flocking to it — for entirely different reasons.

24. Democrats eye new inquiries, witnesses after Cohen testimony -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After three days of grilling Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, Democrats are quickly using his words as a roadmap to open new lines of investigation into the president's ties to Russia and summon additional witnesses.

25. Cohen returns to Capitol Hill after slamming Trump as liar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's former lawyer returned to Capitol Hill on Thursday for hours of closed-door questioning after publicly branding his former boss a racist and a con man who lied about business dealings in Russia and directed him to conceal extramarital relationships.

26. House committee to vote on approving Trump admin subpoenas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are laying the groundwork to subpoena Trump administration officials over family separations at the southern border.

The Oversight Committee will vote Tuesday on whether to approve subpoenas to the heads of Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services. With Democrats as a majority, the authorization is expected, but it's still not clear whether the subpoenas will actually be served.

27. Ex-FBI official: 'Crime may have been committed' by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe said in an interview that aired Sunday that a "crime may have been committed" when President Donald Trump fired the head of the FBI and tried to publicly undermine an investigation into his campaign's ties to Russia.

28. AP sources: Prosecutors probing Enquirer after Bezos report -

NEW YORK (AP) — Federal prosecutors are looking into the National Enquirer's handling of a story about Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' extramarital affair to see if the tabloid's publisher violated a cooperation agreement with prosecutors, two people familiar with the matter told The Associated Press on Friday.

29. Martin selected as fellow to 2019 NELC Academy -

Racquel B. Martin of Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP has been selected a fellow to the 2019 National Employment Law Council Academy.

Founded in 1995, NELC is a non-profit organization charged with enriching minority bar members who represent management in the field of labor and employment law. Held in conjunction with NELC’s annual conference, the NELC Academy provides advanced skills training for minority attorneys with less than four years of experience practicing management-side labor and employment law.

30. Congress to probe whether Trump told lawyer Cohen to lie -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are vowing to investigate whether President Donald Trump directed his personal attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about a Moscow real estate project, calling that possibility a "concern of the greatest magnitude." Trump's current lawyer said the allegations sparking the inquiry are "categorically false."

31. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims innocence in probe; wall myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Feeling the pressure of investigations and a partial government shutdown, President Donald Trump is playing loose with the facts regarding hush payments made by his former attorney Michael Cohen to two women and is changing his story on his promise to build a concrete border wall paid for by Mexico.

32. Trump's pick for AG once called border wall 'overkill' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general, William Barr, once questioned the value of a wall along the Mexican border similar to the one the president has advocated, describing the idea as "overkill."

33. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's judicial comments appear misinformed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Betraying no trust in an independent judiciary, President Donald Trump is using a federal appeals court in San Francisco as a punching bag for his frustrations about not getting his way on border security. He's spreading misinformation in the process and appearing to misunderstand how appeals work.

34. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's misdirection on Calif fires, climate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is going too far in assigning most of the blame for California's devastating wildfires on the state's forest management.

In comments over the weekend, he called forest management a "big problem" and suggested that California officials needed to do a much better job. But most of California's 33 million acres of forests are under federal or private control, not the state's. Fire scientists say that Trump also neglects a larger effect from climate change in promoting abnormally dry conditions and dead trees, creating fuel for fire.

35. Mattis hails troops' border mission as "very good training" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Jim Mattis defended the use of active duty troops on the U.S.-Mexican border, saying that in some ways it provides good training for war. He argued that it's analogous to a 1916 deployment to counter the Mexican revolutionary Gen. Francisco "Pancho" Villa.

36. Trump administration defends its case against CNN's Acosta -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's administration is trying to fend off a legal challenge from CNN and other outlets over the revocation of journalist Jim Acosta's White House "hard pass."

37. Trump says border troops could hit 15K, surprising Pentagon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the number of military troops deployed to the U.S.-Mexican border could reach 15,000 — roughly double the number the Pentagon said it currently plans for a mission whose dimensions are shifting daily.

38. Ex-DEA official says Blackburn had warning on opioid law -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A former top Drug Enforcement Administration official says he told staffers who work with Tennessee Rep. Marsha Blackburn exactly what to expect from a 2016 law she co-sponsored during the nation's opioid crisis.

39. GOP fight over leadership after November vote to be messy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Win or lose in the race for the majority, House Republicans are at risk of plunging into a messy leadership battle after the November election, with the party lacking a clear heir apparent to take the place of House Speaker Paul Ryan.

40. Taylor Swift breaks political silence, backs Bredesen, Cooper -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Music superstar Taylor Swift announced Sunday she's voting for Tennessee's Democratic Senate candidate Phil Bredesen, breaking her long-standing refusal to discuss anything politics.

41. As Trump fumes over leaks, Woodward pushes back on criticism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump vented over White House leaks Monday as a new tell-all book commands attention, an anonymous writer detailing "resistance" in the administration remains at large and a former staffer reveals more private recordings of the commander in chief.

42. Nashville Film Festival executive committee chosen -

The Nashville Film Festival board has announced its executive committee for the festival’s 50th anniversary year.

Jim Scherer, founder and president of artist management and music licensing company WHIZBANG, Inc., will serve as board president.

43. Uncertainty looms over House race after Hunter indictment -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — Despite an ongoing FBI investigation into his campaign spending, U.S. Rep. Duncan Hunter coasted through the June primary election largely unscathed, finishing first by a 30-point margin and establishing himself as a strong favorite to hold the seat in November.

44. 11 House Republicans seek impeachment of DOJ's Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans sharply escalated their months-long clash with the Justice Department as a group of 11 conservatives introduced articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the official who oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

45. 11 House Republicans seek impeachment of DOJ's Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of 11 House conservatives introduced articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the Justice Department official who oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

46. Ryan says Trump just 'trolling' on threat to pull clearances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan is dismissing President Donald Trump's threat to revoke the security clearances of six former top national security and intelligence officials who have been critical of his administration.

47. NY Daily News slashes newsroom staffing in half -

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York tabloid Daily News cut half of its newsroom staff Monday including Jim Rich, the paper's editor in chief.

The paper was sold to Tronc Inc. last year for $1, with the owner of the Chicago Tribune assuming liabilities and debt.

48. Philadelphia's tax on soda upheld by state Supreme Court -

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Philadelphia's tax on soda and other sweetened drinks was upheld on Wednesday when the state's highest court rejected a challenge by merchants and the beverage industry.

The Supreme Court ruled the 1.5-cent-per-ounce (per 28 grams) levy is aimed at distributors and dealers and does not illegally duplicate another tax. The four-justice majority said the state taxes sales at the retail level, a cost that falls directly on consumers, but the beverage tax applies to distributor and dealer-level transactions.

49. In Supreme Court fight, Dems target 2 GOP Senate moderates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By themselves, Democrats can't stop the Republican-run Senate from confirming President Donald Trump's pick for the Supreme Court. But they're determined to make it agonizing for a pair of pivotal GOP senators to back the nominee.

50. Life in Trump's Cabinet: Perks, pestering, power, putdowns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross came in for an Oval Office tongue-lashing after he used a mundane soup can as a TV prop. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis got overruled by President Donald Trump's announcement that a new "Space Force" is in the offing. Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt caught a sharp admonition from Trump to "knock it off" after his ethics problems dominated cable television.

51. Rosenstein, Wray face angry House Republicans in hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans accused top federal law enforcement officials Thursday of withholding important documents from them and demanded details about surveillance tactics during the Russia investigation in a contentious congressional hearing that capped days of mounting partisan complaints.

52. Republicans grill FBI agent who said he would 'stop' Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An FBI agent who worked on separate investigations into Democrat Hillary Clinton and President Donald Trump's campaign defended himself behind closed doors for more than 11 hours Wednesday as House GOP lawmakers stepped up efforts to highlight what they say is bias at the Justice Department.

53. Pentagon agrees to provide space for 20,000 migrant children -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon will make space available on military bases for as many as 20,000 unaccompanied migrant children detained after illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, a spokesman said Thursday.

54. Baker decision not Supreme Court's last word on LGBT rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawsuits over LGBT rights are making their way through courts and will continue, even after the Supreme Court ruled Monday in favor of a Colorado baker who refused to create a wedding cake for a same-sex couple.

55. Bill to protect special counsel is scuttled by McConnell -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has thwarted a bipartisan effort to protect special counsel Robert Mueller's job, saying he will not hold a floor vote on the legislation even if it is approved next week in the Senate Judiciary Committee.

56. Senate committee nixes 4 UT Board appointees -

One of Gov. Bill Haslam’s main legislative pushes has run afoul of a Legislature angry about everything from Sex Week at the University of Tennessee to the handling of the football coach hiring at the Knoxville campus.

57. Bill to criminalize voting to remove monuments fails -

One of several bills considered retribution against the city of Memphis for the removal of Confederate statues died in a House committee today amid questions about its constitutionality.

The House Criminal Justice Committee sent to “summer study” a piece of legislation enabling the state to charge local elected officials with a felony for “knowingly” casting votes in conflict with state law on historical monuments and sanctuary cities. The move effectively defeats the legislation for this session.

58. GOP leaders move slowly on tighter gun laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Paul Ryan on Tuesday showed little interest in stricter gun control proposals being floated in Congress, leaving the issue in the hands of wary Senate leaders and President Donald Trump, whose shifting views have left no clear strategy for legislative action.

59. Kept out: How banks block people of color from homeownership -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Fifty years after the federal Fair Housing Act banned racial discrimination in lending, African Americans and Latinos continue to be routinely denied conventional mortgage loans at rates far higher than their white counterparts.

60. Self-driving cars: A shift in how we work, where we live -

Fully autonomous vehicles are coming to Tennessee’s roads, bringing many more changes than the absence of a steering wheel. Just as America’s interstate highways changed the way we lived, worked, traveled and made decisions in the 1950s and 60s, the age of self-driving cars should deliver significant societal benefits, including reduced accidents, injuries and fatalities, as well as improved traffic management since cars and trucks will be connected, both to each other and traffic signals.

61. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for December 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

62. Shot fired from Memphis ignites Civil War rematch -

Confederate Lt. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest died in 1877, but 140 years later some people just can’t let their hero or the Old South go away.

In fact, the state Legislature is set to reignite the Civil War – to some degree – in 2018. We hope no gunshots are fired.

63. Twitter to talk to House, Senate in Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Social media giant Twitter will visit Capitol Hill Thursday as part of the House and Senate investigations into Russian interference in the 2016 elections.

Twitter's closed-door meetings with staff follow similar briefings from Facebook earlier this month, and the House and Senate panels have invited both tech giants, along with Google, to appear at public hearings this fall. The committees are scrutinizing the spread of false news stories and propaganda on social media, to what extent Russia was involved and whether anyone in the United States helped target those stories.

64. Judge dismisses lawsuit over treatment of Tennessee disabled -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A judge on Friday dismissed a long-standing lawsuit over Tennessee's treatment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, ending federal oversight of state programs.

65. State panel sheds new light on racial atrocities -

State Rep. Johnnie Turner has seen what can happen when old wounds are never allowed to heal.

She’s seen it most recently in clashes between neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klansmen and white supremacists and those who resist their hatred in Charlottesville, Virginia, where a counter-protester was killed and 19 were injured when a car was intentionally driven into a group of counter protesters. Two state troopers also died in a helicopter crash that weekend.

66. Trump bars transgender individuals from US armed forces -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is barring transgender people from serving in the military "in any capacity," citing "tremendous medical costs and disruption."

Trump's announcement Wednesday morning on Twitter did not say what would happen to transgender people already in the military.

67. Legislature losing some powerful, familiar members -

A shakeup in leadership is looming for the state Legislature, though it may portend more of a change in personalities than party strength.

In the House, longtime Rep. Craig Fitzhugh, the affable Democrat from Ripley in West Tennessee, is preparing for a 2018 gubernatorial run, a move that would knock him out of his House seat, at least temporarily, and the position as Democratic Caucus leader.

68. Tennessee, Left Coast a world apart on immigration -

San Francisco resident Terry Karlsson relishes her hometown’s reputation for embracing “multi-cultural diversity.”

The wife of a Swedish immigrant, Karlsson says she believes San Francisco’s status as a sanctuary city, one in which it refuses to participate in the enforcement of federal immigration law, reflects a nation born of people who moved here, a land of immigrants from many countries.

69. Nashville lawyer named TBA executive director -

The Tennessee Bar Association has named Nashville lawyer Joycelyn Stevenson as its new executive director.

A shareholder with Littler Mendelson PC with a practice focused on labor and employment law, Stevenson has been a leader in the Tennessee legal community, serving as president of both the Nashville Bar Association and the Lawyers’ Association for Women - Marion Griffin Chapter. She is the first African-American woman to lead both organizations and will be the first African-American woman to direct the TBA.

70. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for April 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

71. Transcript of AP interview with Trump -

A transcript of an Oval Office interview Friday with President Donald Trump by AP White House Correspondent Julie Pace. Where the audio recording of the interview is unclear, ellipses or a notation that the recording was unintelligible are used.

72. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for March 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

73. Head of Trump-Russia probe under fire, won't step down -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House intelligence committee is refusing to step away from its investigation of Russian meddling in the 2016 election, as fresh political allegations bring new cries of protest from Democrats.

74. What makes a cyberattack? Experts lobby to restrict the term -

LONDON (AP) — When U.S. senator John McCain told Ukrainian television that the allegedly Russian-backed breach of the Democratic National Committee's server was "an act of war," Michael Schmitt cringed.

75. Fahner moves to Kennedy & Associates -

John Fahner, formerly a partner at Inscoe and Fahner PLLC, has joined Kennedy and Associates.

Fahner’s practice concentrates on estate planning and probate practice, as well as business law and civil litigation matters.

76. Republican governors complain about GOP health care plan -

CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Republican governors complain that a GOP proposal to replace former President Barack Obama's health care law would force millions of lower-income earners off insurance rolls or stick states with the cost of keeping them covered.

77. ‘Every generation must carry on the struggle’ -

Over its storied history, Fisk University has nurtured and educated leaders who eventually left the iconic halls of the 150-year-old school and entered intrepidly into the wider world to make history by challenging the status quo.

78. Task force now sought to study kindergarten suspensions -

State Rep. Raumesh Akbari is altering her strategy on legislation to reduce suspension of kindergartners, seeking a task force study on the matter rather than an immediate and outright ban.

Akbari, a Memphis Democrat, will seek an amendment to her legislation asking the Department of Education to find out how Tennessee school districts handle suspensions and expulsions of young students and require them to adopt new policies to reduce suspensions and expulsions for young students.

79. AP FACT CHECK: Trump takes credit where it's not deserved -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The start of a new administration is never a clean slate, even when parties flip. Day One is just another day for military operations, a budget that is still in place from the old crowd and a vast array of economic, social and law enforcement initiatives left over from the last president.

80. AP Source: Trump to choose Acosta to lead Labor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump moved to fill vacancies in his new administration on Thursday, selecting a Florida law school dean and former Justice Department attorney to lead the Labor Department.

81. Clash over refugee ban brings firing of Justice Dept. head -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary public showdown, President Donald Trump fired the acting attorney general of the United States after she publicly questioned the constitutionality of his refugee and immigration ban and refused to defend it in court.

82. Walker to chair Tennessee Economic Partnership -

Clay Walker, CEO of NETWORKS Sullivan Partnership of the Tri-Cities region, has been elected 2017 chair of the board of directors for the Tennessee Economic Partnership (TEP), the statewide public-private partnership that markets the state of Tennessee as a premiere place for business.

83. Not today: Dow still short of 20,000 as health stocks skid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks finished slightly lower Wednesday as health care companies continued to struggle. Energy companies rose as the price of natural gas surged on the first day of winter.

Some traders aren't sticking around to see if the Dow Jones industrial average reaches the 20,000-point milestone: trading volume has fallen sharply this week as the year-end holidays draw near.

84. How a Trump win might affect Tennessee -

Radical change may be the cry of Donald Trump supporters, but questions loom large over a potential presidency for the Republican nominee.

His policies are largely undefined, and his relationship with the Republican Party is tenuous at best. His slogan is “Make America Great Again,” but he’s been unclear how he will achieve such a goal. And whether Republicans get on board with a Trump administration is a mystery, too.

85. Rowland named judicial clerk to Judge Nixon -

Maggie Rowland, who has served as a staff attorney at Patterson Intellectual Property Law since 2014, has been named a judicial clerk to Senior Judge John Trice Nixon, U.S. District Court, Middle District of Tennessee.

86. Tennessee’s top 25 college coaches -

David Climer's "purely subjective" list of the top 25 college coaches in Tennessee:

1. Tim Corbin

Vanderbilt baseball

In 14 years, Corbin has built Vanderbilt baseball into a perennial national power through exceptional recruiting and player development.

87. Parkinson: It's OK to ‘go a little bit extreme’ to get job done -

With U.S. Marine Corps training, Rep. Antonio Parkinson knows how to grab people’s attention.

He did that earlier this year when he sponsored legislation to kill the Achievement School District, Tennessee’s solution for turning around struggling schools.

88. Youth in Government conference set for Capitol -

More than 1,500 high school students will gather at the Tennessee State Capitol April 7-10 and 14-17 as part of the 63rd annual Tennessee YMCA Youth in Government (YIG) conferences.

While today’s students primarily are taught about government through books or the Internet, the conferences provide the necessary realization that true civic engagement is possible only when citizens effectively submerge themselves in the process.

89. Obama nominates Garland to high court, challenging GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama nominated appeals court judge Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court on Wednesday, challenging Republicans to drop their adamant refusal to even consider his choice in an election year.

90. Retired teacher doesn’t mind going against GOP positions -

State Rep. Jim Coley considers himself an independent thinker in the General Assembly. He definitely doesn’t vote down the Republican Party line.

“I think there’s a place in politics for moderation or moderates, because at one time it was a classical virtue and a Christian virtue,” Coley says.

91. Supreme Court vacancy highlights stakes in presidential race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The presidential election just got real. The unexpected death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia — and the immediate declaration from Republicans that the next president should nominate his replacement — adds even more weight to the decision voters will make in November's general election.

92. Minority leader Harris confident even on wrong side of supermajority -

Lee Harris says he ran for state Senate because he felt Memphis could do better on Capitol Hill, defeating Ophelia Ford in 2014.

In his second legislative session, the Senate Minority leader says Democrats, though small in number, are making “inroads” while he continues to focus on improving neighborhoods from downtown Memphis to Millington.

93. House panel rejects bill blocking gay marriage in Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill seeking to block the U.S. Supreme Court's gay marriage ruling in Tennessee was defeated Wednesday in the state House over concerns about nullifying federal rulings.

The Civil Justice Subcommittee voted 4-1 against the Tennessee Natural Marriage Defense Act sponsored by Republican Rep. Mark Pody of Lebanon, who argued that the ruling should not supersede an amendment to the state constitution defining marriage as between a man and a woman.

94. Habitat for Humanity announces 2016 leadership -

Lucia Folk of Country Music Television will serves as the 2016 chair for Habitat for Humanity of Greater Nashville.

Additional executive committee members are: Karen Springer, vice chair, Saint Thomas Health; Kim Neible, secretary, retired, Caterpillar Financial Services Corporation; Larry Morton, treasurer, retired, Crowe Horwath; Ward Wilson, past chair, US Bank; Paul Kleine-Kracht, at-large, c3 Consulting Group; Dan Hogan, at-large, CapStar Bank; Mendy Mazzo, at-large, Skanska; and Ridley Wills, at-large, The Wills Company.

95. Learning from a citizen’s fight for public records -

At a cost of about three or four college educations at the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Sumner County’s school officials and school board just got educated about the state’s public records law.

96. Eyeing major settlement, US states move quickly in VW case -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With billions of dollars at stake in restitution and penalties, U.S. states are moving quickly to try to hold Volkswagen accountable for its emissions-cheating scandal.

Forty-five states and D.C. have joined a multistate investigation led by attorneys general, which is determining how VW was able to game emissions tests to hide that its "Clean Diesel" cars emitted smog-causing exhaust up to 40 times dirtier than the law allows. California and Texas are conducting their own investigations for now. At least one county, Harris County in Texas, also is going after Volkswagen with a lawsuit seeking more than $100 million.

97. Stites & Harbison taps Taylor to lead new entertainment group -

Stites & Harbison, PLLC has announced the launch of a new entertainment law practice with the addition of member Stephanie R. Taylor to its Nashville office. Taylor will lead the team with help from current Stites & Harbison attorney Jeremy Brook.

98. Breen remains defiant on gay marriage -

Father Joseph Breen always makes an entrance, whether he wants to or not, a beloved Nashville figure who inevitably collects handshakes and hugs wherever he goes, unmistakable when he rolls up in his white Chrysler 300 and clerical collar.

99. Special action on same-sex nuptials a waste of time -

With Republican lawmakers scrambling for a response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay-marriage ruling, Tennesseans on both sides of the issue say they are seeking “equality.”

Immediately after the court’s decision on Obergefell v. Hodges, Democratic U.S. Rep. Jim Cooper of Nashville says, “Love and equality won. I’m glad the Supreme Court ruled on the right side of history.”

100. Haslam appoints Bonnie Hommrich as DCS commissioner -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has appointed Bonne Hommrich as commissioner of the state Department of Children's Services.

Hommrich has served for more than a decade as a deputy commissioner for child programs at the agency. According to The Tennessean (http://tnne.ws/1HfFoJf), Haslam said in a statement that the 68-year-old Hommrich "has dedicated her entire career to helping children and families."