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Editorial Results (free)

1. Report criticizes meat industry, USDA response to pandemic -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — At the height of the pandemic, the meat processing industry worked closely with political appointees in the Trump administration to stave off health restrictions and keep slaughterhouses open even as COVID-19 spread rapidly among workers, according to a Congressional report released Thursday.

2. Whisper campaigns grow as Biden nears choice for high court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Too progressive. Too moderate. Bad for workers.

The whispers and background chatter about top contenders for the Supreme Court are growing as President Biden zeroes in on a nominee to replace retiring Justice Stephen Breyer. And while the president is eager for input, the White House insists he's not going to be swayed by any sniping.

3. Senate Dem leader heads to White House to talk Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is having Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer over to the White House on Wednesday to talk about how to fill an upcoming vacancy on the Supreme Court, according to a person familiar with the negotiations.

4. Supreme Court shouldn't be covered in Ivy, 2 lawmakers say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Enough already with the Supreme Court justices with Harvard and Yale degrees. That's the message from one of Congress' top Democrats to President Joe Biden, and a prominent Republican senator agrees.

5. White House: No 'gaming the system' on Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will meet with Senate Judiciary Committee leaders on Tuesday to discuss the upcoming U.S. Supreme Court vacancy and the president's promise to nominate a Black woman to the high court. Aides said Biden's list of potential candidates is longer than three.

6. Biden: Ready for 'long overdue' pick of Black female justice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden strongly affirmed Thursday that he will nominate the first Black woman to the U.S. Supreme Court, declaring such historic representation is "long overdue" and promising to announce his choice by the end of February.

7. Biden has long been preparing for a Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has already narrowed the field for his first Supreme Court pick.

Biden said as a presidential candidate that if he were given the chance to nominate someone to the court, he would make history by choosing a Black woman. And word on Wednesday that Justice Stephen Breyer plans to retire should give Biden that opportunity.

8. Democrats eye new strategy after failure of voting bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats were picking up the pieces Thursday following the collapse of their top-priority voting rights legislation, with some shifting their focus to a narrower bipartisan effort to repair laws Donald Trump exploited in his bid to overturn the 2020 election.

9. Voting bill collapses, Democrats unable to change filibuster -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voting legislation that Democrats and civil rights leaders say is vital to protecting democracy collapsed when two senators refused to join their own party in changing Senate rules to overcome a Republican filibuster after a raw, emotional debate.

10. House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn reports COVID infection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said Wednesday he has tested positive for COVID-19, though he is fully vaccinated with a booster and has no symptoms.

11. Biden faces fresh challenges after infrastructure victory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He has been here before.

President Joe Biden doesn't need to look any further back than his time as vice president to grasp the challenges that lie ahead in promoting his new $1 trillion infrastructure deal to the American people and getting the money out the door fast enough that they can feel a real impact.

12. Agonizing choices as Dems debate shrinking health care pie -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are debating how to divide up what could be a smaller serving of health care spending in President Joe Biden's domestic policy bill, pitting the needs of older adults who can't afford their dentures against the plight of uninsured low-income people in the South.

13. Pro-Sanders group rebranding into 'pragmatic progressives' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stinging from the disappointment of Bernie Sanders' loss in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary, supporters pumped millions into the powerful advocacy group Our Revolution to keep the progressive fight alive and prepare for another swing at the White House.

14. Pressured by allies, Biden escalates fight for voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will lay out the "moral case" for voting rights as he faces growing pressure from civil rights activists and other Democrats to combat efforts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

15. Democrats vow vote on gun bills; Biden says 'we have to act' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats said they are pushing toward a vote on expanded gun control measures as the nation reels from its second mass shooting in a week. President Joe Biden said "we have to act," but prospects for any major changes were dim, for now, in the closely divided Congress.

16. Biden says 'we have to act' after Colorado mass shooting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say they are pushing toward a vote on expanded gun control measures as the nation reels from it its second mass shooting in a week. President Joe Biden said "we have to act," but prospects for any major changes were dim, for now, in the closely divided Congress.

17. Advocates seek Biden push on gun bills, but prospects iffy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After President Joe Biden's giant COVID-19 relief bill passed Congress, he made a prime-time address to the nation and presided over a Rose Garden ceremony.

But there wasn't so much as a statement from the White House after the House passed legislation that would require background checks for gun purchases, a signature Democratic issue for decades.

18. House passes bill to expand background checks for gun sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Emboldened by their majorities in the House and Senate, Democrats are making a new push to enact the first major new gun control laws in more than two decades -- starting with stricter background checks.

19. Harris prepares for central role in Biden's White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kamala Harris will make history on Wednesday when she becomes the nation's first female vice president — and the first Black woman and the first woman of South Asian descent to hold that office. But that's only where her boundary-breaking role begins.

20. Pelosi says House will impeach Trump, pushes VP to oust him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says the House will proceed with legislation to impeach President Donald Trump as she pushes the vice president and the Cabinet to invoke constitutional authority to force him out, warning that Trump is a threat to democracy after the deadly assault on the Capitol.

21. After a tumultuous 2020, Black leaders weigh next steps -

DETROIT (AP) — As a barrier-breaking year draws to a close, there's one undeniable fact: the strength of Black political power.

Black voters were a critical part of the coalition that clinched President-elect Joe Biden's White House bid. The nation will swear in its first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent as vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, who herself may be a leading presidential candidate in four years. And as the global push for racial justice continues, Congress is set to welcome several new Black, progressive freshmen next year.

22. Biden picks Fudge for housing, Vilsack for USDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden made two key domestic policy picks, selecting Ohio Rep. Marcia Fudge as his housing and urban development secretary and former Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack to reprise that role in his administration, according to five people familiar with the decisions.

23. House Dems nominate Pelosi as speaker to lead into Biden era -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats nominated Nancy Pelosi on Wednesday as the speaker to lead them into Joe Biden's presidency, and shortly afterward she seemed to suggest that these would be her final two years in the post.

24. For Joe Biden, long path to a potentially crucial presidency -

When Joe Biden steps to the podium Thursday night as the Democratic Party's presidential nominee, he will offer himself to a wounded, meandering nation as balm — and as a bridge.

A 77-year-old steeped in the American political establishment for a half-century, Biden cannot himself embody the kind of generational change that Presidents John F. Kennedy or Bill Clinton represented. Even with wide-ranging proposals for government action on health care, taxation and the climate crisis, he will never be the face of a burgeoning progressive movement. As a white man, Biden cannot know personally the systemic racism now at the forefront of a national reckoning over centuries-old social and economic inequities.

25. Biden ally Clyburn brings civil rights legacy to DNC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In October 1960, a young James Clyburn gathered with other students and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as frustrations mounted over civil rights protests in what was becoming a tumultuous, dangerous year.

26. Fauci confident virus vaccine will get to Americans in 2021 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Anthony Fauci said Friday that he remains confident that a coronavirus vaccine will be ready by early next year, telling lawmakers that a quarter-million Americans already have volunteered to take part in clinical trials.

27. Democrats urge action on voting rights as tribute to Lewis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mourning the death of civil rights hero John Lewis, Democrats are urging the Senate to take up a bill of enduring importance to Lewis throughout his life: protecting and expanding the right to vote.

28. Biden's VP pick isn't the biggest issue for Latino activists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden would have to do more than select a Latina running mate to win over Hispanics whose support could be crucial to winning the presidency, according to activists who are warning the presumptive Democratic nominee not to take their community for granted.

29. GOP leader names picks for House panel overseeing virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Thursday named five Republicans, including his top deputy and one of Congress' most combative defenders of President Donald Trump, to a new panel tracking federal coronavirus and economic relief spending.

30. As $2 trillion starts to flow, oversight of virus cash lags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress unleashed about $2 trillion to deal with the coronavirus crisis. So far, only two people are working to oversee how it is spent.

Bharat Ramamurti started out as a watchdog of one, the sole appointee to a five-member Congressional Oversight Commission. The Democratic Senate aide was joined Friday by Republican Rep. French Hill of Arkansas.

31. Sanders drops 2020 bid, leaving Biden as likely nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bernie Sanders, who saw his once strong lead in the Democratic primary evaporate as the party's establishment lined swiftly up behind rival Joe Biden, ended his presidential bid on Wednesday, acknowledging the former vice president is too far ahead for him to have any reasonable hope of catching up.

32. Black voters power Joe Biden's Super Tuesday success -

DETROIT (AP) — Joe Biden's presidential campaign spent the past month on the verge of collapse after disappointing finishes in the overwhelmingly white states that launched the Democratic primary. As he watched the turmoil unfold from Gadsden, Alabama, Robert Avery thought the race would change dramatically when it moved into the South.

33. Debate takeaways: Bernie bruised but not broken -

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Democrats held their final debate before the South Carolina presidential primary and the critical Super Tuesday contests that follow three days later.

Here are some key takeaways.

34. Pelosi tries to tamp down impeachment fervor among Democrats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared Wednesday that President Donald Trump is "engaged in a cover up," but she tamped down some Democrats' rush toward an impeachment inquiry, telling lawmakers during a closed meeting to be persistent but patient in their showdown with the White House.

35. Vocal Democrats pressing Pelosi as impeachment talk swells -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More Democrats are calling — and more loudly — for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying.

36. Votes on Senate bills seen as progress even if they fail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate is taking a new approach to ending the partial government shutdown by actually taking votes instead of just pointing fingers.

But competing bills appear likely to fail Thursday, caught in a poisonous Washington impasse.

37. Trump's shutdown gift to Pelosi: A unified Democratic caucus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has done something remarkable in the government shutdown: He's unified the diverse new House Democratic majority firmly behind Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

It's not even about the wall at this point. Democrats are sticking together with an unusual amount of unity as a way to strengthen Pelosi's hand and set a tone in the new Congress that Trump can't simply demand $5.7 billion — using federal workers as leverage — to get his long-promised border wall with Mexico, or anything else on his wish list.

38. Pelosi unopposed as Dems meet to nominate House speaker -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nancy Pelosi enters the House Democratic leadership elections on Wednesday in an unusual position: She's running unopposed.

This was not the plan from Pelosi opponents who vowed to usher in a new era for Democrats. But one by one, the powerful California congresswoman picked off the would-be challengers and smoothed the skeptics. In the end, there was no one willing, or able, to mount a serious campaign against her.

39. Pelosi as House speaker would 'show the power of the gavel' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's a pivotal moment for Nancy Pelosi — the beginning of a triumphal return as the nation's first female House speaker, or the start of a political reckoning over who should lead Democrats in the Donald Trump era.

40. Senate to take up $1.1T bill to keep govt running -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A battle between the Senate's old school veterans and new-breed freshmen such as tea partier Ted Cruz and liberal Elizabeth Warren is taking shape Friday as leaders push for passage of a $1.1 trillion spending bill needed to keep the government running.

41. Leading Democrat says GOP tax argument flawed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A leading House Democrat thinks members of Congress could reach a deal to avoid a government default if they could get past the semantics of tax increases.

Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina tells MSNBC one of the biggest obstacles in talks to resolve the issue is that many Republicans consider closing tax loopholes to be the same as raising taxes. This is a problem, he says, because most House Republicans have signed a no-new-taxes pledge.

42. Biden, congressional group begin budget talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden and top lawmakers are beginning their quest to tame the spiraling U.S. debt with small steps aimed at finding what common ground might exist in vastly different approaches toward restructuring government spending.