» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'George Washington' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:1
Shelby Public Records:231
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:15
Middle Tennessee:39
East Tennessee:22
Other:1

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Supreme Court allows Jan. 6 committee to get Trump documents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a rebuff to former President Donald Trump, the Supreme Court is allowing the release of presidential documents sought by the congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection.

2. Biden names major Democratic donors as UK, Denmark envoys -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday announced his intention to nominate prominent Democratic fundraiser Jane Hartley to serve as ambassador to the United Kingdom and Northern Ireland and major donor Alan Leventhal to serve as his envoy to Denmark.

3. US begins offering 1B free COVID tests, but many more needed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For the first time, people across the U.S. can log on to a government website and order free, at-home COVID-19 tests. But the White House push may do little to ease the omicron surge, and experts say Washington will have to do a lot more to fix the country's long-troubled testing system.

4. Businesses react to ruling against Biden vaccine mandate -

For companies that were waiting to hear from the U.S. Supreme Court before deciding whether to require vaccinations or regular coronavirus testing for workers, the next move is up to them.

Many large corporations were silent on Thursday's ruling by the high court to block a requirement that workers at businesses with at least 100 employees be fully vaccinated or else test regularly for COVID-19 and wear a mask on the job.

5. Biden nominates 3 for Fed board, including first Black woman -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday announced the nominations of three people for the Federal Reserve's Board of Governors, including Sarah Bloom Raskin, a former Fed and Treasury official, for the top regulatory slot and Lisa Cook, who would be the first Black woman to serve on the Fed's board.

6. Biden pays silent tribute as Reid lies in state at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The late Sen. Harry Reid was remembered Wednesday at the U.S. Capitol as a "legendary leader," a hardscrabble Democrat who rose from poverty in a dusty Nevada mining town to deliver landmark legislation from the chamber's most powerful position.

7. Pelosi: 'Democracy won' on Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had a singular message for Americans and the world on the eve of the anniversary of the horrific attack on the Capitol:

"Democracy won."

In an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday, inside the Capitol where a mob loyal to Donald Trump had laid siege, Pelosi said it's time for the country to turn to its "better angels," draw from history and ensure a day like Jan. 6 never happens again.

8. Navy blocked from acting against 35 COVID vaccine refusers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge in Texas has granted a preliminary injunction stopping the Navy from acting against 35 sailors for refusing on religious grounds to comply with an order to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

9. Scientist, enforcer, high-flyer: 3 women put a mark on tech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three bright and driven women with ground-breaking ideas made significant — if very different — marks on the embattled tech industry in 2021.

Frances Haugen, Lina Khan and Elizabeth Holmes — a data scientist turned whistleblower, a legal scholar turned antitrust enforcer and a former Silicon Valley high-flyer turned criminal defendant — all figured heavily in a technology world where men have long dominated the spotlight. Think Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg, Jeff Bezos, Elon Musk.

10. Late Senate leader Harry Reid remembered as `man of action' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidents and former Senate colleagues are lauding longtime Majority Leader Harry Reid for a political legacy that included an expansion of health insurance coverage for millions of Americans and helping secure an economic aid package and banking overhaul following the 2008 financial crisis.

11. McConnell openly courts Manchin to leave Democrats, join GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitch McConnell is done with subtleties. The Senate Republican leader is putting his party's courtship of Joe Manchin on full public display after the West Virginia Democrat's fractious split with the White House over the president's big social and environmental spending package.

12. White House pushes GOP to end blockade of ambassador picks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden unveiled two more ambassador nominees Wednesday, but the White House and Democrats warned that maneuvering by some Senate Republicans to block all but a small fraction of diplomatic and other national security appointees is doing serious harm to U.S. efforts around the globe.

13. How a Kennedy built an anti-vaccine juggernaut amid COVID-19 -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Robert F. Kennedy Jr. strode onto the stage at a Southern California church, radiating Kennedy confidence and surveying the standing ovation crowd with his piercing blue Bobby Kennedy eyes. Then, he launched into an anti-vaccine rant. Democrats "drank the Kool-Aid," he told people assembled for a far right conference, branded as standing for "health and freedom."

14. House votes to hold Meadows in contempt in Jan. 6 probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has voted to hold former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows in contempt of Congress after he ceased to cooperate with the Jan. 6 Committee  investigating the Capitol insurrection  — making it the first time the chamber has voted to hold a former member in contempt since the 1830s.

15. Texts show top Trump defenders' private alarm on Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a mob overran the U.S. Capitol last January, some of Donald Trump's highest-profile defenders in the media — and even his own son — sent urgent text messages to the White House chief of staff urging him to get the then-president to do more to stop the violence.

16. Far too little vote fraud to tip election to Trump, AP finds -

ATLANTA, Ga. (AP) — An Associated Press review of every potential case of voter fraud in the six battleground states disputed by former President Donald Trump has found fewer than 475 — a number that would have made no difference in the 2020 presidential election.

17. Harris unveils plan for electric vehicle charging network -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration released an ambitious federal strategy Monday to build 500,000 charging stations for electric vehicles across the country and bring down the cost of electric cars with the goal of transforming the U.S. auto industry.

18. Dole: 'Genuine hero' paid war's price, triumphed in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole was honored Friday at Washington National Cathedral and the World War II monument he helped create as top leaders from both parties saluted the longtime Kansas senator's ability to practice bare-knuckle politics without losing civility.

19. US orders arms embargo on Cambodia, cites Chinese influence -

BANGKOK (AP) — The U.S. has ordered an arms embargo on Cambodia, citing deepening Chinese military influence, corruption and human rights abuses by the government and armed forces in the Southeast Asian country.

20. Jan. 6 panel to move forward with contempt against Meadows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection has "no choice" but to move forward with contempt charges against former Trump White House chief of staff Mark Meadows now that he is no longer complying with a subpoena, the panel's chairman said Wednesday.

21. Attorney says Meadows won't cooperate with Jan. 6 panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an abrupt reversal, an attorney for former White House chief of staff Mark Meadows said his client will not cooperate with a House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, citing a breakdown in negotiations with the panel.

22. US plans diplomatic boycott of Beijing Winter Olympics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. will stage a diplomatic boycott of the upcoming Winter Olympics in Beijing t o protest Chinese human rights abuses, the White House confirmed Monday, a move that China has vowed to greet with "firm countermeasures."

23. Bob Dole, a man of war, power, zingers and denied ambition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole willed himself to walk again after paralyzing war wounds, ran for Congress with a right arm too damaged to shake hands, and rose through the Senate ranks to become a long-serving Republican leader and tough and tireless champion of his party.

24. Roe v. Wade nearly fell 30 years ago. Can it survive again? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — We've been here before, with the fate of abortion rights throughout the United States in doubt and awaiting a decision by the Supreme Court.

Nearly 30 years ago, the court came within a vote of throwing out the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision that legalized abortion throughout the United States and returning the ability to restrict if not ban abortion to the states.

25. Sewanee leader to resign, says he would take ambassador job -

SEWANEE (AP) — The University of the South's vice chancellor and president has announced that he will resign later this month and would accept a position as U.S. ambassador to South Africa if offered it.

26. Jan. 6 panel to vote on contempt against former DOJ official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection will vote on pursuing contempt charges against a former Justice Department official Wednesday as the committee aggressively seeks to gain answers about the violent attack by former President Donald Trump's supporters.

27. Former Pentagon chief sues to publish material in memoir -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Defense Secretary Mark Esper claims in a lawsuit against the Defense Department that material is being improperly withheld from his use as he seeks to publish an "unvarnished and candid memoir" of his time in President Donald Trump's Cabinet.

28. Supreme Court set to take up all-or-nothing abortion fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Both sides are telling the Supreme Court there's no middle ground in Wednesday's showdown over abortion. The justices can either reaffirm the constitutional right to an abortion or wipe it away altogether.

29. Justices' views on abortion in their own words and votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Supreme Court hears arguments Wednesday over whether Mississippi can ban abortions after 15 weeks, the justices will be focused on an issue that has dominated the term. Not only is there Mississippi's call to overrule Roe v. Wade, but justices are already considering a Texas law banning abortion at roughly six weeks and written to make it difficult to mount legal challenges against it.

30. Fed's Powell will aim to win a high-stakes bet in 2nd term -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell gambled last year that his ultra-low rate policies would help revive an economy that had sunk deep into a pandemic-induced recession. So far, his bet has mostly paid off.

31. Biden praises Canada, Mexico as leaders discuss strains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reviving three-way North American summitry after a five-year break, President Joe Biden on Thursday joined with the leaders of Canada and Mexico to declare their nations can work together and prove "democracies can deliver" even as they sort out differences on key issues.

32. GOP paints Biden's choice for bank regulator as radical -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's choice to become one of the top banking regulators endured a contentious nomination hearing Thursday, with Republican senators warning she would nationalize the U.S. banking system and Democrats saying she's eminently qualified and would be tough overseer of Wall Street.

33. House censures Rep. Gosar for violent video in rare rebuke -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted to censure Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona for posting an animated video that depicted him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez with a sword, an extraordinary rebuke that highlighted the political strains testing Washington and the country.

34. Justice Dept. grant awards $139M to hire 1,000 new officers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is giving $139 million to police departments across the U.S. as part of a grant program that would bring on more than 1,000 new officers.

The grant funding being announced Thursday through the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services will be awarded to 183 law enforcement agencies across the country and in U.S. territories. The funding is meant to help police departments reduce crime and to encourage community policing.

35. Biden, Trudeau to discuss electric vehicle dispute at summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden kicked off the North American Leaders Summit on Thursday with a one-on-one meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, calling their two countries' relationship one of the easiest in the early going of his presidency.

36. Biden's nominee for bank regulator faces hostile opposition -

NEW YORK (AP) — A fierce battle is being waged in Washington over President Biden's choice to lead a typically low-profile agency that oversees the banking industry.

Saule Omarova, 55, was nominated in September to be the nation's next comptroller of the currency. If confirmed, she would be the first woman and person of color to run the 158-year-old agency. But her nomination has drawn intense opposition from Republicans and the banking industry, with the criticism at times echoing the Red Scare that plagued the U.S. after World War II.

37. Thanksgiving has good claim for top US holiday -

As the 400th anniversary of the first Thanksgiving approaches, I suggest that maybe the annual celebration should be recognized as America’s top holiday. Ahead even of Christmas, the perennial No. 1.

38. House censures Rep. Gosar for violent video in rare rebuke -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House voted Wednesday to censure Republican Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona for posting of an animated video that depicted him killing Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez with a sword, an extraordinary rebuke that highlighted the political strains testing Washington and the country.

39. Bannon indictment defies history of Congress' contempt power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon's indictment on contempt of Congress charges is the nation's first since 1983, and his appearance in federal court provides a rare glimpse into one of U.S. lawmakers' politically messiest and least-used powers.

40. A complicated relationship: Biden and Xi prepare for meeting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden and China's Xi Jinping have slurped noodles together in Beijing. They've shared deep thoughts about the meaning of America during an exchange on the Tibetan plateau. They've gushed to U.S. business leaders about developing a sincere respect for each other.

41. Bannon indicted on contempt charges for defying 1/6 subpoena -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon, a longtime ally of former President Donald Trump, was indicted Friday on two counts of criminal contempt of Congress after he defied a subpoena from the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

42. Meadows to defy subpoena as Jan. 6 panel threatens contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A lawyer for former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows says his client will defy a subpoena from a House committee that is investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection, a move that is likely to trigger a contempt vote against the former Republican congressman.

43. Court temporarily delays release of Trump's Jan. 6 records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court has temporarily blocked the release of records sought by a U.S. House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection as the court considers an emergency request by former President Donald Trump.

44. US-funded child care aid nearing reality with Biden bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Women — and some men — in Congress have been fighting for government child care assistance for almost 80 years. With President Joe Biden's $1.85 trillion social services package, they are as close as they have ever been to winning.

45. Whistleblowers to play key role in enforcing vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To enforce President Joe Biden's forthcoming COVID-19 mandate, the U.S. Labor Department is going to need a lot of help. Its Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't have nearly enough workplace safety inspectors to do the job.

46. Biden asking Democrats do so much with so little in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rarely have the leaders of Congress been asked to do so much, with so little, as in navigating President Joe Biden's big domestic vision into law.

Reaching for FDR-style accomplishments with slimmer-than-ever Democratic majorities has been politically messy at best, arduous at worst, and about to become even more daunting for the president and his party.

47. Colin Powell remembered as a model for future generations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Colin L. Powell, the trailblazing soldier-diplomat who rose from humble beginnings to become the first Black secretary of state, was remembered by family and friends Friday as a principled man of humility and grace whose decorated record of leadership can serve as a model for generations to come.

48. All eyes on vulnerable House Democrats after election losses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For many House Democrats, 2021 is looking a lot like 2009, a year when a Republican elected governor in Virginia foreshadowed a dreadful blowout in the next year's midterm elections.

49. Youngkin's Virginia win jolts Democrats, tight race in NJ -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Republican Glenn Youngkin won the Virginia governor's race early Wednesday, tapping into culture war fights over schools and race to unite former President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters with enough suburban voters to become the first GOP candidate to win statewide office in a dozen years.

50. Governors and more: What to watch in Tuesday's elections -

It may be an odd-numbered year but Tuesday's elections aren't sleepy, local contests. Voters in Virginia are weighing in on a governor's race that could rattle President Joe Biden and Democrats in Washington. In Minneapolis, a city still shaken by George Floyd's murder will vote on whether to disband its police department and create a new public safety agency. School board races across the country have become the new battlegrounds for partisan debates over race.

51. Sluggish pace of confirmations vexes Biden White House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's willingness to confirm a president's nominees took a downward turn during Donald Trump's first year in office. And it has only gotten worse for President Joe Biden.

About 36% of Biden's nominees have been confirmed so far in the evenly divided Senate, a deterioration from the paltry 38% success rate that Trump saw at the same stage of his presidency. Their predecessors, Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, both saw about two-thirds of their nominees confirmed through Oct. 21, according to tracking by the Partnership for Public Service.

52. Colin Powell: A trailblazing legacy, blotted by Iraq war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A child of working-class Jamaican immigrants in the Bronx, Colin Powell rose from neighborhood store clerk to warehouse floor-mopper to the highest echelons of the U.S. government. It was a trailblazing American dream journey that won him international acclaim and trust.

53. Reaction to Colin Powell's death from US and world figures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World figures are reacting to the death of Colin Powell, a Vietnam War veteran who rose to the rank of four-star general and became the first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and then secretary of state. Powell died Monday of COVID-19 complications at age 84.

54. Justices' views on abortion in their own words and votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Abortion already is dominating the Supreme Court's new term, months before the justices will decide whether to reverse decisions reaching back nearly 50 years. Not only is there Mississippi's call to overrule Roe v. Wade, but the court also soon will be asked again to weigh in on the Texas law banning abortion at roughly six weeks.

55. A potential Powell renomination for Fed faces some dissent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Resistance to the potential renomination of Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell intensified this week, with Sen. Elizabeth Warren becoming the first senator to publicly oppose him and many progressive groups pushing for some alternative leader at the Fed.

56. Capitol Police chief sees rising threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The newly installed chief of the U.S. Capitol Police says the force, still struggling six months after an insurrection that left its officers battled, bloodied and bruised, "cannot afford to be complacent." The risk to lawmakers is higher than ever. And the threat from lone-wolf attackers is only growing.

57. Green energy takes hold in unlikely places with Ford project -

GLENDALE, Ky. (AP) — When Ford revealed plans to ramp up its commitment to the fledgling electric vehicle sector, the automaker chose to create thousands of jobs and pump billions in investments into two states where Republican leaders have vilified the push for green energy and defended fossil fuels.

58. Jan. 6 trials slowed by mounting evidence in US Capitol riot -

In the nearly nine months since Jan. 6, federal agents have tracked down and arrested more than 600 people across the United States believed to have joined in the riot at the U.S. Capitol.

Getting those cases swiftly to trial is turning out to be an even more difficult task.

59. Biden rule to shield 'Dreamers' seeks to bypass Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Monday renewed efforts to shield hundreds of thousands of immigrants who came to the United States as young children from deportation, the latest maneuver in a long-running drama over the policy's legality.

60. Biden hosts Indo-Pacific leaders as China concerns grow -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Friday is meeting with leaders of an Indo-Pacific alliance known as "the Quad" as he wraps up a difficult week of diplomacy in which he faced criticism from both allies and adversaries.

61. Senators: Bipartisan police overhaul talks end with no deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bipartisan congressional talks on overhauling policing practices have ended without an agreement, top bargainers from both parties said, marking the collapse of an effort that began after killings of unarmed Black people by officers sparked protests across the U.S.

62. UN health agency sets higher, tougher bar for air quality -

GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization said Wednesday that the harmful health effects of air pollution kick in at lower levels than it previously thought and it is setting a higher bar for policymakers and the public in its first update to its air quality guidelines in 15 years.

63. Politico pardoned by Trump accused of illegal campaign scam -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Republican political operative pardoned by President Donald Trump after his conviction in a 2012 bribery plot has been charged again with campaign-related crimes, this time involving a 2016 illegal campaign contribution scheme and a Russian national.

64. Small agency, big job: Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't make many headlines. Charged with keeping America's workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders.

65. Justice Dept. curtails agents' use of 'no-knock' warrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Tuesday it is curtailing federal agents' use of "no-knock" warrants — which allow law enforcement agents to enter a home without announcing their presence — and would also prohibit its agents from using chokeholds in most circumstances.

66. Fighting Texas abortion law could be tough for federal gov't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Foes of the new Texas law that bans most abortions have been looking to the Democratic-run federal government to swoop in and knock down the most restrictive abortion law in effect in the country. But it's nowhere near that simple.

67. Biden to survey NY and NJ storm damage after deadly flooding -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will survey damage in parts of the northeast that suffered catastrophic flash flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Ida, and use the muddy backdrop to call for federal spending to fortify infrastructure so it can better withstand such powerful storms.

68. Biden in New Orleans to see devastation caused by Ida -

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — President Joe Biden could get his first glimpse at the destruction wrought by Hurricane Ida even before he landed in Louisiana on Friday, with blue tarps covering shredded roofs of houses and uprooted trees visible as Air Force One approached New Orleans.

69. Biden message to battered Gulf Coast: 'We are here for you' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is calling for greater public resolve to confront climate change and help the nation deal with the fierce storms, flooding and wildfires that have beset the country as he makes a sojourn to hurricane-battered Louisiana on Friday.

70. Analysis: War is over but not Biden's Afghanistan challenges -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the final stream of U.S. cargo planes soaring over the peaks of the Hindu Kush, President Joe Biden fulfilled a campaign promise to end America's longest war, one it could not win.

71. Last troops exit Afghanistan, ending America's longest war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States completed its withdrawal from Afghanistan late Monday, ending America's longest war and closing a chapter in military history likely to be remembered for colossal failures, unfulfilled promises and a frantic final exit that cost the lives of more than 180 Afghans and 13 U.S. service members, some barely older than the war.

72. Records rebut claims of unequal treatment of Jan. 6 rioters -

It's a common refrain from some of those charged in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and their Republican allies: The Justice Department is treating them harshly because of their political views while those arrested during last year's protests over racial injustice were given leniency.

73. Supreme Court orders 'Remain in Mexico' policy reinstated -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says the Biden administration likely violated federal law in trying to end a Trump-era program that forces people to wait in Mexico while seeking asylum in the U.S.

74. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

75. Biden: Troops will stay in Afghanistan to evacuate Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said he is committed to keeping U.S. troops in Afghanistan until every American is evacuated, even if that means maintaining a military presence there beyond his Aug. 31 deadline for withdrawal.

76. DeSantis top donor invests in COVID drug governor promotes -

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis — who has been criticized for opposing mask mandates and vaccine passports — is now touting a COVID-19 antibody treatment in which a top donor's company has invested millions of dollars.

77. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefited Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

78. GOP hits Biden despite divides over Afghanistan withdrawal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Joe Biden announced he would stick to his predecessor's plan to withdraw U.S. troops from Afghanistan, Republican reaction was mixed and largely muted. Foreign policy had become so contentious that the party's own leaders had no single position on the end of the nation's longest war.

79. Billions spent on Afghan army ultimately benefitted Taliban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Built and trained at a two-decade cost of $83 billion, Afghan security forces collapsed so quickly and completely — in some cases without a shot fired — that the ultimate beneficiary of the American investment turned out to be the Taliban. They grabbed not only political power but also U.S.-supplied firepower — guns, ammunition, helicopters and more.

80. Prospects ever fainter for bipartisan policing overhaul deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prospects seem increasingly faint for a bipartisan Senate deal on overhauling policing practices as deadlocked lawmakers have fled the Capitol for August recess and political pressure for an accord eases with each passing week.

81. Hagerty accused of doing 'Trump's bidding' in infrastructure stall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One by one, Democrats and Republicans  trekked to the Senate floor on Sunday touting a $1 trillion infrastructure proposal and argued that, after months of haggling, it was time for a final vote on the measure.

82. Shipping snags prompt US firms to mull retreat from China -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Game maker Eric Poses last year created The Worst-Case Scenario Card Game, making a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that has delayed shipments around the world and sent freight costs rocketing.

83. Worst-Case Scenario: Firms wrestle with supply bottlenecks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Toy maker Eric Poses created a card game last year he called The Worst-Case Scenario, a wry reference to the way the coronavirus had upended normal life.

He had no idea.

In a twist that Poses never could have predicted, his game itself would become caught up in the latest fallout from the health crisis: a backlogged global supply chain that means shipping delays and rocketing freight costs.

84. Biden's new evictions moratorium faces doubts on legality -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden may have averted a flood of evictions and solved a growing political problem when his administration  reinstated a temporary ban on evictions because of the COVID-19 crisis.  But he left his lawyers with legal arguments that even he acknowledges might not stand up in court.

85. Fast track to normal stuck in partisan mud -

To quote the great philosopher and sage Yogi Berra, “It’s like de´ja` vu all over again.” Remember when we were all up in arms about masks, what type to wear and when and where? And there were all those people who refused to wear one at all, and griped and groused as if the simple act of showing courtesy to others was an intolerable infringement on their constitutional, God-given right to be jerks.

86. Can Biden's plans manufacture more US factory jobs? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will be trying to connect with blue-collar workers Wednesday when he travels to a truck factory in Pennsylvania to advocate for government investments and clean energy as ways to strengthen U.S. manufacturing.

87. Old bugaboo complicates US-Russia search for new arms deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In their search for a new approach to arms control, Moscow and Washington are likely to soon encounter an old bugaboo: Russia's demand that the U.S. stop resisting limits on its missile defenses, which the Russians view as a long-term threat and the Americans see as a deterrent to war.

88. AP-NORC poll: Many Republicans uneasy about party's future -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Republicans want former President Donald Trump to have at least some influence over their party's direction even as many who side with the GOP say they are uneasy about its future.

89. California, NYC to workers: Get vaccine or face weekly tests -

California and New York City announced Monday that they would require all government employees to get the coronavirus vaccine or face weekly COVID-19 testing, and the Department of Veterans Affairs became the first major federal agency to require health care workers to receive the shot.

90. Biden's 1st visit to intel agency to contrast with Trump's -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is making his first visit to an agency of the U.S. intelligence community, looking to emphasize his confidence in national security leaders after his predecessor's incendiary battles against what he often derided as the "deep state."

91. Biden, Iraqi PM to announce end of US combat mission in Iraq -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi are expected to announce on Monday that they've agreed to end the U.S. military's combat mission in Iraq by the end of the year, according to a senior Biden administration official.

92. 'We have to get it right,' Dem vows as Jan. 6 probe begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Bennie Thompson, didn't realize the severity of the Jan. 6 insurrection until his wife called him.

93. 1st Guantanamo detainee sent to home country in policy shift -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Monday transferred a Guantánamo Bay detainee to his home country for the first time, a policy shift from the Trump presidency that repatriated a Moroccan man years after he was recommended for discharge.

94. Biden to talk crime with city, police leaders nationwide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will host New York City's Democratic mayoral candidate and other city and law enforcement leaders from around the country to talk about reducing crime.

Eric Adams, Brooklyn borough president and the likely next mayor of New York, plus Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser and San Jose, California, Mayor Sam Liccardo are among those expected to attend the meeting Monday, according to the White House. Biden will also host Memphis Police Chief C.J. Davis, Chief David Brown of Chicago, Lt. Anthony Lima of the Newark, New Jersey, police, and Chief Robert Tracy of the Wilmington, Delaware, Police Department.

95. Rumsfeld, a cunning leader who oversaw a ruinous Iraq war -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Calling Donald H. Rumsfeld energetic was like calling the Pacific wide. When others would rest, he would run. While others sat, he stood. But try as he might, at the pinnacle of his career as defense secretary he could not outmaneuver the ruinous politics of the Iraq war.

96. Former Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld dead at 88 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Rumsfeld, the two-time defense secretary and one-time presidential candidate whose reputation as a skilled bureaucrat and visionary of a modern U.S. military was soiled by the long and costly Iraq war, has died, his family said in a statement released Tuesday. He was 88.

97. Bipartisan policing deal unlikely this week in blow to talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers are likely to miss their latest deadline for completing a bipartisan deal on overhauling police practices, lawmakers and aides said Thursday, 13 months after George Floyd's killing and with the shadow of next year's elections lengthening over Congress' work.

98. Biden pushes effort to combat rising tide of violent crime -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden plans to lay out new steps to stem a rising national tide of violent crime, with a particular focus on gun violence, as administration officials brace for what they fear could be an especially turbulent summer.

99. Biden anti-crime effort takes on law-breaking gun dealers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is announcing new efforts Wednesday to stem a rising national tide of violent crime but questions persist about how effective the federal efforts will be in calming what could be a turbulent summer.

100. DC statehood facing long odds in the Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Proponents of statehood for Washington, D.C., vowed Tuesday to keep pushing even though the prospects were dim as the bill began working its way through the Senate.

"Our democracy is truly in the hands of this Senate," Mayor Muriel Bowser told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. "We will not quit until we achieve full democracy. ... We will keep pushing until D.C.'s tragic disenfranchisement is rectified."