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Editorial Results (free)

1. YWCA names 2021 Achievement honorees -

YWCA Nashville & Middle Tennessee is recognizing five women and one corporate honoree who have made their mark in Nashville. This group will be officially inducted into the 2021 Academy for Women of Achievement in spring 2022.

2. Biden, Democrats push Civilian Climate Corps in echo of New Deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inspired by the New Deal-era Civilian Conservation Corps, President Joe Biden and congressional Democrats are pushing for a modern counterpart: a Civilian Climate Corps that would create hundreds of thousands of jobs building trails, restoring streams and helping prevent catastrophic wildfires.

3. Biden's complicated new task: keeping Democrats together -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden overcame skepticism, deep political polarization and legislative gamesmanship to win bipartisan approval in the Senate this week of his $1 trillion infrastructure bill.

4. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

5. Biden signs competition order targeting big business -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order on Friday targeting what he labeled anticompetitive practices in tech, health care and other parts of the economy, declaring it would fortify an American ideal "that true capitalism depends on fair and open competition."

6. Biden taking bipartisan infrastructure deal on the road -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will look to sell voters on the economic benefits of the $973 billion infrastructure package while in Wisconsin on Tuesday, hoping to boost the bipartisan agreement that is held together in large part by the promise of millions of new jobs.

7. Biden working to get infrastructure package back on track -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is hoping to get the bipartisan infrastructure deal on track by highlighting its expected economic benefits, stressing its $973 billion would include the largest investment in transportation in nearly a century and millions of jobs would be created.

8. Biden turns to Georgia to begin pitch for huge spending plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the closing days of his presidential campaign, Joe Biden swung through the Georgia town where Franklin Delano Roosevelt coped with polio, making the case that government can be a force for good. Now, 100 days after taking office, Biden is returning to the state trying to sell voters on his ambitious vision.

9. Analysis: Biden pitches big government as antidote to crises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Forty years ago, a newly elected American president declared government the source of many of the nation's problems, reshaping the parameters of U.S. politics for decades to come. On Wednesday night, President Joe Biden unabashedly embraced government as the solution.

10. More action, less talk, distinguish Biden's 100-day sprint -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The card tucked in President Joe Biden's right jacket pocket must weigh a ton. You can see the weight of it on his face when he digs it out, squints and ever-so-slowly reads aloud the latest tally of COVID-19 dead.

11. Biden assigns study on delicate issue of Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has ordered a study on overhauling the Supreme Court, creating a bipartisan commission Friday that will spend the next six months examining the politically incendiary issues of expanding the court and instituting term limits for justices, among other issues.

12. Biden readies for 1st news conference, White House tradition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He'd led allied armies in the defeat of Nazi Germany only to find himself, a decade later, a tad intimidated before the cameras in an echoey room of the Old Executive Office Building, ready to make history again.

13. COVID relief bill could permanently alter social safety net -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief package is being hailed by Democrats and progressive policy advocates as a generational expansion of the social safety net, providing food and housing assistance, greater access to health care and direct aid to families in what amounts to a broad-based attack on the cycle of poverty.

14. Biden's big relief package a bet gov't can help cure America -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden wants America to know that he's from the government and he's here to help.

That sentiment became a well-worn punchline under Ronald Reagan and shaped the politics of both parties for four decades. Democrat Bill Clinton declared the era of big government over in the 1990s, Barack Obama largely kept his party in the same lane and Republican Donald Trump campaigned on the premise that Washington was full of morons, outplayed by the Chinese and others.

15. Churchill painting owned by Angelina Jolie sells for $11.5M -

LONDON (AP) — A Moroccan landscape painted by Winston Churchill and owned by Angelina Jolie sold at auction on Monday for more than $11.5 million, smashing the previous record for a work by Britain's World War II leader.

16. Longtime Reagan Secretary of State George Shultz dies at 100 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Secretary of State George P. Shultz, a titan of American academia, business and diplomacy who spent most of the 1980s trying to improve Cold War relations with the Soviet Union and forging a course for peace in the Middle East, has died. He was 100.

17. AP-NORC Poll: Americans open to Biden's approach to crises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two weeks into a new administration, a majority of Americans say they have at least some confidence in President Joe Biden and his ability to manage the myriad crises facing the nation, including the raging coronavirus pandemic.

18. In early going, Biden floods the zone with decrees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Modern American presidents have found that a good way to get off to a fast start in office is to issue decrees like an ancient king.

With a pen as their scepter, they "hereby proclaim." They "order," "direct," "revoke" and "declare," rendering commandments in regal language drawn from the deep past. President Joe Biden is flooding the zone with them, achieving head-snapping changes in national policy that he would have no hope of getting from Congress quickly, if at all.

19. Analysis: Biden issues call to unity that comes with urgency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As newly inaugurated leaders often do, President Joe Biden began his tenure with a ritual call for American unity.

But standing on the same Capitol steps where just two weeks ago rioters laid siege to the nation's democracy, Biden's words felt less like rhetorical flourishes and more like an urgent appeal to stabilize a country reeling from a spiraling pandemic, economic uncertainty, racial tensions and a growing divide over truth versus lies.

20. Biden takes the helm, appeals for unity to take on crises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, declaring that "democracy has prevailed" and summoning American resilience and unity to confront the deeply divided nation's historic confluence of crises.

21. Biden takes the helm as president: 'Democracy has prevailed' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday, declaring that "democracy has prevailed" and summoning American resilience and unity to confront the deeply divided nation's historic confluence of crises.

22. Analysis: For Biden, chance to turn crisis into opportunity -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the 11 weeks since Election Day, the collision of crises confronting President-elect Joe Biden have gone from staggering to almost unimaginable.

More than 170,000 Americans have died from COVID-19 during that stretch alone, sending total U.S. deaths soaring past 400,000. The deep partisan divisions roiling the nation boiled over into violence during the insurrection on the U.S. Capitol, threatening America's long history of peaceful transitions of power and resulting in the second impeachment of the outgoing president. The economy has steadily weakened, with employers cutting 140,000 jobs just in the month of December.

23. Biden has set sky-high expectations. Can he meet them? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back when the election was tightening and just a week away, Joe Biden went big.

He flew to Warm Springs, the Georgia town whose thermal waters once brought Franklin Delano Roosevelt comfort from polio, and pledged a restitching of America's economic and policy fabric unseen since FDR's New Deal.

24. Biden adjusting agenda to reflect narrow divide in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden is adjusting the scope of his agenda to meet the challenges of governing with a narrowly divided Congress and the complications of legislating during a raging pandemic.

25. Washington Supreme Court: Farmworkers to get overtime pay -

SEATTLE (AP) — A divided Washington Supreme Court ruled Thursday the state's dairy workers are entitled to overtime pay if they work more than 40 hours a week, a decision expected to apply to the rest of the agriculture industry.

26. Biden goes on offense in Georgia while Trump targets Midwest -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One week until Election Day, Joe Biden is going on offense, heading Tuesday to Georgia — which hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992 — and pushing into other territory where President Donald Trump was once expected to easily repeat his wins from four years ago.

27. State museum displaying Cordell Hull's Nobel Peace Prize -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee State Museum is displaying Cordell Hull's Nobel Peace Prize medal to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the founding of the United Nations.

Starting Tuesday until Oct. 25, the museum will display the 1945 award won by the man Franklin Delano Roosevelt called "The Father of the United Nations."

28. AP FACT CHECK: False claims swamp first Trump-Biden debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump unleashed a torrent of fabrications and fear-mongering in a belligerent debate with Joe Biden, at one point claiming the U.S. death toll would have been 10 times higher under the Democrat because he wanted open borders in the pandemic. Biden preached no such thing.

29. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

30. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's untruths on court pick, Biden's flubs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his Senate allies are misrepresenting the facts about Supreme Court nominations as he prepares to push ahead with a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

31. Progressives pledge to keep pushing Biden to expand court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Since Joe Biden ran away with the Democratic presidential nomination in March, leading progressives have accepted him — sometimes grudgingly — as their party's leader. But, in the final weeks of the campaign, the Supreme Court vacancy is threatening to inflame old divides.

32. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's untruths on court pick, Biden's flubs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his Senate allies are misrepresenting the facts about Supreme Court nominations as he prepares to push ahead with a replacement for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

33. Some Dems, not yet Biden, talk of expanding Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The prospect that President Donald Trump and Senate Republicans will fill Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's Supreme Court seat before the year is out has ignited a call for major changes on the court, including expanding the number of justices.

34. AP Analysis: Trump bets presidency on 'law and order' theme -

KENOSHA, Wis. (AP) — After struggling for much of the year to settle on a clear and concise reelection message, President Donald Trump appears to have found his 2020 rallying cry.

Four years ago, it was "Build the Wall," a simple yet coded mantra to white America that nonwhite outsiders threatened their way of life. This week, Trump has re-centered his campaign on another three-word phrase that carries a similar racial dynamic: "Law and Order."

35. Trump's convention blurs official business, politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Plenty of presidents have walked right up to the line separating official business from politics — or even stepped over it. President Donald Trump has blown past it with a bulldozer, and his planned Republican convention speech from the White House lawn this week might be the latest and most blatant example yet.

36. Cognitive Test. Trump. Biden. Campaign. Flashpoint. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It doesn't quite have the ring of "Morning in America" and "I Like Ike."

But the phrase "Person. Woman. Man. Camera. TV." is getting an unlikely moment in the spotlight as President Donald Trump has taken a detour into the politics of dementia three months before the election.

37. UK firms slash jobs to cope with outbreak's long-term impact -

LONDON (AP) — Companies linked to hospitality and travel in Britain have announced thousands of more job cuts as the longer term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic take hold, choosing to slim down for survival rather than await potential government handouts.

38. US unemployment surges to a Depression-era level of 14.7% -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus crisis has sent the U.S. unemployment rate surging to 14.7%, a level last seen when the country was in the throes of the Depression and President Franklin D. Roosevelt was assuring Americans that the only thing to fear was fear itself.

39. Virus-afflicted 2020 looks like 1918 despite science's march -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite a century's progress in science, 2020 is looking a lot like 1918.

In the years between two lethal pandemics, one the misnamed Spanish flu, the other COVID-19, the world learned about viruses, cured various diseases, made effective vaccines, developed instant communications and created elaborate public-health networks.

40. Virus exposes US inequality. Will it spur lasting remedies? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The sick who still go to work because they have no paid leave.

Families who face ruin from even a temporary layoff.

Front-line workers risking infection as they drive buses, bag takeout meals and mop hospital floors.

41. States largely have authority over when to shut down, reopen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has shown no reluctance to use his White House perch to commend and criticize governors over steps they've taken to try to slow the spread of the coronavirus. But one thing Trump can't do, despite his assertion to the contrary on Monday, is command them to ease restrictions  they imposed because of the virus outbreak. The Constitution largely gives states the authority to regulate their own affairs.

42. TVA board backs CEO under Trump's fire for pay -

CHATTANOOGA (AP) — The board of a federal utility is criticizing "ill-informed opinions" about how much their organization's top executive gets paid after President Donald Trump blasted the pay scale as "ridiculous."

43. Trump sees limits of presidency in avoiding blame for virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is confronting the most dangerous crisis a U.S. leader has faced this century as the coronavirus spreads and a once-vibrant economy falters. As the turmoil deepens, the choices he makes in the critical weeks ahead will shape his reelection prospects, his legacy and the character of the nation.

44. Buddy, can you spare a dime? Echoes of '30s in viral crisis? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The imagery floats in sepia-colored photographs, faintly recalled images of bedraggled people lined up for bread or soup. Shacks in Appalachian hollows. Ruined investors taking their lives in the face of stock market crashes. Desperation etched on the faces of a generation that would soon face a world war.

45. Anne Cox Chambers, wealthy newspaper heiress, dies at 100 -

ATLANTA (AP) — Anne Cox Chambers, a newspaper heiress, diplomat and philanthropist who was one of the country's richest women, died Friday at the age of 100.

Her nephew James Cox Kennedy announced her death to The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, her company's flagship newspaper.

46. Experts on Dershowitz's impeachment defense: Quid pro whoa -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Alan Dershowitz delivered a stunning defense of President Donald Trump in the Senate that would essentially make it impossible to impeach a president for anything he might do to boost his reelection prospects. It was a contention quickly and forcefully denounced by a range of legal scholars and historians who said there were clear limits on presidential authority.

47. Former Gov. Dunn objects to building honoring him -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A former Tennessee governor told a newspaper that he doesn't feel qualified for the honor of having the state's legislative office building renamed for him.

Republican former Gov. Winfield Dunn said he has reservations about state Rep. Ron Gant's efforts to rename Nashville's Cordell Hull Office Building in his honor, The Daily Memphian reported Monday. The 92-year-old politician emphasized he still "deeply" appreciates Gant's consideration, he told the newspaper.

48. Former Gov. Dunn objects to building honoring him -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A former Tennessee governor told a newspaper that he doesn't feel qualified for the honor of having the state's legislative office building renamed for him.

Republican former Gov. Winfield Dunn said he has reservations about state Rep. Ron Gant's efforts to rename Nashville's Cordell Hull Office Building in his honor, The Daily Memphian reported Monday. The 92-year-old politician emphasized he still "deeply" appreciates Gant's consideration, he told the newspaper.

49. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's flawed impeachment letter to Pelosi -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The closing passage in President Donald Trump's impeachment-eve letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi had the ring of truth to it. He was writing his thoughts for history, he said. For 100 years from now, "when people look back at this affair."

50. Lawmaker seeks to rename building honoring Nobel winner -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee lawmaker wants to change the name of the state's legislative office building from that of a Democratic Nobel laureate to a Republican one-term governor.

The Cordell Hull Building honors a Tennessean who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 for his work establishing the United Nations. Hull served in the U.S. House and Senate and was the longest serving U.S. Secretary of State, serving under Franklin Roosevelt for 11 years.

51. Warren health plan departs from US 'social insurance' idea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Elizabeth Warren's plan to pay for "Medicare for All" without raising taxes on the middle class departs from how the U.S. has traditionally financed bedrock social insurance programs. That might impact its political viability now and in the future.

52. Retailers seek to stretch shortened holiday shopping season -

NEW YORK (AP) — All they want for Christmas is more time.

Faced with the shortest holiday shopping season since 2013, retailers are trying to figure out ways to get into the minds of shoppers sooner.

53. Where, when to find Nashville’s best fried chicken -

Nashville is a fried chicken town. Before Hot Chicken blew up across the country (thank you Prince’s for starting the ball rolling and creating hourslong lines on the weekend), there was only fried chicken. Glorious, crispy, unfancied-up fried chicken.

54. New ruling puts high court overhaul back on 2020 Dems' radar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thursday's Supreme Court decision on partisan gerrymandering reignited calls from progressives for overhauling the high court, putting new pressure on Democratic presidential hopefuls during their first nationwide debates.

55. Spilling the secrets behind Oak Ridge, the ‘Secret City’ built to build 'the bomb' -

Who knew the beginning of the Atomic Age was so funny? Sort of like the Humor in Uniform section of “Reader’s Digest,” Oak Ridge historian Ray Smith uses homespun humor to tell a condensed version of the key role his city played in the development of the atomic bombs that ended World War II.

56. Elliott Davis names Schmitz market leader -

Elliott Davis, a business solutions firm with nine offices across the Southeast, has hired James (Jim) Schmitz as market leader for the firm’s Nashville office. Schmitz retired last year as Middle Tennessee president of Regions Bank.

57. Democrats seek Green New Deal to address climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York are calling for a Green New Deal intended to transform the U.S. economy to combat climate change and create thousands of jobs in renewable energy.

58. Democrats seek Green New Deal to address climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats including Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York are calling for a Green New Deal intended to transform the U.S. economy to combat climate change and create thousands of jobs in renewable energy.

59. Q&A: Trump and the State of the Union address -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Constitution spells it out clearly in Article II, Section 3: The president "shall from time to time give to the Congress information of the state of the union, and recommend to their consideration such measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient."

60. AP FACT CHECK: Trump fudges history on black vote, drug cost -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing pivotal November elections, President Donald Trump is misrepresenting the history of African-American voting and exaggerating his influence in boosting income and controlling prescription drug prices.

61. Could hard-right Supreme Court haunt GOP? History says maybe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Be careful what you wish for.

That's the history lesson for Republicans eagerly anticipating Brett Kavanaugh's ascension to the Supreme Court, which could cement conservative control of the court for a generation.

62. Trump administration backing Obama proclamation in Oregon -

SALEM, Ore. (AP) — A dispute over acts of Congress in 1906 and 1937 has put the Trump administration in court — and into the unusual position of supporting a proclamation by former President Barack Obama.

63. 2 Supreme Court nominations made, Trump may have none to go -

WASHINGTON (AP) — What would it take for President Donald Trump to get yet another Supreme Court pick? Probably the death of a justice.

Trump has speculated that he could appoint a majority of the nine-member court. But it has been three decades since a president has been able to name more than two justices to their life-tenured posts, and Trump tied that number this week. The court's oldest remaining justices, two liberals and a conservative who are 85, 79 and 70, haven't suggested they're going anywhere and appear in fine health.

64. Alexander: Trump exploration of selling TVA assets a 'looney idea' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The infrastructure plan outlined by President Donald Trump on Monday suggests studying whether the nation's largest public utility should sell its transmission assets, which Tennessee Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander called "a looney idea" with "zero chance of becoming law."

65. Study: TVA shifts costs from commercial to residential customers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The nation's largest public utility has given large businesses breaks on electric rates over six years while residential customers' rates increased, according to a study released this week.

66. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, Moore and their odd orbit of claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The orbit of odd political claims stretched from Utah canyons to the looming Alabama Senate race to crazy-as-usual Washington in recent days.

That's what The Associated Press found when scrutinizing an assortment of statements from President Donald Trump and others last week.

67. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tax plan is far from the biggest ever -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump presented a distorted picture of his tax plan this past week and claimed he was trying to keep the Obama health law's insurance markets afloat even as he took steps that could well sink them.

68. Single-payer cuts the middle men but at what cost? -

Republicans made “Repeal and Replace” a catchy slogan for the right, but Democrats have one of their own.

Get ready to hear a lot of “Medicare for All,” the new rallying cry of those who think it’s time the United States adopts a single-payer health care system – or something like it.

69. With 2018 looming, Democrats divided on their core message -

NEW YORK (AP) — House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joe Crowley hesitated when asked about his party's core message to voters.

70. AP FACT CHECK: Trump adrift on tax rates, Canada, lingo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an interview with The Economist, President Donald Trump whiffed on a batch of economic facts. He got the Canada-U.S. trade balance wrong, misplaced the U.S. in the world ranks of tax burdens and claimed to have coined an economic phrase that's been familiar to economists for some 80 years.

71. Trump at 100 days: 'It's a different kind of presidency' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For nearly 100 days, President Donald Trump has rattled Washington and been chastened by its institutions.

He's startled world leaders with his unpredictability and tough talk, but won their praise for a surprise strike on Syria.

72. Some in GOP chafe new building named after Cordell Hull -

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are nearing a move into freshly overhauled offices at the state Capitol complex, but some Republicans are chafing at the building being named after Democrat Cordell Hull.

73. Trump's Boeing speech shows differences with Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidents since Franklin Delano Roosevelt have loved to tour Boeing factories. The lessons they draw from their time on the factory floor — and the inevitable photo opportunity beside shiny new airplanes — can differ wildly.

74. WHY IT MATTERS: IRS -

WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: The Internal Revenue Service touches everyone, not just taxpayers but anyone who receives a government check, drives on roads made possible by tax revenue or sends a child to a school helped by Washington. It's a touch that can come with a heavy hand, in the eyes of critics who believe the agency's far-reaching powers are abused and the agency needs to be cut down to size.

75. WHY IT MATTERS: Infrastructure -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — THE ISSUE: The U.S. interstate highway system, celebrating its 60th birthday this year, is showing its age. Many roads and bridges are in need of repair or expansion. Similar problems exist for public drinking and wastewater systems, dams and levees, airports, railroads and mass transit systems. Politicians generally agree the nation's infrastructure is in need of improvement. Deciding how to pay for it and which projects should take priority is more difficult.

76. Tennessee Supreme Court building gets historic places marker -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A new market inside the doors of the Tennessee Supreme Court in Nashville celebrates the building's inclusion on the National Register of Historic Places.

When it was completed in 1937, it marked the first time state's highest court had its own building. The structure was funded through President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Public Works Administration.

77. Impatient Clemmons anxious for minority voice to be heard -

Democratic state Rep. John Ray Clemmons is only halfway through his first two-year term representing District 55 in Nashville. But he’s not willing to wait years to speak out or push for change.

78. Pound breaks ground with radio-based treason -

In 1967, Ezra Pound told Allen Ginsberg, “The worst mistake I made was that stupid suburban prejudice of anti-Semitism.”

Some say it was an apology.

Pound died in Venice in 1972, shortly after his 87th birthday. In one of his final cantos, he wrote, “I have tried to write Paradise … Let the Gods [and] those I love try to forgive what I have made.” The above was well after the treason case.

79. Exhibit highlight's New Deal's impact on Tennessee -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A new exhibit at the Tennessee State Library and Archives in Nashville highlights the New Deal's impact on Tennessee.

In response to the Great Depression, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt launched a series of programs under the New Deal aimed at jump-starting the United States' faltering economy.

80. GOP's Walker proposes vast union restrictions -

MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Scott Walker on Monday will call for sweeping restrictions on organized labor in the U.S., seeking to replicate nationwide his successful effort as Wisconsin's governor to curb the power of unions.

81. Things to know about Social Security at 80: Overhaul time? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Social Security turns 80 on Friday, and the massive retirement and disability program is showing its age.

Social Security's disability fund is projected to run dry next year. The retirement fund has enough money to pay full benefits until 2035. But once the fund is depleted, the shortfalls projected to be enormous.

82. There’s more to money than a little pocket change -

A nice fat surprise came in the mail for you the other day.

It was a check that you were expecting, but the amount was still a boost for the day and the bank account. That doesn’t often happen, but it’s always good when it does, and in the new book “Coined” by Kabir Sehgal, you’ll see how that money affects more than just your checkbook.

83. NAFTA shadows Obama's efforts to seek clout for trade deals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A 21-year-old ghost haunts President Barack Obama and his allies as he presses Congress for enhanced powers to make trade deals with Japan and other nations.

Obama says new trade deals will avoid the shortcomings of NAFTA, the 1994 North America Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada, which many Americans blame for big job losses, especially in manufacturing.

84. Obama team asks Congress for enhanced trade-deal authority -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A senior Democratic senator's complaints Tuesday, and noisy protesters, underscored the Obama administration's challenge in seeking congressional approval for enhanced powers to cut trade deals with Japan, Australia and many other countries.

85. 'Infill King’ John Brittle has a plan to curb urban sprawl. You might not like it -

John G. Brittle Jr. doesn’t have an office. He has a war room. The space, crowded with maps, charts, books, piles of paper and marked-up spreadsheets, is ground zero for InfillNashville, the 10-person team of site selection specialists that Brittle leads at Village Real Estate Services.

86. Obama tests work policies on federal contractors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sidestepping Congress, President Barack Obama is using the federal government's vast array of contractors to impose rules on wages, pay disparities and hiring on a segment of the private sector that gets taxpayer money and falls under his control.

87. US never defaulted on its debt? Not so fast -

WASHINGTON (AP) — You hear the same proud claim every time Washington wrestles with the debt limit: The United States has never defaulted. But the record's not that clean. America has stiffed creditors on at least two occasions.

88. King says Cruz conservatives want to 'hijack' GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Rep. Peter King is charging that tea party-backed members of the House Republican Caucus are trying to "hijack the party."

89. Obama walking a familiar path on IRS allegations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Internal Revenue Service controversy dogging President Barack Obama is hardly the first time a White House and the tax agency have been accused of political meddling and bias. Nor is it the first time that political and social advocacy groups have searched for and exploited loopholes and fine points in the federal tax code.

90. TVA officials to toast 80th anniversary of utility -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Valley Authority will observe its 80th anniversary with a public event Friday in Knoxville.

TVA came into being when President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the TVA Act into law on May 18, 1933.

91. Role reversal: GOP blasts Obama plan to sell TVA -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a political role reversal, Republicans are blasting President Barack Obama's plan to consider selling the Tennessee Valley Authority, an icon of the New Deal long targeted by conservatives as an example of government overreach.

92. Unions suffer sharp decline in membership -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Union membership plummeted last year to the lowest level since the 1930s as cash-strapped state and local governments shed workers and unions had difficulty organizing new members in the private sector despite signs of an improving economy.

93. The economy Obama faces: Slow but gaining steadily -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some reward.

Here's the assignment President Barack Obama has won with his re-election: Improve an economy burdened by high unemployment, stagnant pay, a European financial crisis, slowing global growth and U.S. companies still too anxious to expand much.

94. US service firms grow more slowly in October -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. service companies grew at a slightly slower pace in October than September because of a decline in new orders. But a measure of employment rose, indicating services firms hired more.

95. US economy adds 171K jobs; rate rises to 7.9 pct. -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added 171,000 jobs in October, and hiring was stronger in August and September than first thought. The solid job growth showed that the economy is strengthening slowly but consistently.

96. Jobs bill for vets bogs down in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans blocked legislation Wednesday that would have established a $1 billion jobs program putting veterans back to work tending to the country's federal lands and bolstering local police and fire departments.

97. GOP focuses on monthly jobs report, but do voters? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government's monthly jobs report has become Washington's most anticipated and studied economic indicator, pounced upon by politicians, economists and journalists for snap judgments as the presidential election nears. But in the real world, most everybody else just looks around and figures things out for themselves.

98. Ford to sell luxury Lincoln brand in China -

BEIJING (AP) — Ford Motor Co., eager to grab a piece of China's growing luxury market, plans to start selling its Lincoln luxury brand here in 2014.

99. US economic growth slowed to 1.5 pct. rate in Q2 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — High unemployment isn't going away — not as long as the economy grows as slowly as it did in the April-June quarter.

Weak consumer spending held growth to an annual rate of just 1.5 percent, even less than the 2 percent rate in the first quarter. And few expect the economy to accelerate in the second half of the year as Europe's financial woes and a U.S. budget crisis restrain businesses and consumers.

100. US health care reform efforts through history -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's decision to uphold President Barack Obama's health care law follows a century of debate over what role the government should play in helping people in the United States afford medical care. A look at the issue through the years: