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Editorial Results (free)

1. Abortion, women's rights grow as priorities: AP-NORC poll -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new poll finds a growing percentage of Americans calling out abortion or women's rights as priorities for the government in the wake of the Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, especially among Democrats and those who support abortion access.

2. Biden calls migrant deaths 'horrifying and heartbreaking' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that the deaths of migrants who were in the back of a tractor-trailer in Texas was "horrifying and heartbreaking."

"While we are still learning all the facts about what happened and the Department of Homeland Security has the lead for the investigation, initial reports are that this tragedy was caused by smugglers or human traffickers who have no regard for the lives they endanger and exploit to make a profit," he said in a statement shortly after arriving in Spain on the second stop of a trip in Europe.

3. How Tennessee, other U.S. states have banned, limited, protected abortion -

The U.S. Supreme Court has overturned Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that had provided a constitutional right to abortion. Friday's ruling is expected to lead to abortion bans in roughly half the states. In anticipation of the decision, several states led by Democrats have taken steps to protect abortion access. The decision also sets up the potential for legal fights between the states over whether providers and those who help women obtain abortions can be sued or prosecuted.

4. Companies weigh in on proposed SEC climate disclosure rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Securities and Exchange Commission moved closer Friday to a final rule that would dramatically alter what public companies tell shareholders about climate change — both the risks it poses to their operations and their own contributions to the problem.

5. O'Rourke bets shooting will shake up Texas governor's race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Still mourning a Texas mass shooting, Democrat Beto O'Rourke gave his long-shot campaign a jolt by imploring a national audience that it was finally time for real action to curb the proliferation of high-powered guns in his home state and across America.

6. Biden says 'we have to act' after Texas school shooting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lamenting a uniquely American tragedy, an anguished and angry President Joe Biden delivered an urgent call for new restrictions on firearms after a gunman shot and killed at least 19 children at a Texas elementary school.

7. Biden's election year challenge: Blame GOP for nation's woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has an election-year message for frustrated voters: At least he's trying.

For those who think he isn't doing enough to help Ukraine fend off the Russian invasion, Biden announced $800 million in new military support on Thursday. To ease the pain of high gas prices, he's tapped the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and reopened onshore sales of oil and natural gas leases on public land. And to address historic inflation, Biden has tried to smooth out supply chain-crimping bottlenecks at the nation's ports.

8. EXPLAINER: Why is Texas policing its border with Mexico? -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Gov. Greg Abbott's decision to impose additional inspections of trucks entering Texas from Mexico is his latest move in an unprecedented foray into border security, which has long been the federal government's domain.

9. Trucker blockade snarls US-Mexico border over Texas order -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — One of the busiest trade ports on the U.S.-Mexico border remained effectively closed Wednesday as frustration and traffic snarls mounted over new orders by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott requiring extra inspections of commercial trucks as part of the Republican's sprawling border security operation.

10. Biden: Government standing up to 'hateful' transgender bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Thursday that his administration is "standing up" for transgender Americans against "hateful bills" being passed at the state level and that he is committed to advancing equality across society.

11. 'We have to stand up:' US governors impose sanctions on Russia -

Some U.S. governors are taking matters into their own hands and imposing their own economic sanctions on Russia for invading Ukraine.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf on Sunday asked the Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board to remove Russian-sourced products from stores in the commonwealth. He said the board has already identified Russian-sourced products currently being sold at Fine Wine & Good Spirits stores and urged for sales to cease as quickly as possible, WPXI-TV reported.

12. Austin to governors: Guard troops must get COVID-19 vaccine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin, in letters to seven governors, is reaffirming the need for members of their states' Army and Air National Guards to get the mandatory COVID-19 vaccine or lose their Guard status.

13. FDA halts use of antibody drugs that don't work vs. omicron -

WASHINGTON (AP) — COVID-19 antibody drugs from Regeneron and Eli Lilly should no longer be used because they don't work against the omicron variant that now accounts for nearly all U.S. infections, U.S. health regulators said Monday.

14. Samsung says it will build $17B chip factory in Texas -

Samsung said it plans to build a $17 billion semiconductor factory outside of Austin, Texas, amid a global shortage of chips used in phones, cars and other electronic devices.

"This is the largest foreign direct investment in the state of Texas, ever," Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said in announcing the project Tuesday.

15. GOP pushback on employer vaccine mandate underway in states -

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — President Joe Biden's mandate for many private employers to require their workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19 is facing a wall of opposition from state Republican officials who are passing laws and signing orders to exempt workers, threatening businesses that comply and preparing a legal fight over rules that were announced Thursday.

16. Supreme Court questions controversial Texas abortion law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of the Supreme Court signaled Monday they would allow abortion providers to pursue a court challenge to the controversial Texas law that has virtually ended abortion in the nation's second-largest state after six weeks of pregnancy.

17. Supreme Court questions Texas law banning most abortions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of the Supreme Court signaled Monday they would allow abortion providers to pursue a court challenge to a Texas law that has virtually ended abortion in the nation's second-largest state after six weeks of pregnancy.

18. Boeing tells workers they must get COVID-19 vaccine -

SEATTLE (AP) — The Boeing Co. has told employees they must be vaccinated against COVID-19 or possibly be fired.

The Seattle Times reports the deadline for workers at the aerospace giant is Dec. 8.

19. Texas governor orders ban on private company vaccine mandate -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott issued an executive order Monday to prohibit any entity, including private business, from enforcing a COVID-19 vaccine mandate on workers and called on state lawmakers to pass a similar ban into law.

20. EXPLAINER: The Texas abortion law's swift impact, and future -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday ordered Texas to suspend a new law banning most abortions, which had already put a strain on clinics and patients in the month since it took effect.

21. Prisons, border wall: How GOP is looking to use COVID money -

CHICAGO (AP) — When Democrats passed President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package, Republicans called it liberal "pet projects" disguised as pandemic aid.

But now that Republican governors and local leaders have the money in hand, they are using it for things on their wish lists, too.

22. Maybe it’s time for Texas to stop messing with us -

The woman walking up the aisle at the Texas Rangers stadium in Arlington was attractive and apparently a baseball fan, two positive attributes in my book. But her T-shirt message was off-putting:

“American,” it stated. “Until Texas secedes.”

23. Texas GOP bets on hard right turn amid changing demographics -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republicans in America's largest conservative state for years racked up victories under the slogan "Keep Texas Red," a pledge to quash a coming blue wave that Democrats argued was inevitable given shifting demographics.

24. Biden blasts high court failure to block Texas abortion curb -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday blasted the Supreme Court's decision not to block a new Texas law banning most abortions in the state and directed federal agencies to do what they can to "insulate women and providers" from the impact.

25. After voters embraced mail ballots, GOP states tighten rules -

A monthslong campaign by the Republican Party, fueled in part by the false narrative of widespread fraud in last year's presidential election, has led to a wave of new voting laws that will tighten access to the ballot for millions of Americans.

26. Texas Legislature sends sweeping GOP voting bill to governor -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The GOP-controlled Texas Legislature passed a broad overhaul of the state's election laws Tuesday, tightening already strict voting rules and dealing a bruising defeat to Democrats who waged a monthslong fight over what they argued was a brazen attempt to disenfranchise minorities and other Democratic-leaning voters.

27. Virus surge breaks hospital records amid rising toll on kids -

Kentucky and Texas joined a growing list of states that are seeing record numbers of hospitalized COVID-19 patients in a surge that is overwhelming doctors and nurses and afflicting more children.

Intensive care units around the nation are packed with patients extremely ill with the coronavirus — even in places where hospitalizations have not yet reached earlier peaks.

28. Bus driver shortages are latest challenge hitting US schools -

HELENA, Mont. (AP) — A Montana school district is dangling $4,000 bonuses and inviting people to test drive big yellow school buses in hopes of enticing them to take a job that schools are struggling to fill as kids return to in-person classes.

29. GOP governors, school districts battle over mask mandates -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Millions of students in Florida, Texas and Arizona are now required to wear masks in class as school boards in mostly Democratic areas have defied their Republican governors and made face coverings mandatory.

30. Texas governor tests positive for COVID-19, in 'good health' -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Texas Gov. Greg Abbott tested positive for COVID-19 on Tuesday, according to his office, who said the Republican is in good health and experiencing no symptoms.

31. DeSantis top donor invests in COVID drug governor promotes -

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis — who has been criticized for opposing mask mandates and vaccine passports — is now touting a COVID-19 antibody treatment in which a top donor's company has invested millions of dollars.

32. Republicans take to mask wars as virus surges in red states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top Republicans are battling school districts in their own states' urban, heavily Democratic areas over whether students should be required to mask up as they head back to school — reigniting ideological divides over mandates even as the latest coronavirus surge ravages the reddest, most unvaccinated parts of the nation.

33. Analysis: Delta variant upends politicians' COVID calculus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's administration drew up a strategy to contain one coronavirus strain, then another showed up that's much more contagious.

This week — a month late — Biden met his goal of 70% of U.S. adults having received at least one COVID-19 shot. Originally conceived as an affirmation of American resiliency to coincide with Independence Day, the belated milestone offered little to celebrate. Driven by the delta variant, new cases are averaging more than 70,000 a day, above the peak last summer when no vaccines were available. And the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is drawing criticism from experts in the medical and scientific community for its off-and-on masking recommendations.

34. Biden chides Republican governors who resist vaccine rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden called on resistant Republican governors to "get out of the way" of vaccine rules aimed at containing the more transmissible and dangerous COVID-19 variant. He backed city and private mandates requiring people to be vaccinated to go about some daily activities.

35. The long, 'surreal' days of the runaway Texas legislators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sheltered in a downtown D.C. hotel, the Democratic lawmakers who left Texas to block a restrictive voting bill are living a life of stress and scrutiny.

After bolting the state Monday in order to sabotage the bill by denying a quorum in the Texas House of Representatives, the more than 50 state legislators find themselves balancing a punishing schedule of political lobbying, outside work and family obligations, all under a national spotlight.

36. Top Davidson County residential sales for second quarter 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

37. Top Davidson County residential sales for June 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

38. Pressured by allies, Biden escalates fight for voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will lay out the "moral case" for voting rights as he faces growing pressure from civil rights activists and other Democrats to combat efforts by Republican-led state legislatures to restrict access to the ballot.

39. Lee, 14 other GOP governors urge release of Census redistricting data -

Fifteen Republican governors sent a letter Tuesday to the U.S. Department of Commerce urging that the U.S. Census Bureau release redistricting data as soon as possible, saying further delays would hurt efforts to redraw congressional and legislative districts.

40. Justice Dept.: Missouri governor can't void federal gun laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is warning Missouri officials that the state can't ignore federal law, after the governor signed a bill last week that bans police from enforcing federal gun rules.

41. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

42. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

43. Biden pushes for US voting rights law as restrictions mount -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden used the 100th anniversary of Tulsa's race massacre to make a plea for sweeping legislation in Congress to protect the right to vote as Republican-led governments in Texas and other states pass new restrictions making it tougher to cast ballots.

44. With bankruptcy tossed, what's next for the NRA? -

NEW YORK (AP) — Now that a judge has rejected the National Rifle Association's bankruptcy bid, blocking its plan to reincorporate in Texas, the gun rights group is back to fighting a lawsuit that threatens to put it out of business.

45. Judge dismisses NRA bankruptcy case in blow to gun group -

DALLAS (AP) — A federal judge dismissed the National Rifle Association's bankruptcy case Tuesday, leaving the powerful gun-rights group to face a New York state lawsuit that accuses it of financial abuses and aims to put it out of business.

46. Despite business warnings, GOP moves ahead with voting bills -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Republican lawmakers around the country are pressing ahead with efforts to tighten voting laws, despite growing warnings from business leaders that the measures could harm democracy and the economic climate.

47. Top Davidson County residential sales for March 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

48. Some businesses want masks on, even as states drop mandates -

NEW YORK (AP) — Although Texas no longer requires people to wear masks to protect against COVID-19, customers do need them to enter De J. Lozada's store.

"We cannot afford to take chances with the lives of my staffers. They're young people and their parents have entrusted me with their care," says Lozada, owner of Soul Popped Gourmet Popcorn, a shop located in Austin's Barton Creek Square Mall.

49. Republicans trod well-worn path to court to sue Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — These are busy days for Republican state attorneys general, filing repeated lawsuits that claim President Joe Biden and his administration are overstepping their authority on immigration, climate change, the environment and taxes.

50. Homeland Security head spars with Congress over border surge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's head of Homeland Security sparred Wednesday with members of Congress over the surge of migrants at the Southwest border, refusing to concede the situation was a crisis or even much different from what the two previous administrations faced.

51. Crowded bars: March Madness or just plain madness? -

CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA Tournament and bars were made for each other, with fans of powerhouse teams like Gonzaga and longshots like Colgate pouring in to cheer their teams. Until last year, that is, when COVID-19 blew up everybody's brackets.

52. House panel seeks storm documents from Texas grid operator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Oversight Committee is investigating the agency that operates the Texas power grid, seeking information and documents about the lack of preparation for the recent winter storm that caused millions of power outages and dozens of deaths across the state.

53. Biden stands by May timeline for vaccines for all US adults -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said the U.S. expects to take delivery of enough coronavirus vaccine for all adults by the end of May — two months earlier than anticipated — and he pushed states to get at least one shot into the arms of teachers by the end of March to hasten school reopenings.

54. Texas and other states ease COVID-19 rules despite warnings -

Texas on Tuesday became the biggest state to lift its mask rule, joining a rapidly growing movement by governors and other leaders across the U.S. to loosen COVID-19 restrictions despite pleas from health officials not to let down their guard yet.

55. Biden surveys Texas weather damage, thanks emergency workers -

HOUSTON (AP) — President Joe Biden heard firsthand from Texans clobbered by this month's brutal winter weather on Friday as he made his first trip to a major disaster area since he took office.

56. Why some Texans are getting sky-high energy bills -

After unusual icy weather left millions of Texans without power, some are facing another crisis: Sky-high electricity bills.

The surge in pricing is hitting people who have chosen to pay wholesale prices for their power, which is typically cheaper than paying fixed rates during good weather, but can spike when there's high demand for electricity. Many of those who have reported receiving large bills are customers of electricity provider Griddy, which only operates in Texas.

57. US needs to brace itself for more deadly storms, experts say -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Deadly weather will be hitting the U.S. more often, and America needs to get better at dealing with it, experts said as Texas and other states battled winter storms that blew past the worst-case planning of utilities, governments and millions of shivering residents.

58. Daily COVID-19 deaths in US reach highest level since May -

The surging coronavirus is taking an increasingly dire toll across the U.S. just as a vaccine appears at hand, with the country now averaging over 1,300 COVID-19 deaths per day — the highest since the calamitous spring in and around New York City.

59. Governors ratchet up restrictions ahead of Thanksgiving -

From California to Pennsylvania, governors and mayors across the U.S. are ratcheting up COVID-19 restrictions amid the record-shattering resurgence of the virus that is all but certain to get worse because of holiday travel and family gatherings over Thanksgiving.

60. Top Davidson County residential sales for October 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

61. Biden's warning on oil tests voter resolve on climate change -

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Joe Biden is confronting the harsh political realities of combating climate change.

The Democratic presidential nominee has spent months touting a $2 trillion plan to boost investment in clean energy and stop all climate-damaging emissions from the U.S. economy by 2050. The plan implied that he would wean the U.S. off oil and gas, but Biden wasn't so explicit about the industry's fate — until Thursday night.

62. Texas high court blocks Houston plan to offer mail ballots -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The Texas Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that 2 million Houston voters cannot receive unsolicited mail ballot applications from local elections officials who are dramatically expanding ways to vote in November in the nation's third-largest county, a key battleground in Texas.

63. Nashville included in NASCAR 2021 schedule shakeup -

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — NASCAR promised radical changes to the 2021 schedule and delivered Wednesday with six road courses, the first dirt race for the Cup Series since 1970 and new stops in Nashville and Austin, Texas.

64. Confirmed US virus cases rise amid new global restrictions -

MIAMI (AP) — California, Arizona, Texas and Florida together reported about 36,000 new coronavirus cases Wednesday as restrictions aimed at combating the spread of the pandemic took hold in the United States and around the world in an unsettling sign reminiscent of the dark days of April.

65. Virus cases rise in U.S. states amid new world restrictions -

MIAMI (AP) — Arizona, Texas and Florida together reported about 25,000 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday as restrictions aimed at combating the spread of the pandemic took hold in the United States and around the world in an unsettling sign reminiscent of the dark days of April.

66. As virus roars back, so do signs of a new round of layoffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The reopening of Tucson's historic Hotel Congress lasted less than a month.

General manager Todd Hanley on June 4 ended a two-month coronavirus lockdown and reopened the 39-room hotel at half-capacity, along with an adjoining restaurant for outdoor dining. Yet with reported COVID-19 cases spiking across Arizona, Hanley made the painful decision last weekend to give up, for now.

67. States retreat as confirmed virus cases hit all-time high -

Texas and Florida reversed course and clamped down on bars again Friday in the nation's biggest retreat yet as the number of confirmed coronavirus infections per day in the U.S. surged to an all-time high of 40,000.

68. American Airlines will book flights to full capacity -

DALLAS (AP) — American Airlines will start booking flights to full capacity next week, ending any effort to promote social distancing on its planes while the United States sets records for new reported cases of the coronavirus.

69. Governors who quickly reopened backpedal as virus surges -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — When Texas began lifting coronavirus restrictions, Republican Gov. Greg Abbott didn't wear a mask. He wouldn't let mayors enact extra precautions during one of America's swiftest efforts to reopen. He pointed out that the White House backed his plan and gave assurances there were safe ways to go out again.

70. US health officials estimate 20M Americans have had virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. officials estimate that 20 million Americans have been infected with the coronavirus since it first arrived in the United States, meaning that the vast majority of the population remains susceptible.

71. AP-NORC poll: Support for restrictions, virus worries wane -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After months of steady progress, new confirmed cases of COVID-19 climbed to near record levels in the U.S. this week. Experts blame a nation that's become complacent, and a new poll finds evidence to back them up: Support for measures to slow the virus' spread has declined from the early days of the coronavirus pandemic.

72. US virus cases continue to rise at near-record rate -

NEW YORK (AP) — The number of new coronavirus cases per day in the U.S. stood near an all-time high Thursday at more than 34,000, hovering close to the peak reached in late April during some of the darkest and deadliest days of the crisis.

73. US job market's modest improvement may be stalling -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of laid-off workers seeking U.S. unemployment aid barely fell last week, and the reopening of small businesses has leveled off — evidence that the job market's gains may have stalled just as a surge in coronavirus cases is endangering an economic recovery.

74. 'Coming back and biting us': US sees virus resurgence -

HOUSTON (AP) — Hospital administrators and health experts warned desperately Wednesday that parts of the U.S. are on the verge of becoming overwhelmed by a resurgence of the coronavirus, lamenting that politicians and a tired-of-being-cooped-up public are letting a disaster unfold.

75. Beijing outbreak raises virus fears for rest of the world -

BEIJING (AP) — China raised its emergency warning to its second-highest level and canceled more than 60% of the flights to Beijing on Wednesday amid a new coronavirus outbreak in the capital. It was a sharp pullback for the nation that declared victory over COVID-19 in March and a message to the rest of the world about how tenacious the virus really is.

76. Top Davidson County residential sales for May 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

77. SEC to allow football workouts on campus beginning June 8 -

Southeastern Conference schools will be able to bring football and basketball players back to campus for voluntary activities starting June 8 at the discretion of each university.

The SEC's announcement Friday is the latest sign that a college football season will be launched in some form this fall. The move comes two days after the NCAA Division I Council voted to lift a moratorium on voluntary workouts on campus by football and basketball players, effective June 1.

78. Most states still fall short of recommended testing levels -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As businesses reopened Friday in more of the U.S., an overwhelming majority of states still fall short of the COVID-19 testing levels that public health experts say are necessary to safely ease lockdowns and avoid another deadly wave of outbreaks, according to an Associated Press analysis.

79. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's perfect China 'ban,' death toll myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Truth often takes a beating when President Donald Trump talks about his administration's response to the coronavirus and the subsequent death toll in the U.S. This past week was no exception.

80. AP-NORC poll: Majority disapprove of coronavirus protests -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A majority of Americans disapprove of protests against restrictions aimed at preventing the spread the coronavirus, according to a new poll that also finds the still-expansive support for such limits — including restaurant closures and stay-at-home orders — has dipped in recent weeks.

81. Trump 'not sure we even have a choice' on reopening states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump was continuing his push to get states reopened as he praised another Republican governor for rolling back state coronavirus restrictions while welcoming that governor, Greg Abbott of Texas, to the White House. That reopening comes despite Texas failing to meet the administration's recommended benchmarks.

82. AP-NORC poll: Few Americans support easing virus protections -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite pockets of attention-grabbing protests, a new survey finds Americans remain overwhelmingly in favor of stay-at-home orders and other efforts to slow the spread of the coronavirus. A majority say it won't be safe to lift such restrictions anytime soon, even as a handful of governors announce plans to ease within days the public health efforts that have upended daily life and roiled the global economy.

83. Powerful GOP allies propel Trump effort to reopen economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Leading Republicans say the coronavirus shutdown cannot go on. Car-honking activists swarmed a statehouse Wednesday to protest stay-home restrictions. Capitol Hill staff are quietly drafting bills to undo the just-passed rescue aid and push Americans back to work.

84. Court allows medication abortions in Texas during pandemic -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A federal appeals court panel ruled that medication abortions, in which pills are taken to terminate a pregnancy, can be provided in Texas during the coronavirus pandemic.

The ruling Monday from a three-judge panel of the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals was among several developments in Republican-led states where governors have sought to prohibit almost all abortions by classifying them as elective procedures that should be put off during the virus outbreak.

85. Trump resists national shutdown, leaving it up to states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is resisting calls to issue a national stay-at-home order to stem the spread of the new coronavirus despite his administration's projections that tens of thousands of Americans are likely to be killed by the disease. One by one, though, states are increasingly pushing shutdown orders of their own.

86. Another attempt to move ahead on virus aid package snags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump expressed qualms Monday about extending the current 15-day shutdown  recommended by the federal government, even as his officials warned that the coronavirus crisis is deepening and Congress ran into more roadblocks trying to complete a nearly $2 trillion economic rescue package.

87. Congressional rescue talks churn as viral crisis expands -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top-level negotiations between Congress and the White House churned late into the night over a now nearly $2 trillion economic rescue package, as the coronavirus crisis deepened, the nation shut down and the first U.S. senator tested positive for the disease.

88. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for February 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2020, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

89. Online political ads: cheap, efficient and ripe for misuse -

Older men in Arkansas might see a close-up photo of President Donald Trump pumping his fist in the air, along with a message asking them to donate $30 to his campaign for a Super Bowl commercial.

Middle-aged women in California might see a photo of Trump pointing to a crowd, with a plea for them to give "any amount" to the campaign.

90. Storms with hurricane-force winds, huge hail threaten South -

Hurricane-force wind gusts and hail the size of baseballs could accompany potent storms that also threaten to spin up tornadoes and drench the South with heavy rains, forecasters said Friday.

The national Storm Prediction Center said more than 18 million people in Louisiana, Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma will be at an enhanced risk of storms Friday that could include strong tornadoes and flooding rains. The area includes several major Texas cities including Dallas, Houston and Austin.

91. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

92. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

93. Energy Secretary Perry says he is resigning by year's end -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Energy Secretary Rick Perry announced Thursday that he will leave his job by the end of the year, saying that under President Donald Trump the nation is nearing energy independence.

94. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

95. Judge orders Texas not to purge voters after botching list -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Saying there is no evidence of widespread election fraud in Texas, a federal judge Wednesday blocked the removal of any registered voter after state Republican leaders loudly but wrongly questioned the U.S. citizenship of tens of thousands of people.

96. Apple upstages Amazon in selecting new tech hub locations -

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — One tech giant strung dozens of North American cities through a circus-like contest that led mayors and governors to desperately pitch their regions — and offer huge sums of public money — in hopes of landing a gleaming new corporate campus. The other swept in quietly before making its big move.

97. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for July 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

98. $1 million-plus Middle Tennessee residential sales for Q2 2018 -

Residential real estate sales, Second quarter 2018, of $1 million of more for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

99. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for June 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

100. AP FACT CHECK: Trump ignores strong points in US trade -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is presenting a skewed portrait of how the world does business with the U.S to rationalize his escalating trade dispute with allies.

At the same time, he's glossing over aspects of the U.S. economy that don't support his faulty contention that it's the best it's ever been. The complexities of health care for veterans are also set aside as he hails a new era in the Department of Veterans Affairs' system.