» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Eric Cantor' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:2
Shelby Public Records:0
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:0
Middle Tennessee:0
East Tennessee:0
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. House Republicans elect McCarthy as leader with eye to 2020 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Rep. Kevin McCarthy easily won an internal party election to take over the shrunken House GOP caucus, handing the seven-term Californian a familiar role of building the party back to a majority as well as protecting President Donald Trump's agenda.

2. What to watch: After turbulent campaign, it's up to voters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Tweetstorms and a trade war. Kanye in the Oval Office. Kavanaugh in the hearing room.

President Donald Trump's presidency has been a wild, turbulent, two-year ride. Now it's time for voters to weigh in how much they're enjoying it.

3. Upset of Democratic House leader points to party divisions -

NEW YORK (AP) — As Donald Trump's party came together, a 28-year-old liberal activist ousted top House Democrat Joe Crowley in the president's hometown Tuesday night, a stunning defeat that suddenly forced Democrats to confront their own internal divisions.

4. McCarthy, Scalise are likely contenders for House speaker -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some say it's a fight between West and South. Or a test of who can woo conservatives. Or who would be the better fundraiser and communicator for a divided party struggling to protect its House majority.

5. Ryan bowing out, sending ripples of uncertainty through GOP -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Paul Ryan announced Wednesday he will retire rather than seek another term in Congress as the steady if reluctant wingman for President Donald Trump, sending ripples through a Washington already on edge and spreading new uncertainty through a party bracing for a rough election year.

6. Trump expected to end program for young immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is expected to announce that he will end protections for young immigrants who were brought into the country illegally as children, but with a six-month delay, people familiar with the plans said.

7. Trump's neo-Nazi rally comments thrust GOP doubts into open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's racially fraught comments about a deadly neo-Nazi rally have thrust into the open some Republicans' deeply held doubts about his competency and temperament, in an extraordinary public airing of worries and grievances about a sitting president by his own party.

8. Conservatives claim momentum to oust House GOP incumbents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Badly outspent and targeted by a withering Chamber of Commerce television ad, Woody White lost the Republican primary for an open House seat from North Carolina last year. Yet with anti-establishment Republicans riding high in the presidential race and Congress these days, the tea party-backed lawyer senses a better environment should he force a 2016 rematch with his GOP rival.

9. Study shows employers shifting more medical costs to workers -

Employers are leaving a bigger chunk of the bill for care to workers who use their health insurance, and benefits experts see few signs of this trend slowing.

Most companies now offer health coverage that requires employees to pay an annual deductible before insurance kicks in, and the size of that deductible has soared in the past decade, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Kaiser Family Foundation and Health Research & Educational Trust.

10. House OKs bill to speed drug approvals, boost bio research -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Urged on by the medical industry and patients' groups, the House overwhelmingly approved a bipartisan bill that would speed federal approval of drugs and medical devices and boost biomedical research.

11. Tennessee tea party supporters take heart from vote -

NASHVILLE (AP) - For U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander, the elder statesman of Tennessee politics, a primary challenge by a little-known tea party opponent was supposed to be little more than a glorified victory lap around the state.

12. Alexander, Supreme Court justices prevail in Tenn. -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Lamar Alexander became the latest U.S. senator to fend off a tea party challenge in a primary race Thursday, defeating a state lawmaker who had used a familiar tactic in trying to cast him as an out of touch insider.

13. Early voting underway today for Tennessee primary -

NASHVILLE (AP) - Early voters began casting their ballots Friday for Tennessee's primary election, with tea party-styled challenges to U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander's bid for the Republican nomination to a third term.

14. GOP Rep. McCarthy elected House majority leader -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans have made the first change in their leadership since Majority Leader Eric Cantor unexpectedly lost a primary election last week. They've elected California Rep. Kevin McCarthy to replace him in the No. 2 job.

15. Dem Senate candidate Ball to spend $400K on TV ads -

NASHVILLE (AP) - U.S. Senate candidate Gordon Ball said Friday that he is pouring up to $400,000 of his own money into a statewide television advertising campaign to bolster his bid for the Democratic nomination.

16. House GOP conflicted on health law alternative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are united as ever in their election-year opposition to "Obamacare," but they're increasingly divided over their promise to vote this year on an alternative to it.

17. Congress returns to work to do the bare minimum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress gets back to work Monday after a two-week vacation, and it's looking like lawmakers will do what they do best: the bare minimum.

Forget immigration, a tax overhaul, stiffer gun checks. They're all DOA.

18. Pelosi: Race has role in GOP immigration stance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi on Thursday blamed racial issues for the GOP's failure to act on comprehensive immigration legislation.

"I think race has something to do with the fact that they're not bringing up an immigration bill," the California Democrat told reporters at her regular weekly press conference. "I've heard them say to the Irish, 'If it were just you, this would be easy.'"

19. Unemployment benefits bill headed to House -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Election-year legislation to resume long-term jobless benefits is headed to the House, where a small band of dissident Republicans is leaning on Speaker John Boehner to permit a vote on resuming aid to more than 2 million victims of the Great Recession.

20. GOP seeks expansion of choices in health law it hates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At the prodding of business organizations, House Republicans quietly secured a recent change in President Barack Obama's health law to expand coverage choices, a striking, one-of-a-kind departure from dozens of high-decibel attempts to repeal or dismember it.

21. House approves bill to stop cut to Medicare docs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Thursday passed legislation to give doctors a yearlong reprieve from a looming 24 percent cut in their payments from Medicare.

The bill passed on a surprise voice vote and advanced to the Senate, which hopes to pass it before a Monday deadline. The vote was delayed by an hour amid doubt that the measure could muster the two-thirds vote required under fast-track procedures.

22. Writing a budget might divide House Republicans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Divisions among Republicans over a budget deal and a shortfall in tax estimates are complicating the House GOP's efforts to advance a spending plan this spring.

Party leaders insist the GOP-controlled House is moving full speed ahead to approve one, but it has fallen behind schedule amid concerns there will be enough votes to pass it.

23. House backs bill to delay health care penalty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Wednesday backed a one-year delay in the penalty that individuals would have to pay for failing to sign up for health insurance, the 50th time Republicans have forced a vote to repeal, gut or change the law championed by President Barack Obama.

24. Paul Ryan: Immigration legislation unlikely in '14 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Days after House Republicans unveiled a roadmap for an overhaul of the nation's broken immigration system, one of its backers said legislation is unlikely to pass during this election year.

25. Republicans blame Obama for stalling immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are starting to lay the blame on President Barack Obama if an overhaul of the nation's broken immigration system fails to become law.

The GOP's emerging plan on immigration is to criticize Obama as an untrustworthy leader and his administration as an unreliable enforcer of any laws that might be passed. Perhaps realizing the odds of finding a consensus on immigration are long, the Republicans have started telling voters that if the GOP-led House doesn't take action this election year, it is Obama's fault.

26. Farm bill deal would cut food stamps by 1 percent -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Farm-state lawmakers are lobbying colleagues member by member, vote by vote as they push for House passage of a massive, five year farm bill that would make cuts to food stamps and continue generous subsidies for farmers.

27. Doctors say cutting food stamps could backfire -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Doctors are warning that if Congress cuts food stamps, the federal government could be socked with bigger health bills. Maybe not immediately, they say, but over time if the poor wind up in doctors' offices or hospitals as a result.

28. Fed chair, unemployment on tap as Congress returns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Back to work on Monday, Congress faces a hefty list of unfinished business and a politically driven agenda in an election year that will determine control of the House and Senate.

29. House Republicans signal support for budget deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans signaled support Wednesday for a budget deal worked out a day earlier, a plan narrowly drawn but promoted as a way to stabilize Congress' erratic fiscal efforts, avert another government shutdown and mute some of the partisan rancor that has damaged Americans' attitudes about their lawmakers.

30. Lawmakers look to sanctions if Iran deal falters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers are making contingency plans for what happens if — or when — the nuclear accord with Iran falls apart.

Congress is out of town through the end of the month, but lawmakers are already weighing their options for how to address the deal with Iran, in which Tehran agrees to a six-month pause in its nuclear program in exchange for eased sanctions worth $7 billion. Lawmakers from both parties are skeptical the agreement will prod Tehran to give up its nuclear ambitions and say they will be waiting with even harsher punishment if Iran proves an untrustworthy partner.

31. New GOP shutdown/debt plan, but no agreement yet -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are offering to pass legislation to avert a default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday.

32. Obama plans to talk to GOP again on shutdown, debt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is inviting Republican lawmakers to the White House as pressure builds on both sides to resolve their deadlock over the federal debt limit and the partial government shutdown.

33. Obama says talks OK after default threat averted -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After weeks of gridlock, House Republicans floated broad hints Tuesday they might be willing to pass short-term legislation re-opening the government and averting a default in exchange for immediate talks with the Obama administration on reducing deficits and changing the three-year-old health care law.

34. Shutdown in 3rd day with bigger trouble looming -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama laid the blame for the government's partial shutdown at the feet of House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday, escalating a confrontation that is running the risk of a potentially damaging clash over the nation's borrowing authority.

35. Obama hits GOP 'ideological crusade' in shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress hung "Closed" signs on a big swath of the government Tuesday and sent home 800,000 workers in what President Barack Obama labeled an "ideological crusade" by GOP lawmakers determined to gut his health care law. On Capitol Hill, House Republicans answered with a bid to restart a few favored slices of government, including national parks, while still demanding concessions on health care.

36. House and Senate face deep divide over food stamps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Farm-state lawmakers hoping for passage of a farm bill by the end of the year will have to bridge a deep divide between the House and the Senate over the role of the government in helping the nation's poor.

37. AP sources: A revised GOP attack on 'Obamacare' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House GOP leaders Wednesday announced that they will move quickly to raise the government's borrowing cap by attaching a wish list of GOP priorities like blocking "Obamacare," forcing construction of the Keystone XL pipeline and setting the stage for reforming the loophole-cluttered tax code.

38. House conservatives back 'Obamacare' alternative -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A large group of House conservatives intends to unveil legislation providing an expanded tax break for consumers who purchase their own health coverage and increasing the government funding for high-risk pools, according to lawmakers who said the plan marked the Republicans' first comprehensive alternative to President Barack Obama's health care overhaul.

39. GOP struggles to win support for funding bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican leaders struggled Tuesday to win over conservatives for a plan that would keep the government running through mid-December and force the Senate to vote on derailing implementation of President Barack Obama's signature health care law.

40. Oil rises as Obama gets support in Syria effort -

NEW YORK (AP) — Oil rose above $108 a barrel Tuesday as President Barack Obama won the support of key Republicans for a punitive U.S. military strike against Syria.

Meanwhile, Americans headed back to work and school after bidding farewell to what AAA says was the third most expensive driving season on record.

41. Transportation funding bill faces GOP opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A measure awarding generous funding to road and bridge projects, community development grants and housing help for the poor is running into stiff Republican opposition in the Senate.

42. Boehner calls out Rep. King on immigration insult -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker John Boehner on Thursday elevated his criticism of fellow Republican Rep. Steve King over King's suggestion that many immigrants in the country illegally are drug runners, calling the comments "deeply offensive and wrong."

43. House GOP, Democrats clash over immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans took a tentative step toward offering citizenship to some unauthorized immigrants Tuesday, but hit an immediate wall of resistance from the White House on down as Democrats said it wasn't enough.

44. House passes bill to replace education law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Friday passed legislation outlining their vision for national educational policy to replace the No Child Left Behind law. The measure would give state and local governments greater powers to determine how best to improve schools and would sharply reduce federal involvement in education matters.

45. Obama, GOP offer differing visions on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is using his presidential pulpit to press the Republican-controlled House to embrace a path to citizenship for all 11 million people living illegally in the U.S., while a top Republican says those brought to America as children should be given the highest priority for legalization.

46. Republicans to tackle cuts in food stamp program -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House approval of a scaled-back farm bill is setting up what could be an even bigger fight over food stamps and the role of domestic food aid in the United States.

Food stamps have been a part of farm bills since the 1970s to gain urban Democratic votes for the rural measure. But that union has soured this year as the food aid has exploded in cost and House Republicans have taken aim at the program. Normally bipartisan, farm bills have become much less so.

47. GOP rejects comprehensive approach on immigration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans are embracing a step-by-step approach to immigration, in contrast to the sweeping plan passed by the Senate and backed by the White House. But they're offering neither specifics nor a timetable — nor any mention of possible citizenship for an estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country unlawfully.

48. House's rejection of farm bill leaves few options -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House's broad rejection of a massive farm bill could signal a shift in the way Congress views agriculture policy.

Farm issues once had enormous clout on Capitol Hill, but the healthy agriculture economy and an increased interest in cutting spending have worked against farm-state lawmakers who are now trying to push a farm bill through for a third year in a row.

49. House set to OK bill to change overtime pay law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led House is poised to approve a bill that would give private sector workers the option of choosing paid time off instead of cash wages for working overtime.

The measure would allow employees who work more than 40 hours a week to save up their earned time off for use weeks or months later. GOP lawmakers say they want to give busy working parents at private firms the same flexibility that public sector workers have to take time off to spend with their children or care for aging parents.

50. GOP seeks alternative to overtime pay -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It seems like a simple proposition: give employees who work more than 40 hours a week the option of taking paid time off instead of overtime pay.

The choice already exists in the public sector. Federal and state workers can save earned time off and use it weeks or even months later to attend a parent-teacher conference, care for an elderly parent or deal with home repairs.

51. Obama, NY and NJ lawmakers press for Sandy aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans and Democrats from New York and New Jersey lashed out at House Speaker John Boehner on Wednesday for pulling legislation on Hurricane Sandy aid, demanding that he reverse course and allow a vote as their constituents continue to struggle with the aftermath of the devastating storm. President Barack Obama called for an immediate House vote, and governors of the two states called House inaction a "dereliction of duty."

52. Congress OKs cliff deal, signaling future fights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress' excruciating, extraordinary New Year's Day approval of a compromise averting a prolonged tumble off the fiscal cliff hands President Barack Obama most of the tax boosts on the rich that he campaigned on.

53. Boehner on averting fiscal cliff: 'God only knows' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker John Boehner signaled on Friday he's still open to negotiations with President Barack Obama on avoiding across-the-board tax increases set to hit taxpayers Jan. 1, but sounded pessimistic about reaching a grand deal with the president.

54. Bill to extend fed insurance plan dies in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal program giving unlimited insurance guarantees to some no-interest bank accounts, enacted at the height of the financial meltdown, will die out at the end of the year following defeat of a Senate plan to extend it.

55. 'Fiscal cliff' talks vexing official Washington -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Five weeks after President Barack Obama won re-election and gained more leverage to make GOP conservatives bend on taxes, the new balance of power is proving vexing for both sides.

56. GOP leaders remove 4 from plum House committees -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker John Boehner's decision to take plum committee assignments away from four conservative Republican lawmakers after they bucked party leaders on key votes isn't going over well with conservative advocacy groups that viewed them as role models.

57. GOP issues new 'fiscal cliff' offer to Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Monday proposed a new 10-year, $2.2 trillion blueprint to President Barack Obama that calls for raising the eligibility age for Medicare and lowering cost-of-living hikes for Social Security benefits, a counteroffer to jump-start stalled talks with the "fiscal cliff" just weeks away.

58. Congress, with much left to do, takes 5 weeks off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After a final day of partisan battles over drought relief and cybersecurity, members of Congress streamed out of the Capitol looking forward to five weeks of vacation and a fall fraught with decisions on the political and economic future of the country.

59. House leaders: Drought bill may come up next week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republican leaders said Thursday they expected to take up legislation next week to help farmers and ranchers, particularly livestock producers, hit by the drought that has parched much of the nation.

60. House leaders wary of farm, postal bill showdowns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate-passed bills to cut farm subsidies and food stamps and overhaul the financially teetering Postal Service have been put on hold by House Republican leaders wary of igniting internal party fights or risking voters' ire three months before the election.

61. Senate rejects Dem, GOP business tax cut bills -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Thursday rejected rival Democratic and Republican plans for cutting taxes on businesses, with both parties refusing to yield ground in their election-year struggle over how best to spark the economy.

62. Health care law survives with Roberts' help -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Obamacare lives.

America's historic health care overhaul, derided by Republicans as intrusive, costly "Obamacare," narrowly survived an election-year battle at the Supreme Court Thursday with the improbable help of conservative Chief Justice John Roberts.

63. High court upholds Obama health law by 5-4 vote -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld virtually all of President Barack Obama's historic health care overhaul, including the hotly debated core requirement that nearly every American have health insurance.

64. Lawmakers try to save stalled transportation bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House and Senate leaders are making a last-ditch effort to revive stalled legislation to overhaul federal transportation programs — Congress' best bet for passage of a major jobs bill this year — but prospects for passage before the November election are dimming.

65. GOP derails Senate 'Buffett rule' taxes on wealthy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic "Buffett rule" bill Monday forcing the nation's top earners to pay at least 30 percent of their income in taxes, using the day before Americans' taxes are due to defy President Barack Obama on one of his signature election-year issues.

66. GOP, Dems clash over Obama tax boosts on wealthy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans accused President Barack Obama of pitting Americans against each other as they moved Monday toward blocking a Democratic attempt in the Senate to impose Obama's "Buffett rule" taxes on the rich. Democrats said it was time for the tax code to treat the wealthy and the middle class fairly.

67. Long political fights ahead over dueling tax plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats and Republicans are forcing votes in Congress this coming week on competing tax plans that affect millionaires and smaller businesses, and they know the proposals are doomed from the start.

68. Obama signs small business legislation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama signed bipartisan jobs legislation Thursday that will help small businesses and make it easier for startups to raise capital, saying it could be a "game-changer" for entrepreneurs dreaming of founding the next Microsoft or Facebook.

69. Senate passes small business investment bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation to help startup companies raise capital by reducing some federal regulations won easy passage in the Senate Thursday despite warnings from some Democrats that less government oversight would mean more abuse and scams.

70. Popular small business bill hits Senate obstacles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It might seem a recipe for success: Legislation to help small businesses raise capital passed the House last week with 95 percent of lawmakers voting for it and President Barack Obama's support. But in today's Congress, nothing comes easy.

71. House passes bipartisan bill to help startups -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Showing that they can on occasion work together, House lawmakers on Thursday overwhelmingly passed a package of bills making it easier for small businesses and startups to raise the capital they need to grow and hire new workers.

72. Romney, Santorum share Super Tuesday momentum -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Mitt Romney padded his delegate count on the biggest night of the GOP presidential primary season but Rick Santorum demonstrated enough strength to ensure that there's more convulsion ahead as Republicans struggle to settle on a candidate to take on President Barack Obama.

73. Cantor: GOP beginning to 'coalesce' for Romney -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Majority Leader Eric Cantor says Republicans are coalescing around Mitt Romney's candidacy and looking for ways to work together to defeat President Barack Obama.

74. GOP promotes plan to help small businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Tuesday unveiled a package of largely uncontroversial measures they said will help small businesses raise capital and create jobs while showing that Congress can put aside its partisan differences and act in the country's economic interests.

75. Capitol Hill weighs GOP payroll tax gambit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House lawmakers are returning to Capitol Hill to weigh a proposal by GOP leaders to extend the 2-percentage-point cut in the payroll tax through the end of the year and add the approximately $100 billion cost to the nation's $15 trillion-plus debt instead of scrounging around the budget for ways to pay for it.

76. House bans federal lawmakers from insider trading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Thursday joined the Senate in voting to explicitly prohibit members of Congress and other top officials from making investments on insider information. But an effort to bridle purveyors of Capitol Hill political intelligence could delay the bill's enactment.

77. House passes insider trading bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House passed a bill banning Congress and executive branch officials from insider trading, but brushed aside a provision aimed at reining in those who pry financial information from Congress and sell it to investment firms.

78. House GOP offers its own insider trading bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — New legislation from House Republicans would ban insider trading by thousands of federal officials and bar lawmakers who are convicted of a felony from collecting government pensions.

79. House ready to consider insider trading ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legislation that would ban insider trading by lawmakers and thousands of executive branch officials headed for what could be a more contentious debate in the House after sailing through the Senate on a 96-3 vote.

80. Senate clears way for vote on insider-trading ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is rushing to make it absolutely clear to everyone that its members are banned from insider stock trading, hoping to improve their sagging image that has approval ratings at historic lows.

81. Obama to Republicans: Game on -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama delivered an election-year broadside to Republicans: Game on.

The GOP, from Congress to the campaign trail, signaled it's ready for the fight.

In his third State of the Union address, Obama issued a populist call for income equality that echoed the Occupy Wall Street movement. He challenged GOP lawmakers to work with him or move aside so he could use the power of the presidency to produce results for an electorate uncertain whether he deserves another term.

82. House GOP to reject stopgap payroll tax cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the Senate adjourned for the holidays, House Republicans are moving to shelve a bipartisan two-month extension of the Social Security payroll tax cut that cleared the Senate over the weekend and are demanding instead that their fellow lawmakers return to the Capitol for negotiations.

83. Debt, elections prod GOP to ease anti-tax stance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP's image as a rigidly anti-tax party is softening. Spurred by federal debt worries in Congress, the shift conceivably could reshape the Republican Party's brand ahead of the 2012 elections, forcing tough decisions by its presidential candidates.

84. GOP hopefuls oppose potential deficit deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican presidential hopefuls are assaulting a proposal by GOP lawmakers on a bipartisan deficit-reduction panel that calls for increased tax revenues even as the special supercommittee appears increasingly headed for deadlock.

85. US Supreme Court: Pre-election health care showdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday promised an extraordinarily thorough springtime review of President Barack Obama's historic health care overhaul — more than five hours of argument, unprecedented in modern times — in time for a likely ruling affecting millions of Americans just before the presidential election in November.

86. House GOP leader says deficit deal likely -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The No. 2 Republican in the House said Monday he's still confident that a bipartisan deficit "supercommittee" will be able to reach agreement even though there's little more than a week to go before its deadline.

87. House Democrats say GOP wants too many days off -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House will be in session less than one out of every three days next year, a slight decline from past years. House Republicans say they are running the place more efficiently and lawmakers need the time to be with constituents in an election year. Democrats say that's too few days on the job during an economic crisis.

88. House to repeal law withholding contractors' taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Against a backdrop of thousands of government contractors underpaying their taxes by billions of dollars, Congress decided in 2006 to start withholding 3 percent of the contracted price until taxes owed are paid. It never happened.

89. Obama, GOP push and pull on economic plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seeking to gain political advantage, President Barack Obama insisted Monday that Congress vote on his entire $447 billion economic plan this month, a step promptly rejected by Republicans who called for both sides to find common ground in their competing proposals to stimulate growth.

90. House to wrap up emergency spending bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is poised to fund the government for six weeks to give President Barack Obama and lawmakers more time to work out some $1 trillion of unfinished agency budgets for the fiscal year already days old.

91. Obama would hike taxes to pay for his jobs bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a sharp challenge to the GOP, President Barack Obama proposed paying for his costly new jobs plan Monday with tax hikes that Republicans have already rejected, and he accused them of political motives if they still refuse to go along.

92. Obama tax cut would boost typical pay by $1,500 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Typical workers would get an extra $1,500 in their paychecks next year under a plan by President Barack Obama to expand a payroll tax cut that is scheduled expire at the end of the year. Higher paid workers would get more, and businesses would get tax breaks, too.

93. Obama challenges GOP to back more payroll tax cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is challenging congressional Republicans to back an aggressive plan to cut payroll taxes in an effort to revive the economy and entice employers to hire more workers.

94. Congress returns to fight over jobs, budget cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Fights large and small await Congress as it gets back to business, with jobs and budget cuts topping a contentious agenda that also includes a lengthy roster of lower-profile but must-do items that also are potential victims of partisan gridlock.

95. Getting back to even on jobs divides US leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — America's sickly economy can be healed with jobs, jobs and more jobs. On that, everyone agrees. Figuring out how to produce them is what is stumping everyone.

Other than letting time take its course, Washington lacks a clear answer on how to create permanent new jobs on a national scale. Forecasters suggest it will take 20 million new jobs over the next 10 years just to repair recession damage and to keep pace with adult population growth.

96. White House: Irene's federal cost $1.5 billion -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House estimated on Monday that Hurricane Irene will cost federal taxpayers $1.5 billion in disaster relief, further ballooning a government account that was already the focus of fresh partisan friction between President Barack Obama and Congress.

97. Battle over disaster aid brewing in Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) - A political battle between the tea party-driven House and the Democratic-controlled Senate is threatening to slow money to the government's main disaster aid account, which is so low that new rebuilding projects have been put on hold to help victims of Hurricane Irene and future disasters.

98. House GOP to spike rules as part of jobs agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Republican agenda this fall will focus on repealing environmental and labor regulations that GOP lawmakers say are driving up the cost of doing business and discouraging employers from hiring new workers.

99. The next deficit deal: There's a rough road ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The special panel's goal is lofty: concoct a deal both parties will embrace to slash federal deficits by a mammoth $1.5 trillion or more over the next decade.

Yet from the moment House and Senate leaders appoint the 12 members until the 2012 elections, hurricane-force political pressures are going to make it tough to produce anything substantial.

100. Pitching for votes with movie clips, coarse talk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Movie clips, some coarse talk and behind-the-scenes hardball.

House GOP leaders are selling, selling, selling Speaker John Boehner's debt limit plan to skeptical rank-and-file Republicans.