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Editorial Results (free)

1. Stocks climb after Fed cuts rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose broadly after the Federal Reserve lowered interest rates for the third time this year.

The gains Wednesday were enough to push the S&P 500 to its second record high this week.

2. Fed cuts rates for a 3rd time but signals it will now pause -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for the third time this year to try to sustain the economic expansion in the face of global threats. But it indicated that it won't cut again in the coming months unless the economic outlook worsens.

3. Fed is expected to cut rates but may offer little guidance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is set to cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for a third time this year to help sustain the U.S. economic expansion in the face of widespread trade tensions and slower global growth.

4. Here's the single phrase to watch for from the Fed this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Economists and investors who are trying to get a fix on what the Federal Reserve may do in the months ahead have zeroed in on a single phrase in the statement it has issued after its most recent policy meetings.

5. Uncertainties escalate for Fed as it weighs another rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve finds itself in an unusually delicate spot as it considers how much more to try to stimulate an economy that's still growing and adding jobs but also appears vulnerable.

6. Zuckerberg defends Facebook's currency plans before Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg endured hours of prickly questioning from lawmakers Wednesday as he defended the company's new globally ambitious project to create a digital currency while also dealing with widening scrutiny from U.S. regulators.

7. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for September 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

8. Fed plans more Treasury purchases to control lending rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Friday that it will buy short-term Treasury bills each month until the second quarter of 2020 to inject cash into the banking system and make it easier to control overnight lending rates.

9. Facebook CEO to appear before Congress on currency plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will appear before Congress this month as the tech giant is under pressure from lawmakers and regulators over its massive market power and record of privacy breaches.

10. Fed officials were sharply divided over September rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were sharply divided last month when they decided to cut their key policy rate for a second time this year, a split that indicates the path forward for future rate cuts remains cloudy.

11. Powell faces key question: What's wrong with low inflation? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When out shopping, most Americans like lower prices. But the Federal Reserve sees things a little differently.

Fed Chairman Jerome Powell instead says that low inflation, along with low interest rates, are "longer-term challenges" for the United States.

12. Powell sees cooler US hiring in possible hint of rate cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that U.S. job growth since early last year was not as robust as thought, a hint that the Fed may be ready to keep cutting interest rates to support the economy.

13. Fed's odd dilemma: Low unemployment but pressure to do more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the nation's unemployment rate at its lowest point since human beings first walked on the moon, you might expect the Federal Reserve to be raising interest rates to keep the economy from overheating and igniting inflation.

14. Chairman: Federal reserve must avoid political pressures -

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell on Monday stressed the importance of an independent central bank "absolutely free" from politics in the wake of increasing pressure from President Donald Trump urging the central bank to lower interest rates.

15. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tale about Romney unrest, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing an impeachment inquiry, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook to defend himself: blasting the inquiry as illegal, attacking his investigators and critics alike, and deriding the whistleblower process as all-but-rigged.

16. Business economists foresee slowdown in US growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's business economists think President Donald Trump's trade war with China will contribute to a sharp slowdown in economic growth this year and next, raising concerns about a possible recession starting late next year.

17. Fed chairman says goal is to keep economy in 'good place' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday that the U.S. economy is facing some risks at the moment, but overall it is in a "good place" and the Fed's main job is to "keep it there as long as possible."

18. President Trump says Fed Chair Powell's job is 'safe' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite all of his attacks on the Federal Reserve, President Donald Trump says Chairman Jerome Powell's job is safe.

Asked in an interview with Fox News if Powell's job was safe, Trump said, "It's safe. Yes, it's safe. I mean, sure, why not."

19. Japan central bank stands pat after Fed rate cut -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central bank opted Thursday to keep its monetary policy unchanged despite the growing signs of trouble that prompted the Federal Reserve to cut its benchmark rate.

The Bank of Japan said in its policy statement that exports, industrial output and business sentiment had been affected by the slowdown in overseas markets.

20. Japan central bank stands pat after Fed rate cut -

TOKYO (AP) — Japan's central bank opted Thursday to keep its monetary policy unchanged despite the growing signs of trouble that prompted the Federal Reserve to cut its benchmark rate.

The Bank of Japan said in its policy statement that exports, industrial output and business sentiment had been affected by the slowdown in overseas markets.

21. Stocks sink then recover after Fed cut -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are rebounding at the close of trading, led by banks and big tech names, after the Federal Reserve delivered an expected cut in interest rates.

Stocks initially fell after the Fed announcement, after the Fed showed its members are divided about the upcoming path for interest rates. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped as much as 210 points

22. A divided Fed reduces rates but might not cut again this year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharply divided Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate Wednesday for a second time this year but declined to signal that further rate cuts are likely this year.

The Fed's move reduces its key short-term rate — which influences many consumer and business loans — by an additional quarter-point to a range of 1.75% to 2%.

23. 3 things to watch for from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When it previously met in late July, the Federal Reserve cut its benchmark interest rate for the first time since America's financial system stood on the edge of collapse more than a decade ago.

24. With Trump trade war a threat, Fed is set to cut rates again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second straight time, the Federal Reserve is set to cut interest rates this week to try to protect the economy from the consequences of a global slowdown and President Donald Trump's trade war with China.

25. As 9/11 dawns, Trump blasts Fed members as 'boneheads' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says the U.S. is missing out economically because "Boneheads" at the Federal Reserve won't lower interest rates at his insistence.

The Fed is meeting next week and is expected to trim its benchmark rate by another quarter point after cutting the rate for the first time in a decade in July. Trump has been pressuring Fed chairman Jerome Powell to drop rates to zero. The rate currently is in a range of 2% to 2.25%.

26. S&P 500 finishes flat; smaller company stocks notch gains -

Major U.S. stock indexes ended mixed Monday as large companies gave up early gains and smaller companies closed broadly higher.

The S&P 500 ended virtually flat as losses in technology and health care stocks outweighed gains in financials and other sectors. The Russell 2000 index of smaller company stocks, which has lagged the S&P 500 this year, outpaced the rest of the market.

27. US stocks' mixed finish nudges S&P 500 to a 2nd weekly gain -

Major U.S. stock indexes finished little changed Friday after a day of mostly quiet trading capped the S&P 500's second straight weekly gain.

The market shook off an early stumble thanks largely to gains in health care stocks, makers of consumer products and retailers. Technology, communications and utilities stocks fell, as did bond yields and gold prices.

28. Fed Chairman Powell says he doesn't expect recession -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Friday that the Fed is not expecting a U.S. or global recession. But it is monitoring a number of uncertainties, including trade conflicts, and will "act as appropriate to sustain the expansion."

29. Thanks to consumers, US economy is rising steadily if slowly -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy slowed in the spring, and most analysts expect it to weaken further in the months ahead. Yet the main driver of growth — consumer spending — remains vigorous enough to keep the economy growing steadily if still modestly.

30. 'Our bigger enemy': Trump escalates attack on Fed chief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump launched a furious and highly personal Twitter attack Friday against the Federal Reserve and Chairman Jerome Powell, fuming that the Fed once more "did NOTHING!" and wondering who is "our bigger enemy" — Powell or China's leader.

31. Powell: No clear hint on rates but says Fed will aid economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell sent no clear signal Friday that the Fed will further cut interest rates this year but said it would "act as appropriate" to sustain the expansion — phrasing that analysts see as suggesting rate cuts.

32. As global economic picture dims, solutions seem out of reach -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As global leaders gather on two continents to take account of a darkening economic outlook, this is the picture they face:

Factories are slumping, many businesses are paralyzed, global growth is sputtering and the world's two mightiest economies are in the grip of a dangerous trade war.

33. Democrats see opening on economy, resist cheering recession -

PROLE, Iowa (AP) — Campaigning under the stifling August sun, Joe Biden assailed President Donald Trump's trade war with China, accusing him of squandering a strong economy and putting Americans' financial security at risk.

34. US stock indexes end mixed ahead of Fed chairman speech -

A wobbly day on Wall Street left stock indexes mostly lower Thursday as investors turned cautious ahead of a widely anticipated speech by the Federal Reserve chairman.

Losses by health care, technology and energy companies, among other sectors, outweighed gains by banks, consumer goods makers and elsewhere in the market. Bond prices fell, nudging yields higher.

35. Trump flip-flops on tax cuts, saying US has 'strong economy' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after considering cutting taxes to promote economic growth, President Donald Trump changed course and said he would abandon the idea because the nation already had "a strong economy."

36. Trump flip-flops on tax cuts, saying US has 'strong economy' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after considering cutting taxes to promote economic growth, President Donald Trump changed course and said he would abandon the idea because the nation already had "a strong economy."

37. US stocks climb after major US retailers post solid earnings -

Strong earnings reports from several big retailers helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Wednesday as the market bounced back from its first loss in four days.

Target notched its biggest-ever gain, while Lowe's had its best day in more than a year, leading a broad rally in companies that rely on consumer spending. Nordstrom, Kohl's, Gap and other retailers closed higher.

38. Fed officials widely divided on rates at July meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials were widely divided at their meeting last month when they decided to cut rates for the first time in a decade, with some arguing for a bigger rate cut while others insisted the Fed should not cut rates at all.

39. Trump acknowledges China policies may mean US economic pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump acknowledged his aggressive China trade policies may mean economic pain for Americans but insisted they're needed for more important long-term benefits. He contended he does not fear a recession but is nonetheless considering new tax cuts to promote growth.

40. Major US stock indexes finish lower, snapping a 3-day rally -

Stocks fell broadly on Wall Street Tuesday after another slide in bond yields and a mixed batch of corporate earnings weighed on the market.

The selling pulled every major sector lower, snapping a three-day winning streak for the S&P 500.

41. Technology companies drive a broad rally on Wall Street -

Technology companies powered a rally on Wall Street Monday that gave the market its third straight gain.

The surge in tech stocks followed a decision by the U.S. to give Chinese telecom giant Huawei another 90 days to buy equipment from American suppliers. Chipmakers including Qualcomm, Intel and Micron, all rose.

42. Trump calls on Federal Reserve to cut interest rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is calling on the Federal Reserve to cut interest rates by at least a full percentage point "over a fairly short period of time," saying that such an action would make the U.S. economy even better and would also "greatly and quickly" enhance the global economy.

43. Trump dismisses worries of recession, says economy is strong -

BERKELEY HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — President Donald Trump dismissed concerns of recession on Sunday and offered an optimistic outlook for the economy after last week's steep drop in the financial markets.

44. 74% of economists in survey see US recession by end of 2021 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A strong majority, 74%, of U.S. business economists appear sufficiently concerned about the risks of some of President Donald Trump's economic policies that they expect a recession in the U.S. by the end of 2021.

45. US consumer prices rose 0.3% amid widespread cost increases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose 0.3% in July, pushed higher by more expensive gas, medical care and housing.

The consumer price index increased 1.8% compared with a year earlier, up from 1.6% in June, the Labor Department said Tuesday. Excluding the volatile food and energy categories, core prices moved up 0.3% in July and 2.2% from a year ago.

46. US stocks fall again, joining worldwide sell-off, on tariffs -

Investors rattled by President Donald Trump's latest escalation in his trade war with China drove another round of selling on Wall Street Friday.

The latest losses, which eased somewhat in the final hour of trading, had the market on track to close out its worst week of the year just seven days after the benchmark S&P 500 hit an all-time high.

47. Stocks fall as rally gives way to US-China trade war worries -

Stocks slumped Thursday and bond prices spiked after President Donald Trump surprised markets with a new 10% tariff on $300 billion worth of goods from China beginning next month.

The news erased a broad rally on Wall Street, leading to the market's fourth straight loss. Bond prices surged, sending yields sharply lower, as investors sought safety.

48. Survey: US manufacturing growth slows again in July -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory activity expanded at a slower rate in July for the fourth consecutive month as the Trump administration squares off with other countries on trade.

The Institute for Supply Management, an association of purchasing managers, said Thursday that its manufacturing index slipped to 51.2 last month from 51.7 in June. Any reading above 50 signals an expansion.

49. Powell Fed raises as many questions as answers with rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve cut its key interest rate Wednesday for the first time in a decade to try to counter the impact of President Donald Trump's trade wars, stubbornly low inflation and global weakness.

50. Stocks sink as Powell dents hopes for multiple rate cuts -

Stocks fell and bond yields rose on Wall Street Wednesday after the Federal Reserve lowered its key interest rate for the first time in a decade but left investors feeling uncertain about the likelihood of further cuts.

51. Fed cuts key rate in its first reduction in more than decade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve cut its key interest rate Wednesday for the first time in a decade to try to counter threats ranging from uncertainties caused by President Donald Trump's trade wars to chronically low inflation and a dim global outlook.

52. US economy dodges the threat of painful spending cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The budget agreement that congressional leaders and President Donald Trump forged late Monday lifted a big potential drag on the U.S. economy for this year and next.

Under the agreement, the economy was spared from a series of deep spending cuts that were set to take effect under a far-reaching budget law enacted in 2011. Monday's agreement nullified those cuts and increased spending by $320 billion over two years.

53. AP FACT CHECK: Trump challenges Fed with dubious theory -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is flipping interest-rate theory on its head as he tries to blame the Fed for holding back growth.

Trump went after the Federal Reserve on Friday after advancing a dubious argument this week that blue-collar workers have gained the most from the strong stock market.

54. US average long-term mortgage rates rise; 30-year at 3.81% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. long-term mortgage rates rose this week after three weeks of holding steady, tipped higher by expectations that the Federal Reserve could reduce interest rates soon.

Mortgage buyer Freddie Mac said Thursday the average rate on the benchmark 30-year mortgage increased to 3.81% from 3.75% last week. Those are historically low levels for the key rate, which a year ago stood at 4.52%

55. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts Omar's words on terrorism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump falsely accused Rep. Ilhan Omar of expressing pride in terrorists and misrepresented the record on the economy and health care in his freewheeling North Carolina rally.

56. Dems pan 'Zuck buck,' want Facebook to rein in currency plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook endured a second day of criticism from Congress over its plan to create a digital currency as senior House Democrats asked Facebook to scale back the project and threatened legislation that would block big tech companies from getting into banking.

57. Fed survey finds widespread concerns over trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve's latest nationwide survey released Wednesday reveals that despite growing worries about the impact of President Donald Trump's trade battles, the overall economy remained solid.

58. Powell says financial crisis accelerated economic changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that the 2008 financial crisis accelerated major changes in the U.S. and global economies, leading to slower growth, lower inflation and lower interest rates.

59. Facebook's currency plan gets hostile reception in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Under sharp criticism from senators, a Facebook executive on Tuesday defended the social network's ambitious plan to create a digital currency and pledged to work with regulators to achieve a system that protects the privacy of users' data.
"We know we need to take the time to get this right," David Marcus, the Facebook executive leading the project, told the Senate Banking Committee at a hearing.
But that message did little to assure senators. Members of both parties demanded to know why a company with massive market power and a track record of scandals should be trusted with such a far-reaching project, given the potential for fraud, abuse and criminal activity.
"Facebook is dangerous," asserted Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio, the committee's senior Democrat. Like a toddler playing with matches, "Facebook has burned down the house over and over," he told Marcus. "Do you really think people should trust you with their bank accounts and their money?"
Republican Sen. Martha McSally of Arizona said "the core issue here is trust."Users won't be able to opt out of providing their personal data when joining the new digital wallet for Libra, McSally said. "Arizonans will be more likely to be scammed" using the currency, she said. The litany of criticism came as Congress began two days of hearings on the currency planned by Facebook, to be called Libra. Also Tuesday, a House Judiciary subcommittee was extending its bipartisan investigation of the market power of Facebook, Google, Amazon and Apple.
On the defensive from bursts of aggressive questioning, Marcus indicated the currency plan is a work in progress. "We will take the time" to ensure the network won't be open to use by criminals and illicit activity like money laundering and financial fraud. "We hope that we'll avoid conflicts of interest. We have a lot of work to do," Marcus said.
The grilling followed a series of negative comments and warnings about the Libra plan in recent days from President Donald Trump, his treasury secretary and the head of the Federal Reserve.
But some senators emphasized the potential positive benefits of Facebook's plan, meant to bring money transacting at low cost to millions around the globe who don't have bank accounts. Facebook had its strong defenders of the project, too, on the panel.
"To strangle this baby in the crib is wildly premature," said Sen. Pat Toomey, R-Pa.
In that vein, Marcus said Libra "is about developing a safe, secure and low-cost way for people to move money efficiently around the world. We believe that Libra can make real progress toward building a more inclusive financial infrastructure."
The planned digital currency is to be a blend of multiple currencies, so that its value will fluctuate in any given local currency. Because Libra will be backed by a reserve, and because the group of companies managing it will encourage a competitive system of exchanges, the project leaders say, "anyone with Libra has a high degree of assurance they can sell it for local (sovereign) currency based on an exchange rate."
Promising low fees, the new currency system could open online commerce to millions of people around the world who lack access to bank accounts and make it cheaper to send money across borders. But it also raises concerns over the privacy of users' data and the potential for criminals to use it for money laundering and fraud.
To address privacy concerns, Facebook created a nonprofit oversight association, with dozens of partners including PayPal, Uber, Spotify, Visa and MasterCard, to govern Libra. As one among many in the association, Facebook says it won't have any special rights or privileges. It also created a "digital wallet" subsidiary, Calibra, to work on the technology, separately from its main social media business. While Facebook owns and controls Calibra, it won't see financial data from it, the company says.
Senators demanded to know exactly what that separation will entail.
"Facebook isn't a company; it's a country," said Sen. John Kennedy, R-La. Kennedy and other conservative senators took the occasion to air long-standing grievances against Facebook, Twitter and Google for a perceived bias against conservative views.
Facebook's currency proposal has also faced heavy skepticism from the Trump administration.
Trump tweeted last week that the new currency, Libra, "will have little standing or dependability." Both Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin and Fed Chair Jerome Powell have expressed serious concerns recently that Libra could be used for illicit activity.
The Treasury Department has "very serious concerns that Libra could be misused by money launderers and terrorist financers," Mnuchin told reporters at the White House on Monday. "This is indeed a national security issue."
Facebook has "a lot of work to do before we get to the point where we're comfortable with it," Mnuchin said.

...

60. Stocks climb to records on hopes for lower interest rates -

NEW YORK (AP) — The major U.S. stock indexes closed at record highs on Friday, with the S&P 500 ending above 3,000 for the first time. The market was driven higher by technology, consumer discretionary and industrial company stocks, which more than offset the drop in drugmakers.

61. US producer prices rise a modest 0.1% in June -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. producer prices rose modestly in June, another sign that inflationary pressures remain subdued.

The Labor Department said Friday that its producer price index, which measures inflation before it reaches consumers, rose 0.1% last month, same as the increase in May. Wholesale prices rose 1.7% from June 2018.

62. One reason for a Fed cut: Powell now fears too-low inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a shift from just a few months ago, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell is worried that too-low inflation could persist for a while — and undercut the U.S. economy.

63. Dow Jones industrials cross 27,000 points for first time -

A turbulent day on Wall Street ended in the record books Thursday as the Dow Jones Industrial Average climbed above 27,000 for the first time and the S&P 500 index hit another all-time high.

The milestones came on a day when the S&P 500 briefly moved above 3,000 for the second straight day before an early rally lost some of its momentum.

64. Powell sends further signals of future rate cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell, testifying for a second day before Congress, said Thursday that the economy is in a "very good place" despite headwinds and that the Fed is prepared to do what it can to "keep it there."

65. US consumer prices tick up just 0.1% as inflation stays tame -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose just 0.1% in June, as cheaper gas prices were offset by higher rents and auto costs.

The Labor Department said Thursday that the consumer price index increased 1.6% in June from a year earlier. That is down from 1.8% in May and the second straight drop. However, excluding the volatile food and energy prices, core inflation rose 0.3% in June, the biggest increase in 18 months. It rose 2.1% from a year ago.

66. US consumer prices tick up just 0.1% as inflation stays tame -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices rose just 0.1% in June, as cheaper gas prices were offset by higher rents and auto costs.

The Labor Department said Thursday that the consumer price index increased 1.6% in June from a year earlier. That is down from 1.8% in May and the second straight drop. However, excluding the volatile food and energy prices, core inflation rose 0.3% in June, the biggest increase in 18 months. It rose 2.1% from a year ago.

67. Tech sector leads US stocks higher as Fed signals rate cut -

Stocks finished higher Wednesday as Wall Street welcomed new signals suggesting the Federal Reserve is ready to cut interest rates for the first time in a decade.

Technology stocks drove much of the gains, nudging the Nasdaq composite to an all-time high. The benchmark S&P 500 index briefly traded above 3,000 for the first time before pulling back to just below its most recent record high a week ago.

68. Federal Reserve minutes show broad worries about economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Federal Reserve officials expressed concern at a meeting last month that the outlook for the U.S. economy was weakening, and many said the Fed should soon cut rates if uncertainty continued to weigh on growth.

69. Fed chairman: Pay gains too slow to lift inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Worker pay isn't rising fast enough to push up inflation, Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell says, even with the unemployment rate near a five-decade low. Little inflation pressure makes it easier for the Fed to cut short-term interest rates.

70. Powell's message to Congress: Rate cut is likely coming soon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pointing to a weaker global economy, rising trade tensions and chronically low inflation, Chairman Jerome Powell signaled Wednesday that the Federal Reserve is likely to cut interest rates late this month for the first time in a decade.

71. S&P 500 snaps 2-day losing streak; mixed finish for stocks -

Wall Street capped a day of listless trading Tuesday with modest gains, narrowly avoiding a three-day losing streak for the S&P 500 index.

A last-minute burst of buying nudged the benchmark index into positive territory after spending most of the day flat or down.

72. Powell says bank stress tests need to keep evolving -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell the Fed's annual stress tests of the nation's largest banks will need to evolve to keep pace with a changing financial system.

73. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts census, Obama-Biden record -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is stretching the truth in his legally questionable bid to get a citizenship question added to the 2020 census.

Brushing aside a Supreme Court ruling against him and his agencies saying it's probably too late, Trump is ordering that the question somehow be included anyway, insisting that it's "almost always" been asked on the census.

74. Trump pick for Fed says she does not want to harm investors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Economist Judy Shelton, tapped by President Donald Trump for a seat on the Federal Reserve board, said on Friday she does not favor credit tightening by the Federal Reserve that would harm investors.

75. US adds solid 224,000 jobs; Fed rate cut may be less certain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers sharply stepped up their hiring in June, adding a robust 224,000 jobs, an indication of the economy's durability after more than a decade of expansion.

The strength of the jobs report the government issued Friday could complicate a decision for the Federal Reserve late this month on whether to cut interest rates to help support the economy. Most investors have anticipated a rate cut in July and perhaps one or two additional Fed cuts later in the year. That scenario may be less likely now.

76. Trump says he will tap economists for 2 key Fed vacancies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, who has criticized the Federal Reserve for not cutting interest rates, said Tuesday that he intends to nominate two economists to fill influential positions on the central bank's Board of Governors.

77. Stocks indexes end mostly lower after early rally fades -

Stocks closed slightly lower on Wall Street Wednesday after an early rally fueled by optimism over the next round of trade talks between the U.S. and China lost momentum toward the end of the day.

The wobbly finish extended the S&P 500 index's losing streak to a fourth straight day, though the market is still on track to end the month with solid gains.

78. Stocks move lower on economic data, Powell remarks -

Technology and internet companies led a broad slide for U.S. stocks Tuesday after discouraging economic data and cautionary remarks from the head of the Federal Reserve weighed on the market.

The sell-off marked the third straight loss for the market and the biggest drop this month for the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 index, which hit an all-time high only last week.

79. Powell says economy facing growing uncertainties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday the economic outlook has become cloudier since early May, with rising uncertainties over trade and global growth causing the central bank to reassess its next move on interest rates.

80. US stocks rise after Fed signals future rate cuts -

Stocks brushed off a muted start on Wall Street and notched modest gains Wednesday after the Federal Reserve reaffirmed that it is prepared to cut interest rates if needed to shield the U.S. economy from trade conflicts or other threats.

81. Fed leaves its key rate unchanged but hints of future cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve left its key interest rate unchanged Wednesday but signaled that it's prepared to start cutting rates if needed to protect the U.S. economy from trade conflicts and other threats.

82. Optimism over trade sends US stocks sharply higher -

Potentially encouraging news on trade and interest rates put Wall Street in a buying mood Tuesday, driving the  market to solid gains and sending the Dow Jones Industrial Average 350 points higher.

83. 3 things to watch for from the Federal Reserve on Wednesday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve is likely — if not certain — to leave interest rates alone when its latest policy meeting ends Wednesday. But expectations are high that the Fed and its chairman, Jerome Powell, will signal that a rate cut may come soon for the first time in more than a decade.

84. Fed likely to leave rates alone but signal readiness to cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell has tantalized the financial world with the prospect that the Federal Reserve he leads may soon cut interest rates for the first time in over a decade.

85. AP FACT CHECK: Trump fudges facts on economy, 2020 voting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An eye toward his 2020 campaign, President Donald Trump is turning to a familiar playbook of exaggerated boasts about economic performance and overdrawn complaints about a race tilted against him.

86. Stocks post small losses; investors look ahead to Fed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended a choppy week of trading with modest losses Friday as investors look forward to getting more clues about the direction of interest rates.

Technology shares drove the declines, and energy stocks also fell a day after leading the market. Some late-day gains in banks and insurers helped temper the market's losses.

87. Trump says he plans to keep criticizing Fed over rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump says he has no intention of ending his public attacks on the Federal Reserve's interest rate policies even though he knows he has made Chairman Jerome Powell's job more difficult.

88. US stocks notch gains, snap short losing streak -

Gains in energy and internet companies helped drive stocks broadly higher on Wall Street Thursday, snapping a two-day losing streak for the market in an otherwise choppy week of trading.

The gains were initially fueled by rising oil prices, which boosted energy companies following a suspected attack on two oil tankers in the strategic Strait of Hormuz. The sector sustained its gains as a mix of media, internet and consumer-oriented companies took the lead in pushing every major index higher. Small company stocks rose more than the rest of the market.

89. Trump signals frustration with Fed's independent policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump complained Monday that President Xi Jinping enjoys a major advantage in the U.S.-China trade war in that he controls China's central bank while Trump must deal with a Federal Reserve that is "very destructive to us."

90. Why Trump's trade wars are pressuring both economy and Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A sharp pullback in U.S. hiring for May intensified fears that the economy has weakened and that many employers have grown nervous, in part from President Donald Trump's escalating trade wars.

91. US stocks climb on hope of US-Mexico trade deal -

U.S. stocks finished higher Thursday as optimism that the U.S. and Mexico can work out a deal before costly tariffs kick in next week helped power the market to its third straight gain.

A modest rally gained strength in the final hour of trading after Bloomberg reported that the U.S. was considering delaying a 5% tariff on Mexican goods that is set to go into effect on Monday.

92. Tech companies lead US stocks broadly higher; oil slumps -

Stocks closed higher on Wall Street for the second straight day Wednesday, extending Tuesday's strong gains as investors bet an interest rate cut could be ahead.

Technology, industrial and health care companies accounted for much of the broad gains, which were tempered by a slide in energy stocks following a 3.4% plunge in the price of U.S. crude oil.

93. Fed says economic gains tempered by trade worries -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most areas of the country saw a slight improvement in economic activity in the spring, but those gains were tempered by concerns over rising trade tensions, the Federal Reserve said Wednesday.

94. Dow jumps over 500 points amid hopes of Fed rate cut -

The Dow Jones Industrial Average jumped more than 500 points Tuesday as investors welcomed signs that the Federal Reserve may cut interest rates to help buttress U.S. economic growth in the face of escalating trade wars.

95. Powell hints Fed will cut rates if needed over trade wars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chairman Jerome Powell said Tuesday that the Federal Reserve is prepared to respond if it decides the Trump administration's trade conflicts are threatening the U.S. economy. Investors read his remarks as a signal that the Fed will likely cut interest rates later this year.

96. US consumer spending slows to 0.3% gain in April -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumer spending slowed in April while inflation was up, but still far below the target set by the Federal Reserve.

The Commerce Department said Friday that spending increased 0.3% in April following a 1.1% surge in March that had been the largest increase in nearly a decade. Personal income growth, which had been lagging in recent months, jumped 0.5% in April.

97. Minutes show some on Fed still think rate hikes possible -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve officials at their recent meeting believed the central bank could remain "patient" in deciding when to adjust interest rates, though some officials thought future rate hikes might still be needed.

98. Powell says he sees 'moderate' risk from corporate debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Monday that the central bank is closely monitoring a sharp rise in corporate debt but currently does not see the types of threats that triggered the 2008 financial crisis.

99. US consumer prices rise 0.3% on higher gas, housing costs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. consumer prices increased 0.3% in April, led by more expensive gasoline, apartment rents and appliances.

The Labor Department said Friday that the consumer price index climbed 2% in the year ending in April. Excluding the volatile food and energy categories, core prices increased 0.1% last month and 2.1% from a year ago.

100. Powell says policies needed for slowing income growth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell said Thursday the United States needs to find ways to address a decades-long slowdown in income growth and upward economic mobility.

In a speech at a Fed research conference, Powell said that incomes have grown more slowly for middle-class families since the 1970s than for higher-income households.