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Editorial Results (free)

1. Small agency, big job: Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't make many headlines. Charged with keeping America's workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders.

2. Biden's vaccine rules ignite instant, hot GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's aggressive push to require millions of U.S. workers to vaccinate against the coronavirus is running into a wall of resistance from Republicans threatening everything from lawsuits to civil disobedience, plunging the country deeper into culture wars that have festered since the onset of the pandemic.

3. Analysis: Biden takes fight to unvaccinated in virus battle -

WASHINGTON (AP) — They're a source of frustration. A risk to their fellow citizens. A threat to the nation's economic recovery.

President Joe Biden is trying to concentrate the anger of the nation's inoculated majority against the refusal of 25% of eligible Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

4. Biden: GOP governors 'cavalier' for resisting vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called some Republican governors "cavalier" on Friday for resisting his call for far-reaching new federal coronavirus vaccine requirements he hopes will curb the surging delta variant.

5. Lee, other governors using federal virus aid to expand school choice -

When Congress sent states billions of dollars early in the coronavirus pandemic to help make schools safe, Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee saw an opportunity.

He used part of the windfall to further his goal of offering school choice options for parents, sending millions to charter schools that operate without traditional public oversight. That included funneling more than $4 million to new charters that are not scheduled to open until at least next year.

6. Republicans take to mask wars as virus surges in red states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Republicans are battling school districts in their own states' urban, heavily Democratic areas over whether students should be required to mask up as they head back to school — reigniting ideological divides over mandates even as the latest coronavirus surge ravages the reddest, most unvaccinated parts of the nation.

7. Lee, 14 other GOP governors urge release of Census redistricting data -

Fifteen Republican governors sent a letter Tuesday to the U.S. Department of Commerce urging that the U.S. Census Bureau release redistricting data as soon as possible, saying further delays would hurt efforts to redraw congressional and legislative districts.

8. Medicaid incentive so far not enough to sway holdout states -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Democrats' nearly $2 trillion coronavirus relief package includes a big financial incentive for the states that have opted against expanding Medicaid to provide health coverage for more low-income Americans. It's proving to be a tough sell.

9. Biden health pick taking heat for support of abortion rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick for health secretary is taking heat from Republicans for his actions in support of abortion rights. They want to define him — and the new administration — as out of the mainstream.

10. Governors scramble to speed vaccine effort after slow start -

New York's governor is threatening to fine hospitals that don't use their allotment of COVID-19 vaccine fast enough. His South Carolina counterpart says health care workers have until Jan. 15 to get a shot or move to the back of the line. California's governor wants to use dentists to vaccinate people.

11. Fauci: US could soon give 1 million vaccinations a day -

The U.S. could soon be giving at least a million COVID-19 vaccinations a day despite the sluggish start, Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday, even as he warned of a dangerous next few weeks as the coronavirus surges.

12. 'Impossible': School boards are at heart of reopening debate -

ROCK HILL, S.C. (AP) — Helena Miller listened to teachers, terrified to reenter classrooms, and parents, exhausted from trying to make virtual learning work at home. She heard from school officials who spent hundreds of hours on thousands of details — buses, classrooms, football, arts, special education. She spent countless nights, eyes wide open, her mind wrestling over the safety and education of the 17,000 children she swore to protect.

13. Republicans eager to reopen economy; Democrats more cautious -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Announcing plans to begin reopening his state, South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster cited the ongoing economic damage from the coronavirus pandemic.

"South Carolina's business is business," he declared this week as he lifted restrictions on department stores, florists, music shops and some other businesses that previously had been deemed nonessential.

14. Southern states largely go it alone in reopening decisions -

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Governors in 17 states have committed to regional coordination to reopen their economies during the coronavirus outbreak — but none are in the South, where leaders are going it alone, just as they did in imposing restrictions.

15. Easter storms sweep South, killing at least 19 people -

CHATSWORTH, Ga. (AP) — Storms that killed more than 30 people in the Southeast, piling fresh misery atop a pandemic, spread across the eastern United States on Monday, leaving more than 1 million homes and businesses without power amid floods and mudslides.

16. How dire projections, grim images dashed Trump's Easter plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two doctors spread out their charts on the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office.

The projections were grim: Even if the U.S. were to continue to do what it was doing, keeping the economy closed and most Americans in their homes, the coronavirus could leave 100,000 to 200,000 people dead and millions infected. And the totals would be far worse if the nation reopened.

17. How dire projections, grim images dashed Trump's Easter plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two doctors spread out their charts on the Resolute Desk in the Oval Office.

The projections were grim: Even if the U.S. were to continue to do what it was doing, keeping the economy closed and most Americans in their homes, the coronavirus could leave 100,000 to 200,000 people dead and millions infected. And the totals would be far worse if the nation reopened.

18. Carolinas farms could take billions in losses from Florence -

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hurricane Florence is testing the resolve of farmers in the Carolinas, who could face billions of dollars in agricultural damage while still feeling the sting from Hurricane Matthew almost two years ago.

19. Democrats seek to keep focus on corruption, not impeachment -

CHICAGO (AP) — Democrats aren't ready to embrace the I-word.

A day after separate legal hammers dropped nearly simultaneously on two former members of Donald Trump's inner circle, Democrats in Washington and across the country faced a delicate balance as they sought to take political advantage of the president's growing troubles without alienating moderates and independents turned off by talk of impeachment.

20. Democrats seek to keep focus on corruption, not impeachment -

CHICAGO (AP) — Democrats aren't ready to embrace the I-word.

A day after separate legal hammers dropped nearly simultaneously on two former members of Donald Trump's inner circle, Democrats in Washington and across the country faced a delicate balance as they sought to take political advantage of the president's growing troubles without alienating moderates and independents turned off by talk of impeachment.

21. Trump's endorsements signal more involvement in GOP politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Competing in a contested runoff campaign for Georgia's governor, Brian Kemp didn't see it coming: the single-most prized endorsement in Republican politics.

22. Upset of Democratic House leader points to party divisions -

NEW YORK (AP) — As Donald Trump's party came together, a 28-year-old liberal activist ousted top House Democrat Joe Crowley in the president's hometown Tuesday night, a stunning defeat that suddenly forced Democrats to confront their own internal divisions.

23. Trump's clout within GOP on the line in Tuesday elections -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — President Donald Trump is not on the ballot, but he has invested time, energy and political capital in a slate of primary contests across America that will again test his clout within his own party.

24. In SC primary, ardent Trump backer defeats Rep. Mark Sanford -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — President Donald Trump is crediting his Election-Day tweet in part for the defeat of a South Carolina Republican congressman who has been critical of his administration.

Trump tweeted Wednesday that his advisers didn't want him to get involved in the Republican primary, thinking Rep. Mark Sanford "would easily win."

25. Slow-moving winter storm leaves lingering effect in South -

DURHAM, N.C. (AP) — Several Southern states were dealing Thursday with the lingering effects of a slow-moving winter storm that dumped up to 12 inches (30 centimeters) of snow in central North Carolina, dusted the Deep South and killed at least 10 people.

26. Another GOP governor seeks exclusion from drilling proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Opposition to the Trump administration's plan to expand offshore drilling is mounting as Democrats from coastal states accuse President Donald Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders and a second Republican governor asks to withdraw his state from the plan.

27. Another GOP governor seeks exclusion from drilling proposal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Opposition to the Trump administration's plan to expand offshore drilling is mounting as Democrats from coastal states accuse President Donald Trump of punishing states with Democratic leaders and a second Republican governor asks to withdraw his state from the plan.

28. Dems say Trump action on Florida drilling guided by politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats from coastal states accused the Trump administration of punishing states with Democratic leaders after the administration said it would block oil drilling off Florida's coast following objections from that state's Republican governor.

29. Vovlo invests $520M to build 2nd vehicle in South Carolina -

RIDGEVILLE, S.C. (AP) — Even before the first vehicle rolls off the line at Volvo Cars' new factory in South Carolina, the Swedish automaker has nearly doubled its investment to $1 billion and promised to build a second vehicle at the site.

30. Trump's neo-Nazi rally comments thrust GOP doubts into open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's racially fraught comments about a deadly neo-Nazi rally have thrust into the open some Republicans' deeply held doubts about his competency and temperament, in an extraordinary public airing of worries and grievances about a sitting president by his own party.

31. BMW announces $600M expansion as it celebrates 25 years -

BMW said Monday it will invest an additional $600 million to expand its South Carolina plant, creating 1,000 new jobs over the next four years.

CEO Harald Krueger's announcement coincided with the German automaker's celebration of 25 years of manufacturing in the state. BMW, which has already invested $8 billion in South Carolina, also unveiled its 2018 BMW X3, a compact sports vehicle expected to be available in November. It will be built at the plant in Greer alongside the BMW X4, X5 and X6.

32. Boeing union bid fails in South averse to organizing -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Production workers at Boeing's South Carolina plant have overwhelmingly rejected an effort to unionize, maintaining Southern reluctance toward unionization and setting up a picture-perfect stop for President Donald Trump, who visits the facilities this week.