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Editorial Results (free)

1. How COVID shots for kids help prevent dangerous new variants -

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Cadell Walker rushed to get her 9-year-old daughter Solome vaccinated against COVID-19 — not just to protect her but to help stop the coronavirus from spreading and spawning even more dangerous variants.

2. US advisers support expanding COVID boosters to all adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government on Friday moved to open up COVID-19 booster shots to all adults, expanding efforts to get ahead of rising coronavirus cases that experts fear could snowball into a winter surge as millions of Americans travel for the holidays.

3. Racial disparities in kids' vaccinations are hard to track -

The rollout of COVID-19 shots for elementary-age children has exposed another blind spot in the nation's efforts to address pandemic inequalities: Health systems have released little data on the racial breakdown of youth vaccinations, and community leaders fear that Black and Latino kids are falling behind.

4. 'Strong' start to kids vaccine campaign, but challenges loom -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The campaign to vaccinate elementary school age children in the U.S. is off to a strong start, health officials said Wednesday, but experts say there are signs that it will be difficult to sustain the initial momentum.

5. Rare Starbucks union vote set to begin in Buffalo -

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Never in its 50-year history has Starbucks relied on union workers to serve up frothy lattes as its U.S. cafes. But some baristas aim to change that.

Workers at three separate Starbucks stores in and around Buffalo, New York, are expected to begin voting by mail this week on whether they want to be represented by Workers United, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union.

6. Roll up your sleeves: Kids' turn arrives for COVID-19 shots -

Hugs with friends. Birthday parties indoors. Pillow fights. Schoolchildren who got their first COVID-19 shots Wednesday said these are the pleasures they look forward to as the U.S. enters a major new phase in fighting the pandemic.

7. FDA paves way for Pfizer COVID-19 vaccinations in young kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday paved the way for children ages 5 to 11 to get Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine.

The FDA cleared kid-size doses — just a third of the amount given to teens and adults — for emergency use, and up to 28 million more American children could be eligible for vaccinations as early as next week.

8. Cheap antidepressant shows promise treating early COVID-19 -

A cheap antidepressant reduced the need for hospitalization among high-risk adults with COVID-19 in a study hunting for existing drugs that could be repurposed to treat coronavirus.

Researchers tested the pill used for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder because it was known to reduce inflammation and looked promising in smaller studies.

9. Mounting money mistakes could signal dementia -

Some of the early signs of dementia are financial, forgetting to pay bills, for example, or having trouble calculating a tip. People who develop dementia also are more likely to miss credit card payments and have subprime credit scores years before they’re diagnosed, a study published last year in medical journal JAMA Internal Medicine finds.

10. FDA panel backs Pfizer's low-dose COVID-19 vaccine for kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. moved a step closer to expanding COVID-19 vaccinations for millions more children as government advisers on Tuesday endorsed kid-size doses of Pfizer's shots for 5- to 11-year-olds.

11. FDA advisers review Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for kids -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Kid-size doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine may be getting closer as government advisers on Tuesday began deliberating whether there's enough evidence that the shots are safe and effective for 5- to 11-year-olds.

12. Tennessee plans 8 town halls on education funding formula -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee will hold eight town hall hearings as officials review the state's K-12 education funding formula.

The Department of Education says the events will be Oct. 27 at Merrol Hyde Magnet School in Hendersonville; Oct. 28 at the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis; Nov. 1 at UT-Southern in Pulaski; Nov. 2 at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville; Nov. 3 at Niswonger Performance Arts Center in Greeneville; Nov. 4 at The Howard School in Chattanooga; Nov. 10 at Jackson County Middle School in Gainesboro; and Nov. 22 at Gibson County High School in Dyer.

13. Pfizer asks US to allow COVID shots for kids ages 5 to 11 -

Pfizer asked the U.S. government Thursday to allow use of its COVID-19 vaccine in children ages 5 to 11 -- and if regulators agree, shots could begin within a matter of weeks.

Many parents and pediatricians are clamoring for protection for children younger than 12, today's age cutoff for the vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech. Not only can youngsters sometimes get seriously ill, but keeping them in school can be a challenge with the coronavirus still raging in poorly vaccinated communities.

14. More than 120,000 US children had caregivers die during pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — The number of U.S. children orphaned during the COVID-19 pandemic may be larger than previously estimated, and the toll has been far greater among Black and Hispanic Americans, a new study suggests.

15. Biden bets on rapid COVID tests that can be hard to find -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is betting on millions more rapid, at-home tests to help curb the latest deadly wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, which is overloading hospitals and threatening to shutter classrooms around the country.

16. Pfizer says COVID-19 vaccine works in kids ages 5 to 11 -

Pfizer said Monday its COVID-19 vaccine works for children ages 5 to 11 and that it will seek U.S. authorization for this age group soon -- a key step toward beginning vaccinations for youngsters.

The vaccine made by Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech already is available for anyone 12 and older. But with kids now back in school and the extra-contagious delta variant causing a huge jump in pediatric infections, many parents are anxiously awaiting vaccinations for their younger children.

17. Contest winners, health worker orbiting world in SpaceX 1st -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The four people on SpaceX's first private flight are fairly ordinary, down-to-Earth types brought together by chance.

They'll circle Earth for three days at an unusually high altitude — on their own without a professional escort — before splashing down off the Florida coast.

18. FDA strikes neutral tone ahead of vaccine booster meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Influential government advisers will debate Friday if there's enough proof that a booster dose of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine is safe and effective — the first step toward deciding which Americans need one and when.

19. 100,000 more COVID deaths seen unless US changes its ways -

The U.S. is projected to see nearly 100,000 more COVID-19 deaths between now and Dec. 1, according to the nation's most closely watched forecasting model. But health experts say that toll could be cut in half if nearly everyone wore a mask in public spaces.

20. US regulators give full approval to Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. gave full approval to Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine Monday, potentially boosting public confidence in the shots and instantly opening the way for more universities, companies and local governments to make vaccinations mandatory.

21. Record delta wave hits kids, raises fear as US schools open -

The day before he was supposed to start fourth grade, Francisco Rosales was admitted to a Dallas hospital with COVID-19, struggling to breathe, with dangerously low oxygen levels and an uncertain outcome.

22. Groups make own drugs to fight high drug prices, shortages -

Impatient with years of inaction in Washington on prescription drug costs, U.S. hospital groups, startups and nonprofits have started making their own medicines in a bid to combat stubbornly high prices and persistent shortages of drugs with little competition.

23. VUMC’s Wilkins lands major national award -

Consuelo Wilkins, M.D., MSCI, is the 2021 recipient of the Marion Spencer Fay Award from Drexel University College of Medicine in Philadelphia.

The national award recognizes women physicians and/or scientists who have made “an exceptionally significant contribution to health care.” Previous recipients include the late Bernadine Healy, M.D., the first female director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and pioneering breast cancer geneticist Mary-Claire King, Ph.D.

24. Unvaccinated staff eyed in rising nursing home cases, deaths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lagging vaccination rates among nursing home staff are being linked to a national increase in COVID-19 infections and deaths at senior facilities in July, and are at the center of a federal investigation in a hard-hit Colorado location where disease detectives found many workers were not inoculated.

25. Jeff Bezos blasts into space on own rocket: 'Best day ever!' -

VAN HORN, Texas (AP) — Jeff Bezos blasted into space Tuesday on his rocket company's first flight with people on board, becoming the second billionaire in just over a week to ride his own spacecraft.

26. Does new Alzheimer's drug work? Answers might miss 2030 target -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When a controversial Alzheimer's drug won U.S. approval, surprise over the decision quickly turned to shock at how long it might take to find out if it really works — nine years.

27. Moderna says its vaccine works in children as young as 12 -

Moderna said Tuesday its COVID-19 vaccine strongly protects kids as young as 12, a step that could put the shot on track to become the second option for that age group in the U.S.

With global vaccine supplies still tight, much of the world is struggling to vaccinate adults in the quest to end the pandemic. But earlier this month, the U.S. and Canada authorized another vaccine — the shot made by Pfizer and BioNTech — to be used starting at age 12.

28. 'Horrible' weeks ahead as India's virus catastrophe worsens -

NEW DELHI (AP) — COVID-19 infections and deaths are mounting with alarming speed in India with no end in sight to the crisis and a top expert warning that the coming weeks in the country of nearly 1.4 billion people will be "horrible."

29. India cases up as scientists appeal to Modi to release data -

NEW DELHI (AP) — Indian scientists appealed to Prime Minister Narendra Modi to publicly release virus data that would allow them to save lives as coronavirus cases climbed again Friday, prompting the army to open its hospitals in a desperate bid to control a massive humanitarian crisis.

30. 'Red' states on U.S. electoral map lagging on vaccinations -

SAVANNAH, Georgia (AP) — With coronavirus shots now in the arms of nearly half of American adults, the parts of the U.S. that are excelling and those that are struggling with vaccinations are starting to look like the nation's political map: deeply divided between red and blue states.

31. COVID testing blitz undermined screening, fight against STDs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After an unprecedented push to test and track COVID-19, public health workers are grappling with a worrisome side effect: a collapse in screening for sexually transmitted diseases that have been on the rise for years.

32. FDA OKs first new ADHD drug in over a decade for children -

U.S. regulators have approved the first new drug in over a decade for children with ADHD, which causes inattention, hyperactivity and impulsivity.

The Food and Drug Administration late Friday OK'd Qelbree (KELL'-bree) for treating attention deficit hyperactivity disorder in children ages 6 to 17. It comes as a capsule that's taken daily.

33. Pfizer says its COVID-19 vaccine protects younger teens -

Pfizer announced Wednesday that its COVID-19 vaccine is safe and strongly protective in kids as young as 12, a step toward possibly beginning shots in this age group before they head back to school in the fall.

34. G. Gordon Liddy, Watergate mastermind, dead at 90 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — G. Gordon Liddy, a mastermind of the Watergate burglary and a radio talk show host after emerging from prison, died Tuesday at age 90 at his daughter's home in Virginia.

His son, Thomas Liddy, confirmed the death but did not reveal the cause, other than to say it was not related to COVID-19.

35. Shots in little arms: COVID-19 vaccine testing turns to kids -

The 9-year-old twins didn't flinch as each received test doses of Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine -- and then a sparkly bandage to cover the spot.

"Sparkles make everything better," declared Marisol Gerardo as she hopped off an exam table at Duke University to make way for her sister Alejandra.

36. AstraZeneca confirms strong vaccine protection after US rift -

AstraZeneca insists that its COVID-19 vaccine is strongly effective even after counting additional illnesses in its U.S. study, the latest in an extraordinary public dispute with American officials.

37. CDC changes school guidance, allowing desks to be closer -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention relaxed its social distancing guidelines for schools Friday, saying students can now sit 3 feet apart in classrooms.

The revised COVID-19 recommendations represent a turn away from the 6-foot standard that has forced some schools to remove desks, stagger scheduling and take other steps to keep children away from one another.

38. Amid COVID-19 pandemic, flu has disappeared in the US -

NEW YORK (AP) — February is usually the peak of flu season, with doctors' offices and hospitals packed with suffering patients. But not this year.

Flu has virtually disappeared from the U.S., with reports coming in at far lower levels than anything seen in decades.

39. Rush Limbaugh, 'voice of American conservatism,' has died -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Rush Limbaugh, the talk radio host who ripped into liberals, foretold the rise of Donald Trump and laid waste to political correctness with a merry brand of malice that made him one of the most powerful voices on the American right, died Wednesday. He was 70.

40. A new COVID-19 challenge: Mutations rise along with cases -

The race against the virus that causes COVID-19 has taken a new turn: Mutations are rapidly popping up, and the longer it takes to vaccinate people, the more likely it is that a variant that can elude current tests, treatments and vaccines could emerge.

41. University of Memphis' first Black professor dies -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Miriam DeCosta-Willis, the University of Memphis' first Black professor and a participant in the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s, has died, the school said. She was 86.

DeCosta-Willis died Thursday at home, surrounded by family, the university said in a statement. A cause of death wasn't released.

42. Fauci: US could soon give 1 million vaccinations a day -

The U.S. could soon be giving at least a million COVID-19 vaccinations a day despite the sluggish start, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday, even as he warned of a dangerous next few weeks as the coronavirus surges.

43. The autopsy, a fading practice, revealed secrets of COVID-19 -

NEW YORK (AP) — The COVID-19 pandemic has helped revive the autopsy. When the virus first arrived in U.S. hospitals, doctors could only guess what was causing its strange constellation of symptoms: What could explain why patients were losing their sense of smell and taste, developing skin rashes, struggling to breathe and reporting memory loss on top of flu-like coughs and aches?

44. US experts debate: Who should be next in line for vaccine? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Deciding that health care workers and nursing home residents should be first in line for the initial, limited supplies of COVID-19 shots wasn't that hard a call. Now U.S. health officials have to determine who should be next.

45. Waller adds employment, bankruptcy, IP depth -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has hired Flynne Dowdy, Gaby Smith and Saba Daneshvar. Each of the attorneys joins Waller with more than five years of experience in labor and employment, bankruptcy and restructuring, and patent law, respectively.

46. Vaccine rollout barrels on with health disparity in backseat -

Getting a COVID-19 vaccine to the right people could change the course of the pandemic in the United States. But who are the right people?

As the decision looms for President-elect Joe Biden's incoming administration, a new analysis argues for targeting the first vaccines to the same low-income Black, Hispanic and Native American households that have disproportionately suffered from the coronavirus. But no one at the federal level has committed to the idea, which would be a significant shift from the current population-based method adopted by Operation Warp Speed.

47. Alexander preaches consensus in farewell to fractious Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Lamar Alexander, a Tennessee political legend who forged a productive path as a Senate institutionalist after tours as governor and Cabinet secretary, said goodbye to the chamber on Wednesday, advising his colleagues to seek broadly backed, durable solutions to the nation's problems rather than succumb to easy partisanship.

48. US panel: 1st vaccines to health care workers, nursing homes -

NEW YORK (AP) — Health care workers and nursing home residents should be at the front of the line when the first coronavirus vaccine shots become available, an influential government advisory panel said Tuesday.

49. First blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer's goes on sale -

A company has started selling the first blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer's disease, a leap for the field that could make it much easier for people to learn whether they have dementia. It also raises concern about the accuracy and impact of such life-altering news.

50. Wiping down groceries? Experts say keep risk in perspective -

NEW YORK (AP) — Cleaning wipes are harder to find on store shelves, and businesses are reassuring customers with stepped up sanitation measures. In New York, the subway system is shut down nightly for disinfecting.

51. CDC begs Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving -

NEW YORK (AP) — With the coronavirus surging out of control, the nation's top public health agency pleaded with Americans on Thursday not to travel for Thanksgiving and not to spend the holiday with people from outside their household.

52. With COVID-19 surging, schools suspend in-person education -

With COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations in the state spiking to record levels, bus drivers and teachers in quarantine, students getting sick and the holidays looming, Schools Superintendent Scott Hanback in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, made a tough decision this week.

53. US hits record COVID-19 hospitalizations amid virus surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The U.S. hit a record number of coronavirus hospitalizations Tuesday and surpassed 1 million new confirmed cases in just the first 10 days of November amid a nationwide surge of infections that shows no signs of slowing.

54. Doctors may be better equipped to handle latest virus surge -

NEW YORK (AP) — The latest surge in U.S. coronavirus cases appears to be much larger than the two previous ones, and it is all but certain to get worse — a lot worse. But experts say there are also reasons to think the nation is better able to deal with the virus this time.

55. Regulators, experts take up thorny vaccine study issues -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. regulators who will decide the fate of COVID-19 vaccines are taking an unusual step: Asking outside scientists if their standards are high enough.

The Food and Drug Administration may have to decide by year's end whether to allow use of the first vaccines against the virus. Thursday, a federal advisory committee pulls back the curtain on that decision process, debating whether the guidelines FDA has set for vaccine developers are rigorous enough.

56. Next up in hunt for COVID-19 vaccine: Testing shots in kids -

The global hunt for a COVID-19 vaccine for kids is only just beginning — a lagging start that has some U.S. pediatricians worried they may not know if any shots work for young children in time for the next school year.

57. Big drop reported in vaping by US teenagers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Vaping by U.S. teenagers fell dramatically this year, especially among middle schoolers, according to a federal report released Wednesday.

Experts think last year's outbreak of vaping related illnesses and deaths may have scared off some kids, but they believe other factors contributed to the drop, including higher age limits and flavor bans.

58. Bold hopes for virus antibody tests still unfulfilled -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the height of the coronavirus lockdown, President Donald Trump and his top health advisers trumpeted a new test that would help Americans reclaim their lives — one that would tell them if they already had the virus and were protected from getting it again.

59. Bloomberg gives $100M to historically Black medical schools -

ATLANTA (AP) — Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg is giving about $100 million to four historically Black medical schools over the next four years, with students getting up to $100,000 apiece.

60. Smith named president of Tennessee Medical Association -

The Tennessee Medical Association has named Vanderbilt University Medical Center’s M. Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC of Nashville as 2020-21 president of the member-based nonprofit advocacy organization that represents 9,500 physicians statewide.

61. A Zoom Thanksgiving? Summer could give way to a bleaker fall -

As the Summer of COVID draws to a close, many experts fear an even bleaker fall and suggest that American families should start planning for Thanksgiving by Zoom.

Because of the many uncertainties, public health scientists say it's easier to forecast the weather on Thanksgiving Day than to predict how the U.S. coronavirus crisis will play out this autumn. But school reopenings, holiday travel and more indoor activity because of colder weather could all separately increase transmission of the virus and combine in ways that could multiply the threat, they say.

62. Rapid $5 coronavirus test doesn't need specialty equipment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday authorized the first rapid coronavirus test that doesn't need any special computer equipment to get results.

The 15-minute test from Abbott Laboratories will sell for $5, giving it a competitive edge over similar tests that need to be popped into a small machine. The size of a credit card, the self-contained test is based on the same technology used to test for the flu, strep throat and other infections.

63. District Attorneys General Conference names deputy director -

Former Davidson County prosecutor Zoe K. Sams has been named deputy director of the Tennessee District Attorneys General Conference. Most recently, she served as the director of legislation and Safe Baby Court statewide coordinator for the Tennessee Department of Children Services.

64. Revved by Sturgis Rally, COVID-19 infections move fast, far -

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The hundreds of thousands of bikers who attended the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally may have departed western South Dakota, but public health departments in multiple states are trying to measure how much and how quickly the coronavirus spread in bars, tattoo shops and gatherings before people traveled home to nearly every state in the country.

65. Mounting US deaths reveal an outsize toll on people of color -

As many as 215,000 more people than usual died in the U.S. during the first seven months of 2020, suggesting that the number of lives lost to the coronavirus is significantly higher than the official toll. And half the dead were people of color — Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans and, to a marked degree unrecognized until now, Asian Americans.

66. Pandemic pushes expansion of 'hospital-at-home' treatment -

As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

Across the U.S., "hospital at home" programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical equipment and teams of doctors, nurses, X-ray techs and paramedics. That's reducing strains on medical centers and easing patients' fears.

67. Pandemic pushes expansion of 'hospital-at-home' treatment -

As hospitals care for people with COVID-19 and try to keep others from catching the virus, more patients are opting to be treated where they feel safest: at home.

Across the U.S., "hospital at home" programs are taking off amid the pandemic, thanks to communications technology, portable medical equipment and teams of doctors, nurses, X-ray techs and paramedics. That's reducing strains on medical centers and easing patients' fears.

68. FDA flags accuracy issue with widely used coronavirus test -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Potential accuracy issues with a widely used coronavirus test could lead to false results for patients, U.S. health officials warned.

The Food and Drug Administration issued the alert Monday to doctors and laboratory technicians using Thermo Fisher's TaqPath genetic test. Regulators said issues related to laboratory equipment and software used to run the test could lead to inaccuracies. The agency advised technicians to follow updated instructions and software developed by the company to ensure accurate results.

69. Telemedicine shines during pandemic but will glow fade? -

Racked with anxiety, Lauren Shell needed to talk to her cancer doctor.

But she lives at least an hour away and it was the middle of her workday. It was also the middle of a pandemic. Enter telemedicine.

70. Nashville children, parents perform DIY tests for coronavirus science -

In a comfy suburb just outside Nashville, a young family swabs their noses twice a month in a DIY study seeking answers to some of the most vexing questions about the coronavirus.

How many U.S. children and teens are infected? How many kids who are infected show no symptoms? How likely are they to spread it to other kids and adults?

71. US labs buckle amid testing surge; world virus cases top 15M -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Laboratories across the U.S. are buckling under a surge of coronavirus tests, creating long processing delays that experts say are actually undercutting the pandemic response.

72. Closing bars to stop coronavirus spread is backed by science -

Authorities are closing honky tonks, bars and other drinking establishments in some parts of the U.S. to stem the surge of COVID-19 infections — a move backed by sound science about risk factors that go beyond wearing or not wearing masks.

73. Closing bars to stop coronavirus spread is backed by science -

Authorities are closing honky tonks, bars and other drinking establishments in some parts of the U.S. to stem the surge of COVID-19 infections — a move backed by sound science about risk factors that go beyond wearing or not wearing masks.

74. Fauci: US 'going in wrong direction' in coronavirus outbreak -

The U.S. is "going in the wrong direction" with the coronavirus surging badly enough that Dr. Anthony Fauci told senators Tuesday some regions are putting the entire country at risk — just as schools and colleges are wrestling with how to safely reopen.

75. Open wide: US dentists quickly rebuild after virus shutdown -

U.S. dental offices are quickly bouncing back, but it won't be business as usual. Expect social distancing, layers of protective gear and a new approach to some procedures to guard against coronavirus.

76. First commercial space taxi a pit stop on Musk's Mars quest -

It all started with the dream of growing a rose on Mars.

That vision, Elon Musk's vision, morphed into a shake-up of the old space industry, and a fleet of new private rockets. Now, those rockets will launch NASA astronauts from Florida to the International Space Station -- the first time a for-profit company will carry astronauts into the cosmos.

77. New coronavirus test is imperfect step toward mass screening -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work.

78. New coronavirus test is imperfect step toward mass screening -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new type of coronavirus test offers a cheaper, quicker way to screen for infections, moving the U.S. toward the kind of mass screening that experts say is essential to returning millions of Americans to school and work.

79. COVID-19 vaccine hunt heats up globally, still no guarantee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hundreds of people are rolling up their sleeves in countries across the world to be injected with experimental vaccines that might stop COVID-19, spurring hope — maybe unrealistic — that an end to the pandemic may arrive sooner than anticipated.

80. Will Tennesseans go to the polls or the mailbox? -

Will this year’s voters chat with neighbors and familiar poll workers before they press on computer screens to make their choices?

Or will they stand 6 feet apart and sanitize their hands before entering a room where people in masks, gloves and possibly gowns show them how to vote while touching as little as possible?

81. 2 types of testing look for COVID-19 infections new and old -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Testing is critical to controlling the coronavirus and eventually easing restrictions that have halted daily life for most Americans. But there's been confusion about what kinds of tests are available and what they actually measure.

82. US clears first saliva test to help diagnose COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rutgers University researchers have received U.S. government clearance for the first saliva test to help diagnose COVID-19, a new approach that could help expand testing options and reduce risks of infection for health care workers.

83. FDA warns Alex Jones to stop pitching bogus virus remedies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are warning conspiracy theorist and radio host Alex Jones to stop pitching bogus remedies for the coronavirus.

84. Coronavirus survivor: 'In my blood, there may be answers' -

NEW YORK (AP) — Tiffany Pinckney remembers the fear when COVID-19 stole her breath. So when she recovered, the New York City mother became one of the country's first survivors to donate her blood to help treat other seriously ill patients.

85. Not all or nothing: Anti-virus lockdowns could lift slowly -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the millions of Americans living under some form of lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus, not knowing when the restrictions will end is a major source of anxiety. Will life events — weddings, funerals, even just simple nights out with friends — be delayed for a few weeks, a few months or much longer?

86. Malfunctioning EpiPens could harm patients, companies say -

U.S. regulators on Tuesday warned the public about malfunctions involving some EpiPens, the emergency injectors for severe allergic reactions.

The Food and Drug Administration issued the warning after drugmakers Pfizer and Mylan told medical providers that the problems could cause death or serious injuries.

87. Potential coronavirus treatment granted rare disease status -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The pharmaceutical giant that makes a promising coronavirus drug has registered it as a rare disease treatment with U.S. regulators, a status that can potentially be worth millions in tax breaks and competition-free sales.

88. Can blood from coronavirus survivors treat the newly ill? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hospitals are gearing up to test if a century-old treatment used to fight off flu and measles outbreaks in the days before vaccines, and tried more recently against SARS and Ebola, just might work for COVID-19, too: using blood donated from patients who've recovered.

89. Lee orders restaurants, bars, more closed for 14 days -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Sunday urged residents to work from home and ordered bars and restaurants to close for 14 days starting Monday with the exception of drive-thru, take-out and delivery services in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

90. Trump angrily defends his handling of pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, an angry President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at reporters and broke with his own health officials on the science of the outbreak.

91. Trump angrily defends his handling of pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defending his handling of the coronavirus pandemic, an angry President Donald Trump on Friday lashed out at reporters and broke with his own health officials on the science of the outbreak.

92. A pot shop at your door: Home delivery surges amid outbreak -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — One company rushed to expand its delivery fleet. Another has seen sales triple. The global coronavirus pandemic has left millions of people locked out of bars, restaurants and theaters, but it's been an unexpected boost for some U.S. pot shops.

93. Tennessee lawmakers pass budget, recess amid virus outbreak -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Working in the close quarters health officials advised against, Tennessee lawmakers cut short their 2020 session and won't return until June 1 after passing a dramatically reduced spending plan for the upcoming year in reaction to widespread coronavirus-related disruptions.

94. How long will Americans be fighting the coronavirus? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a matter of days, millions of Americans have seen their lives upended by measures to curb the spread of the new coronavirus.

Normally bustling streets are deserted as families hunker down in their homes. Many of those who do venture out try to stay a safe distance from anyone they encounter, even as they line up to buy now-precious commodities like hand sanitizer. Parents juggle childcare as schools close, perhaps for the rest of the school year. And restaurants and bars sit empty as more and more convert to delivery-only options.

95. Surgeon general's TV praise of Trump earns his 'star' label -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. surgeon general caught the eye of Donald Trump in a tried-and-true way: praising the 45th president on television.

At a recent briefing with his coronavirus task force standing behind him, Trump turned to Dr. Jerome Adams and declared the previously low-profile 20th surgeon general among the administration's "stars" to emerge from this crisis.

96. Gov. Lee scales back Tennessee spending amid virus outbreak -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Wednesday proposed funneling money into relief for tornado and health crises, scaling back planned teacher raises, and socking more cash away into reserves, as the state reacted to the global impact of the coronavirus on everyday life.

97. Lawmakers seek to lift testing requirements as schools close -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are working quickly on a proposal to drop state testing this spring in response to Gov. Bill Lee's latest effort to contain the new coronavirus by asking all schools to close by the end of the week.

98. Tennessee lawmakers eye quick finish amid virus restrictions -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers acknowledged they were shirking federal health recommendations on the coronavirus by sitting in close quarters as they conducted business Tuesday.

They also drew questions about whether they were staying focused on only the most necessary legislation, as promised, during their sprint toward a recess by the end of the week.

99. Trump addresses coronavirus' heavy impact on the US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was focused Tuesday on addressing the devastating impact the coronavirus pandemic is having on the American economy, meeting with tourism executives and speaking on the phone with restaurant executives, retailers and suppliers.

100. Stranded travelers struggle to get home as borders close -

BERLIN (AP) — Traffic jams swelled along borders and some travelers appealed to their governments for help getting home Tuesday as countries in Europe and beyond imposed strict controls along their frontiers aimed at slowing the spread of the coronavirus.