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Editorial Results (free)

1. US wholesale inflation fell in July for 1st time in 2 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prices at the wholesale level fell from June to July, the first month-to-month drop in more than two years and a sign that some of the U.S. economy's inflationary pressures cooled last month.

2. EXPLAINER: Mixed US inflation signs. Where are prices going? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers struggling with skyrocketing prices for food, gas, autos and rent got a tantalizing hint of relief last month, when prices didn't budge at all from June after 25 straight months of increases. With gas prices continuing to fall, inflation is probably slowing further this month.

3. Lower prices offer Americans slight reprieve from inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Falling prices for gas, airline tickets and clothes gave Americans a little bit of relief last month, though overall inflation is still running at close to its highest level in four decades.

4. US inflation will likely stay high even as gas prices fall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans may finally be catching a break from relentlessly surging prices — if just a slight one — even as inflation is expected to remain painfully high for months.

Thanks largely to falling gas prices, the government's inflation report for July, to be released Wednesday morning, is expected to show that prices jumped 8.7% from a year earlier — still a sizzling pace but a slowdown from the 9.1% year-over-year figure in June, which was the highest in four decades.

5. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

6. Employment market shows signs of cooling amid rate hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The employment market appears to have lost some of its sizzle, a development that could influence Federal Reserve policy and further raise concerns about an economic recession among investors.

7. Inflation and wage data suggest US prices will keep climbing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation surged in June and workers' average wages accelerated in the spring — signs that Americans won't likely feel any relief from rising prices anytime soon and that the Federal Reserve will feel compelled to further raise borrowing costs.

8. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy has contracted for two straight quarters, intensifying fears that the nation is on the cusp of a recession — if not already in one — barely two years after the pandemic recession officially ended.

9. US not yet in recession and 4 other takeaways from the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell delivered a tough message at the start of a news conference Wednesday: Inflation is way too high, and the Federal Reserve is laser-focused on taming it with higher borrowing costs.

10. US economy shrinks for a 2nd quarter, raising recession fear -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank from April through June for a second straight quarter, contracting at a 0.9% annual pace and raising fears that the nation may be approaching a recession.

11. How the Federal Reserve's rate hikes affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Higher mortgage rates have sent home sales tumbling. Credit card rates have grown more burdensome, and so have auto loans. Savers are finally receiving yields that are actually visible, while crypto assets are reeling.

12. Fed unleashes another big rate hike in bid to curb inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday raised its benchmark interest rate by a hefty three-quarters of a point for a second straight time in its most aggressive drive in three decades to tame high inflation.

13. EXPLAINER: How do we know when a recession has begun? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — By one common definition, the U.S. economy is on the cusp of a recession. Yet that definition isn't the one that counts.

On Thursday, when the government estimates the gross domestic product for the April-June period, some economists think it may show that the economy shrank for a second straight quarter. That would meet a longstanding assumption for when a recession has begun.

14. US economy sending mixed signals: Here's what it all means -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is caught in an awkward, painful place. A confusing one, too.

Growth appears to be sputtering, home sales are tumbling and economists warn of a potential recession ahead. But consumers are still spending, businesses keep posting profits and the economy keeps adding hundreds of thousands of jobs each month.

15. Fed set to impose another big rate hike to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Conflicting signs about the health of the U.S. economy have thrust the Federal Reserve into a difficult spot.

With inflation raging at a four-decade high, the job market strong and consumer spending still solid, the Fed is under pressure to raise interest rates aggressively.

16. Fed ethics inquiry clears Powell and Clarida trades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's inspector general concluded Thursday that financial trades made several years ago by Chair Jerome Powell and Richard Clarida, then the vice chair, did not violate any laws or ethics rules.

17. Fed board member opens door to 1-point hike if demand rises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Christopher Waller, a member of the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, said Thursday that he would be open to supporting a huge 1 percentage point increase in the Fed's key short-term interest rate later this month if upcoming economic data points to robust consumer spending.

18. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, and when it may ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation's relentless surge didn't merely persist in June. It accelerated.

For the 12 months ending in June, the government's consumer price index rocketed 9.1%, the fastest year-over-year jump since 1981.

19. Fed's Bullard: Solid US economy can handle rising rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy is healthy and shows little sign of an imminent recession, and can withstand higher interest rates, St. Louis Federal Reserve president James Bullard said Monday.

20. A robust June jobs report clouds outlook for US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong hiring report for June has assuaged fears that the U.S. economy might be on the cusp of a recession — and highlighted the resilience of the nation's job market.

21. Fed: Sharply higher rates may be needed to quell inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were concerned at their meeting last month that consumers were increasingly anticipating higher inflation, and they signaled that much higher interest rates could be needed to restrain it.

22. US job openings slip, though remain at healthy level -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers advertised fewer jobs in May amid signs that the economy is weakening, though the overall demand for workers remained strong.

Employers posted 11.3 million job openings at the end of May, the Labor Department said Wednesday, down from nearly 11.7 million in April. Job openings reached 11.9 million in March, the highest level on records dating back more than 20 years. There are nearly two job openings for every unemployed person, a sharp reversal from the historic pattern: Before the pandemic, there were always more unemployed people than available jobs.

23. Genesco taps Sandfort as independent director -

The independent directors of the Genesco board have unanimously selected Gregory A. Sandfort as the company’s lead independent director. Sandfort succeeds Matthew C. Diamond, who has served in that role for the past four years.

24. Powell: 'No guarantee' Fed can tame inflation, spare jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said there's "no guarantee'' the central bank can tame runaway inflation without hurting the job market.

25. Stocks slide on Wall Street as inflation worries persist -

Stocks closed broadly lower on Wall Street Tuesday, after a discouraging snapshot of U.S. consumer confidence stoked investors' worries about the risk that sharply higher interest rates and pervasive inflation could trigger a recession.

26. Europe's central bank ready to 'stamp out' surging inflation -

SINTRA, Portugal (AP) — The head of the European Central Bank said Tuesday that it will move gradually to combat soaring consumer prices with interest rate hikes in July and September but will keep its options open to "stamp out" inflation if it surges faster than expected.

27. Wall Street shakes off a midday stumble and ends higher -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks shook off a midday slump and ended higher, keeping major indexes on track for weekly gains.

Trading was wobbly throughout the day as investors remained focused on another day of testimony before Congress by Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell.

28. Powell: Fed must convince public it can tame inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As if their job weren't hard enough at a time of raging inflation, Chair Jerome Powell and his Federal Reserve colleagues have to do more these days than decide just how much to raise interest rates without triggering a recession.

29. US stocks give up afternoon gains and end slightly lower -

NEW YORK (AP) — A choppy day of trading on Wall Street ended with a modest pullback for stocks Wednesday, the latest bout of volatility for the market amid concerns about inflation and uncertainty over whether rising interest rates will help or hinder the economy.

30. Powell: Fed aims to avoid recession but says it's possible -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell sought Wednesday to reassure the public that the Fed will raise interest rates high and fast enough to quell inflation, without tightening credit so much as to throttle the economy and cause a recession.

31. Wall Street ends broadly higher after sharp losses last week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are ending higher on Wall Street Tuesday, clawing back some of the ground they lost last week in their worst weekly drop since the beginning of the pandemic.

The S&P 500 rose 2.4%. It's still 21.5% below the record high it set in January. The tech-heavy Nasdaq climbed 2.5% and the Dow Jones Industrial Average added 2.1%.

32. Fed's Powell facing rising criticism for inflation missteps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell won praise for his deft leadership during the maelstrom of the pandemic recession. As threats to the U.S. economy have mounted, though, Powell has increasingly struck Fed watchers as much less sure-footed.

33. Wall Street closes worst week since 2020 with slight gain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street closed out its most punishing week since the 2020 coronavirus crash with a meandering day of trading Friday that left it a bit higher.

The S&P 500 rose 8.07 points, or 0.2%, to 3,674.84 after waffling between modest losses and gains for most of the day. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dipped 38.29, or 0.1%, to 29,888.78, while the Nasdaq composite climbed 152.25, or 1.4%, to 10,798.35.

34. Fed's aggressive rate hikes raise likelihood of a recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has pledged to do whatever it takes to curb inflation, now raging at a four-decade high and defying the Fed's efforts so far to tame it.

Increasingly, it seems, doing so might require the one painful thing the Fed has sought to avoid: A recession.

35. Bank of England hikes interest rates but resists bolder move -

LONDON (AP) — The Bank of England raised interest rates by a quarter-percentage point Thursday, shrugging off pressure for a bolder move to combat price increases that have pushed inflation to a 40-year high.

36. This is how a higher Fed rate could affect your finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record-low mortgages are long gone. Credit card rates will likely rise. So will the cost of an auto loan. Savers may finally see a noticeable return.

The unusually large t hree-quarter point hike in its benchmark short-term rate that the Federal Reserve announced Wednesday won't, by itself, have a huge effect on most Americans' finances. But combined with earlier rate hikes and additional large increases to come, economists and investors foresee the fastest pace of rate increases since 1989.

37. Wall Street rallies in relief after Fed's assurance on rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street rallied Wednesday following the Federal Reserve's sharpest hike to interest rates since 1994, and its later assurance that such mega-hikes would not be common.

The S&P 500 climbed 54.51, or 1.5%, to 3,789.99 after whipping through roller-coaster trading immediately following the Fed's announcement. In equally topsy-turvy trading, Treasury yields eased in the bond market after Chair Jerome Powell seemed to soothe the market's fears about an overly aggressive Fed by implying more modest rate increases may be coming later this year.

38. Biggest rate hike in years expected as Fed tackles inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is expected Wednesday to announce its largest interest rate hike since 1994 — a bigger increase than it had previously signaled and a sign that the central bank is struggling to restrain stubbornly high inflation.

39. EXPLAINER: Recession fears grow. Just how high is the risk? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is at a 40-year high. Stock prices are sinking. The Federal Reserve is making borrowing much costlier. And the economy actually shrank in the first three months of this year.

40. Treasury bond yield inversion raises worries over recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the more reliable warning signals for an economic recession is shining alarmingly brighter.

The "yield curve" is watched for clues on how the bond market feels about the long-term outlook for the U.S. economy. On Tuesday, a closely followed part of the yield curve lit up again for the second time this year.

41. Hot inflation dims likelihood Fed can achieve 'soft landing' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For months, Chair Jerome Powell has held out hope that the Federal Reserve will be able to raise interest rates high enough to throttle rampant inflation without tipping the economy into recession.

42. US inflation at new 40-year high as price increases spread -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The cost of gas, food and most other goods and services jumped in May, pushing inflation to a four-decade high and offering Americans no respite.

Consumer prices surged 8.6% last month from a year earlier, faster than April's year-over-year increase of 8.3%, the Labor Department said Friday. The new inflation figure, the biggest increase since December 1981, heightens pressure on the Federal Reserve to continue raising interest rates aggressively.

43. Worry about stagflation, a flashback to '70s, begins to grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stagflation. It was the dreaded "S word" of the 1970s.

For Americans of a certain age, it conjures memories of painfully long lines at gas stations, shuttered factories and President Gerald Ford's much-ridiculed "Whip Inflation Now" buttons.

44. Yellen: inflation to 'remain high;' hopes it's 'coming down' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen acknowledged Tuesday that she and Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell "could have used a better word" than "transitory" when describing the expected run of inflation in the U.S. economy. She added that she was hopeful it would soon be on the decline.

45. Wall Street ticks higher as recession watch remains murky -

NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks ticked higher Monday as Wall Street keeps wrestling with whether the economy will successfully avoid a recession amid rising interest rates and high inflation. The S&P 500 edged up 0.3% and the Nasdaq rose 0.4%. Both started the day with even bigger gains, following up on strength across European and Asian markets after China relaxed some tough anti-COVID measures. But stocks fell back a bit as Treasury yields continued to climb, putting downward pressure on stocks. The yield on the 10-year Treasury, which helps set interest rates on mortgages and other loans, jumped back above 3%.

46. US job openings decline from record level but remain high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The white-hot demand for U.S. workers cooled a bit in April, though the number of unfilled jobs remains high and companies are still desperate to hire more people.

Employers advertised 11.4 million jobs at the end of April, the Labor Department said Wednesday, down from nearly 11.9 million in March, the highest level on records that date back 20 years. At that level, there are nearly two job openings for every unemployed person. That's a sharp reversal from the historic pattern: Before the pandemic, there were always more unemployed people than available jobs.

47. US consumer confidence slips in May amid stubborn inflation -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. consumer confidence edged lower in May as Americans' view of their present and future prospects dimmed in the midst of persistent inflation.

The Conference Board said Tuesday that its consumer confidence index dipped to 106.4 in May — still a strong reading — from 108.6 in April.

48. Key inflation gauge slowed to still-high 6.3% over past year -

An inflation gauge closely tracked by the Federal Reserve rose 6.3% in April from a year earlier, just below a four-decade high set in March and the first slowdown since November 2020.

Friday's report from the Commerce Department added to other recent signs showing that while high inflation continues to cause hardships for millions of households, it may finally be moderating, at least for now.

49. Worry about stagflation, a flashback to '70s, begins to grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stagflation. It was the dreaded "S word" of the 1970s.

For Americans of a certain age, it conjures memories of painfully long lines at gas stations, shuttered factories and President Gerald Ford's much-ridiculed "Whip Inflation Now" buttons.

50. Fed officials signal rates may head to 'restrictive' levels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials agreed when they met earlier this month that they may have to raise interest rates to levels that would weaken the economy as part of their drive to curb inflation, which is near a four-decade high.

51. Powell: 'Soft' economic landing may be out of Fed's control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, fresh off winning Senate confirmation for a second term earlier in the day, acknowledged for the first time Thursday that high inflation and economic weakness overseas could thwart his efforts to avoid causing a recession.

52. Fed nominee Michael Barr calls inflation 'far too high' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to be the Federal Reserve's top banking regulator pledged Thursday to help reduce high inflation and provide "clear rules" to govern financial innovation.

53. Stocks fall sharply as Target's woes renew inflation fears -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank more than 1,100 points and the S&P 500 had its biggest drop in nearly two years Wednesday, as big earnings misses by Target and other major retailers stoked investors' fears that surging inflation could cut deeply into corporate profits.

54. Biden's burdens grow: Sagging global economy adds to US woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Joe Biden embarks for Asia on Thursday, he's facing a new risk at home for the economy and his Democratic Party: a global slowdown caused by Russia's invasion of Ukraine and the pandemic shutting down Chinese cities and factories.

55. Powell: Fed to keep hiking rates until it controls inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell on Tuesday underscored the Federal Reserve's determination to keep raising interest rates until there is clear evidence inflation is steadily falling — a high-stakes effort that carries the risk of causing an eventual recession.

56. Retail sales rise 0.9% in April as consumers show resilience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. retail sales rose 0.9% in April, a solid increase that underscores Americans' ability to keep ramping up spending even as inflation persists at nearly a 40-year high.

The increase was driven by greater sales of cars, electronics, and at restaurants, the Commerce Department said Tuesday.

57. Bitcoin tumbles, stablecoin plunges in wild week in crypto -

NEW YORK (AP) — It's been a wild week in crypto, even by crypto standards.

Bitcoin tumbled, stablecoins were anything but stable and one of the crypto industry's highest-profile companies lost a third of its market value.

58. Powell: 'Soft' economic landing may be out of Fed's control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell, fresh off winning Senate confirmation for a second term earlier in the day, acknowledged for the first time Thursday that high inflation and economic weakness overseas could thwart his efforts to avoid causing a recession.

59. Senate confirms Powell for 2nd term as Fed fights inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed Jerome Powell for a second four-year term as Federal Reserve chair, giving bipartisan backing to Powell's high-stakes efforts to curb the highest inflation in four decades.

60. US producer prices surge 11% in April on higher food costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. producer prices soared 11% in April from a year earlier, a hefty gain that indicates high inflation will remain a burden for consumers and businesses in the months ahead.

61. US inflation dips from 4-decade high but still causing pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation eased slightly in April after months of relentless increases but remains near a four-decade high, imposing a continuing financial strain on American households.

Consumer prices jumped 8.3% last month from a year ago, the government said Wednesday. That was below the 8.5% year-over-year surge in March, which was the highest since 1981. On a monthly basis, prices rose 0.3% from March to April, the smallest rise in eight months.

62. Senate approves Cook as first Black woman to Fed post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate confirmed economist Lisa Cook on Tuesday to serve on the Federal Reserve's board of governors, making her the first Black woman to do so in the institution's 108-year history.

63. EXPLAINER: Recession fears grow. But how high is the risk? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation is at a 40-year high. Stock prices are sinking. The Federal Reserve is making borrowing much costlier. And the economy actually shrank in the first three months of this year.

64. Markets cheer after Powell downplays even larger rate hikes -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Dow Jones Industrial Average surged more than 900 points and the S&P 500 had its biggest gain in two years Wednesday after Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell downplayed the likelihood of an even larger interest rate hike after announcing the sharpest rate increase since 2000.

65. How higher Fed rates stand to affect Americans' finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record-low mortgages below 3%, reached last year, are long gone. Credit card rates will likely rise. So will the cost of an auto loan. Savers may finally receive a yield high enough to top inflation.

66. Text of the Federal Reserve's statement after its meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Below is the statement the Fed released Wednesday after its policy meeting ended:

Although overall economic activity edged down in the first quarter, household spending and business fixed investment remained strong. Job gains have been robust in recent months, and the unemployment rate has declined substantially. Inflation remains elevated, reflecting supply and demand imbalances related to the pandemic, higher energy prices, and broader price pressures.

67. Fed raises key rate by a half-point in bid to tame inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve intensified its fight against the worst inflation in 40 years by raising its benchmark interest rate by a half-percentage point Wednesday — its most aggressive move since 2000 — and signaling further large rate hikes to come.

68. Fed to fight inflation with fastest rate hikes in decades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is poised this week to accelerate its most drastic steps in three decades to attack inflation by making it costlier to borrow — for a car, a home, a business deal, a credit card purchase — all of which will compound Americans' financial strains and likely weaken the economy.

69. US economy shrinks, threats loom, but growth likely to last -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy shrank in the first three months of the year, and faces threats from high inflation and rising interest rates, yet economists foresee a return to growth for the rest of 2022 based on the strength of the job market and consumer spending.

70. Brainard wins Senate confirmation to be Fed's vice chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday confirmed the nomination of Lael Brainard to a four-year term as vice chair of the Federal Reserve, elevating her to the Fed's No. 2 post in the midst of the central bank's toughest fight against inflation in four decades.

71. Why Fed worries about the strongest US job market in decades -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell isn't as pleased with the robust U.S. job market as you might think he'd be, and he and the Federal Reserve plan to do something about it: Take it down a notch.

72. Powell reinforces expectations of sharp rate hike next month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve must move faster than it has in the past to rein in high inflation, Chair Jerome Powell said Thursday, signaling that sharp interest rate increases are likely in the coming months, beginning at the Fed's next policy meeting in May.

73. Biden picks Michael Barr for Fed's bank regulation post -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Friday he plans to nominate Michael Barr, the dean of the University of Michigan's public policy school, to be the Federal Reserve's vice chairman of supervision.

74. EXPLAINER: Why US inflation is so high, when it might ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Another month, another four-decade high for inflation.

For the 12 months that ended in March, consumer prices rocketed 8.5%. That was the fastest year-over-year jump since 1981, far surpassing February's mark of 7.9%, itself a 40-year high.

75. Fed casting its inflation fight as battle against inequality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the Federal Reserve intensifies its efforts to tame high inflation, its top officials are casting their aggressive drive in a new light: As a blow against economic inequality.

That thinking marks a sharp reversal from the conventional view of the Fed's use of interest rates. Normally, the steep rate hikes the Fed is planning for the coming months would be seen as a particular threat to disadvantaged and lower-income households. These groups are most likely to suffer if rate hikes weaken an economy, cause unemployment to rise and sometimes trigger a recession.

76. Fed signals more aggressive steps to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials are signaling that they will take an aggressive approach to fighting high inflation in the coming months — actions that will make borrowing sharply more expensive for consumers and businesses and heighten risks to the economy.

77. EXPLAINER: Why bond yields may be warning of a recession -

NEW YORK (AP) — One of the more reliable warning signals for an economic recession is shining brighter.

The "yield curve" is watched for clues to how the bond market is feeling about the U.S. economy's long-term prospects. On Friday, a closely followed part of the yield curve lit up again after giving a brief signal earlier in the week.

78. Fed's rate hikes threaten its goal of narrowing racial gaps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's hiring boom of the past year has narrowed racial disparities in unemployment. Yet the Federal Reserve's ongoing interest rate hikes — shaping up to be the steepest in 15 years — threaten to reverse that progress.

79. US growth in Q4 revised lower to 6.9%, slower growth to come -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy ended 2021 by expanding at a healthy 6.9% annual pace from October through December, the government reported Wednesday, a slight downgrade from its previous estimates.

80. Senate advances controversial Fed nominee on party-line vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday agreed to consider the nomination of Lisa Cook for a position on the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors on a 50-49 party-line vote.

81. US job openings, quitting at near record high in February -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Job openings hovered at a near-record level in February, little changed from the previous month, continuing a trend that Federal Reserve officials see as a driver of inflation.

There were 11.3 million available jobs last month, matching January's figure and just below December's record of 11.4 million, the Labor Department said Tuesday.

82. Powell: Digital currencies will require new regulations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said new forms of digital money such as cryptocurrencies and stablecoins present risks to the U.S. financial system and will require new rules to protect consumers.

83. Stocks gain ground on Wall Street, oil prices ease lower -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street Tuesday and oil prices eased as investors remained focused on the outlook for inflation.

The S&P 500 rose 1.1%, the Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 0.7% and the Nasdaq rose 2%. Banks helped drive the gains, along with technology and retailer stocks.

84. Powell says Fed will hike further and faster if necessary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell said Monday that the Federal Reserve would raise its benchmark short-term interest rate faster than expected, and high enough to restrain growth and hiring, if it decides this would be necessary to slow rampaging inflation.

85. Powell says Fed will hike further and faster if necessary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell said Monday that the Federal Reserve would raise its benchmark short-term interest rate faster than expected, and high enough to restrain growth and hiring, if it decides this would be necessary to slow rampaging inflation.

86. Powell and 3 other nominees to Fed posts clear Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Banking Committee approved Jerome Powell's nomination to a second four-year term as chair of the Federal Reserve Wednesday, just hours after the central bank began what will be a difficult effort to combat inflation.

87. How higher interest rates will affect Americans' finances -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans who have long enjoyed the benefits of historically low interest rates will have to adapt to a very different environment as the Federal Reserve embarks on what's likely to be a prolonged period of rate hikes to fight inflation.

88. Fed begins inflation fight with key rate hike, more to come -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve launched a high-risk effort Wednesday to tame the worst inflation since the early 1980s, raising its benchmark short-term interest rate and signaling up to six additional rate hikes this year.

89. Embattled Federal Reserve pick Raskin withdraws nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sarah Bloom Raskin has withdrawn her nomination to the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors after a key Democrat joined with all Republicans in the Senate to oppose her confirmation, according to a person familiar with the matter who requested anonymity before an official announcement.

90. Raskin nomination for Fed in peril as Democrat opposes pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Joe Manchin, a West Virginia Democrat, said Monday that he opposes the nomination of Sarah Bloom Raskin to a key position on the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, endangering her prospects of winning Senate confirmation.

91. Federal Reserve to begin risky pursuit of a 'soft landing' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday will launch one of the most difficult tasks a central bank can attempt: Raise borrowing costs enough to slow growth and tame high inflation, but not so much as to topple the economy into recession.

92. Long-term US mortgage rates increase -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates rose this week but remain at historically low levels as the Federal Reserve prepares to raise its main borrowing rate.

The average rate on a 30-year loan hit 3.85%, up from 3.76% last week, mortgage buyer Freddie Mac reported Thursday. A year ago, the long-term rate was 3.05%.

93. US job openings near record, adding to price pressures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. businesses posted a near-record level of open jobs in January, a trend that has helped push up worker's pay and added to inflationary pressures in the U.S. economy.

Employers posted 11.3 million jobs at the end of January, down slightly from a record of 11.4 million in December, the Labor Department said Wednesday.

94. Strong job growth points to COVID's fading grip on economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a buoyant sign for the U.S. economy, businesses stepped up their hiring last month as omicron faded and more Americans ventured out to spend at restaurants, shops and hotels despite surging inflation.

95. Stocks end another bumpy day lower, crude oil prices ease -

Stocks ended another bumpy day lower on Wall Street and crude oil prices eased back as markets remain concerned about the broader impact of Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The S&P 500 fell 0.5% Thursday. The Nasdaq fell 1.6% as technology companies led the way lower. Less risky sectors like utilities gained ground.

96. Long-term US mortgage rates fall this week to 3.76% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates fell this week and remain at historically low levels, just as the Federal Reserve prepares to raise its main borrowing rate later this month.

97. Fed's Powell: Russia's war on Ukraine will worsen inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell warned Thursday that Russia's invasion of Ukraine, which has already driven up oil prices, will likely further magnify the high inflation that has engulfed the U.S. economy.

98. Wall Street roars back to rally mode, even as oil rises anew -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street took another sharp swing Wednesday, this time back to rally mode, as stocks and Treasury yields rose even as oil prices continued to climb.

The S&P 500 rose 1.9%, putting it back into the green for the week, after Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said he supports a more modest rise in interest rates this month than some investors had been fearing.

99. Powell expects a quarter-point Fed rate hike this month -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chair Jerome Powell said Wednesday that he supports a traditional quarter-point increase in the Federal Reserve's benchmark short-term interest rate when the Fed meets later this month, rather than a larger increase that some of its policymakers have proposed.

100. Fed's Waller says bigger rate hike in March may be needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Governor Christopher Waller said Thursday he is willing to support a half-point interest rate hike at the central bank's next meeting in March if upcoming data suggests inflation is worsening.