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Editorial Results (free)

1. Attorney general won't recuse from overseeing Mueller probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr will not recuse himself from overseeing the special counsel's Russia probe after consulting with senior ethics officials, the Justice Department said Monday.

2. House committee to vote on approving Trump admin subpoenas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are laying the groundwork to subpoena Trump administration officials over family separations at the southern border.

The Oversight Committee will vote Tuesday on whether to approve subpoenas to the heads of Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services. With Democrats as a majority, the authorization is expected, but it's still not clear whether the subpoenas will actually be served.

3. From corn to Apple: What's behind the US-China standoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear the Americans tell it, the Chinese have gone on a commercial crime spree, pilfering trade secrets from seed corn to electronic brains behind wind turbines. China has stripped the arm off a T-Mobile robot, the U.S. says, and looted trade secrets about robotic cars from Apple.

4. Sticking to the script -

Bill Lee the governor sounds a lot like Bill Lee the candidate as he works to implement the policies he brought to Tennessee voters since the Republican businessman announced that he would seek the state’s top job.

5. Senate confirms William Barr as attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed William Barr as attorney general, placing the veteran government official and lawyer atop the Justice Department as special counsel Robert Mueller investigates Russian interference in the 2016 election.

6. Whitaker: I have 'not interfered' with Mueller investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said on Friday that he has "not interfered in any way" in the special counsel's Russia investigation as he faced a contentious and partisan congressional hearing in his waning days on the job.

7. Senate panel approves Barr, Trump's AG pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general.

William Barr's nomination was approved along party lines Thursday. It now heads to the Senate floor, where Barr is expected to be confirmed.

8. Senate panel set to approve Trump's attorney general nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee is poised to approve William Barr's nomination to be attorney general Thursday in a vote that is likely to be mostly along party lines as Democrats have questioned how transparent Barr will be once special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation concludes.

9. Mueller probe is 'close to being completed,' acting AG says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel's Russia probe is "close to being completed," the acting attorney general said Monday in the first official sign that the investigation may be wrapping up.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's comments were a departure for the Justice Department, which rarely comments on the state of the investigation into whether President Donald Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

10. Supreme Court inaction suggests DACA safe for another year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation and that President Donald Trump has sought to end seems likely to survive for at least another year.

That's because the Supreme Court took no action Friday on the Trump administration's request to decide by early summer whether Trump's bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was legal. The program has been protected by several federal courts.

11. Watchdog: Many more migrant families may have been separated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands more migrant children may have been split from their families than the Trump administration previously reported, in part because officials were stepping up family separations long before the border policy that prompted international outrage last spring, a government watchdog said Thursday.

12. Takeaways: AG nominee assures, frustrates Mueller defenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General nominee William Barr made one thing clear during his Senate confirmation hearing : He may want the job, but he doesn't need it.

The 68-year-old Barr, who has already served once before as attorney general, said Tuesday he's in a position in life where he "can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences."

13. Barr seeks to assure senators he won't be a Trump loyalist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vowing "I will not be bullied," President Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general asserted independence from the White House, saying he believed that Russia had tried to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, that the special counsel investigation shadowing Trump is not a witch hunt and that his predecessor was right to recuse himself from the probe.

14. Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration cannot put a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census, a federal judge in New York ruled Friday in a boost to proponents of counting immigrants.

15. Things to watch at William Barr's AG confirmation hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As he did almost 30 years ago, William Barr is appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to make the case he's qualified to serve as attorney general.

Barr served as attorney general from 1991 to 1993 and has been nominated by President Donald Trump to do the job again. His confirmation hearing Tuesday has multiple story lines worth watching.

16. Trump's AG pick to steer through Dem, GOP queries at hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee will have to navigate his confirmation hearing skillfully, emphasizing his support for Trump's policies while assuring Democrats he will act independently and won't interfere with the special counsel's Russia investigation.

17. Barr as attorney general: old job, very different Washington -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When William Barr was attorney general in the early 1990s, he was outspoken about some of America's biggest problems — violent crime, drug addiction, teenage pregnancy. The "Age of Aquarius," he warned, had given way to crack babies and broken families, misery and squalor.

18. Democrats worry over AG nominee's view of presidential power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — William Barr once advised that a president didn't need Congress' permission to attack Iraq, that his administration could arrest a foreign dictator and that the FBI could capture suspects abroad without that country's consent.

19. AP source: Rosenstein expected to leave Justice in weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed special counsel Robert Mueller and remains his most visible Justice Department protector, is expected to leave his position soon after William Barr is confirmed as attorney general, a person familiar with the plans said Wednesday.

20. Trump's pick for AG once called border wall 'overkill' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general, William Barr, once questioned the value of a wall along the Mexican border similar to the one the president has advocated, describing the idea as "overkill."

21. Legal marijuana industry toasts year of global gains -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The last year was a 12-month champagne toast for the legal marijuana industry as the global market exploded and cannabis pushed its way further into the financial and cultural mainstream.

22. Legal marijuana industry had banner year in 2018 -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The last year was a 12-month champagne toast for the legal marijuana industry as the global market exploded and cannabis pushed its way further into the financial and cultural mainstream.

23. Whitaker rejected advice to recuse from Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker chose not to recuse himself from the Russia investigation even though a top Justice Department ethics official advised him to step aside out of an "abundance of caution," a senior official said Thursday.

24. Judge blocks restrictions on who can apply for asylum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday blocked Trump administration policies that prevented immigrants who suffered gang violence in their home countries or domestic violence from seeking asylum.

25. Trump says he'll nominate Barr for attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he will nominate William Barr, the late President George H.W. Bush's attorney general, to serve in the same role.

26. Tech execs at White House field ideas for US dominance -

Top executives from Google, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and Qualcomm gathered Thursday at the White House amid strained ties between President Donald Trump's administration and the tech industry and an ongoing trade war with China.

27. House Democrats say Whitaker will testify in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will testify before the House Judiciary Committee in January.

28. Right-leaning nonprofit paid Whitaker nearly $1M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Before joining the Justice Department, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker earned nearly $1 million from a right-leaning nonprofit that doesn't disclose its donors, according to newly released financial disclosure forms.

29. Right-leaning nonprofit paid Whitaker nearly $1M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Before joining the Justice Department, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker earned nearly $1 million from a right-leaning nonprofit that doesn't disclose its donors, according to newly released financial disclosure forms.

30. Democratic senators sue over Whitaker's appointment as AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three Senate Democrats filed a lawsuit Monday arguing that Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's appointment is unconstitutional and asking a federal judge to remove him.

31. WikiLeaks chief could see charges, US court filing suggests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department inadvertently named Julian Assange in a court filing in an unrelated case that suggests prosecutors have prepared charges against the WikiLeaks founder under seal.

32. Court challenge to be filed over appointment of acting AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Maryland is challenging the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as the new U.S. acting attorney general, arguing that President Donald Trump sidestepped the Constitution and the Justice Department's own succession plan by elevating Whitaker to the top job.

33. Trump, Pelosi talk about getting along - until they don't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Suddenly facing life under divided government, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders talked bipartisanship but then bluntly previewed the fault lines to come. Trump threatened to go after House Democrats who try to investigate him, while Rep. Nancy Pelosi said her party would be "a check and balance" against the White House.

34. Trump, Pelosi talk about getting along - until they don't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Suddenly facing life under divided government, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders talked bipartisanship but then bluntly previewed the fault lines to come. Trump threatened to go after House Democrats who try to investigate him, while Rep. Nancy Pelosi said her party would be "a check and balance" against the White House.

35. Trump forces out Jeff Sessions as US attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions was pushed out Wednesday as the country's chief law enforcement officer after enduring more than a year of blistering and personal attacks from President Donald Trump over his recusal from the Russia investigation.

36. Election Impact: Health care stocks jump following midterms -

NEW YORK (AP) — The outcome of the midterm elections was good for the stock market in general, mostly because it didn't produce any big surprises, but it was especially good for the health care industry and several other companies.

37. Tech and health care lead US stock surge after midterms -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied Wednesday as investors were relieved to see that the U.S. midterm elections went largely as they expected they would. Big-name technology and consumer and health care companies soared as the S&P 500 index closed at its highest level in four weeks.

38. Report: Agencies blindsided by Trump immigration order -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal immigration and health officials were blindsided by President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" policy on migrants crossing the southwest border, triggering a cascade of problems as agencies struggled with the fallout from family separations, congressional investigators said in a critical report issued Wednesday.

39. Organizing committee named for 2019 NFL Draft -

The local organizing committee for the 2019 NFL Draft includes 35 Nashville business and community leaders, including country artist Tim McGraw and Eddie George, formerly of the Tennessee Titans, and is led by honorary co-chairs Amy Adams Strunk, Tennessee Titans owner, and Mayor David Briley. Serving as co-chairs are Steve Underwood, CEO and president of the Tennessee Titans, and Dan Mohnke, senior vice president, sales & marketing and operations, Nissan North America.

40. Trump tells AP he won't accept blame if GOP loses House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing the prospect of bruising electoral defeat in congressional elections, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he won't accept the blame if his party loses control of the House in November, arguing his campaigning and endorsements have helped Republican candidates.

41. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on health plan protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't playing it straight when it comes to his campaign pledge not to undercut health coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Five weeks before midterm elections, he is telling voters that those provisions "are safe," even as his Justice Department is arguing in court that those protections in the Affordable Care Act should fall. The short-term health plans Trump often promotes as a bargain alternative to "Obamacare" offer no guarantee of covering pre-existing conditions.

42. White House postpones meeting between Trump, Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A highly anticipated meeting between President Donald Trump and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was postponed until next week to avoid conflicting with a dramatic Senate hearing involving Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the White House said Thursday.

43. Trump says he prefers to keep Rosenstein, may delay meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he would "certainly prefer not" to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and that he may delay a highly anticipated meeting with the Justice Department's No. 2 official.

44. US House approves $1.7 billion in disaster aid for Carolinas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed legislation that would provide $1.7 billion to help residents of the Carolinas and elsewhere recover from recent natural disasters.

The aid was added to legislation to keep Federal Aviation Administration programs running beyond month's end. The bill passed 398-23.

45. If Rosenstein leaves Justice Department, what happens next? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The investigation into Russian election interference is often called the Mueller probe, but it's Rod Rosenstein who oversees it.

Rosenstein's fate as deputy attorney general remains in the air after reports last week that he floated the idea of recording President Donald Trump. Rosenstein went to the White House on Monday expecting to be fired, but the president gave him a three-day reprieve, and the two are set to have a face-to-face showdown on Thursday.

46. Rosenstein's job to be topic of Thursday meeting with Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After a long weekend spent wondering if he should resign or would be fired, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein still has his job — for now.

President Donald Trump gave Rosenstein a three-day reprieve pending their face-to-face White House showdown on Thursday. That's when the man who oversees the Trump-Russia investigation will respond to reports that he had discussed secretly recording the president and possibly using constitutional procedures to remove him from office.

47. Trump rips Sessions: 'I don't have an attorney general' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is renewing his attacks on Jeff Sessions, saying, "I don't have an attorney general."

48. Trump, others dispute book's description of unhinged leader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An incendiary tell-all book by a reporter who helped bring down President Richard Nixon set off a firestorm in the White House, with its descriptions of current and former aides calling President Donald Trump an "idiot" and a "liar," disparaging his judgment and claiming they plucked papers off his desk to prevent him from withdrawing from a pair of trade agreements.

49. Facebook, Twitter pledge to defend against foreign intrusion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Twitter executives assured Congress on Wednesday that they are aggressively working to root out foreign attempts to sow discord in America, and they pledged to better protect their social networks against manipulation during the 2018 midterm elections and beyond.

50. Republicans hit Trump for criticizing Justice Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump encountered bipartisan criticism on Tuesday for complaining that his own Justice Department's indictments against two Republican congressmen were endangering the GOP's midterm election prospects, with one Republican senator saying of Trump's attack, "We can't normalize that."

51. Trump says Sessions' DOJ has placed GOP in midterm jeopardy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Showing his disregard for the Justice Department's independence, President Donald Trump tweeted that federal indictments against two Republican congressmen placed the GOP in midterm election jeopardy.

52. Trump escalates attacks on his attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is escalating his attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He's suggesting the Department of Justice put Republicans jeopardy ahead of midterms with recent indictments of two GOP congressmen.

53. AP sources: Lawyer was told Russia had 'Trump over a barrel' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior Justice Department lawyer says a former British spy told him at a breakfast meeting two years ago that Russian intelligence believed it had Donald Trump "over a barrel," according to multiple people familiar with the encounter.

54. His way: Washington says goodbye to John McCain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans lined up for blocks outside the U.S. Capitol Thursday to say goodbye to John McCain as officials, relatives and friends paid their tributes inside to the Vietnam hero and longtime senator lying in state under the majestic dome.

55. White House faces brain drain at perilous moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increasingly convinced that the West Wing is wholly unprepared to handle the expected assault from Democrats if they win the House in November, President Donald Trump's aides and allies are privately raising alarm as his circle of legal and communications advisers continues to shrink.

56. Top Trump lawyer latest to leave White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House counsel Don McGahn, a consequential insider in President Donald Trump's legal storms and successes and a key figure in the administration's handling of the Russia investigation, will be leaving in the fall, the president announced Wednesday.

57. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's bent reality: Cohen, clean air, taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is living in an alternate reality when it comes to special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation and other controversies swirling around him.

He laments the threat of a "perjury trap" in explaining why he's hesitant to be interviewed by Mueller in the Russia probe, even as Trump's lawyers assert that Mueller had ruled out trying to indict a sitting president.

58. A president who demands loyalty finds it fleeting in DC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Et tu, Michael Cohen?

Loyalty has long been a core value for President Donald Trump. But he's learning the hard way that in politics, it doesn't always last.

59. Sessions hits Trump back: Won't be 'improperly influenced' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, newly incensed by campaign allegations, plunged back into his criticism of Attorney General Jeff Sessions, claiming in an interview that Sessions "never took control of the Justice Department" after Trump put him there. Sessions quickly hit back, declaring that he and his department "will not be improperly influenced by political considerations."

60. Trump suggests outlawing prosecutors' deals with defendants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, incensed over a deal his longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen cut with prosecutors, says it might be better if "flipping" were illegal because people "just make up lies."

61. Trump denies wrongdoing, says Cohen is making up stories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump dug in to his denials of wrongdoing as his White House struggled to manage the fallout from allegations that he orchestrated a campaign cover-up to buy the silence of two women who say they had affairs with him.

62. Project uncovering South's hidden LGBTQ history -

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — A new project is documenting the history of LGBTQ people in the Deep South, a region that once all but forced gays, lesbians and others to live in hiding.

Bob Burns, who is gay, both lived through some of the toughest times for LGBTQ Southerners and documented them through years of activism. Now 66, he compiled a trove of information from years that included the AIDS epidemic and the systemic oppression of gay people in the Deep South.

63. Mueller offers Trump team new proposal for interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In negotiations over a possible interview by prosecutors, special counsel Robert Mueller's team has offered the White House format changes, perhaps willing to limit some questions asked of President Donald Trump or accept some answers in writing, according to a person briefed on the proposal.

64. White House: Trump's tweet about Russia probe was an opinion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump bluntly declared his attorney general should terminate "right now" the federal probe into the campaign that took him to the White House, a newly fervent attack on the special counsel investigation that could imperil his presidency. Trump also assailed the trial, just underway, of his former campaign chairman by the special counsel's team

65. 11 House Republicans seek impeachment of DOJ's Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans sharply escalated their months-long clash with the Justice Department as a group of 11 conservatives introduced articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the official who oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

66. 11 House Republicans seek impeachment of DOJ's Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A group of 11 House conservatives introduced articles of impeachment against Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, the Justice Department official who oversees special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

67. O Canna-bis! US marijuana companies go public in Canada -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Green Thumb Industries had a business plan, expertise and plenty of ambition to grow its marijuana business. What the Chicago-based company didn't have was access to enough capital to make it all happen.

68. Detaining immigrant kids is now a billion-dollar industry -

SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Detaining immigrant children has morphed into a surging industry in the U.S. that now reaps $1 billion annually — a tenfold increase over the past decade, an Associated Press analysis finds.

69. Deadline to reunite immigrant families rapidly approaching -

WASHINGTON (AP) — This spring, the Trump administration began a "zero tolerance" policy to criminally prosecute anyone caught crossing the border illegally. Because children can't be in jail with their parents, more than 2,300 families caught by Border Patrol were separated. The move prompted mass outrage in the United States and internationally. After first blaming the practice on the Democrats, Trump on June 20 signed an executive order that stopped the separation of families. A June 26 court order by a federal judge set a hard deadline to reunite the families, and that deadline is fast approaching.

70. Pruitt is out, handing EPA reins to former coal lobbyist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bowing out after months of scandals, Scott Pruitt is turning the Environmental Protection Agency over to a far less flashy deputy who is expected to continue Pruitt's rule-cutting, business-friendly ways as steward of the country's environment.

71. Life in Trump's Cabinet: Perks, pestering, power, putdowns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross came in for an Oval Office tongue-lashing after he used a mundane soup can as a TV prop. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis got overruled by President Donald Trump's announcement that a new "Space Force" is in the offing. Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt caught a sharp admonition from Trump to "knock it off" after his ethics problems dominated cable television.

72. High court rules against Calif. crisis pregnancy center law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court effectively put an end Tuesday to a California law that forces anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers to provide information about abortion.

The 5-4 ruling also casts doubts on similar laws in Hawaii and Illinois.

73. Trump tweet complicates House GOP efforts on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hours before House showdown votes on immigration, President Donald Trump suggested Thursday that any measure the chamber passes would be doomed in the Senate anyway. His comments could weaken Republicans' already uphill drive to pass legislation on an issue that's become politically fraught amid heart-rending images of migrant families being separated at the border.

74. Trump tweet complicates House GOP efforts on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hours before House showdown votes on immigration, President Donald Trump suggested Thursday that any measure the chamber passes would be doomed in the Senate anyway. His comments could weaken Republicans' already uphill drive to pass legislation on an issue that's become politically fraught amid heart-rending images of migrant families being separated at the border.

75. 'Great job,' says Trump: Nielsen back in good graces for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kirstjen Nielsen has one hard-earned presidential signing pen.

President Donald Trump used the black marker Wednesday to sign an executive order halting family separations at the U.S. border — then handed it to Nielsen, his Homeland Security secretary.

76. United Methodist Church chides Sessions over border policy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More than 600 members of Attorney General Jeff Sessions' church are denouncing him over the Trump administration's "zero tolerance" immigration policy that has led to children being separated from their parents at the border.

77. 2K children alone: Trump's self-inflicted domestic crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands of children split from their families at the U.S. southern border are being held in government-run facilities. A look at how we got here, what's real and what's not, and what might happen next.

78. Family separation policy starts dividing Republicans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing a rising tide of outrage from Democrats and some Republicans over the forced separation of migrant children and parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, President Donald Trump dug in Monday, again falsely blaming Democrats in the escalating political crisis.

79. AP FACT CHECK: Trump ignores strong points in US trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is presenting a skewed portrait of how the world does business with the U.S to rationalize his escalating trade dispute with allies.

At the same time, he's glossing over aspects of the U.S. economy that don't support his faulty contention that it's the best it's ever been. The complexities of health care for veterans are also set aside as he hails a new era in the Department of Veterans Affairs' system.

80. Saving Sessions: Inside the GOP effort to protect the AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Days after President Donald Trump deemed Jeff Sessions "beleaguered" and threatened to fire him last July, members of the president's inner circle made a desperate case to save the attorney general's job.

81. Trump boosts pressure on Justice Department in Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is increasing the pressure on the Justice Department, declining to say whether he has confidence in Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein after the White House negotiated rare access to classified documents for Trump's congressional allies.

82. Congressional leaders to review information on Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ratcheting up pressure on the Russia investigation, the White House announced that top FBI and Justice Department officials have agreed to meet with congressional leaders and "review" highly classified information the lawmakers have been seeking on the handling of the probe.

83. Trump to DOJ: Investigate whether FBI infiltrated campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he will "demand" that the Justice Department investigate whether the FBI infiltrated his presidential campaign, an extraordinary order that came hours before his legal team said the special counsel indicated the investigation into the president could be concluded by September.

84. CIA nominee says she doesn't believe torture works -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's CIA nominee said during her confirmation hearing that she doesn't believe torture works as an interrogation technique and that her "strong moral compass" would prevent her from carrying out any presidential order she found objectionable.

85. Sessions: No tears over Tennessee immigration raid -

GATLINBURG (AP) — The nation's top law enforcement officer says he isn't shedding tears over a raid at a Tennessee meat processing plant where 97 workers were arrested by immigration officials.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions was speaking about employers, saying they shouldn't be able to gain advantage by hiring workers who are in the country illegally. The comments were made at a law enforcement training conference in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, which is not far from the plant that was raided April 5.

86. Special counsel team has floated idea of subpoena for Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel leading the Russia investigation raised the prospect in March of issuing a grand jury subpoena for President Donald Trump, his former attorney said, confirming that investigators have floated the extraordinary idea of forcing a sitting president to testify under oath.

87. Trump: 'Disgraceful' leak of Mueller Russia probe questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday it's "disgraceful" that a list of questions that the special counsel investigating Russian election interference wants to ask him was "leaked" to the news media.

88. Struggle for transgender rights shifts to health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Military service. Bathroom use. Job bias. And now, health care. The Trump administration is coming under fire for rewriting a federal rule that bars discrimination in health care based on "gender identity." Critics say it's another attempt to undercut acceptance for transgender people.

89. Cohen loaned millions to Ukraine-born cab mogul -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump's personal attorney, whose business dealings are being investigated by the FBI, and his father-in-law have lent $26 million in recent years to a taxi mogul who is shifting into the legalized marijuana industry, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press.

90. DOJ watchdog finds himself in familiar political hot seat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump wasted no time before seizing on last week's report by the Justice Department's internal watchdog on misconduct allegations against the FBI's former No. 2 official, Andrew McCabe. Trump tweeted it was proof that his archrival James Comey, the former FBI director, "totally controlled" McCabe.

91. Backpage.com CEO pleads guilty, will testify against others -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — The chief executive of Backpage.com pleaded guilty to state and federal charges including conspiracy and money laundering, and agreed to testify in ongoing prosecutions against others at the website that authorities have dubbed a lucrative nationwide "online brothel," authorities said.

92. Trump seethes over FBI raid, ponders firing those he blames -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was so incensed by the FBI's raid of his personal attorney's office and hotel room that he's privately pondered firing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and publicly mused about ousting special counsel Robert Mueller.

93. Trump wants US military to secure border until wall is built -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump, annoyed by the lack of progress on fulfilling the signature promise of his campaign, said he wants to use the military to secure the U.S.-Mexico border until his "big, beautiful wall" is erected.

94. White House says Trump isn't considering firing Mueller -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is not considering firing the special counsel investigating Russian election interference, a top White House lawyer said, after a cascade of Trump tweets revived chatter that the deeply frustrated president may be preparing to get rid of the veteran prosecutor.

95. In Nashville, Sessions pledges to keep investing in police -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions has pledged to a conference of police leaders that President Donald Trump's administration will continue to invest in their departments.

96. Trump lawyers have no easy options on interview request -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel's office wants to talk to Donald Trump about the firings of James Comey and Michael Flynn, but as the president's lawyers negotiate the terms and scope of a possible interview, they're left with no easy options.

97. Florida’s epiphany on guns means little in Tennessee -

Memphis resident Stevie Moore has been waging a war to take illegal guns off the streets since someone shot his son in the head with an AK-47 15 years ago.

“It’s my mission to fight these guns whatever way I can,” says Moore, who founded the organization Freedom From Unnecessary Negatives in an effort to steer youth away from violence.

98. Trump's strong words on guns give way to political reality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Not two weeks ago, President Donald Trump wagged his finger at a Republican senator and scolded him for being "afraid of the NRA," declaring that he would stand up to the powerful gun lobby and finally get results on quelling gun violence following last month's Florida school shooting.

99. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's trade talk comes up short on facts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump leaves out a big component of trade when he complains about the huge imbalance between what the U.S. buys from abroad and what the world buys from the U.S. He ignores services, an American strength and part of the trade equation.

100. Trump hopes top court will rein in judges who block policies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is looking for ways to deal with a recurring frustration: individual federal judges who have put the brakes on one major administration policy after another.