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1. Confederate flag-toting man, son convicted in Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Wednesday convicted a Confederate flag-toting man and his son of charges that they stormed the U.S. Capitol together to obstruct Congress from certifying President Joe Biden's 2020 electoral victory.

2. Despite push, states slow to make Juneteenth a paid holiday -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Recognition of Juneteenth, the effective end of slavery in the U.S., gained traction after the police killing of George Floyd in 2020. But after an initial burst of action, the movement to have it recognized as an official holiday in the states has largely stalled.

3. Independent booksellers grew in number, diversity in 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Laura Romani, a Chicago-area resident with a background in education and library science, had been thinking of a new career.

"I was at home a couple of years ago reflecting on all the experience I gained and how I wanted to contribute to the Latino community, while also allowing myself to be on my own and make use of my love for books and passion for multilingualism," she says.

4. Officer hailed as hero testifies at Capitol riot trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A police officer lauded for his bravery during the U.S. Capitol riot testified Monday that a man carrying a Confederate battle flag jabbed at him with the flagpole before joining the mob that chased him up a staircase.

5. How Biden, cops and advocates forged deal on police and race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jim Pasco, the executive director for the Fraternal Order of Police, was watching football on a Sunday afternoon when he got a call from Susan Rice, the top domestic policy adviser at the White House.

6. Biden signs policing order on anniversary of Floyd's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order Wednesday to improve accountability in policing —a meaningful but limited action on the second anniversary of George Floyd's death that reflected the challenges in addressing racism, excessive use of force and public safety when Congress is deadlocked on stronger measures.

7. Panel recommends new names for Fort Bragg, other Army bases -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent commission on Tuesday recommended new names for nine Army posts that commemorated Confederate officers. Among their recommendations: Fort Bragg in North Carolina would become Fort Liberty and Fort Gordon in Georgia would become Fort Eisenhower.

8. Biden to sign policing order on Floyd anniversary: AP source -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden plans to sign an executive order on policing on Wednesday, the second anniversary of George Floyd's death, according to three people familiar with the matter.

9. Spy agencies urged to fix open secret: A lack of diversity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The peril National Security Agency staff wanted to discuss with their director didn't involve terrorists or enemy nations. It was something closer to home: the racism and cultural misunderstandings inside America's largest intelligence service.

10. As diversity rises, US boards still disproportionately white -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amid the push to get U.S. boardrooms to look more like companies' customers and employees, advocates are finally seeing just how steep the task will be.

Boards of directors at publicly traded U.S. companies are much more white and much less diverse than the overall population, often starkly so. Just 2.7% of directors at the start of the year were Hispanic, for example. That would need to soar to 18.5% to mirror the U.S. population.

11. California corporate diversity law ruled unconstitutional -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A Los Angeles judge ruled Friday that California's landmark law mandating that corporations diversify their boards with members from certain racial, ethnic or LGBT groups is unconstitutional.

12. Biden signs bill making lynching a federal hate crime -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidents typically say a few words before they turn legislation into law. But Joe Biden flipped the script Tuesday when it came time to put his signature on the Emmett Till Anti-Lynching Act.

13. 1st Dem picks US House contest in newly carved up Nashville -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A community organizer is the first Democrat to announce a run in any of the three new congressional districts created by a Republican map that carved up Nashville to extend the GOP's steep advantage in the state.

14. Apple investors urge company to undergo civil rights audit -

SAN RAMON, Calif. (AP) — Apple's shareholders have approved a proposal urging the iPhone maker to undergo an independent audit assessing its treatment of female and minority employees, delivering a rare rebuke to a management team that runs the world's most valuable company.

15. Biden risks progressives, Blacks with pivot to the center -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is signaling an election-year shift to the center, embracing a strategy he hopes will protect fragile Democratic majorities in Congress. But he's risking a revolt from key voices across his party's sprawling coalition.

16. Abolition newspaper revived for nation grappling with racism -

BOSTON (AP) — America's first newspaper dedicated to advocating for the end of slavery is being resurrected and reimagined more than two centuries later as the nation continues to grapple with its legacy of racism.

17. In GOP embrace of truckers, some see racist double standard -

Former President Donald Trump, who repeatedly called Black Lives Matter protesters "thugs" and "anarchists," said there's "a lot of respect" for the overwhelmingly white truckers who blocked streets in the Canadian capital and shut down border crossings with the U.S. to oppose COVID-19 restrictions.

18. Doeg elected to Baker Donelson board -

Bruce C. Doeg has been elected a member of Baker Donelson’s board of directors by the firm’s shareholders.

Doeg, a shareholder in the firm’s Nashville office and co-chair of the Firm’s Privacy and Technology Center of Excellence, concentrates his practice in the area of business law with an emphasis on rapidly changing industries, including technology, digital health and life sciences.

19. Black lawmakers say Tennessee GOP ignores racism concerns -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The first month back at the state Capitol has felt frustratingly familiar for Black lawmakers in Tennessee's majority-white Legislature.

First, lawmakers passed a new congressional map scattering Nashville's Black voters across multiple districts. Now, a Republican lawmaker wants to advance a resolution dismissing the existence of deep-rooted racism in the military as detailed in an Associated Press investigation.

20. Texts show top Trump defenders' private alarm on Jan. 6 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a mob overran the U.S. Capitol last January, some of Donald Trump's highest-profile defenders in the media — and even his own son — sent urgent text messages to the White House chief of staff urging him to get the then-president to do more to stop the violence.

21. Top Davidson County residential sales for November 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

22. Former Pentagon chief sues to publish material in memoir -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Defense Secretary Mark Esper claims in a lawsuit against the Defense Department that material is being improperly withheld from his use as he seeks to publish an "unvarnished and candid memoir" of his time in President Donald Trump's Cabinet.

23. Justice Dept. grant awards $139M to hire 1,000 new officers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is giving $139 million to police departments across the U.S. as part of a grant program that would bring on more than 1,000 new officers.

The grant funding being announced Thursday through the Justice Department's Office of Community Oriented Policing Services will be awarded to 183 law enforcement agencies across the country and in U.S. territories. The funding is meant to help police departments reduce crime and to encourage community policing.

24. All eyes on vulnerable House Democrats after election losses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For many House Democrats, 2021 is looking a lot like 2009, a year when a Republican elected governor in Virginia foreshadowed a dreadful blowout in the next year's midterm elections.

25. Youngkin's Virginia win jolts Democrats, tight race in NJ -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Republican Glenn Youngkin won the Virginia governor's race early Wednesday, tapping into culture war fights over schools and race to unite former President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters with enough suburban voters to become the first GOP candidate to win statewide office in a dozen years.

26. Governors and more: What to watch in Tuesday's elections -

It may be an odd-numbered year but Tuesday's elections aren't sleepy, local contests. Voters in Virginia are weighing in on a governor's race that could rattle President Joe Biden and Democrats in Washington. In Minneapolis, a city still shaken by George Floyd's murder will vote on whether to disband its police department and create a new public safety agency. School board races across the country have become the new battlegrounds for partisan debates over race.

27. District attorneys refuse to prosecute some GOP-led laws -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When Republican lawmakers in Tennessee blocked a policy to ease up on low-level marijuana cases, Nashville's top prosecutor decided on a workaround: He just didn't charge anyone with the crime.

28. Senators: Bipartisan police overhaul talks end with no deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bipartisan congressional talks on overhauling policing practices have ended without an agreement, top bargainers from both parties said, marking the collapse of an effort that began after killings of unarmed Black people by officers sparked protests across the U.S.

29. Justice Dept. curtails agents' use of 'no-knock' warrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department said Tuesday it is curtailing federal agents' use of "no-knock" warrants — which allow law enforcement agents to enter a home without announcing their presence — and would also prohibit its agents from using chokeholds in most circumstances.

30. NFL roster spots are for the great or versatile -

I first heard the term, “the more you can do,” from the late Floyd Reese, former Titans general manager, when I first started covering the Titans and the NFL.

Now a quarter century later, you’ll still hear that phrase spring forth from the Titans administration, including current general manager Jon Robinson and head coach Mike Vrabel. It came into play again last week when roster cuts were finalized.

31. Biden to survey NY and NJ storm damage after deadly flooding -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will survey damage in parts of the northeast that suffered catastrophic flash flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Ida, and use the muddy backdrop to call for federal spending to fortify infrastructure so it can better withstand such powerful storms.

32. Records rebut claims of unequal treatment of Jan. 6 rioters -

It's a common refrain from some of those charged in the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol and their Republican allies: The Justice Department is treating them harshly because of their political views while those arrested during last year's protests over racial injustice were given leniency.

33. Reese’s contributions to Titans can't be overstated -

Quantifying the on-field impact that Floyd Reese had on the Tennessee Titans franchise is easy enough. With 111 victories in 13 seasons as the team’s general manager, and its only Super Bowl appearance to date, it is easy to see the contributions of Reese, who died last week at 73.

34. How AI-powered tech landed man in jail with scant evidence -

CHICAGO (AP) — Michael Williams' wife pleaded with him to remember their fishing trips with the grandchildren, how he used to braid her hair, anything to jar him back to his world outside the concrete walls of Cook County Jail.

35. Prospects ever fainter for bipartisan policing overhaul deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prospects seem increasingly faint for a bipartisan Senate deal on overhauling policing practices as deadlocked lawmakers have fled the Capitol for August recess and political pressure for an accord eases with each passing week.

36. SEC approves Nasdaq's plan to require board diversity -

ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — The Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday approved Nasdaq's groundbreaking proposal to boost the number of women, racial minorities and LGBTQ people on U.S. corporate boards.

37. Confederate bust moved from Tennessee Capitol building -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The bust of a Confederate general and early Ku Klux Klan leader that had been prominently displayed inside the Tennessee Capitol for decades — over objections from Black lawmakers and activists — was removed from its pedestal Friday.

38. Confederate bust to be removed from Tennessee Capitol -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A decadeslong effort to remove a bust of a Confederate general and early Ku Klux Klan leader from the Tennessee Capitol cleared its final hurdle Thursday, with state leaders approving the final vote needed to allow the statue to be relocated to a museum.

39. Titans adding Phillips, Fisher, former GM to ring of honor -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Bum Phillips, Jeff Fisher and former general manager Floyd Reese will be the newest members of the Tennessee Titans' ring of honor.

40. Biden to talk crime with city, police leaders nationwide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will host New York City's Democratic mayoral candidate and other city and law enforcement leaders from around the country to talk about reducing crime.

Eric Adams, Brooklyn borough president and the likely next mayor of New York, plus Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser and San Jose, California, Mayor Sam Liccardo are among those expected to attend the meeting Monday, according to the White House. Biden will also host Memphis Police Chief C.J. Davis, Chief David Brown of Chicago, Lt. Anthony Lima of the Newark, New Jersey, police, and Chief Robert Tracy of the Wilmington, Delaware, Police Department.

41. Tennessee man pleads guilty to arson at Metro Courthouse -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee man pleaded guilty Tuesday to federal arson charges in connection with damage to the Metro Courthouse that followed protests last year in Nashville.

Wesley Somers, 26, of Hendersonville, entered his plea in U.S. District Court and faces five to 20 years in prison when he is sentenced Dec. 1, the U.S. attorney's office said.

42. Bipartisan policing deal unlikely this week in blow to talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers are likely to miss their latest deadline for completing a bipartisan deal on overhauling police practices, lawmakers and aides said Thursday, 13 months after George Floyd's killing and with the shadow of next year's elections lengthening over Congress' work.

43. Biden pushes effort to combat rising tide of violent crime -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden plans to lay out new steps to stem a rising national tide of violent crime, with a particular focus on gun violence, as administration officials brace for what they fear could be an especially turbulent summer.

44. Biden anti-crime effort takes on law-breaking gun dealers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is announcing new efforts Wednesday to stem a rising national tide of violent crime but questions persist about how effective the federal efforts will be in calming what could be a turbulent summer.

45. DC statehood facing long odds in the Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Proponents of statehood for Washington, D.C., vowed Tuesday to keep pushing even though the prospects were dim as the bill began working its way through the Senate.

"Our democracy is truly in the hands of this Senate," Mayor Muriel Bowser told the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. "We will not quit until we achieve full democracy. ... We will keep pushing until D.C.'s tragic disenfranchisement is rectified."

46. Judge tosses most claims over clearing protesters in DC park -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge dismissed most claims filed by activists and civil liberties groups who accused the Trump administration of violating the civil rights of protesters who were forcefully removed by police before then-President Donald Trump walked to a church near the White House for a photo op.

47. Black Americans laud Juneteenth holiday, say more work ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans rejoiced after President Joe Biden made Juneteenth a federal holiday, but some said that, while they appreciated the recognition at a time of racial reckoning in America, more is needed to change policies that disadvantage too many of their brethren.

48. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

...

49. DA eyes Floyd case expert for Nashville officer's trial -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Prosecutors in Tennessee who are preparing for the first-degree murder trial of a Nashville police officer next month may try to call a law enforcement expert witness who served similarly in the case against Derek Chauvin in George Floyd's death.

50. Homicides are up, but GOP misleads with claims about blame -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "SKYROCKETING MURDER RATES," claimed the National Fraternal Order of Police. "An explosion of violent crime," said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell. "Democrat-run cities across the country who cut funding for police have seen increases in crime," tweeted U.S. Rep. Patrick McHenry, R-N.C.

51. Study: Racial diversity stagnated on corporate boards -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many U.S. companies have rushed to appoint Black members to their boards of directors since racial justice protests swept the country last year.

But in the two preceding years, progress on increasing racial diversity on boards stagnated, a new study revealed Tuesday. Black men even lost ground.

52. Senate report details broad failures around Jan. 6 attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate investigation of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol found a broad intelligence breakdown across multiple agencies, along with widespread law enforcement and military failures that led to the violent attack.

53. Biden honors forgotten victims of Tulsa race massacre -

TULSA, Okla. (AP) — President Joe Biden led a remembrance Tuesday of one of the nation's darkest — and long suppressed — moments of racial violence, marking the 100th anniversary of the destruction of a thriving Black community in Tulsa.

54. Lawyers: Biden in office makes 2020 protest suit unnecessary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawsuits filed by protesters who were forcefully removed from a park near the White House before a photo op by former President Donald Trump should be dismissed because the new administration is not likely to repeat the events of last June, lawyers argued Friday.

55. GOP senators set summer deadline on Congress' policing bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers should reach a bipartisan deal on revamping policing procedures by early summer or abandon the effort, Republicans said Wednesday, a day after George Floyd's family used visits to the White House and the Capitol to prod lawmakers to act.

56. As deadlines slip, Biden agenda faces crucial assessment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan is hitting roadblocks. A policing overhaul after the killing of George Floyd is up in the air. Even a seemingly bipartisan effort to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol faces the blockade of Republican opposition in Congress.

57. Sotomayor: Americans need to take critical look at policing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As communities nationwide are re-examining law enforcement practices, Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor says Americans should think critically about how they want police to interact with citizens.

58. EXPLAINER: How Congress' Jan. 6 commission would work -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An independent commission to study the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection would be modeled after a similar panel that studied the 9/11 terrorist attacks and has long been hailed as a bipartisan success.

59. Amazon to extend pause on police use of facial recognition -

NEW YORK (AP) — Amazon said Tuesday that it will extend its ban on police use of its face-recognition technology beyond the one-year pause it announced last year.

Amazon and other technology companies have been under pressure from civil rights activists and their own workers to halt the sale of face-recognition systems to law enforcement agencies. One concern is that the technology can incorrectly identify people with darker skin. Amazon has pushed back against bias claims and touted its technology's accuracy.

60. GOP's McCarthy opposes Jan. 6 panel; McConnell hits 'pause' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy said Tuesday that he won't support a proposal to form an independent, bipartisan commission to study the deadly Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol, almost certainly eroding GOP support ahead of a vote and positioning his party as opposed to investigations of the attack.

61. Biden moving to improve legal services for poor, minorities -

DETROIT (AP) — President Joe Biden plans to take executive action Tuesday to ensure minorities, low-income Americans and others have better access to quality legal representation after services dwindled during the Trump administration.

62. House panel has agreement on bipartisan Jan. 6 commission -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The top Democratic and Republican members of the House Homeland Security Committee have reached an agreement on legislation to form a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol. The measure had stalled amid partisan differences.

63. Hearing on Jan. 6 violence exposes stark partisan divisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans sought to shift the narrative on the violent Jan. 6 insurrection during a congressional hearing Wednesday, with some painting the Trump supporters who stormed the building as patriots who have been unfairly harassed, as Democrats clashed with the former Pentagon chief while drilling into the government's unprepared response.

64. Biden's agenda: What can pass and what faces steep odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out a long list of policy priorities in his speech to Congress — and some are more politically plausible than others.

The two parties are working together in some areas, including on changes to policing and confronting the rise of hate crimes against Asian Americans. But Republicans are likely to block other Democratic initiatives on immigration and voting rights.

65. Biden speech takeaways: Government is good, and so are jobs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden returned to the U.S. Capitol, his home for more than three decades, and used his first address to Congress to make the case that the era of big government is back.

66. GOP's Sen. Scott suggests Dems use race as political weapon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Tim Scott accused Democrats on Wednesday of dividing the country and suggested they're wielding race as "a political weapon," using the official Republican response to President Joe Biden's maiden speech to Congress to credit the GOP for leading the country out of its pandemic struggles and toward a hopeful future.

67. Biden's declaration: America's democracy 'is rising anew' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden declared that "America is rising anew" as he called for an expansion of federal programs to drive the economy past the coronavirus pandemic and broadly extend the social safety net on a scale not seen in decades.

68. Democrats move 2 bills showing strength and limits of power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats were on a roll. The House voted along party lines to make the nation's capital the 51st state, and two hours later, the Senate overwhelmingly approved bipartisan legislation to address violence against Asian Americans.

69. Talks narrow on a compromise to changes in US policing laws -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bolstered with new momentum, Congress is ready to try again to change the nation's policing laws, heeding President Joe Biden's admonition that the guilty verdict in George Floyd's death is "not enough" for a country confronting a legacy of police violence.

70. DC statehood approved by House as Senate fight looms -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A decades-long movement to reshape the American political map took a further step Thursday as the House of Representatives approved a bill to make the nation's capital the 51st state.

71. Garland announces sweeping police probe after Floyd verdict -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into policing practices in Minneapolis after a former officer was convicted in the killing of George Floyd there, Attorney General Merrick Garland announced Wednesday.

72. Biden to America after Floyd verdict: 'We can't stop here' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said the conviction of former Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin in the killing of George Floyd "can be a giant step forward" for the nation in the fight against systemic racism. But he declared that "it's not enough."

73. House panel votes to advance bill on slavery reparations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House panel advanced a decades-long effort to pay reparations to the descendants of slaves by approving legislation Wednesday that would create a commission to study the issue.

It's the first time the House Judiciary Committee has acted on the legislation. Still, prospects for final passage remain poor in such a closely divided Congress. The vote to advance the measure to the full House passed 25-17 after a lengthy and often passionate debate that stretched late into the night.

74. 'Clear the Capitol,' Pence pleaded, timeline of riot shows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From a secure room in the Capitol on Jan. 6, as rioters pummeled police and vandalized the building, Vice President Mike Pence tried to assert control. In an urgent phone call to the acting defense secretary, he issued a startling demand.

75. Amazon warehouse workers reject union bid in Alabama -

Workers at an Amazon warehouse in Bessemer, Alabama handed the online retail giant a decisive victory when they voted against forming a union and cut off a path that labor activists had hoped would lead to similar efforts throughout the company and beyond.

76. Target to spend more than $2B at Black-owned businesses -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will spend a total of more than $2 billion at Black-owned businesses by 2025 as part of its effort to advance racial equity.

That's a significant increase in overall spending on Black-owned businesses, according to Target, though it declined be more specific Wednesday.

77. Vanderbilt hospital road renamed for Black surgery pioneer -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A road leading to Vanderbilt University Medical Center is now named for a Black pioneer in cardiac surgery, instead of bearing the Confederacy-tied moniker of Dixie Place.

Officials in Nashville commemorated the name change to Vivien Thomas Way during an event Monday.

78. Tennessee GOP pushes gun bill over law enforcement concerns -

NASHVILLE (AP) — When Tennessee lawmakers pushed last summer to increase penalties against demonstrators demanding police reform, they did so in the name of supporting law enforcement. But when police advocacy groups asked them not to remove background checks and training requirements for most people seeking to carry a handgun, Republicans in charge at the Capitol were decidedly less responsive.

79. DC's long-simmering statehood push begins in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington, D.C.'s bid for statehood finally got a congressional hearing Monday, but Mayor Muriel Bowser's clashes with Republicans on the panel made clear that the issue is far from settled.

80. Corporations become unlikely financiers of racial equity -

In the months since the police killing of George Floyd sparked a racial reckoning in the United States, American corpo-rations have emerged as an unexpected leading source of funding for social justice.

81. With Biden's backing, Dems revive bill to overhaul policing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Cheered on by President Joe Biden, House Democrats hustled to pass the most ambitious effort in decades to overhaul policing nationwide, able to avoid clashing with moderates in their own party who are wary of reigniting a debate they say hurt them during last fall's election.

82. Eager to act, Biden and Democrats leave Republicans behind -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress are jamming their agenda forward with a sense of urgency, an unapologetically partisan approach based on the calculation that it's better to advance the giant COVID-19 rescue package and other priorities than waste time courting Republicans who may never compromise.

83. BLM launches Survival Fund amid federal COVID-19 relief wait -

NEW YORK (AP) — The Black Lives Matter Global Network Foundation is formally expanding a $3 million financial relief fund that it quietly launched earlier this month, to help people struggling to make ends meet during the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

84. Federal grand jury hearing evidence in death of George Floyd -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several witnesses have been subpoenaed to appear before a federal grand jury considering charges against former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, who is already facing state murder charges in the death of George Floyd, a person familiar with the matter told The Associated Press on Wednesday.

85. Tennessee moves vote on Confederate bust in Capitol to March -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Due to severe winter weather, a Tennessee panel won't vote until next month on whether to remove the bust of a Confederal general and early Ku Klux Klan leader from the state Capitol.

86. Bezos, Bloomberg among top 50 US charity donors for 2020 -

As the world grappled with COVID-19, a recession and a racial reckoning, the ultrawealthy gave to a broader set of causes than ever before — bestowing multimillion-dollar gifts on food pantries, historically Black colleges and universities and organizations that serve the poor and the homeless, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy's annual rankings of the 50 Americans who gave the most to charity last year.

87. Zuckerberg part of $100M 'California Black Freedom Fund' -

More than two dozen philanthropic organizations and corporations on Thursday launched the California Black Freedom Fund, a $100 million, five-year initiative that they say will provide resources to Black-led organizations in the state that are seeking to eradicate systemic racism.

88. Report: Hate groups in decline, migrate to online networks -

During one of the most politically divisive years in recent memory, the number of active hate groups in the U.S. actually declined as far-right extremists migrated further to online networks, reflecting a splintering of white nationalist and neo-Nazi groups that are more difficult to track.

89. Building on success, nonprofits aim to keep aiding elections -

NEW YORK (AP) — Democracy, as President Joe Biden declared in his inaugural speech, survived a barrage of misinformation and an insurrection at the U.S. Capitol to achieve a peaceful transfer of power.

90. Claiming unrest potential, Nashville officer wants murder trial moved -

NASHVILLE (AP) — An attorney argued Monday that the potential for civil unrest is among the reasons a white Nashville police officer charged in the 2018 fatal shooting of an armed Black man from behind during a chase should have his first-degree murder trial and the jury pool moved.

91. AP-NORC poll: Virus, economy swamp other priorities for US -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Containing the coronavirus outbreak and repairing the economic damage it has inflicted are the top priorities for Americans as Joe Biden prepares to become the 46th president of the United States, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

92. EXPLAINER: Why National Guard's role was limited during riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the aftermath of the deadly riot at the U.S. Capitol last week, questions are being raised about why the District of Columbia National Guard played such a limited role as civilian law enforcement officers were outnumbered and overrun.

93. Capitol Police rejected offers of federal help to quell mob -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three days before supporters of President Donald Trump rioted at the Capitol, the Pentagon asked the U.S Capitol Police if it needed National Guard manpower. And as the mob descended on the building Wednesday, Justice Department leaders reached out to offer up FBI agents. The police turned them down both times, according to senior defense officials and two people familiar with the matter.

94. Biden to introduce Judge Merrick Garland as attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden will introduce Merrick Garland as his pick for attorney general on Thursday along with three others he has selected for senior Justice Department positions to "restore the independence" of the agency and faith in the rule of law.

95. Biden to name judge Merrick Garland attorney general -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden has selected Merrick Garland, a federal appeals court judge who in 2016 was snubbed by Republicans for a seat on the Supreme Court, as his attorney general, two people familiar with the selection process said Wednesday.

96. 'Only in America': Warnock's rise from poverty to US senator -

SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Raphael Warnock's roots showed little promise of a future that led to the U.S. Senate.

He grew up in Savannah in the Kayton Homes public housing project, the second youngest of 12 children. His mother as a teenager had worked as a sharecropper picking cotton and tobacco. His father was a preacher who also made money hauling old cars to a local scrapyard.

97. After a tumultuous 2020, Black leaders weigh next steps -

DETROIT (AP) — As a barrier-breaking year draws to a close, there's one undeniable fact: the strength of Black political power.

Black voters were a critical part of the coalition that clinched President-elect Joe Biden's White House bid. The nation will swear in its first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent as vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, who herself may be a leading presidential candidate in four years. And as the global push for racial justice continues, Congress is set to welcome several new Black, progressive freshmen next year.

98. Trump leaves mark on immigration policy, some of it lasting -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Donald Trump was running for reelection, foreign-born U.S. residents were rushing to get their American citizenship before it might be too late.

"I didn't know what would happen if Trump got a second term," said Victoria Abramowska, who became a citizen in Maine this fall, "after all the crazy things he did already."

99. COVID-19 is top 2020 Tennessee story; tornadoes No. 2 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The top story in Tennessee in 2020 was the new coronavirus and its crippling grip on every facet of life, while a string of deadly tornadoes in March came in at No. 2 in an annual Associated Press survey of reporters, editors and broadcasters.

100. Virginia's Lee statue has been removed from the US Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee that has represented Virginia in the U.S. Capitol for 111 years has been removed.

Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam said in a statement that workers removed the statue from the National Statuary Hall Collection early Monday morning.