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Editorial Results (free)

1. IRS asks Treasury watchdog to probe Comey, McCabe tax audits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The IRS commissioner has asked the Treasury Department's internal watchdog to immediately review the circumstances surrounding intensive tax audits that targeted ex-FBI Director James Comey and former Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, frequent targets of Donald Trump's ire during his presidency.

2. Genesco taps Sandfort as independent director -

The independent directors of the Genesco board have unanimously selected Gregory A. Sandfort as the company’s lead independent director. Sandfort succeeds Matthew C. Diamond, who has served in that role for the past four years.

3. Trump White House aide Hutchinson now in spotlight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just two years out of college, Cassidy Hutchinson said she watched as a valet mopped up the president's lunch after he had smashed his plate against a wall. Donald Trump was in a rage because his attorney general had refuted his claims that the election he lost had been stolen.

4. Too many races a challenge for diligent voters -

As a firm believer not only in the right to vote, but also in the duty, I have begun my due diligence for Nashville’s May 3 election.

Initial conclusion: Yikes!

Some 72 people are running for 43 public jobs. To use a dining analogy, this is an all-you-can-eat buffet consisting of six-dozen varieties of squash casserole.

5. Supreme Court nominee's 'empathy' is flashpoint for Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Empathy is not a quality many Republican senators want to see in the next Supreme Court justice.

Traditionally considered an admirable attribute, the ability to empathize with another's plight has become a touchstone for GOP opposition to Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson.

6. Group: Tax rich to fund vaccines for poor hit by pandemic -

LONDON (AP) — Anti-poverty organization Oxfam called Monday for governments to impose a one-time 99% tax on the world's billionaires and use the money to fund expanded production of vaccines for the poor — part of an effort to combat global inequality widened by the coronavirus pandemic.

7. US pulls out of settlement talks in family separation suits -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government withdrew Thursday from settlement negotiations to end lawsuits filed on behalf of parents and children who were forcibly separated under the Trump administration's zero-tolerance border policy, the American Civil Liberties Union said.

8. Remember when government intrusion was a bad thing? -

Tennessee legislators have shown they don’t need a monthslong session to commit mayhem. When they put their hive mind to it, they can muck things up in just three days.

Three days and change, actually, since the recent special session ran from Wednesday into the wee hours of Saturday morning.

9. US to restore full pension of FBI official fired under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe has won back his full pension as part of a settlement of his lawsuit arising from his firing during the Trump administration more than three years ago, his lawyers announced Thursday.

10. Mayor names Jurkovich public affairs senior adviser -

Tom Jurkovich has joined Mayor John Cooper’s administration as senior adviser for public affairs.

Jurkovich will provide strategic leadership in communications, community outreach, issue management, and coalition building as part of the effort to advance the mayor’s priorities on a range of policy areas, including transportation, sustainability, affordable housing and economic development.

11. Will gyms go the way of arcades, movie rental stores? -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Going to the gym was always part of Kari Hamra's routine until last year's government-ordered shutdowns forced her to replace the workouts with daily rides on her Peloton stationary bike.

12. Garland formally prohibits seizure of reporters' records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Monday formally prohibited federal prosecutors from seizing the records of journalists in leak investigations, with limited exceptions, reversing years of department policy.

13. Should you take money advice from ‘experts’ on Reddit? -

Should you take money advice from a stranger on the internet? In Reddit’s r/personalfinance channel, anonymous users exchange tips on buying homes, choosing insurance plans and managing very personal, nuanced money situations. (Think: “How do I handle my dying dad’s debts?”)

14. Justice Department to tighten rules on seizing Congress data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department will tighten its rules around obtaining records from members of Congress, Attorney General Merrick Garland said Monday, amid revelations the department under former President Donald Trump had secretly seized records from Democrats and members of the media.

15. Congress, Justice Dept. probing Trump seizures of Dems' data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog launched an investigation Friday after revelations that former President Donald Trump's administration secretly seized phone data from at least two House Democrats as part of an aggressive leaks probe. Democrats called the seizures a "shocking" abuse of power.

16. McGahn: Effort to get Mueller fired was 'point of no return' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House counsel Don McGahn told lawmakers in a closed-door interview last week that he regarded President Donald Trump's effort to have special counsel Robert Mueller fired as "a point of no return" for the administration if carried out.

17. After 2-year battle, House panel interviewing Trump counsel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is questioning former White House counsel Don McGahn behind closed doors on Friday, two years after House Democrats originally sought his testimony as part of investigations into former President Donald Trump.

18. Trump Justice Dept. seized phone records of 4 NYT reporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump Justice Department secretly obtained the phone records of four New York Times reporters as part of a leak investigation, the newspaper reported Wednesday.

It is the third instance over the last month in which a news media organization has disclosed that federal authorities seized the records of its journalists in an effort to identify sources for national security stories published during President Donald Trump's administration.

19. Biden moving to improve legal services for poor, minorities -

DETROIT (AP) — President Joe Biden plans to take executive action Tuesday to ensure minorities, low-income Americans and others have better access to quality legal representation after services dwindled during the Trump administration.

20. HCA honored by LinkedIn as top company -

Nashville’s HCA Healthcare has been recognized on the 2021 LinkedIn Top Companies ranking, an annual guide that identifies the best places for professionals to grow their careers and develop skills.

21. Garland rescinds Trump-era memo curtailing consent decrees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Friday rescinded a Trump-era memo that curtailed the use of consent decrees that federal prosecutors have used in sweeping investigations of police departments.

22. Next slide, please: Inside wonky White House virus briefings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — No matter how encouraging Andy Slavitt's news is at the government's coronavirus briefings, he can always count on next-up Dr. Rochelle Walensky to deliver a downbeat.

After the tumultuous briefings of the Trump era — when top doctors would troop to the podium in the White House press room only to be upstaged by spurious pronouncements from Donald Trump himself — the thrice-weekly virtual sessions of 2021 have taken on a more restrained and predictable rhythm.

23. Block a bill? Biden wants old-school Senate filibusters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden wants the Senate to engage in old-fashioned filibusters, forcing senators who try to block bills to have to stand and talk for hours, as happened in Hollywood movies and during the civil rights era, if they want to object to his legislative agenda.

24. Labor movement targets Amazon as a foothold in the South -

BESSEMER, Ala. (AP) — The South has never been hospitable to organized labor. But that may be changing, with an important test in Alabama, where thousands of workers at an Amazon campus are deciding whether to form a union.

25. Senate confirms Merrick Garland to be US attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate has confirmed Merrick Garland to be the next U.S. attorney general with a strong bipartisan vote, placing the widely-respected, veteran judge in the post as President Joe Biden has vowed to restore the Justice Department's reputation for independence.

26. Parents scramble for fewer camp slots -

The need to register children for summer camp before sessions fill up creeps up on busy parents every year as moms and dads struggle through the last few months of school, racing from one extracurricular to another, barely able to leave the office in time to do it all.

27. 'Overwhelm the problem': Inside Biden's war on COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The meetings begin each day not long after dawn. Dozens of aides report in, coffee in hand, joining by Zoom from agency headquarters, their homes or even adjacent offices.

The sessions start with the latest sobering statistics meant to focus the work and offer a reminder of what's at stake: new coronavirus cases, people in hospitals, deaths. But they also include the latest signs of progress: COVID-19 tests administered, vaccine doses shipped, shots injected.

28. Justice Dept. seeks resignations of Trump-era US attorneys -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department will ask U.S. attorneys who were appointed by former President Donald Trump to resign from their posts, as the Biden administration moves to transition to its own nominees, a senior Justice Department official said Monday.

29. AP Exclusive: DOJ rescinds 'zero tolerance' immigration rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department rescinded a Trump-era memo that established a "zero tolerance" enforcement policy for migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, which resulted in thousands of family separations.

30. Trump says Barr resigning, will leave before Christmas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr, one of President Donald Trump's staunchest allies, is departing amid lingering tension over the president's baseless claims of election fraud and the investigation into President-elect Joe Biden's son.

31. GOP's focus on Trump leaves scant room for Congress hopefuls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — All national political conventions are ultimately about the presidential candidate. That's especially true at this year's Republican National Convention, where leading speakers demonstrated a single-minded focus on President Donald Trump but barely mentioned the party's struggle to protect its Senate majority and gain ground in the House.

32. Tishler to lead Waller Healthcare Restructuring -

Waller has chosen John Tishler as leader of the firm’s Healthcare Restructuring Team, which provides support to borrowers and lenders at a time when the health care industry is being tested by the COVID-19 pandemic and the resulting economic downturn.

33. Barr able to put his stamp on executive power as Trump's AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gathered in the small assembly hall in Little Rock, Arkansas, their chairs spaced 6 feet (1.83 meters) apart, the business leaders listen admiringly to the nation's chief law enforcement official.

34. Trump signs order on police reform, doesn't mention racism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Following weeks of national protests since the death of George Floyd, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said would encourage better police practices. But he made no mention of the roiling national debate over racism spawned by police killings of black men and women.

35. A look at Democrats' sweeping proposals to overhaul policing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats in Congress are proposing an overhaul of police procedures and accountability after the mass protests over the deaths of black Americans at the hand of law enforcement.

The Justice in Policing Act is among the most ambitious law enforcement reforms from Congress in years and confronts several aspects of policing that have come under strong criticism, especially as more and more police violence is captured on cellphone video and shared across the nation and the world.

36. Rosenstein says he wouldn't approve Russia warrant now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told lawmakers Wednesday that he would not have approved an FBI surveillance application for a former Trump campaign aide during the Russia investigation had he known at the time about the problems that have since been revealed.

37. With impeachment over, critics see Trump 'retribution tour' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the week since his acquittal on impeachment charges, a fully emboldened President Donald Trump is demonstrating his determination to assert an iron grip on government, pushing his Justice Department to ease up on a longtime friend while using the levers of presidential powers to exact payback on real and perceived foes.

38. With impeachment over, critics see Trump 'retribution tour' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the week since his acquittal on impeachment charges, a fully emboldened President Donald Trump is demonstrating his determination to assert an iron grip on government, pushing his Justice Department to ease up on a longtime friend while using the levers of presidential powers to exact payback on real and perceived foes.

39. Justice Department brings new suits over sanctuary policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department ratcheted up legal pressure Monday on local governments over "sanctuary" policies that hinder federal immigration officers, bringing two new lawsuits and launching a coordinated messaging campaign to highlight an election-year priority of President Donald Trump.

40. Trump impeached on charges of abuse of power, obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives, becoming only the third American chief executive to be formally charged under the Constitution's ultimate remedy for high crimes and misdemeanors.

41. Trump impeached on charges of abuse of power, obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was impeached by the U.S. House of Representatives, becoming only the third American chief executive to be formally charged under the Constitution's ultimate remedy for high crimes and misdemeanors.

42. Rosenstein said he was 'horrified' at how Comey was fired -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told the FBI he was "angry, ashamed, horrified and embarrassed" at the way James Comey was fired as FBI director, according to records released Monday.

43. US official charged with leaking secrets to journalists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Defense Intelligence Agency official was arrested Wednesday and charged with leaking classified intelligence information to two journalists, including a reporter he was dating, the Justice Department said.

44. Trump pushes Attorney General Barr into political fray again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In offering Ukraine's president the help of Attorney General William Barr in investigating rival Joe Biden, President Donald Trump is once again inserting the nation's top law enforcement officer in a political fray.

45. US House passes bill giving pot businesses access to banking -

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would grant legal marijuana businesses access to banking, a measure that would clear up a longstanding headache for the industry.

The bill, called the SAFE Banking Act, passed 321-103 on the strength of near-unanimous support from Democrats and nearly half of Republicans. Its prospects in the Senate are uncertain, but supporters said the amount of Republican support in the House was a good sign.

46. Lewandowski, House Democrats spar at impeachment hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats' first impeachment hearing quickly turned hostile Tuesday as their sole witness, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, stonewalled many of their questions and said they were "focusing on petty and personal politics."

47. House Judiciary Committee to hold 1st impeachment hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As they investigate President Donald Trump, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee will hold their first official hearing in what they are calling an impeachment investigation.

48. House committee approves guidelines for impeachment hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler says there's no confusion about what his committee is doing: It's an impeachment investigation, no matter how you want to phrase it.

49. Some Democrats concerned as Judiciary sets impeachment rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is preparing for its first impeachment-related vote, set to define procedures for upcoming hearings on President Donald Trump even as some moderates in the caucus are urging the panel to slow down.

50. Ex-FBI official Andrew McCabe sues over his firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, a frequent target of President Donald Trump's ire, sued the FBI and the Justice Department on Thursday over his firing.

The lawsuit, the second this week from an ex-FBI official challenging the circumstances of his termination, says the firing was part of Trump's plan to rid the bureau of leaders he perceived as disloyal to him. The complaint contends that the two officials responsible for demoting and then firing McCabe — FBI Director Chris Wray and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions — created a pretext to force him out in accordance with the president's wishes.

51. What to look for when Mueller testifies on the Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When a reluctant Robert Mueller takes his seat at the congressional witness table, Democrats will be looking for incriminating, hidden-till-now details about Donald Trump and Russia. Republicans want the former special counsel to concede his investigation was all a waste of time and money, if not an outright hoax.

52. What to look for when Mueller testifies about Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats want incriminating, hidden-till-now details about Donald Trump and Russia. Republicans want Robert Mueller to concede it was all a waste of time and money, if not an outright hoax.

53. Nadler: Mueller hearing to air evidence of Trump wrongdoing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee chairman said Sunday that this week's hearing with Robert Mueller will air "very substantial evidence" of wrongdoing by President Donald Trump and make a public case for impeachment. Republicans pledged sharp questioning of the special counsel about what they see as a "one-sided" Russia investigation.

54. House Republicans vow tough questions for Mueller at hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are pledging tough questioning of special counsel Robert Mueller when he testifies before Congress this week as Democrats plan to air evidence of wrongdoing by President Donald Trump in a potentially last-ditch bid to impeach him.

55. Democrats questioning Robert Mueller to focus on obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee who will question former special counsel Robert Mueller next week plan to focus on a narrow set of episodes laid out in his report, an effort to direct Americans' attention to what they see as the most egregious examples of President Donald Trump's conduct.

56. Facing calls for resignation, Acosta defends Epstein deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Insisting he got the best deal he could at the time, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta on Wednesday defended his handling of a sex-trafficking case involving now-jailed financier Jeffrey Epstein as Acosta tried to stave off intensifying Democratic calls for his resignation.

57. House Judiciary will vote on subpoenas for Kushner, Sessions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is moving to authorize subpoenas for several people tied to special counsel Robert Mueller's report, including President Donald Trump's son in law, Jared Kushner, and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

58. House panel releases written answers from ex-Trump official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee says a former Trump administration official who was a vital witness in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation was blocked by the White House from answering more than 200 of its questions.

59. Raines retiring as dean of Belmont’s business school -

Pat Raines, dean of Belmont University’s Jack C. Massey College of Business, has announced his retirement after 16 years of service to the school.

During Raines’ tenure, the school has received accolades from Princeton Review, BusinessWeek and Entrepreneurship magazine for having some of the top business programs in the country. The College of Business’s undergraduate enrollment has grown by more than 100%, and the graduate enrollment has increased by nearly 80%.

60. Hope Hicks blocked from answering more than 150 questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks was blocked by President Donald Trump's lawyers from answering questions more than 150 times in a combative interview with the House Judiciary Committee this week, according to Democrats who released a 273-page transcript on Thursday.

61. Hicks rebuffs questions on Trump White House in interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks on Wednesday refused to answer questions related to her time in the White House in an interview with the House Judiciary Committee, dimming Democrats' chances of obtaining new or substantive information about President Donald Trump as part of their investigation into obstruction of justice.

62. Former Trump aide Hope Hicks agrees to Judiciary interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House communications director Hope Hicks has agreed to a closed-door interview with the House Judiciary Committee, the panel announced Wednesday, a breakthrough for Democrats who have been frustrated by President Donald Trump's broad stonewalling of their investigations.

63. In Barr, Trump has found his champion and advocate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump could only be delighted to have his attorney general in El Salvador, dealing with his biggest issue: illegal immigration. Yet Barr did even better for his boss. In interviews from the Central American country, he's been offering cryptic comments suggesting the Russia probe unfairly targeted Trump.

64. Barr working with intel chiefs on Russia review -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr is stepping up the probe into the origins of the Russia investigation, naming a U.S. attorney to oversee the investigation and working with intelligence chiefs to see how surveillance was conducted.

65. Barr launches new look at origins of Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr has appointed a U.S. attorney to examine the origins of the Russia investigation and determine if intelligence collection involving the Trump campaign was "lawful and appropriate," according to a person familiar with the issue.

66. Barr besieged by allegations he's being Trump's protector -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr portrayed himself as an apolitical elder statesman at his confirmation hearing. He declared he'd rather resign than be asked to fire special counsel Robert Mueller without cause and insisted the prosecutor he'd known for decades would never involve himself in a witch hunt as the president claimed.

67. King of the Road was like Nashville’s own Vegas, complete with Miller’s ‘Rat Pack’ -

Standing on the open terrace outside the location of Roger Miller’s private suite next to The Roof, the Vegas-styled club atop his King of the Road Motor Inn, I look back in time and, dang me, I both wonder where it all went and celebrate that I can remember.

68. Trump depicted in Mueller report feared being tabbed a fraud -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fear was persistent. As the Russia investigation heated up and threatened to shadow Donald Trump's presidency, he became increasingly concerned. But the portrait painted by special counsel Robert Mueller is not of a president who believed he or anyone on his campaign colluded with Russians to interfere in the 2016 election.

69. Rod Rosenstein submits letter of resignation to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein submitted his resignation Monday after a two-year run defined by his appointment of a special counsel to investigate connections between President Donald Trump's campaign and Russia.

70. How Trump's anger at AG grew: 'It's all because you recused' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jeff Sessions was "weak," the president of the United States shouted.

Donald Trump was livid — as angry as aide Steve Bannon had ever seen him. And the worst of his fury was directed at his attorney general.

71. House subpoena for Mueller report escalates investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee issued a subpoena Friday for special counsel Robert Mueller's report as Congress escalates its investigation of President Donald Trump.

72. Trump blasts ex-advisers who say he tried to stop Mueller -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after celebrating the release of the Mueller report as "a good day," President Donald Trump struck a defiant tone Friday, unleashing tweets saying claims in the report by former administration officials that he tried numerous times to stop or influence the probe were "total bullshit."

73. Former counsel may have saved Trump from himself -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Don McGahn was barely on speaking terms with President Donald Trump when he left the White House last fall. But special counsel Robert Mueller's report reveals the president may owe his former top lawyer a debt of gratitude.

74. Congress plunges into Mueller report, subpoena upcoming -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's now up to Congress to decide what to do with special counsel Robert Mueller's findings about President Donald Trump.

75. A beleaguered Trump feared 'the end of my presidency' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the moment two years ago when Donald Trump learned a special counsel had been appointed to investigate his campaign and Russia, the president responded with profane fury — and something resembling panic.

76. Analysis: Mueller paints a damning portrait of the president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To Donald Trump, the start of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation looked alarmingly like the end of his presidency. So he tried to stop it.

77. What the Mueller report says about Trump-Russia contacts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sweeping two-year investigation, special counsel Robert Mueller identified numerous contacts between President Donald Trump's campaign officials and Russians. But the evidence that his team uncovered during the Russia probe that shadowed Trump's presidency didn't rise to the level of a chargeable crime, he said.

78. The 10 instances of possible obstruction in Mueller report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election identified 10 instances of possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump. Mueller said in his report that he could not conclusively determine that Trump had committed a crime or that he hadn't.

79. Mueller report: Trump largely failed to derail Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sought the removal of special counsel Robert Mueller, discouraged witnesses from cooperating with prosecutors and prodded aides to mislead the public on his behalf, according to a hugely anticipated report from Mueller that details multiple efforts the president made to curtail a Russia probe he feared would cripple his administration.

80. The Latest: Report says officials blocked Trump's efforts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller says President Donald Trump's efforts to influence the Russia investigation "were mostly unsuccessful," but that was because the people surrounding the president "declined to carry out orders to accede to his requests."

81. Mueller report release spirals into political gamesmanship -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After nearly two years of waiting, America will get some answers straight from Robert Mueller — but not before President Donald Trump's attorney general has his say.

The Justice Department on Thursday is expected to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report on Russian election interference and Trump's campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country.

82. AP sources: Trump considers adding 'immigration czar' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is considering bringing on a "border" or "immigration czar" to coordinate the president's immigration policies across various federal agencies, according to three people familiar with the discussions.

83. Mueller's evidence is likely a massive amount of material -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say they want "all of the underlying evidence" in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation . But what is all of that evidence?

84. Mueller finds no Trump collusion, leaves obstruction open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller found no evidence President Donald Trump's campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election but reached no conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. That brought a hearty claim of vindication from Trump but set the stage for new rounds of political and legal fighting.

85. Mueller concludes Russia-Trump probe; no new indictments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates.

86. AP FACT CHECK: Trump falsely says Mueller appointment biased -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to discredit a highly anticipated report on the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump is attacking the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller by falsely claiming it was biased and conflicted.

87. Attorney general won't recuse from overseeing Mueller probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr will not recuse himself from overseeing the special counsel's Russia probe after consulting with senior ethics officials, the Justice Department said Monday.

88. House committee to vote on approving Trump admin subpoenas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are laying the groundwork to subpoena Trump administration officials over family separations at the southern border.

The Oversight Committee will vote Tuesday on whether to approve subpoenas to the heads of Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services. With Democrats as a majority, the authorization is expected, but it's still not clear whether the subpoenas will actually be served.

89. From corn to Apple: What's behind the US-China standoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear the Americans tell it, the Chinese have gone on a commercial crime spree, pilfering trade secrets from seed corn to electronic brains behind wind turbines. China has stripped the arm off a T-Mobile robot, the U.S. says, and looted trade secrets about robotic cars from Apple.

90. Sticking to the script -

Bill Lee the governor sounds a lot like Bill Lee the candidate as he works to implement the policies he brought to Tennessee voters since the Republican businessman announced that he would seek the state’s top job.

91. Senate confirms William Barr as attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed William Barr as attorney general, placing the veteran government official and lawyer atop the Justice Department as special counsel Robert Mueller investigates Russian interference in the 2016 election.

92. Whitaker: I have 'not interfered' with Mueller investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said on Friday that he has "not interfered in any way" in the special counsel's Russia investigation as he faced a contentious and partisan congressional hearing in his waning days on the job.

93. Senate panel approves Barr, Trump's AG pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general.

William Barr's nomination was approved along party lines Thursday. It now heads to the Senate floor, where Barr is expected to be confirmed.

94. Senate panel set to approve Trump's attorney general nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee is poised to approve William Barr's nomination to be attorney general Thursday in a vote that is likely to be mostly along party lines as Democrats have questioned how transparent Barr will be once special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation concludes.

95. Mueller probe is 'close to being completed,' acting AG says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel's Russia probe is "close to being completed," the acting attorney general said Monday in the first official sign that the investigation may be wrapping up.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's comments were a departure for the Justice Department, which rarely comments on the state of the investigation into whether President Donald Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

96. Supreme Court inaction suggests DACA safe for another year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation and that President Donald Trump has sought to end seems likely to survive for at least another year.

That's because the Supreme Court took no action Friday on the Trump administration's request to decide by early summer whether Trump's bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was legal. The program has been protected by several federal courts.

97. Watchdog: Many more migrant families may have been separated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands more migrant children may have been split from their families than the Trump administration previously reported, in part because officials were stepping up family separations long before the border policy that prompted international outrage last spring, a government watchdog said Thursday.

98. Takeaways: AG nominee assures, frustrates Mueller defenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General nominee William Barr made one thing clear during his Senate confirmation hearing : He may want the job, but he doesn't need it.

The 68-year-old Barr, who has already served once before as attorney general, said Tuesday he's in a position in life where he "can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences."

99. Barr seeks to assure senators he won't be a Trump loyalist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vowing "I will not be bullied," President Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general asserted independence from the White House, saying he believed that Russia had tried to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, that the special counsel investigation shadowing Trump is not a witch hunt and that his predecessor was right to recuse himself from the probe.

100. Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration cannot put a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census, a federal judge in New York ruled Friday in a boost to proponents of counting immigrants.