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Editorial Results (free)

1. Trump taps cancer specialist from Texas hospital to run FDA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday picked a cancer specialist and hospital executive to lead the Food and Drug Administration.

If confirmed, Dr. Stephen Hahn of the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston would inherit a raft of high-profile public health issues, including leading the agency's response to the problem of underage vaping and the prescription opioid epidemic.

2. Study triples population at risk of climate-triggered floods -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of people threatened by climate change-triggered flooding is about three times higher than previously thought, a new study says. But it's not because of more water.

It's because the land, especially in Asia and the developing world, is several feet lower than what space-based radar has calculated, according to a study in the journal Nature Communications Tuesday.

3. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for September 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

4. Is the stethoscope dying? High-tech rivals pose a threat -

CHICAGO (AP) — Two centuries after its invention, the stethoscope — the very symbol of the medical profession — is facing an uncertain prognosis.

It is threatened by hand-held devices that are also pressed against the chest but rely on ultrasound technology, artificial intelligence and smartphone apps instead of doctors' ears to help detect leaks, murmurs, abnormal rhythms and other problems in the heart, lungs and elsewhere. Some of these instruments can yield images of the beating heart or create electrocardiogram graphs.

5. Biogen reanalyzes studies, presses ahead on Alzheimer's drug -

Biogen Inc. said Tuesday it will seek federal approval for a medicine to treat early Alzheimer's disease, a landmark step toward finding a treatment that can alter the course of the most common form of dementia.

6. McLeod joins Butler Snow’s Nashville office -

Robert R. McLeod has joined Butler Snow’s Nashville office and will practice with the firm’s pharmaceutical, medical device and health care litigation group.

Before joining Butler Snow, McLeod clerked for Judge Thomas W. Brothers.

7. Consumer watchdog agency probes Juul and 5 more vaping firms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal consumer watchdogs have ordered Juul and five other vaping companies to hand over information about how they market e-cigarettes, the government’s latest move targeting the industry.

8. Bradley welcomes Davis as litigation associate -

Judea S. Davis is joining Bradley Arant Boult Cummings as an associate in the Litigation Practice Group.

Previously, Davis clerked for Judge Michelle Childs of the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina and Judge Garrison Hill of the South Carolina Court of Appeals. She served as a law fellow and law clerk for the Equal Justice Initiative, researching constitutional and criminal law issues and representing clients before the Alabama Board of Pardons and Paroles.

9. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for August 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, August 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

10. 'We're all in big trouble': Climate panel sees a dire future -

NEW YORK (AP) — Earth is in more hot water than ever before, and so are we, an expert United Nations climate panel warned in a grim new report Wednesday.

Sea levels are rising at an ever-faster rate as ice and snow shrink, and oceans are getting more acidic and losing oxygen, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in a report issued as world leaders met at the United Nations.

11. US official expects 'hundreds more' cases of vaping illness -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of vaping-related illnesses in the U.S. could soon climb much higher, a public health official said Tuesday.

Dr. Anne Schuchat, of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told a congressional subcommittee that she believes "hundreds more" lung illnesses have been reported to health authorities since last Thursday, when the CDC put the tally at 530 confirmed and probable cases.

12. Will combo pill catch on in US to prevent heart attacks? -

A cheap, daily pill that combines four drugs has been tested for the first time in the United States to see if it works as well among low-income Americans as it has in other countries to treat conditions leading to heart attacks and strokes.

13. AP-NORC Poll: Americans somewhat confident in climate fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans are at least somewhat confident that the world will step up in its fight against global warming — but there are limits to their optimism.

That's according to a new poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research that also shows most think their own actions can make a difference.

14. Scientists rethink Alzheimer's, diversifying the drug search -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When researchers at the University of Kentucky compare brains donated from people who died with dementia, very rarely do they find one that bears only Alzheimer's trademark plaques and tangles — no other damage.

15. Anti-smoking advocates bemoan "faltering" pace of FDA action -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It seemed like a new era in the half-century battle against the deadly toll of tobacco: U.S. health officials for the first time would begin regulating cigarettes, chew and other products responsible for a half-million American deaths annually.

16. How much pot in that brownie? Chocolate can throw off tests -

How much marijuana is really in that pot brownie? Chocolate can throw off potency tests so labels aren't always accurate, and now scientists are trying to figure out why.

In states where marijuana is legal, pot comes in cookies, mints, gummies, protein bars — even pretzels. These commercial products are labeled with the amount of high-inducing THC. That helps medical marijuana patients get the desired dose and other consumers attune their buzz.

17. Guidelines say more women may need breast cancer gene test -

WASHINGTON (AP) — More women may benefit from gene testing for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer, especially if they've already survived cancer once, an influential health group recommended Tuesday.

18. Brand-name drug prices rising at slower pace, lower amounts -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Drug companies are still raising prices for brand-name prescription medicines, just not as often or by as much as they used to, according to an Associated Press analysis.

After years of frequent list price hikes, many drugmakers are showing some restraint, according to the analysis of drug prices provided by health information firm Elsevier.

19. US makes new push for graphic warning labels on cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials are making a new attempt at adding graphic images to cigarette packets to discourage and Americans from lighting up. If successful, it would be the first change to U.S. cigarette warnings in 35 years.

20. UN climate report: Change land use to avoid a hungry future -

GENEVA (AP) — Human-caused climate change is dramatically degrading the Earth's land and the way people use the land is making global warming worse, a new United Nations scientific report says. That creates a vicious cycle which is already making food more expensive, scarcer and less nutritious.

21. Nobel laureate Toni Morrison dead at 88 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nobel laureate Toni Morrison, a pioneer and reigning giant of modern literature whose imaginative power in "Beloved," ''Song of Solomon" and other works transformed American letters by dramatizing the pursuit of freedom within the boundaries of race, has died at age 88.

22. First CRISPR study inside the body to start in US -

Patients are about to be enrolled in the first study to test a gene-editing technique known as CRISPR inside the body to try to cure an inherited form of blindness.

People with the disease have normal eyes but lack a gene that converts light into signals to the brain that enable sight.

23. Revamped OxyContin was supposed to reduce abuse, but has it? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic?

24. New standards aim to improve surgery for the oldest patients -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 92-year-old had a painful tumor on his tongue, and major surgery was his best chance. Doctors called a timeout when he said he lived alone, in a rural farmhouse, and wanted to keep doing so.

25. The heat goes on: June toastiest on record, July may follow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The heat goes on: Earth sizzled to its hottest June on record as the climate keeps going to extremes.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Thursday announced that June averaged 60.6 degrees (15.9 Celsius), about 1.7 degrees (0.9 Celsius) warmer than the 20th century average.

26. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for second quarter 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

27. Future is in doubt for cheaper versions of biologic drugs -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — They were the drugs that were supposed to save the U.S. tens of billions of dollars.

Called "biosimilars," they are near-copies of complex and expensive biologic drugs to treat cancer, rare diseases and autoimmune disorders like rheumatoid arthritis and colitis.

28. Wayfair workers protest contract with detention center -

BOSTON (AP) — Employees at online home furnishings retailer Wayfair walked out Wednesday to protest the company's decision to sell $200,000 worth of furniture to a government contractor that runs a detention center for migrant children in Texas.

29. 'Sell By' or what? US pushes for clarity on expiration dates -

NEW YORK (AP) — If milk is a few days past its "Sell By" date, is it safe to drink?

U.S. regulators are urging food-makers to be more consistent with labeling terms like "Best By" and "Enjoy By" that cause confusion. By clarifying the meaning of such dates, they are trying to prevent people from prematurely tossing products and to reduce the mountains of food that goes to waste each year.

30. 'Sell By' or what? US pushes for clarity on expiration dates -

NEW YORK (AP) — If milk is a few days past its "Sell By" date, is it safe to drink?

U.S. regulators are urging food-makers to be more consistent with labeling terms like "Best By" and "Enjoy By" that cause confusion. By clarifying the meaning of such dates, they are trying to prevent people from prematurely tossing products and to reduce the mountains of food that goes to waste each year.

31. At stores and online, health care moves closer to customers -

Health care is moving closer to patients.

Drugstores are expanding the care and support they offer, and telemedicine is bringing doctors and therapists to the family room couch as the system shifts to help people stay healthy and attract customers who want convenience.

32. US aims to help more cancer patients try experimental drugs -

CHICAGO (AP) — Sally Atwater's doctor spent two months on calls, messages and paperwork to get her an experimental drug he thinks can fight the lung cancer that has spread to her brain and spine.

33. Companies report progress on blood tests to detect cancer -

A California company says its experimental blood test was able to detect many types of cancer at an early stage and gave very few false alarms in a study that included people with and without the disease.

34. Can a business owner require staffers to get vaccinated? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Small business owners worried about the spread of measles may want to be sure their staffers have been vaccinated, but before issuing any orders, they should speak with a labor law attorney or human resources consultant.

35. Food poisoning remains persistent problem, US report finds -

NEW YORK (AP) — As recent illnesses tied to raw turkey , ground beef , cut melon and romaine lettuce suggest, U.S. food poisoning cases don't appear to be going away anytime soon.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report Thursday that the frequency of several types of food poisoning infections climbed last year, but that the increases could be the result of new diagnostic tools that help identify more cases.

36. SpaceX suffers serious setback with crew capsule accident -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX has suffered a serious setback in its effort to launch NASA astronauts into orbit this year, with the fiery loss of its first crew capsule.

Over the weekend, the Dragon crew capsule that flew to the International Space Station last month was engulfed in smoke and flames on an engine test stand. SpaceX was testing the Dragon's abort thrusters at Cape Canaveral, Florida, when Saturday's accident occurred.

37. Heated debate over high drug costs returns to Capitol Hill -

Patient bills, competition and secrecy shared the spotlight Tuesday as pharmacy benefit managers testified before Congress about prescription drug prices.

Members of a Senate Finance Committee investigating drug costs pushed the benefit managers to explain why they can't do more to control prices and to reveal the details behind the contracts they negotiate. The hearing was the committee's third so far this year focused on the high cost of prescriptions.

38. US experts revisit breast implant safety after new concerns -

SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — U.S. medical authorities are revisiting the safety of breast implants used by millions of American women, the latest review in an ongoing debate about their potential health effects.

39. US health officials move to tighten sales of e-cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators are moving ahead with a plan designed to keep e-cigarettes out of the hands of teenagers by restricting sales of most flavored products in convenience stores, gas stations, pharmacies and other retail locations.

40. UN: Environment is deadly, worsening mess, but not hopeless -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Earth is sick with multiple and worsening environmental ills killing millions of people yearly, a new U.N. report says.

Climate change, a global major extinction of animals and plants, a human population soaring toward 10 billion, degraded land, polluted air, and plastics, pesticides and hormone-changing chemicals in the water are making the planet an increasing unhealthy place for people, says the scientific report issued once every few years.

41. Smith elected president of Tennessee Medical Association -

Kevin Smith, M.D., Ph.D., MMHC, FACP, has been elected president of the Tennessee Medical Association and will take office in May.

Smith practices primary care and teaches general internal medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. He was previously in private practice at Saint Thomas West Hospital, including six years in solo practice.

42. Year in space put US astronaut's disease defenses on alert -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly a year in space put astronaut Scott Kelly's immune system on high alert and changed the activity of some of his genes compared to his Earth-bound identical twin.

43. What the FDA's actions mean for dietary supplements -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration announced plans Monday to step up its policing of dietary supplements, which it said has mushroomed into a $40 billion industry with more than 50,000 products. The agency warned 17 companies for illegally making claims about their products' ability to treat diseases.

44. 2018 was 4th warmest, but next 5 years could break records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record, British meteorologists are predicting the next five years will be much hotter, maybe even record-breaking.

Two U.S. agencies, the United Kingdom Met Office and the World Meteorological Organization analyzed global temperatures in slightly different ways, but each came to the same conclusion Wednesday: 2018 was the fourth-warmest year on record behind 2016, 2015 and 2017.

45. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for December 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, December 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

46. Science Says: Get used to polar vortex outbreaks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It might seem counterintuitive, but the dreaded polar vortex is bringing its icy grip to the Midwest thanks to a sudden blast of warm air in the Arctic.

Get used to it. The polar vortex has been wandering more often in recent years.

47. High heat but no record: 2018 was 4th warmest year on Earth -

WASHINGTON (AP) — While Earth was a tad cooler last year than the last couple of years, it still was the fourth warmest on record, a new analysis shows.

With the partial U.S. government shutdown, federal agency calculations for last year's temperatures are delayed. But independent scientists at Berkeley Earth calculate that last year's average temperature was 58.93 degrees (14.96 degrees Celsius).

48. Polly is chair of 2019 Campaign for Equal Justice -

Erin Palmer Polly, an attorney at Butler Snow LLP in Nashville and immediate past president of the Nashville Bar Association, will serve as the chair for its 2019 Campaign for Equal Justice, an annual initiative that raises funds for the Legal Aid Society of Middle Tennessee and the Cumberlands.

49. Scientists seek ways to finally take a real measure of pain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Is the pain stabbing or burning? On a scale from 1 to 10, is it a 6 or an 8?

Over and over, 17-year-old Sarah Taylor struggled to make doctors understand her sometimes debilitating levels of pain, first from joint-damaging childhood arthritis and then from fibromyalgia.

50. Waller elects 5 partners in 3 practice areas -

Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP has elected five partners from the firm’s Healthcare Compliance and Operations, Finance and Restructuring Corporate, and Litigation & Dispute Resolution practices.

51. US medical marketing reaches $30B, drug ads top surge -

Ads for prescription drugs appeared 5 million times in just one year, capping a recent surge in U.S. medical marketing, a new analysis found.

The advertisements for various medicines showed up on TV, newspapers, online sites and elsewhere in 2016. Their numbers soared over 20 years as part of broad health industry efforts to promote drugs, devices, lab tests and even hospitals.

52. AP-NORC Poll: Most support gene editing to protect babies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans say it would be OK to use gene-editing technology to create babies protected against a variety of diseases — but a new poll shows they'd draw the line at changing DNA so children are born smarter, faster or taller.

53. Tobacco giant strides into vape market with $13B Juul stake -

Altria, one of the world's biggest tobacco companies, is spending nearly $13 billion to buy a huge stake in the vape company Juul as cigarette use continues to decline.

The Marlboro maker said Thursday that it will take a 35 percent share of Juul, putting the value of the company at $38 billion, larger than Ford Motor Co., Delta Air Lines or the retail giant Target.

54. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

55. US surgeon general warns of teen risks from e-cigarettes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's top doctor is taking aim at the best-selling electronic cigarette brand in the U.S., urging swift action to prevent Juul and similar vaping brands from addicting millions of teenagers.

56. Climate change is more extensive and worse than once thought -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Climate scientists missed a lot about a quarter century ago when they predicted how bad global warming would be.

They missed how bad wildfires, droughts, downpours and hurricanes would get. They missed how much ice sheets in West Antarctica and Greenland would melt and contribute to sea level rise. They missed much of the myriad public health problems and global security issues.

57. Young Leaders Council honors Snitker, Day -

Ron Snitker, executive director of business development at Waller Lansden Dortch & Davis, LLP, has been named the 2018 Young Leader of the Year, and Jaynee Day, president & CEO of Second Harvest Food Bank of Middle Tennessee, received the 2018 Hero of the Year Award from Young Leaders Council, a Nashville-based nonprofit organization that has trained more than 2,500 men and women to effectively participate on the boards of nonprofit agencies since 1985.

58. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for October 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

59. Farm animals may soon get new features through gene editing -

OAKFIELD, N.Y. (AP) — Cows that can withstand hotter temperatures. Cows born without pesky horns. Pigs that never reach puberty.

A company wants to alter farm animals by adding and subtracting genetic traits in a lab. It sounds like science fiction, but Recombinetics sees opportunity for its technology in the livestock industry.

60. Medicare expands access to in-home support for seniors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare is experimenting with a new direction in health care. Starting next year, seniors in many states will be able to get additional services such as help with chores and respite for caregivers through private Medicare Advantage insurance plans.

61. US approves first new type of flu drug in 2 decades -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — U.S. health regulators have approved the first new type of flu drug in two decades.

Wednesday's approval of Xofluza for people age 12 and older comes ahead of the brunt of this winter's flu season.

62. AP analysis: 'Obamacare' shapes opioid grant spending -

With Republicans and Democrats joining forces again in a bipartisan effort to target the U.S. opioid crisis, an Associated Press analysis of the first wave of emergency money from Congress finds that states are taking very different approaches to spending it.

63. Global warming driving higher costs for beer -

Global warming to leave us crying in our costlier beer

By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) — Add beer to chocolate , coffee and wine as some of life's little pleasures that global warming will make scarcer and costlier, scientists say.

64. UN report on global warming carries life-or-death warning -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Preventing an extra single degree of heat could make a life-or-death difference in the next few decades for multitudes of people and ecosystems on this fast-warming planet, an international panel of scientists reported Sunday. But they provide little hope the world will rise to the challenge.

65. Survey: Companies continue to pass health costs to workers -

If your employer is sticking you with a bigger share of the medical bill before health insurance kicks in, you may have to get used to it.

More companies are making workers pay an annual deductible or increasing the amount they must spend before insurance starts covering most care, according to a survey released Wednesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation. Annual deductibles for single coverage have now climbed about eight times as fast as wages over the last decade.

66. Pinnacle is top bank in Nashville area for deposits -

Pinnacle Financial Partners is the No. 1 bank in the Nashville-Davidson-Murfreesboro-Franklin MSA by deposit market share, data from the FDIC reveals.

The firm leapt ahead of a large regional bank and one of the biggest banks in the nation to earn the top spot. Last year, Pinnacle was at No. 3 behind Bank of America and Regions, respectively.

67. SpaceX changes plans to send tourists around the moon -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — SpaceX said it has signed the first private moon traveler, with some changes to its original game plan.

The big reveal on who it is — and when the flight to the moon will be — will be announced Monday at the company's headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

68. Siloam Health expands board of directors -

Siloam Health, a faith-based, charitable health center for the uninsured, especially the immigrant and refugee community, has added four health, community and religious leaders to its board of directors.

69. HCA pays $1.5B for NC’s Mission Health -

HCA Healthcare has announced it will acquire Mission Health for approximately $1.5 billion.

Under the definitive agreement, Nashville-based HCA will substantially buy all of the assets of the nonprofit North Carolina health system.

70. Hospital groups launch own company to make generic drugs -

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Several major hospital groups Thursday launched their own generic drug company to tackle chronic shortages and high prices.

The new company, Civica Rx, plans to start with 14 widely used hospital drugs long in short supply. The company isn't disclosing the drugs' names for competitive reasons, but they include a mix of generic pills, patches and injectable drugs for treating infections, pain and heart conditions, board chairman Dan Liljenquist said.

71. Early results boost hopes for historic gene editing attempt -

PHOENIX (AP) — Early, partial results from a historic gene editing study give encouraging signs that the treatment may be safe and having at least some of its hoped-for effect, but it's too soon to know whether it ultimately will succeed.

72. Nashville attorneys included in 2019 Best lawyers list -

The Best Lawyers in America, a nationally recognized referral guide to the legal profession that has been published since 1983, has selected several Nashville attorneys for inclusion on its 2019 list. Attorneys selected for the publication are reviewed by professional peers through an extensive survey.

73. Blackburn unanimously elected presiding judge -

Davidson County General Sessions judges have unanimously elected Judge Melissa Blackburn to serve as presiding judge through Sept. 2019.

Blackburn has been serving as presiding judge since Dec. 2017 when Judge Angelita Blackshear Dalton was elevated to the 20th District Criminal Court by Gov. Bill Haslam. She was elected to serve as judge of the Division II General Sessions Court in 2014.

74. FDA plans to ease OTC approvals for some prescription drugs -

U.S. regulators proposed new guidelines Tuesday to make it easier for some common medicines to be sold without a prescription — and more convenient for consumers to get them.

The Food and Drug Administration is evaluating ways to make sure patients don't take an inappropriate over-the-counter drug, Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. That could include adding information to the packaging label and offering online questionnaires to help people decide if a drug is right for them.

75. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for May 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

76. Enemy turned ally: Poliovirus is used to fight brain tumors -

One of the world's most dreaded viruses has been turned into a treatment to fight deadly brain tumors. Survival was better than expected for patients in a small study who were given genetically modified poliovirus, which helped their bodies attack the cancer, doctors report.

77. Medical milestone: US OKs marijuana-based drug for seizures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health regulators on Monday approved the first prescription drug made from marijuana, a milestone that could spur more research into a drug that remains illegal under federal law, despite growing legalization for recreational and medical use.

78. Too hot to handle: Politics of warming part of culture wars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When it comes to global warming, America's political climate may have changed more than the Earth's over the past three decades.

NASA scientist James Hansen put the world on notice about global warming on June 23, 1988. Looking back, he says: "I was sufficiently idealistic that I thought we would have a sensible bipartisan approach to the problem."

79. Allergies, glaciers, pikas: climate change in action -

WASHINGTON (AP) — You don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around. Some examples of where climate change's effects have been measured:

—Glaciers across the globe are melting and retreating, with 279 billion tons of ice lost since 2002, according to NASA's GRACE satellite. Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland is flowing faster than any other glacier on Earth. In 2012, it hit a record pace of about 75 inches per hour (1.9 meters). In 2017, it slowed down to 40 inches per hour (1 meter). The Portage Glacier in Alaska has retreated so much it cannot be seen from the visitor center that opened in 1986.

80. Not just heat: Climate change signs can be seen all around -

WASHINGTON (AP) — You don't just feel the heat of global warming, you can see it in action all around.

Some examples of where climate change's effects have been measured:

—Glaciers across the globe are melting and retreating, with 279 billion tons of ice lost since 2002, according to NASA's GRACE satellite. Jakobshavn Glacier in Greenland is flowing faster than any other glacier on Earth. In 2012, it hit a record pace of about 75 inches per hour (1.9 meters). In 2017, it slowed down to 40 inches per hour (1 meter). The Portage Glacier in Alaska has retreated so much it cannot be seen from the visitor center that opened in 1986.

81. Many breast cancer patients can skip chemo, big study finds -

CHICAGO (AP) — Most women with the most common form of early-stage breast cancer can safely skip chemotherapy without hurting their chances of beating the disease, doctors are reporting from a landmark study that used genetic testing to gauge each patient's risk.

82. Clocks may go a little cuckoo with power grid change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Running late for work or just miss that bus? You could have a good excuse: Your electric clock might be running a bit cuckoo.

Because of a change in federal energy regulations, some scientists say your trusty, older plug-in clock may be losing or gaining a few ticks over time.

83. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for March 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, March 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

84. Selfie medicine: Phone apps push people to take their pills -

SEATTLE (AP) — Take two tablets and a selfie? Your doctor's orders may one day include a smartphone video to make sure you took your medicine.

Smartphone apps that monitor pill-taking are now available, and researchers are testing how well they work when medication matters. Experts praise the efficiency, but some say the technology raises privacy and data security concerns.

85. AP Exclusive: Transport safety rules sidelined under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — On a clear, dry June evening in 2015, cars and trucks rolled slowly in a herky-jerky backup ahead of an Interstate 75 construction zone in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Barreling toward them: an 18-ton tractor-trailer going about 80 mph.

86. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 690 commercial real estate transactions worth $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 333, followed by Williamson (152), Rutherford (104), Sumner (51) and Wilson (50).

87. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

88. Science Says: Why there's a big chill in a warmer world -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Anchorage, Alaska, was warmer Tuesday than Jacksonville, Florida. The weather in the U.S. is that upside down.

That's because the Arctic's deeply frigid weather escaped its regular atmospheric jail that traps the worst cold. It then meandered south to the central and eastern United States.

89. In a milestone year, gene therapy finds a place in medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

90. In a milestone year, gene therapy finds a place in medicine -

After decades of hope and high promise, this was the year scientists really showed they could doctor DNA to successfully treat diseases. Gene therapies to treat cancer and even pull off the biblical-sounding feat of helping the blind to see were approved by U.S. regulators, establishing gene manipulation as a new mode of medicine.

91. Governor adds 217 appointees to 93 boards -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has announced the appointments of 217 Tennesseans to 93 boards and commissions.

“By serving on our state boards and commissions, these Tennesseans are helping us provide responsive, effective and efficient service to their fellow citizens,” Haslam says. “I am grateful for their service and know they will well represent the people of Tennessee.”

92. Butler Snow’s Polly elected president of Nashville Bar -

Erin Palmer Polly, a commercial litigation attorney at Butler Snow, LLP, will serve as the 2018 president of the Nashville Bar Association. In 2014, she was president of the NBA Young Lawyers Division, became a fellow of the Nashville Bar Foundation and received the Legal Aid Society Volunteer Lawyer’s Program Pro Bono Award.

93. Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin adds 2 attorneys -

The law firm of Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC has hired Flynne Bailey and Hilary Dennen, both litigation attorneys.

Bailey joins as an associate and practices in the areas of complex business and commercial litigation, personal injury defense litigation, governmental liability litigation and real estate litigation.

94. AP Exclusive: US scientists try 1st gene editing in the body -

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person's DNA to try to cure a disease.

The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot.

95. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for September 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2017, for Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for September.

96. Franklin receives infrastructure loans -

The state Department of Environment and Conservation has announced the recipients of low-interest construction loans for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.

The City of Franklin will receive a $1.5 million low-interest loan for its wastewater treatment plant improvement and expansion project.

97. Studying 1 million people to end cookie-cutter health care -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. researchers are getting ready to recruit more than 1 million people for an unprecedented study to learn how our genes, environments and lifestyles interact.

Today, health care is based on averages, what worked best in short studies of a few hundred or thousand patients. The massive "All of Us" project instead will push what's called precision medicine, using traits that make us unique to forecast health and treat disease.

98. Single-payer cuts the middle men but at what cost? -

Republicans made “Repeal and Replace” a catchy slogan for the right, but Democrats have one of their own.

Get ready to hear a lot of “Medicare for All,” the new rallying cry of those who think it’s time the United States adopts a single-payer health care system – or something like it.

99. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for July 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

100. Science Says: Trump team garbles climate science -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his cabinet often avoid talking about the science of climate change, but when pressed what they have said clashes with established mainstream science, data and peer-reviewed studies and reports.