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Editorial Results (free)

1. US official charged with leaking secrets to journalists -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Defense Intelligence Agency official was arrested Wednesday and charged with leaking classified intelligence information to two journalists, including a reporter he was dating, the Justice Department said.

2. Trump pushes Attorney General Barr into political fray again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In offering Ukraine's president the help of Attorney General William Barr in investigating rival Joe Biden, President Donald Trump is once again inserting the nation's top law enforcement officer in a political fray.

3. US House passes bill giving pot businesses access to banking -

The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill Wednesday that would grant legal marijuana businesses access to banking, a measure that would clear up a longstanding headache for the industry.

The bill, called the SAFE Banking Act, passed 321-103 on the strength of near-unanimous support from Democrats and nearly half of Republicans. Its prospects in the Senate are uncertain, but supporters said the amount of Republican support in the House was a good sign.

4. Lewandowski, House Democrats spar at impeachment hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats' first impeachment hearing quickly turned hostile Tuesday as their sole witness, former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, stonewalled many of their questions and said they were "focusing on petty and personal politics."

5. House Judiciary Committee to hold 1st impeachment hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As they investigate President Donald Trump, Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee will hold their first official hearing in what they are calling an impeachment investigation.

6. House committee approves guidelines for impeachment hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler says there's no confusion about what his committee is doing: It's an impeachment investigation, no matter how you want to phrase it.

7. Some Democrats concerned as Judiciary sets impeachment rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is preparing for its first impeachment-related vote, set to define procedures for upcoming hearings on President Donald Trump even as some moderates in the caucus are urging the panel to slow down.

8. Ex-FBI official Andrew McCabe sues over his firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, a frequent target of President Donald Trump's ire, sued the FBI and the Justice Department on Thursday over his firing.

The lawsuit, the second this week from an ex-FBI official challenging the circumstances of his termination, says the firing was part of Trump's plan to rid the bureau of leaders he perceived as disloyal to him. The complaint contends that the two officials responsible for demoting and then firing McCabe — FBI Director Chris Wray and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions — created a pretext to force him out in accordance with the president's wishes.

9. What to look for when Mueller testifies on the Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When a reluctant Robert Mueller takes his seat at the congressional witness table, Democrats will be looking for incriminating, hidden-till-now details about Donald Trump and Russia. Republicans want the former special counsel to concede his investigation was all a waste of time and money, if not an outright hoax.

10. What to look for when Mueller testifies about Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats want incriminating, hidden-till-now details about Donald Trump and Russia. Republicans want Robert Mueller to concede it was all a waste of time and money, if not an outright hoax.

11. Nadler: Mueller hearing to air evidence of Trump wrongdoing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee chairman said Sunday that this week's hearing with Robert Mueller will air "very substantial evidence" of wrongdoing by President Donald Trump and make a public case for impeachment. Republicans pledged sharp questioning of the special counsel about what they see as a "one-sided" Russia investigation.

12. House Republicans vow tough questions for Mueller at hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are pledging tough questioning of special counsel Robert Mueller when he testifies before Congress this week as Democrats plan to air evidence of wrongdoing by President Donald Trump in a potentially last-ditch bid to impeach him.

13. Democrats questioning Robert Mueller to focus on obstruction -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee who will question former special counsel Robert Mueller next week plan to focus on a narrow set of episodes laid out in his report, an effort to direct Americans' attention to what they see as the most egregious examples of President Donald Trump's conduct.

14. Facing calls for resignation, Acosta defends Epstein deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Insisting he got the best deal he could at the time, Labor Secretary Alex Acosta on Wednesday defended his handling of a sex-trafficking case involving now-jailed financier Jeffrey Epstein as Acosta tried to stave off intensifying Democratic calls for his resignation.

15. House Judiciary will vote on subpoenas for Kushner, Sessions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is moving to authorize subpoenas for several people tied to special counsel Robert Mueller's report, including President Donald Trump's son in law, Jared Kushner, and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

16. House panel releases written answers from ex-Trump official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee says a former Trump administration official who was a vital witness in special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation was blocked by the White House from answering more than 200 of its questions.

17. Raines retiring as dean of Belmont’s business school -

Pat Raines, dean of Belmont University’s Jack C. Massey College of Business, has announced his retirement after 16 years of service to the school.

During Raines’ tenure, the school has received accolades from Princeton Review, BusinessWeek and Entrepreneurship magazine for having some of the top business programs in the country. The College of Business’s undergraduate enrollment has grown by more than 100%, and the graduate enrollment has increased by nearly 80%.

18. Hope Hicks blocked from answering more than 150 questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks was blocked by President Donald Trump's lawyers from answering questions more than 150 times in a combative interview with the House Judiciary Committee this week, according to Democrats who released a 273-page transcript on Thursday.

19. Hicks rebuffs questions on Trump White House in interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former top White House adviser Hope Hicks on Wednesday refused to answer questions related to her time in the White House in an interview with the House Judiciary Committee, dimming Democrats' chances of obtaining new or substantive information about President Donald Trump as part of their investigation into obstruction of justice.

20. Former Trump aide Hope Hicks agrees to Judiciary interview -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House communications director Hope Hicks has agreed to a closed-door interview with the House Judiciary Committee, the panel announced Wednesday, a breakthrough for Democrats who have been frustrated by President Donald Trump's broad stonewalling of their investigations.

21. In Barr, Trump has found his champion and advocate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump could only be delighted to have his attorney general in El Salvador, dealing with his biggest issue: illegal immigration. Yet Barr did even better for his boss. In interviews from the Central American country, he's been offering cryptic comments suggesting the Russia probe unfairly targeted Trump.

22. Barr working with intel chiefs on Russia review -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr is stepping up the probe into the origins of the Russia investigation, naming a U.S. attorney to oversee the investigation and working with intelligence chiefs to see how surveillance was conducted.

23. Barr launches new look at origins of Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr has appointed a U.S. attorney to examine the origins of the Russia investigation and determine if intelligence collection involving the Trump campaign was "lawful and appropriate," according to a person familiar with the issue.

24. Barr besieged by allegations he's being Trump's protector -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr portrayed himself as an apolitical elder statesman at his confirmation hearing. He declared he'd rather resign than be asked to fire special counsel Robert Mueller without cause and insisted the prosecutor he'd known for decades would never involve himself in a witch hunt as the president claimed.

25. King of the Road was like Nashville’s own Vegas, complete with Miller’s ‘Rat Pack’ -

Standing on the open terrace outside the location of Roger Miller’s private suite next to The Roof, the Vegas-styled club atop his King of the Road Motor Inn, I look back in time and, dang me, I both wonder where it all went and celebrate that I can remember.

26. Trump depicted in Mueller report feared being tabbed a fraud -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The fear was persistent. As the Russia investigation heated up and threatened to shadow Donald Trump's presidency, he became increasingly concerned. But the portrait painted by special counsel Robert Mueller is not of a president who believed he or anyone on his campaign colluded with Russians to interfere in the 2016 election.

27. Rod Rosenstein submits letter of resignation to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein submitted his resignation Monday after a two-year run defined by his appointment of a special counsel to investigate connections between President Donald Trump's campaign and Russia.

28. How Trump's anger at AG grew: 'It's all because you recused' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jeff Sessions was "weak," the president of the United States shouted.

Donald Trump was livid — as angry as aide Steve Bannon had ever seen him. And the worst of his fury was directed at his attorney general.

29. House subpoena for Mueller report escalates investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee issued a subpoena Friday for special counsel Robert Mueller's report as Congress escalates its investigation of President Donald Trump.

30. Trump blasts ex-advisers who say he tried to stop Mueller -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A day after celebrating the release of the Mueller report as "a good day," President Donald Trump struck a defiant tone Friday, unleashing tweets saying claims in the report by former administration officials that he tried numerous times to stop or influence the probe were "total bullshit."

31. Former counsel may have saved Trump from himself -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Don McGahn was barely on speaking terms with President Donald Trump when he left the White House last fall. But special counsel Robert Mueller's report reveals the president may owe his former top lawyer a debt of gratitude.

32. Congress plunges into Mueller report, subpoena upcoming -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's now up to Congress to decide what to do with special counsel Robert Mueller's findings about President Donald Trump.

33. A beleaguered Trump feared 'the end of my presidency' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the moment two years ago when Donald Trump learned a special counsel had been appointed to investigate his campaign and Russia, the president responded with profane fury — and something resembling panic.

34. Analysis: Mueller paints a damning portrait of the president -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To Donald Trump, the start of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation looked alarmingly like the end of his presidency. So he tried to stop it.

35. What the Mueller report says about Trump-Russia contacts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sweeping two-year investigation, special counsel Robert Mueller identified numerous contacts between President Donald Trump's campaign officials and Russians. But the evidence that his team uncovered during the Russia probe that shadowed Trump's presidency didn't rise to the level of a chargeable crime, he said.

36. The 10 instances of possible obstruction in Mueller report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election identified 10 instances of possible obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump. Mueller said in his report that he could not conclusively determine that Trump had committed a crime or that he hadn't.

37. Mueller report: Trump largely failed to derail Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sought the removal of special counsel Robert Mueller, discouraged witnesses from cooperating with prosecutors and prodded aides to mislead the public on his behalf, according to a hugely anticipated report from Mueller that details multiple efforts the president made to curtail a Russia probe he feared would cripple his administration.

38. The Latest: Report says officials blocked Trump's efforts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller says President Donald Trump's efforts to influence the Russia investigation "were mostly unsuccessful," but that was because the people surrounding the president "declined to carry out orders to accede to his requests."

39. Mueller report release spirals into political gamesmanship -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After nearly two years of waiting, America will get some answers straight from Robert Mueller — but not before President Donald Trump's attorney general has his say.

The Justice Department on Thursday is expected to release a redacted version of the special counsel's report on Russian election interference and Trump's campaign, opening up months, if not years, of fights over what the document means in a deeply divided country.

40. AP sources: Trump considers adding 'immigration czar' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration is considering bringing on a "border" or "immigration czar" to coordinate the president's immigration policies across various federal agencies, according to three people familiar with the discussions.

41. Mueller's evidence is likely a massive amount of material -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say they want "all of the underlying evidence" in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation . But what is all of that evidence?

42. Mueller finds no Trump collusion, leaves obstruction open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller found no evidence President Donald Trump's campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election but reached no conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. That brought a hearty claim of vindication from Trump but set the stage for new rounds of political and legal fighting.

43. Mueller concludes Russia-Trump probe; no new indictments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates.

44. AP FACT CHECK: Trump falsely says Mueller appointment biased -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to discredit a highly anticipated report on the Russia investigation, President Donald Trump is attacking the appointment of special counsel Robert Mueller by falsely claiming it was biased and conflicted.

45. Attorney general won't recuse from overseeing Mueller probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr will not recuse himself from overseeing the special counsel's Russia probe after consulting with senior ethics officials, the Justice Department said Monday.

46. House committee to vote on approving Trump admin subpoenas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats are laying the groundwork to subpoena Trump administration officials over family separations at the southern border.

The Oversight Committee will vote Tuesday on whether to approve subpoenas to the heads of Justice, Homeland Security and Health and Human Services. With Democrats as a majority, the authorization is expected, but it's still not clear whether the subpoenas will actually be served.

47. From corn to Apple: What's behind the US-China standoff -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To hear the Americans tell it, the Chinese have gone on a commercial crime spree, pilfering trade secrets from seed corn to electronic brains behind wind turbines. China has stripped the arm off a T-Mobile robot, the U.S. says, and looted trade secrets about robotic cars from Apple.

48. Sticking to the script -

Bill Lee the governor sounds a lot like Bill Lee the candidate as he works to implement the policies he brought to Tennessee voters since the Republican businessman announced that he would seek the state’s top job.

49. Senate confirms William Barr as attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday confirmed William Barr as attorney general, placing the veteran government official and lawyer atop the Justice Department as special counsel Robert Mueller investigates Russian interference in the 2016 election.

50. Whitaker: I have 'not interfered' with Mueller investigation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker said on Friday that he has "not interfered in any way" in the special counsel's Russia investigation as he faced a contentious and partisan congressional hearing in his waning days on the job.

51. Senate panel approves Barr, Trump's AG pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee has approved President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general.

William Barr's nomination was approved along party lines Thursday. It now heads to the Senate floor, where Barr is expected to be confirmed.

52. Senate panel set to approve Trump's attorney general nominee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate Judiciary Committee is poised to approve William Barr's nomination to be attorney general Thursday in a vote that is likely to be mostly along party lines as Democrats have questioned how transparent Barr will be once special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation concludes.

53. Mueller probe is 'close to being completed,' acting AG says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special counsel's Russia probe is "close to being completed," the acting attorney general said Monday in the first official sign that the investigation may be wrapping up.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's comments were a departure for the Justice Department, which rarely comments on the state of the investigation into whether President Donald Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

54. Supreme Court inaction suggests DACA safe for another year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama-era program that shields young immigrants from deportation and that President Donald Trump has sought to end seems likely to survive for at least another year.

That's because the Supreme Court took no action Friday on the Trump administration's request to decide by early summer whether Trump's bid to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program was legal. The program has been protected by several federal courts.

55. Watchdog: Many more migrant families may have been separated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thousands more migrant children may have been split from their families than the Trump administration previously reported, in part because officials were stepping up family separations long before the border policy that prompted international outrage last spring, a government watchdog said Thursday.

56. Takeaways: AG nominee assures, frustrates Mueller defenders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General nominee William Barr made one thing clear during his Senate confirmation hearing : He may want the job, but he doesn't need it.

The 68-year-old Barr, who has already served once before as attorney general, said Tuesday he's in a position in life where he "can do the right thing and not really care about the consequences."

57. Barr seeks to assure senators he won't be a Trump loyalist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vowing "I will not be bullied," President Donald Trump's nominee for attorney general asserted independence from the White House, saying he believed that Russia had tried to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, that the special counsel investigation shadowing Trump is not a witch hunt and that his predecessor was right to recuse himself from the probe.

58. Judge bars citizenship question from 2020 census -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Trump administration cannot put a question about citizenship status on the 2020 census, a federal judge in New York ruled Friday in a boost to proponents of counting immigrants.

59. Things to watch at William Barr's AG confirmation hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As he did almost 30 years ago, William Barr is appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee to make the case he's qualified to serve as attorney general.

Barr served as attorney general from 1991 to 1993 and has been nominated by President Donald Trump to do the job again. His confirmation hearing Tuesday has multiple story lines worth watching.

60. Trump's AG pick to steer through Dem, GOP queries at hearing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee will have to navigate his confirmation hearing skillfully, emphasizing his support for Trump's policies while assuring Democrats he will act independently and won't interfere with the special counsel's Russia investigation.

61. Barr as attorney general: old job, very different Washington -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When William Barr was attorney general in the early 1990s, he was outspoken about some of America's biggest problems — violent crime, drug addiction, teenage pregnancy. The "Age of Aquarius," he warned, had given way to crack babies and broken families, misery and squalor.

62. Democrats worry over AG nominee's view of presidential power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — William Barr once advised that a president didn't need Congress' permission to attack Iraq, that his administration could arrest a foreign dictator and that the FBI could capture suspects abroad without that country's consent.

63. AP source: Rosenstein expected to leave Justice in weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed special counsel Robert Mueller and remains his most visible Justice Department protector, is expected to leave his position soon after William Barr is confirmed as attorney general, a person familiar with the plans said Wednesday.

64. Trump's pick for AG once called border wall 'overkill' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick for attorney general, William Barr, once questioned the value of a wall along the Mexican border similar to the one the president has advocated, describing the idea as "overkill."

65. Legal marijuana industry toasts year of global gains -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The last year was a 12-month champagne toast for the legal marijuana industry as the global market exploded and cannabis pushed its way further into the financial and cultural mainstream.

66. Legal marijuana industry had banner year in 2018 -

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The last year was a 12-month champagne toast for the legal marijuana industry as the global market exploded and cannabis pushed its way further into the financial and cultural mainstream.

67. Whitaker rejected advice to recuse from Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker chose not to recuse himself from the Russia investigation even though a top Justice Department ethics official advised him to step aside out of an "abundance of caution," a senior official said Thursday.

68. Judge blocks restrictions on who can apply for asylum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday blocked Trump administration policies that prevented immigrants who suffered gang violence in their home countries or domestic violence from seeking asylum.

69. Trump says he'll nominate Barr for attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday he will nominate William Barr, the late President George H.W. Bush's attorney general, to serve in the same role.

70. Tech execs at White House field ideas for US dominance -

Top executives from Google, Microsoft, IBM, Oracle and Qualcomm gathered Thursday at the White House amid strained ties between President Donald Trump's administration and the tech industry and an ongoing trade war with China.

71. House Democrats say Whitaker will testify in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats say acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker will testify before the House Judiciary Committee in January.

72. Right-leaning nonprofit paid Whitaker nearly $1M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Before joining the Justice Department, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker earned nearly $1 million from a right-leaning nonprofit that doesn't disclose its donors, according to newly released financial disclosure forms.

73. Right-leaning nonprofit paid Whitaker nearly $1M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Before joining the Justice Department, acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker earned nearly $1 million from a right-leaning nonprofit that doesn't disclose its donors, according to newly released financial disclosure forms.

74. Democratic senators sue over Whitaker's appointment as AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three Senate Democrats filed a lawsuit Monday arguing that Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker's appointment is unconstitutional and asking a federal judge to remove him.

75. WikiLeaks chief could see charges, US court filing suggests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department inadvertently named Julian Assange in a court filing in an unrelated case that suggests prosecutors have prepared charges against the WikiLeaks founder under seal.

76. Court challenge to be filed over appointment of acting AG -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Maryland is challenging the appointment of Matthew Whitaker as the new U.S. acting attorney general, arguing that President Donald Trump sidestepped the Constitution and the Justice Department's own succession plan by elevating Whitaker to the top job.

77. Trump, Pelosi talk about getting along - until they don't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Suddenly facing life under divided government, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders talked bipartisanship but then bluntly previewed the fault lines to come. Trump threatened to go after House Democrats who try to investigate him, while Rep. Nancy Pelosi said her party would be "a check and balance" against the White House.

78. Trump, Pelosi talk about getting along - until they don't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Suddenly facing life under divided government, President Donald Trump and congressional leaders talked bipartisanship but then bluntly previewed the fault lines to come. Trump threatened to go after House Democrats who try to investigate him, while Rep. Nancy Pelosi said her party would be "a check and balance" against the White House.

79. Trump forces out Jeff Sessions as US attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Jeff Sessions was pushed out Wednesday as the country's chief law enforcement officer after enduring more than a year of blistering and personal attacks from President Donald Trump over his recusal from the Russia investigation.

80. Election Impact: Health care stocks jump following midterms -

NEW YORK (AP) — The outcome of the midterm elections was good for the stock market in general, mostly because it didn't produce any big surprises, but it was especially good for the health care industry and several other companies.

81. Tech and health care lead US stock surge after midterms -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rallied Wednesday as investors were relieved to see that the U.S. midterm elections went largely as they expected they would. Big-name technology and consumer and health care companies soared as the S&P 500 index closed at its highest level in four weeks.

82. Report: Agencies blindsided by Trump immigration order -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal immigration and health officials were blindsided by President Donald Trump's "zero tolerance" policy on migrants crossing the southwest border, triggering a cascade of problems as agencies struggled with the fallout from family separations, congressional investigators said in a critical report issued Wednesday.

83. Organizing committee named for 2019 NFL Draft -

The local organizing committee for the 2019 NFL Draft includes 35 Nashville business and community leaders, including country artist Tim McGraw and Eddie George, formerly of the Tennessee Titans, and is led by honorary co-chairs Amy Adams Strunk, Tennessee Titans owner, and Mayor David Briley. Serving as co-chairs are Steve Underwood, CEO and president of the Tennessee Titans, and Dan Mohnke, senior vice president, sales & marketing and operations, Nissan North America.

84. Trump tells AP he won't accept blame if GOP loses House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing the prospect of bruising electoral defeat in congressional elections, President Donald Trump said Tuesday that he won't accept the blame if his party loses control of the House in November, arguing his campaigning and endorsements have helped Republican candidates.

85. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's falsehoods on health plan protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't playing it straight when it comes to his campaign pledge not to undercut health coverage for people with pre-existing medical conditions.

Five weeks before midterm elections, he is telling voters that those provisions "are safe," even as his Justice Department is arguing in court that those protections in the Affordable Care Act should fall. The short-term health plans Trump often promotes as a bargain alternative to "Obamacare" offer no guarantee of covering pre-existing conditions.

86. White House postpones meeting between Trump, Rosenstein -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A highly anticipated meeting between President Donald Trump and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein was postponed until next week to avoid conflicting with a dramatic Senate hearing involving Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh, the White House said Thursday.

87. Trump says he prefers to keep Rosenstein, may delay meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he would "certainly prefer not" to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and that he may delay a highly anticipated meeting with the Justice Department's No. 2 official.

88. US House approves $1.7 billion in disaster aid for Carolinas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday overwhelmingly passed legislation that would provide $1.7 billion to help residents of the Carolinas and elsewhere recover from recent natural disasters.

The aid was added to legislation to keep Federal Aviation Administration programs running beyond month's end. The bill passed 398-23.

89. If Rosenstein leaves Justice Department, what happens next? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The investigation into Russian election interference is often called the Mueller probe, but it's Rod Rosenstein who oversees it.

Rosenstein's fate as deputy attorney general remains in the air after reports last week that he floated the idea of recording President Donald Trump. Rosenstein went to the White House on Monday expecting to be fired, but the president gave him a three-day reprieve, and the two are set to have a face-to-face showdown on Thursday.

90. Rosenstein's job to be topic of Thursday meeting with Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After a long weekend spent wondering if he should resign or would be fired, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein still has his job — for now.

President Donald Trump gave Rosenstein a three-day reprieve pending their face-to-face White House showdown on Thursday. That's when the man who oversees the Trump-Russia investigation will respond to reports that he had discussed secretly recording the president and possibly using constitutional procedures to remove him from office.

91. Trump rips Sessions: 'I don't have an attorney general' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is renewing his attacks on Jeff Sessions, saying, "I don't have an attorney general."

92. Trump, others dispute book's description of unhinged leader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An incendiary tell-all book by a reporter who helped bring down President Richard Nixon set off a firestorm in the White House, with its descriptions of current and former aides calling President Donald Trump an "idiot" and a "liar," disparaging his judgment and claiming they plucked papers off his desk to prevent him from withdrawing from a pair of trade agreements.

93. Facebook, Twitter pledge to defend against foreign intrusion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook and Twitter executives assured Congress on Wednesday that they are aggressively working to root out foreign attempts to sow discord in America, and they pledged to better protect their social networks against manipulation during the 2018 midterm elections and beyond.

94. Republicans hit Trump for criticizing Justice Department -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump encountered bipartisan criticism on Tuesday for complaining that his own Justice Department's indictments against two Republican congressmen were endangering the GOP's midterm election prospects, with one Republican senator saying of Trump's attack, "We can't normalize that."

95. Trump says Sessions' DOJ has placed GOP in midterm jeopardy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Showing his disregard for the Justice Department's independence, President Donald Trump tweeted that federal indictments against two Republican congressmen placed the GOP in midterm election jeopardy.

96. Trump escalates attacks on his attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is escalating his attacks on Attorney General Jeff Sessions. He's suggesting the Department of Justice put Republicans jeopardy ahead of midterms with recent indictments of two GOP congressmen.

97. AP sources: Lawyer was told Russia had 'Trump over a barrel' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior Justice Department lawyer says a former British spy told him at a breakfast meeting two years ago that Russian intelligence believed it had Donald Trump "over a barrel," according to multiple people familiar with the encounter.

98. His way: Washington says goodbye to John McCain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans lined up for blocks outside the U.S. Capitol Thursday to say goodbye to John McCain as officials, relatives and friends paid their tributes inside to the Vietnam hero and longtime senator lying in state under the majestic dome.

99. White House faces brain drain at perilous moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Increasingly convinced that the West Wing is wholly unprepared to handle the expected assault from Democrats if they win the House in November, President Donald Trump's aides and allies are privately raising alarm as his circle of legal and communications advisers continues to shrink.

100. Top Trump lawyer latest to leave White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — White House counsel Don McGahn, a consequential insider in President Donald Trump's legal storms and successes and a key figure in the administration's handling of the Russia investigation, will be leaving in the fall, the president announced Wednesday.