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Editorial Results (free)

1. Capitol riot committee has interviewed 250 people so far -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House committee investigating the Capitol insurrection has interviewed about 250 people so far, its chairman said Thursday, a staggering pace over just five months as lawmakers work to compile the most comprehensive account yet of the violent attack and plan to hold public hearings next year.

2. Jan. 6 panel votes to hold former DOJ official in contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection has voted to pursue contempt charges against Jeffrey Clark, a former Justice Department official who refused to answer the committee's questions — but the panel agreed to let him come back for another try.

3. Jan. 6 panel to vote on contempt against former DOJ official -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House panel investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection will vote on pursuing contempt charges against a former Justice Department official Wednesday as the committee aggressively seeks to gain answers about the violent attack by former President Donald Trump's supporters.

4. Appeals court orders release of some Mueller report passages -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court on Tuesday directed the Justice Department to disclose certain redacted passages from special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation report that relate to individuals who were investigated by prosecutors but not ultimately charged.

5. Alex Jones, Roger Stone subpoenaed by House Jan. 6 committee -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A committee investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection has issued subpoenas to five more individuals, including former President Donald Trump's ally Roger Stone and conspiracy theorist Alex Jones, as lawmakers deepened their probe of the rallies that preceded the deadly attack.

6. Bannon indictment defies history of Congress' contempt power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon's indictment on contempt of Congress charges is the nation's first since 1983, and his appearance in federal court provides a rare glimpse into one of U.S. lawmakers' politically messiest and least-used powers.

7. Bannon indicted on contempt charges for defying 1/6 subpoena -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Steve Bannon, a longtime ally of former President Donald Trump, was indicted Friday on two counts of criminal contempt of Congress after he defied a subpoena from the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

8. U.S. charges two suspected major ransomware operators -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two suspected criminal hackers have been charged in the United States in connection with a wave of ransomware attacks, including one that led to the temporary shutdown of the world's largest meat processor and another that snarled businesses around the globe on the Fourth of July weekend, U.S. officials said Monday.

9. Analyst who aided Trump-Russia dossier charged with lying -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Russian analyst who contributed to a dossier of Democratic-funded research into ties between Russia and Donald Trump was arrested Thursday on charges of lying to the FBI about his sources of information, among them an associate of Hillary Clinton.

10. Justice Dept. conducting cyber crackdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is stepping up actions to combat ransomware and cybercrime through arrests and other actions, its No. 2 official told The Associated Press, as the Biden administration escalates its response to what it regards as an urgent economic and national security threat.

11. Sen. Burr under investigation again for pandemic stock sales -

WASHINGTON (AP) — North Carolina Sen. Richard Burr and his brother-in-law are being investigated by the Securities and Exchange Commission for potential insider trading, a case that stems from their abrupt sales of financial holdings during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, according to recent federal court filings.

12. House votes to hold Trump ally Steve Bannon in contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House has voted to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena from the committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

13. House set to recommend contempt charges against Bannon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House is voting Thursday on whether to hold Steve Bannon, a longtime ally and aide to former President Donald Trump, in contempt of Congress for defying a subpoena from the committee investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

14. Jan. 6 panel votes to hold Steve Bannon in contempt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection voted unanimously to hold former White House aide Steve Bannon in contempt of Congress after the longtime ally of former President Donald Trump defied a subpoena for documents and testimony.

15. Trump files lawsuit to keep Jan. 6 documents from Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump on Monday sought to block the release of documents related to the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection to a House committee investigating the attack, challenging President Joe Biden's initial decision to waive executive privilege.

16. Jan. 6 panel plans contempt vote as Trump sues over probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House committee tasked with investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection is moving swiftly Tuesday to hold at least one of Donald Trump's allies in contempt as the former president is pushing back on the probe in a new lawsuit.

17. US to restore full pension of FBI official fired under Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe has won back his full pension as part of a settlement of his lawsuit arising from his firing during the Trump administration more than three years ago, his lawyers announced Thursday.

18. White House blacklists Russian ransomware payment 'enabler' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration sought Tuesday to choke the finances of criminal ransomware gangs, announcing sanctions against a Russia-based virtual currency brokerage that officials say helped at least eight ransomware gangs launder virtual currency.

19. Biden administration targets ransomware payment 'enablers' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration took aim Tuesday at the financial marketplace for criminal ransomware gangs, announcing sanctions against a Russia-based virtual currency brokerage that officials say has processed illicit transactions for attackers.

20. Politico pardoned by Trump accused of illegal campaign scam -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Republican political operative pardoned by President Donald Trump after his conviction in a 2012 bribery plot has been charged again with campaign-related crimes, this time involving a 2016 illegal campaign contribution scheme and a Russian national.

21. Capitol rally seeks to rewrite Jan. 6 by exalting rioters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — First, some blamed the deadly  Jan. 6 attack at the U.S. Capitol  on left-wing antifa antagonists, a theory quickly debunked. Then came comparisons of the rioters to peaceful protesters or even tourists.

22. Poll: Americans warier of US government surveillance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks approaches, Americans increasingly balk at intrusive government surveillance in the name of national security, and only about a third believe that the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were worth fighting, according to a new poll.

23. Biden moves to declassify documents about Sept. 11 attacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order Friday directing the declassification of certain documents related to the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, a supportive gesture to victims' families who have long sought the records in hopes of implicating the Saudi government.

24. Tech companies pledge billions in cybersecurity investments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some of the country's leading technology companies have committed to investing billions of dollars to strengthen cybersecurity defenses and to train skilled workers, the White House announced Wednesday following President Joe Biden's private meeting with top executives.

25. Biden to tackle cybersecurity with tech, finance leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is meeting Wednesday with top executives from some of the country's leading technology companies and financial institutions as the White House urges the private sector to help toughen cybersecurity defenses against increasingly sophisticated attacks.

26. Taliban takeover prompts fears of a resurgent al-Qaida -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The lightning-fast changes in Afghanistan are forcing the Biden administration to confront the prospect of a resurgent al-Qaida, the group that attacked America on Sept. 11, 2001, at the same time the U.S. is trying to stanch violent extremism at home and cyberattacks from Russia and China.

27. Biden: Greater threats than Taliban-controlled Afghanistan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden says even with the Taliban in power in Afghanistan, he sees a greater threat from outposts of al-Qaida and its affiliated groups in other countries, and that it was no longer "rational" to continue to focus U.S. military power there.

28. Biden: Troops will stay in Afghanistan to evacuate Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said he is committed to keeping U.S. troops in Afghanistan until every American is evacuated, even if that means maintaining a military presence there beyond his Aug. 31 deadline for withdrawal.

29. Misread warnings helped lead to chaotic Afghan evacuation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The warnings were clear: The Afghan government would likely fall once U.S. troops pulled out. But intelligence agencies and ultimately President Joe Biden missed how quickly it would happen, losing weeks that could have been used for evacuations and spurring a foreign policy crisis.

30. Pentagon: US in talks with Taliban to ease Kabul obstacles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senior U.S. military officers at the Kabul airport are talking to Taliban commanders in the capital about Taliban checkpoints and curfews that have limited the number of Americans and Afghans able to enter the airport, the Pentagon said Wednesday.

31. White House: Taliban agree to allow civilian 'safe passage' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Taliban have agreed to allow "safe passage" from Afghanistan for civilians hoping to join a U.S.-directed airlift from the capital, President Joe Biden's national security adviser said Tuesday, although a timetable for completing the evacuation of Americans, Afghan allies and possibly other civilians has yet to be worked out with the country's new rulers.

32. Biden: Afghan chaos 'gut-wrenching' but stands by withdrawal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A defiant President Joe Biden rejected blame for chaotic scenes of Afghans clinging to U.S. military planes in Kabul in a desperate bid to flee their home country after the Taliban's easy victory over an Afghan military that America and NATO allies had spent two decades trying to build.

33. Evidence presented to grand jury in Durham's Russia probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — John Durham, the federal prosecutor tapped to investigate the origins of the Russia investigation, has been presenting evidence before a grand jury as part of his probe, a person familiar with the matter said Friday.

34. Judge: House entitled to some of Trump's financial records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats who have spent years investigating Donald Trump are entitled to some of the former president's financial records, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.

The ruling from U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta in Washington empowering Congress to have the records is the latest development in years-long legal and political skirmishes over access to Trump's closely-held finances. But it's unlikely to be the last say on the matter given expected appeals. The U.S. Supreme Court has already weighed in once.

35. Watchdog: No evidence Giuliani had Clinton probe inside info -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's inspector general said Thursday that it did not find evidence that FBI agents shared inside information about the Hillary Clinton email investigation with Rudy Giuliani.

36. Trump urged Justice officials to declare election 'corrupt' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump urged senior Justice Department officials to declare the results of the 2020 election "corrupt" in a December phone call, according to handwritten notes from one of the participants in the conversation.

37. US moves to better protect infrastructure from cyber threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is eyeing ways to harden cybersecurity defenses for critical infrastructure, announcing Wednesday the development of performance goals and a voluntary public-private partnership to protect core sectors.

38. 'This is how I'm going to die': Officers tell Jan. 6 stories -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "This is how I'm going to die, defending this entrance," Capitol Police Sergeant Aquilino Gonell recalled thinking, testifying Tuesday at the emotional opening hearing of the congressional panel investigating the violent Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection.

39. 8 US attorney picks by Biden would include historic firsts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is nominating eight new leaders for U.S. attorney positions across the country, including in the office overseeing the prosecutions of hundreds of defendants charged in the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol.

40. Dems renew questions about FBI background check of Kavanaugh -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are raising new concerns about the thoroughness of the FBI's background investigation into Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh after the FBI revealed that it had received thousands of tips and had provided "all relevant" ones to the White House counsel's office.

41. Biden to meet next month with private sector on cyber issues -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and members of his national security team plan to meet next month with business executives about cybersecurity, an official said Wednesday.

The Aug. 25 meeting comes as the White House is scrambling to help companies protect against ransomware attacks from Russia-based criminal syndicates and as the administration also confronts an aggressive cybersecurity threat from the Chinese government.

42. Microsoft Exchange email hack was caused by China, US says -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration on Monday blamed China for a hack of Microsoft Exchange email server software that compromised tens of thousands of computers around the world earlier this year.

43. Top Davidson County residential sales for second quarter 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

44. Biden: US damage appears minimal in big ransomware attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Tuesday that damage to U.S. businesses in the biggest ransomware attack on record appears minimal, though information remained incomplete. The company whose software was exploited said fewer than 1,500 businesses worldwide appeared compromised but cybersecurity experts caution that the incident isn't over.

45. 20 years after 9/11, lawsuit against Saudis hits key moment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As the 20th anniversary of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks approaches, victims' relatives are pressing the courts to answer what they see as lingering questions about the Saudi government's role in the attacks.

46. Tax law experts see 'strong' case against Trump Org. CFO -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies give perks to their employees all the time. Many top executives at Fortune 500 companies have access to a corporate jet for personal use, a company apartment, or an expense account for fancy meals. Even lower-level employees regularly get access to perks like tuition reimbursement or cash to join a gym.

47. Congress, Justice Dept. probing Trump seizures of Dems' data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog launched an investigation Friday after revelations that former President Donald Trump's administration secretly seized phone data from at least two House Democrats as part of an aggressive leaks probe. Democrats called the seizures a "shocking" abuse of power.

48. Wray: FBI frowns on ransomware payments despite recent trend -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The FBI's director told lawmakers Thursday that the bureau discourages ransomware payments to hacking groups even as major companies in the past month have participated in multimillion-dollar transactions aimed at getting their systems back online.

49. Pipeline CEO defends paying ransom amid cyberattack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A pipeline company CEO made no apologies Tuesday for his decisions to abruptly halt fuel distribution for much of the East Coast and pay millions to a criminal gang in Russia as he faced down one of the most disruptive ransomware attacks in U.S. history.

50. US recovers most of ransom paid after Colonial Pipeline hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department has recovered most of a multimillion-dollar ransom payment made to hackers after a cyberattack that caused the operator of the nation's largest fuel pipeline to halt its operations last month, officials said Monday.

51. Biden's pledge on media freedom may be easier said than done -

WASHINGTON (AP) — One of the Biden Justice Department's first big moves has been to alert reporters at three major news organizations that their phone records were seized as part of leak investigations under the Trump administration, with President Joe Biden saying he would abandon the practice of spying on journalists.

52. Trump Justice Dept. seized phone records of 4 NYT reporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump Justice Department secretly obtained the phone records of four New York Times reporters as part of a leak investigation, the newspaper reported Wednesday.

It is the third instance over the last month in which a news media organization has disclosed that federal authorities seized the records of its journalists in an effort to identify sources for national security stories published during President Donald Trump's administration.

53. Justice Dept. appeals judge's order on Russia probe memo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said Monday that it would appeal a judge's order directing it to release in its entirety a legal memo on whether President Donald Trump had obstructed justice during the Russia investigation. But it also agreed to make a brief portion of the document public.

54. Key impeachment witness sues Pompeo over $1.8M in legal fees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Gordon Sondland, the Trump administration's ambassador to the European Union and a pivotal witness in 2019 impeachment proceedings, sued former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Monday in an effort to recoup $1.8 million he racked up in legal expenses.

55. CNN: Trump Justice Department seized reporter phone records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration Justice Department secretly obtained the 2017 phone records of a CNN correspondent, the network said Thursday in revealing the existence of another apparent leak investigation aimed at identifying a journalist's sources.

56. Top Davidson County residential sales for April 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

57. Judge orders Justice Dept. to release Trump obstruction memo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge has ordered the release of a legal memorandum the Trump-era Justice Department prepared for then-Attorney General William Barr before he announced his conclusion that President Donald Trump had not obstructed justice during the Russia investigation.

58. US to create center targeting foreign election interference -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration said Monday that it will establish a new center responding to what the U.S. intelligence community has assessed as attempts by Russia and other adversaries to interfere with American elections.

59. US takes new aim at ransomware after most costly year -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is taking new aim at ransomware after a year that officials say was the most costly on record for the crippling cyberattacks.

Formation of a task force of FBI agents and Justice Department prosecutors is an acknowledgment of the growing threat posed by ransomware attacks, in which hackers lock up computer data and demand ransom payments in order to give it back. The force is part of a broader government effort to combat cyberattacks that target vital infrastructure, including a 100-day Biden administration initiative to bolster the digital security of electricity in the nation.

60. US takes steps to protect electric system from cyberattacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is taking steps to protect the country's electric system from cyberattacks through a new 100-day initiative combining federal government agencies and private industry.

61. US says Russia was given Trump campaign polling data in 2016 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It was one of the more tantalizing, yet unresolved, questions of the investigation into possible connections between Russia and Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign: Why was a business associate of campaign chairman Paul Manafort given internal polling data — and what did he do with it?

62. Top Davidson County residential sales for March 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

63. Biden to pull US troops from Afghanistan, end 'forever war' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden said Wednesday he will withdraw remaining U.S. troops from the "forever war" in Afghanistan, declaring that the Sept. 11 terror attacks of 20 years ago cannot justify American forces still dying in the nation's longest war.

64. US intel report: Virus impact to cause global 'aftershocks' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The effects of the coronavirus pandemic are expected to contribute over the next year to "humanitarian and economic crises, political unrest, and geopolitical competition," according to a new intelligence report that also warns about the threats from foreign adversaries and from violent extremists inside the United States.

65. 'Clear the Capitol,' Pence pleaded, timeline of riot shows -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From a secure room in the Capitol on Jan. 6, as rioters pummeled police and vandalized the building, Vice President Mike Pence tried to assert control. In an urgent phone call to the acting defense secretary, he issued a startling demand.

66. Grim view of global future offered in intelligence report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. intelligence officials are painting a dark picture of the world's future, writing in a report released Thursday that the coronavirus pandemic has deepened economic inequality, strained government resources and fanned nationalist sentiments.

67. After hack, officials draw attention to supply chain threats -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. government is working to draw attention to supply chain vulnerabilities, an issue that received particular attention late last year after suspected Russian hackers gained access to federal agencies and private corporations by sneaking malicious code into widely used software.

68. General says attacks by foreign hackers are 'clarion call' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Cyber Command conducted more than two dozen operations aimed at preventing interference in last November's presidential election, the general who leads the Pentagon's cyber force said Thursday.

69. US cyber experts conducted operations to safeguard election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Cyber Command conducted more than two dozen operations aimed at preventing interference in last November's presidential election, the general who leads the Pentagon's cyber force said Thursday.

70. Tool created to aid cleanup from Microsoft hack in broad use -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A tool designed to help businesses protect themselves from further compromises after a global hack of Microsoft email server software has been downloaded more than 25,000 times since it was released last week, the White House's National Security Council said Monday.

71. Top Davidson County residential sales for February 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

72. US: Putin approved operations to help Trump against Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Russian President Vladimir Putin authorized influence operations to help Donald Trump in last November's presidential election, according to a declassified intelligence assessment that found broad efforts by the Kremlin and Iran to shape the outcome of the race but ultimately no evidence that any foreign actor changed votes or otherwise disrupted the voting process.

73. FBI chief calls Jan. 6 'domestic terrorism,' defends intel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — FBI Director Chris Wray condemned the January riot at the U.S. Capitol as "domestic terrorism" Tuesday as he defended the bureau's handling of intelligence indicating the prospect for violence. He told lawmakers the information was properly shared with other law enforcement agencies even though it was raw and unverified.

74. Watchdog reviews complaint about FBI surveillance warrant -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department's internal watchdog is reviewing a former Boeing engineer's allegations that he was unfairly investigated by the FBI on suspicion that he was spying for China, according to correspondence and court filings reviewed by The Associated Press. It's the latest challenge related to secretive surveillance powers used in some terrorism and espionage cases.

75. CIA nominee pledges to provide 'unvarnished' intelligence -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's nominee to run the CIA told lawmakers Wednesday that he would keep politics out of the job and deliver "unvarnished" intelligence to politicians and policymakers even if they don't want to hear it.

76. Suit blames Saudi Arabia for attack at Florida military base -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Victims of a 2019 shooting at a Florida military base and their families are suing Saudi Arabia, claiming the kingdom knew the gunman had been radicalized and that it could have prevented the killings.

77. Democratic's lawsuit accuses Trump of inciting deadly Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Homeland Security chairman accused Donald Trump in a federal lawsuit Tuesday of inciting the deadly insurrection at the U.S. Capitol and conspiring with his lawyer and extremist groups to try to prevent Congress from certifying the results of the presidential election he lost to Joe Biden.

78. Pelosi says independent commission will examine Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Monday that Congress will establish an independent, Sept. 11-style commission to look into the deadly insurrection that took place at the U.S. Capitol.

79. Trump can't hang on to lawyers after false election claims -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump spent much of his career deploying high-powered lawyers to do his bidding. Now he is having trouble finding top-tier help when he might need it most.

Since losing the November election to President Joe Biden, Trump has been hemorrhaging attorneys. Established firms backed away from his baseless claims of election fraud. Those he did retain made elementary errors in cases that were quickly rejected as meritless. His personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, was ridiculed for his performance before a federal judge during one election-related case.

80. What to Watch: Democrats to argue Trump alone incited mob -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats will begin two days of arguments in Donald Trump's second impeachment trial, trying to convince skeptical Republicans that the former president alone was responsible for inciting his mob of supporters who broke into the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and interrupted the presidential electoral count.

81. What to watch as Trump's 2nd impeachment trial kicks off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial begins on Tuesday, a solemn proceeding that will force lawmakers to relive the violent events of Jan. 6 as House Democrats prosecute their case for "incitement of insurrection."

82. EXPLAINER: What's ahead as Trump impeachment trial begins -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial will force the Senate to decide whether to convict him of incitement of insurrection after a violent mob of his supporters laid siege to the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

83. AP Exclusive: DOJ rescinds 'zero tolerance' immigration rule -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department rescinded a Trump-era memo that established a "zero tolerance" enforcement policy for migrants crossing the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, which resulted in thousands of family separations.

84. Russian hack of US agencies exposed supply chain weaknesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The elite Russian hackers who gained access to computer systems of federal agencies last year didn't need to painstakingly break one-by-one into the networks of each department in order to cause havoc.

85. Biden orders review of domestic violent extremism threat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has directed law enforcement and intelligence officials in his administration to study the threat of domestic violent extremism in the United States, an undertaking being launched weeks after a mob of insurgents loyal to Donald Trump stormed the U.S. Capitol.

86. Biden DNI pick says no room for politics in intel agencies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden's nominee to lead the intelligence community, Avril Haines, promised Tuesday to "speak truth to power" and keep politics out of intelligence agencies to ensure their work is trusted. Her remarks implied a departure from the Trump administration's record of pressuring intelligence officials to shape their analysis to the president's liking.

87. FBI vetting Guard troops in DC amid fears of insider attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. defense officials say they are worried about an insider attack or other threat from service members involved in securing President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration, prompting the FBI to vet all of the 25,000 National Guard troops coming into Washington for the event.

88. Police on report man was making bombs: 'Hindsight is 20/20' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than a year before Anthony Warner detonated a Christmas Day bomb in downtown Nashville, officers visited his home after his girlfriend told police he was building bombs in a recreational vehicle at his residence, according to documents. But they did not make contact with him, or see inside his RV.

89. Nashville man's girlfriend warned he was building bombs -

NASHVILLE (AP) — More than a year before Anthony Warner detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, officers visited his home after his girlfriend told police he was building bombs in an RV trailer at his residence, according to documents obtained by The Associated Press. But they did not make contact with him, or see inside his RV.

90. Nashville bomber left hints of trouble, but motive elusive -

NASHVILLE (AP) — In the days before he detonated a bomb in downtown Nashville on Christmas, Anthony Quinn Warner changed his life in ways that suggest he never intended to survive the blast that killed him and wounded three other people.

91. Bomber to neighbor: The world is 'never going to forget me' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — It seemed like a friendly chat between neighbors. Only after a bomb exploded in downtown Nashville on Christmas morning could Rick Laude grasp the sinister meaning behind his neighbor's smiling remark that the city and the rest of the world would never forget him.

92. Senator: Treasury Dept. email accounts compromised in hack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dozens of email accounts at the Treasury Department were compromised in a massive breach of U.S. government agencies being blamed on Russia, with hackers breaking into systems used by the department's highest-ranking officials.

93. Barr undercuts Trump on election and Hunter Biden inquiries -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr used his final public appearance to undercut President Donald Trump on multiple fronts Monday, saying he saw no reason to appoint a special counsel to look into the president's claims about the 2020 election or to name one for the tax investigation of President-elect Joe Biden's son.

94. Trump says Barr resigning, will leave before Christmas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General William Barr, one of President Donald Trump's staunchest allies, is departing amid lingering tension over the president's baseless claims of election fraud and the investigation into President-elect Joe Biden's son.

95. Judge dismisses Flynn case following pardon from Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday dismissed the criminal case against former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn but pointedly noted that a pardon Flynn received from the president last month does not mean that he is innocent.

96. Pardon probe centered on clemency effort for psychologist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A California psychologist convicted of tax evasion was at the center of a mysterious, recently disclosed Justice Department investigation into whether White House officials were illegally lobbied to obtain a presidential pardon.

97. Barr's special counsel move could tie up his successor -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Outgoing Attorney General William Barr's decision to appoint a special counsel to investigate the handling of the Russia probe ensures his successor won't have an easy transition.

98. US probing potential WH bribery, lobbying scheme for pardon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is investigating whether there was a secret scheme to lobby White House officials for a pardon as well as a related plot to offer a hefty political contribution in exchange for clemency, according to a court document unsealed Tuesday.

99. Trump campaign legal team distances itself from Powell -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Perhaps Sidney Powell has gone too far for even Rudy Giuliani this time.

The Trump campaign's legal team moved to distance itself Sunday from the firebrand conservative attorney after a tumultuous several days in which Powell made multiple incorrect statements about the voting process, unspooled unsupported and complex conspiracy theories and vowed to "blow up" Georgia with a "biblical" court filing.

100. Criminal probe, legal fights await Trump after White House -

A few miles south of the namesake tower where Donald Trump began his run for president, New York prosecutors are grinding away at an investigation into his business dealings that could shadow him long after he leaves office in January.