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Editorial Results (free)

1. Inflation, Fed action set stage for higher mortgage rates -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Mortgage rates have hovered near all-time lows for much of this year, even as inflation has increased sharply across much of the economy.

That could begin to change in the weeks to come, now that the Federal Reserve has signaled it could announce as early as next month plans to begin rolling back the measures it has taken to shore up the economy during the pandemic.

2. Dow surges 4.9% in another wild day on hopes for virus aid -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks on Tuesday recouped most of their historic losses from the prior day as hopes rose, faded and then bloomed again on Wall Street that the U.S. government will try to cushion the economic pain from the coronavirus.

3. As stocks tumble, long-term investors advised to sit tight -

It's hard to sit tight during uncertain times. But when it comes to long-term investing, it's the best time to do just that.

U.S. stock markets have plunged due to a combination of falling oil prices and worsening coronavirus fears. The rout on Monday knocked 7.6% off the S&P 500 index, which is now down 18.9% from its record peak reached just last month.

4. What the Fed's rate cut means for you -

The Federal Reserve has cut its benchmark interest rate again, big news for the U.S. economy but something that will likely have a muted impact on Americans' personal finances, experts say.

That's because the reduction doesn't offset the increases of recent years. And as the key rate creeps closer to zero, financial institutions are less eager to pass borrowing benefits along. Lower rates could also further dampen the perks of savings.

5. Wall Street keeps hitting records. What do investors do now? -

The S&P 500 just hit an all-time high, recovering from last year's dramatic plunge. The economy seems to be on fairly solid footing, still it's anyone's guess what happens next for the stock market.

6. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

7. Fed leaves key rate unchanged but sees further hikes ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve has left its key policy rate unchanged but signaled that it plans to keep responding to the strong U.S. economy with more interest rate hikes. The next rate increase is expected in December.

8. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for September 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

9. Fed raises key rate and sees possible acceleration in hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve took note of a resilient U.S. economy Wednesday by raising its benchmark interest rate for the second time this year and signaling that it may step up its pace of rate increases.

10. Investors must make sense of a sudden drop in stock market -

Stumble, fall or crash? Investors may be wondering what to make of the dramatic sell-off in the stock market after months of tranquility. A slide that started early last week led to a sharp dive in markets Friday and Monday. The combined two-day drop represented a 6.3 percent decrease in the Standard & Poor's 500 index that undid the market's gains for the year.

11. Pay for no play: UT paying millions to former coaches -

Tennessee’s bungled search for a football coach will come at a cost for the university. A big cost.

There are buyouts everywhere. A potential lawsuit looms. And a rift between boosters caused by the botched search may be the costliest item of all for the university long term.

12. Hillsboro’s Phillips playing for bragging rights -

Tennessee’s football team and interim head coach Brady Hoke will try to avoid a historically bad season Saturday.

If the Vols (4-7, 0-7 SEC) lose to Vanderbilt (4-7, 0-7), it would be the first team in program history to lose eight games and go winless in the conference. Kickoff is 3 p.m. CST at Neyland Stadium (TV: SEC Network).

13. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

14. Fed raises key interest rate and foresees 3 hikes in 2017 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve has raised a key interest rate in response to a strengthening U.S. economy and expectations of higher inflation, and it foresees three more rate hikes in 2017.

15. Fed's more upbeat tone suggests rate hike as early as September -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve said Wednesday that near-term risks to the U.S. economy have diminished, reviving the prospect that it will resume raising interest rates as soon as September.

16. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for first quarter 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, first quarter 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

17. Fed keeps key rate unchanged; no hint on timing of next hike -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve kept a key interest rate unchanged Wednesday against the backdrop of a slowdown in U.S. and global growth and provided no hint of when its next rate hike may occur.

18. Buying a car? A home? Fed rate hike shouldn't matter much -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For anyone considering whether to buy a home or car, the Federal Reserve's interest rate increase Wednesday shouldn't make much difference.

The rates that most people pay for mortgages, auto loans or college tuition aren't expected to jump anytime soon. The Fed's benchmark interest rate has limited influence on those things.

19. Boomerang home buyers poised to return to market with a roar -

TRINITY, Fla. (AP) — Tears still spring into Debbie Cooley-Guy's eyes when she thinks about her dream home, with its wide, sweeping porch. It overlooked a bayou filled with wading birds, a glittering blue pool and the space for not only a 12-foot Christmas tree, but a grand piano as well.

20. Why a higher-rate era may not pain economies and individuals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Consumers, businesses and investors are facing an era of higher borrowing costs as some of the lowest global interest rates in modern history begin to rise.

Yet the message from most economists is a reassuring one: Rates won't likely climb fast or high enough to inflict much damage on economic recoveries in the United States or Europe. Borrowers and investors may feel some short-term pain but should manage fine in the long run.

21. Why many experts missed this: Cheap oil can hurt US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If there was one thing most economists agreed on at the start of the year, it was this: Plunging oil prices would boost the U.S. economy.

It hasn't worked out that way.

22. First-time buyers face hurdles to homeownership this spring -

Young people aspiring to buy their first home are already facing disappointment this year.

Rising prices are putting more homes out of reach, and pickings are slim because few properties have come onto the market this spring, when sales are supposed to take off.

23. Why Fed won't have a big impact on your loans anytime soon -

NEW YORK (AP) — Nobody knows when exactly, but the day will eventually come when the Federal Reserve nudges its benchmark lending rate from next to zero to something slightly higher.

When that happens, it will put upward pressure on borrowing rates throughout the economy — for credit cards, mortgages and student loans. But that doesn't mean the era of incredibly low interest rates will soon be over.

24. For varying groups, market frenzy may help or hurt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The turbulence that's roiling financial markets is punishing stock investors, raising worries for major U.S. companies and will likely produce even punier returns for savers.

Yet some Americans actually stand to benefit from the forces that are driving the frenzied trading. Lower oil prices and sinking interest rates are lowering gas prices, keeping inflation low and cutting mortgage rates to levels that, for some, will scream refinance.

25. ATM fees keep climbing, survey shows -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The penalty for using an ATM that is not affiliated with your bank rose 5 percent over the past year.

The average fee for using an out-of-network ATM climbed to a new high of $4.35 per transaction, according to a survey released Monday by Bankrate.com. That figure includes $2.77 that banks charge non-customers and $1.58 that banks levy against their own customers for using an outside ATM.

26. Wal-Mart's mobile checking account nixes fees -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart is the latest company to get rid of fees that traditional banks charge customers who don't have enough money in their accounts to cover purchases.

The world's largest retailer said Wednesday that it teamed up with Green Dot Corp., a company known for its reloadable prepaid cards, to bring mobile checking accounts to its shoppers. The accounts won't charge overdraft and bounced-check fees.

27. Fed keeps rates low, but brace for the inevitable -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Enjoy the easy money while it lasts.

By mid-2015, economists expect the Fed to abandon a nearly 6-year-old policy of keeping short-term rates at record lows. Those rates have helped support the economy, cheered the stock market and shrunk mortgage rates. A Fed rate increase could potentially reverse those trends.

28. Once-troubled reverse mortgages poised for rebound -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Advertised as a path to an affordable retirement, federally insured reverse mortgages are showing signs of a rebound, drawing the scrutiny of regulators seeking to reduce historically high default rates that have cost the government billions.

29. Some fear auto industry returning to bad habits -

DETROIT (AP) — Big discounts. Six- or seven-year loans, in some cases to buyers who would have been turned down in the past.

As the auto industry strives to sustain its post-recession comeback, car companies are resorting to tactics that some experts warn will lead to trouble down the road.

30. Fed cuts monthly bond purchases and sounds upbeat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve struck an encouraging note Wednesday: It will further cut its bond purchases because the U.S. job market needs less help. And it said the economy had strengthened after all but stalling during a harsh winter.

31. A fading middle-class perk: lower mortgage rates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For three decades, the U.S. middle class enjoyed a rare financial advantage over the wealthy: lower mortgage rates.

Now, even that perk is fading away.

Most ordinary homebuyers are paying the same or higher rates than the fortunate few who can afford much more.

32. Surprise from Fed: No pullback in bond purchases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a surprise, the Federal Reserve has decided against reducing its stimulus for the U.S. economy because its outlook for growth has dimmed in the past three months.

The Fed said it will continue to buy $85 billion a month in bonds while it awaits conclusive evidence that the economy is strengthening. The Fed's bond purchases are intended to keep long-term borrowing rates low to boost spending and economic growth.

33. How higher rates touch consumers, firms, investors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — All it took was speculation that the Federal Reserve could slow its bond buying months from now — and then a few words Wednesday from Chairman Ben Bernanke to confirm it.

The result is that record-low interest rates that have fueled economic growth, cheered the stock market, shrunk mortgage rates but punished savers are headed up.

34. Fed says it will stick with aggressive stimulus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve on Wednesday stood by its efforts to keep borrowing costs at record lows, saying it isn't yet convinced that the U.S. economy's growth can accelerate without significant help from the central bank.

35. Charities compete for cancer dollars -

Who knew that universally beloved Grand Ole Opry character Minnie Pearl – the joke crackin’ country gal with the price tag dangling from her hat – could ever be this controversial?

36. Fed is expected to launch new bond buying program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a nervous eye on the "fiscal cliff," the Federal Reserve is expected this week to announce a new bond-buying plan to support the U.S. economy.

The goal would be to further reduce long-term interest rates and encourage borrowing by companies and individuals. If it succeeds, the Fed might at least soften the blow from tax increases and spending cuts that will kick in in January if Congress can't reach a budget deal.

37. 30-year mortgage falls to 4.12 pct., record low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fixed mortgage rates fell this week to the lowest levels in six decades. But few Americans can take advantage of the rates to refinance or buy a home.

The average rate for the 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 4.12 percent, down from 4.22 percent, Freddie Mac said Thursday. It's the lowest level on records dating back to 1971. Freddie Mac said the last time rates were cheaper was 1951, when most long-term home loans lasted just 20 or 25 years.

38. 30-year mortgage falls to 4.12 pct., record low -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fixed mortgage rates fell this week to the lowest levels in six decades. But few Americans can take advantage of the rates to refinance or buy a home.

The average rate for the 30-year fixed mortgage fell to 4.12 percent, down from 4.22 percent, Freddie Mac said Thursday. It's the lowest level on records dating back to 1971. Freddie Mac said the last time rates were cheaper was 1951, when most long-term home loans lasted just 20 or 25 years.

39. Fed to keep interest rate near zero for 2 years -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve sketched a dim outlook for the economy Tuesday, suggesting it will remain weak for two more years. As a result, the Fed said it expects to keep its key interest rate near zero through mid-2013.