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Editorial Results (free)

1. New crypto oversight legislation arrives as industry shakes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After 13 years, at least three crashes, dozens of scams and Ponzi schemes and hundreds of billions of dollars made and evaporated, cryptocurrencies finally have the full attention of Congress, whose lawmakers and lobbyists have papered Capitol Hill with proposals on how to regulate the industry.

2. After Roe, Dems seek probe of tech's use of personal data -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the Supreme Court ending the constitutional protections for abortion, four Democratic lawmakers are asking federal regulators to investigate Apple and Google for allegedly deceiving millions of mobile phone users by collecting and selling their personal data.

3. Tentative Senate gun deal has surprises, and loose ends -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The outline of a bipartisan Senate agreement to rein in gun violence has no game-changing steps banning the deadliest firearms. It does propose measured provisions making it harder for some young gun buyers, or people considered threatening, to have weapons.

4. Crypto meltdown is wake-up call for many, including Congress -

NEW YORK (AP) — Meltdowns in the cryptocurrency space are common, but the latest one really touched some nerves. Novice investors took to online forums to share tales of decimated fortunes and even suicidal despair. Experienced crypto supporters, including one prominent billionaire, were left feeling humbled.

5. How Biden, cops and advocates forged deal on police and race -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jim Pasco, the executive director for the Fraternal Order of Police, was watching football on a Sunday afternoon when he got a call from Susan Rice, the top domestic policy adviser at the White House.

6. Biden signs policing order on anniversary of Floyd's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order Wednesday to improve accountability in policing —a meaningful but limited action on the second anniversary of George Floyd's death that reflected the challenges in addressing racism, excessive use of force and public safety when Congress is deadlocked on stronger measures.

7. Will Congress act on guns after Sandy Hook, Buffalo, Uvalde? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer swiftly set in motion a pair of background-check bills for gun buyers Wednesday in response to the school massacre in Texas. But the Democrat acknowledged Congress' unyielding rejection of previous legislation to curb the national epidemic of gun violence.

8. Jackson confirmed as first Black female high court justice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate confirmed Ketanji Brown Jackson to the Supreme Court on Thursday, shattering a historic barrier by securing her place as the first Black female justice and giving President Joe Biden a bipartisan endorsement for his effort to diversify the high court.

9. Crowd, cheers, history as Senate confirms Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Moments before the Senate began Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's confirmation vote to become the first Black woman on the Supreme Court, the chamber filled with the swell of history.

10. Murkowski, Romney back Jackson, all but assure confirmation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Sens. Lisa Murkowski and Mitt Romney say they will vote to confirm Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson's historic elevation to the Supreme Court, giving President Joe Biden's nominee a burst of bipartisan support and all but assuring she'll become the first Black female justice.

11. Democrats appear united on Jackson; GOP votes may be elusive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Joe Manchin announced Friday that he plans to vote for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson to serve on the Supreme Court, likely clearing the path for President Joe Biden's historic nominee to be confirmed. But Democratic hopes of securing significant Republican support for Jackson's nomination appear to be fading.

12. Jackson on track for confirmation, but GOP votes in doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than 30 hours of hearings, the Senate is on track to confirm Ketanji Brown Jackson as the first Black woman on the Supreme Court. But Democrats seem unlikely to confirm her with a robust bipartisan vote, dashing President Joe Biden's hopes for a grand reset after partisan battles over other high court nominees.

13. Takeaways: Jackson hearing closes with Trump, civil rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The historic Senate hearings for Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson, the first Black woman nominated for the Supreme Court, have been joyful, combative and clarifying, putting on display the breadth of the nation's partisan divide and the unresolved problems of its past.

14. Jackson heading for likely confirmation despite GOP darts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal judge Ketanji Brown Jackson faced down a barrage of Republican questioning Wednesday about her sentencing of criminal defendants, as her history-making bid to join the Supreme Court veered from lofty constitutional questions to attacks on her motivations on the bench.

15. Senate committee wraps up hearings on Jackson's nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legal experts praised Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in her final day of Senate hearings on Thursday, with a top lawyers' group saying its review found she has a "sterling" reputation, "exceptional" competence and is well qualified to sit on the Supreme Court.

16. Takeaways: Supreme Court hearings a venue for culture wars -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not just Supreme Court nominee Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson who is being scrutinized. Senators are also being watched at this milestone moment in history considering the first Black woman for the high court.

17. Jackson pushes back at GOP critics, defends record -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing Republican senators' pointed questions, Supreme Court nominee Ketanji Brown Jackson forcefully defended her record as a federal judge Tuesday and declared she will rule "from a position of neutrality" if confirmed as the first Black woman on the high court.

18. House passes bill to prohibit discrimination based on hair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black people who wear hairstyles like Afros, cornrows or tightly coiled twists should not face bias in society, school and the workplace, the U.S. House said Friday in voting to make it explicit that such discrimination is a violation of federal civil rights law.

19. High court's Alabama ruling sparks alarm over voting rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court's decision to halt efforts to create a second mostly Black congressional district in Alabama for the 2022 election sparked fresh warnings Tuesday that the court is becoming too politicized, eroding the Voting Rights Act and reviving the need for Congress to intervene.

20. Biden gets CEO support for economic agenda -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday secured the blessing of several business leaders on his economic agenda that has stalled in the Senate, part of an effort to restart some momentum for the nearly $2 trillion in spending and tax increases that he's proposed.

21. House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn reports COVID infection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn said Wednesday he has tested positive for COVID-19, though he is fully vaccinated with a booster and has no symptoms.

22. Crow, Warren, Booker test positive for breakthrough COVID-19 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two U.S. senators and a third lawmaker say they have tested positive for COVID-19 after having been vaccinated, as the nation deals with another surge in cases and the emergence of the omicron variant.

23. No joke: Comedians, cannabis companies push pot legalization -

NEW YORK (AP) — Big cannabis companies are backing a new, celebrity-infused campaign to enlist marijuana users to pressure members of Congress to legalize pot nationwide.

Federal legalization has advanced somewhat but still faces strong headwinds on Capitol Hill. The "Cannabis in Common" initiative launched Tuesday aims to change that.

24. Senators: Bipartisan police overhaul talks end with no deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bipartisan congressional talks on overhauling policing practices have ended without an agreement, top bargainers from both parties said, marking the collapse of an effort that began after killings of unarmed Black people by officers sparked protests across the U.S.

25. Dem senator: Talks with GOP on police overhaul have failed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bipartisan congressional talks on overhauling policing practices have ended without an agreement, the top Democratic bargainer said Wednesday, marking an unproductive end to an effort that began after killings of unarmed Black people by officers sparked protests across the U.S.

26. Prospects ever fainter for bipartisan policing overhaul deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prospects seem increasingly faint for a bipartisan Senate deal on overhauling policing practices as deadlocked lawmakers have fled the Capitol for August recess and political pressure for an accord eases with each passing week.

27. Top Dem sees tough pathway for $3.5T social, climate plans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hours after clinching an initial budget victory, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer conceded Wednesday that Democrats face a tough pathway to delivering a package surging $3.5 trillion into family, health and environment programs to President Joe Biden's desk.

28. Senate leader lends clout to marijuana legalization push -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat is backing a bill that would strike down a longstanding federal prohibition on marijuana, embracing a proposal that has slim chance of becoming law yet demonstrates growing public support for decriminalizing the drug.

29. Bipartisan policing deal unlikely this week in blow to talks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers are likely to miss their latest deadline for completing a bipartisan deal on overhauling police practices, lawmakers and aides said Thursday, 13 months after George Floyd's killing and with the shadow of next year's elections lengthening over Congress' work.

30. GOP senators set summer deadline on Congress' policing bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers should reach a bipartisan deal on revamping policing procedures by early summer or abandon the effort, Republicans said Wednesday, a day after George Floyd's family used visits to the White House and the Capitol to prod lawmakers to act.

31. As deadlines slip, Biden agenda faces crucial assessment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's infrastructure plan is hitting roadblocks. A policing overhaul after the killing of George Floyd is up in the air. Even a seemingly bipartisan effort to investigate the Jan. 6 insurrection at the Capitol faces the blockade of Republican opposition in Congress.

32. Biden expanding summer food program for 34M schoolchildren -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is expanding a program to feed as many as 34 million schoolchildren during the summer months, using funds from the coronavirus relief package approved in March.

33. AG nominee Garland vows Capitol riot will be top priority -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Merrick Garland, President Joe Biden's attorney general nominee, vowed Monday to prioritize combating extremist violence and said his first focus would be on the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol as he sought to assure lawmakers that the Justice Department would remain politically independent on his watch.

34. After a tumultuous 2020, Black leaders weigh next steps -

DETROIT (AP) — As a barrier-breaking year draws to a close, there's one undeniable fact: the strength of Black political power.

Black voters were a critical part of the coalition that clinched President-elect Joe Biden's White House bid. The nation will swear in its first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent as vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, who herself may be a leading presidential candidate in four years. And as the global push for racial justice continues, Congress is set to welcome several new Black, progressive freshmen next year.

35. McConnell, Schumer to lead, but Senate majority uncertain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senators chose party leaders Tuesday with few changes at the top, but it's unclear who will be the majority leader in the new Congress with no party having secured control of the Senate until a January runoff election in Georgia.

36. In South, most Black Senate candidates since Reconstruction -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — In the battle for control of the U.S. Senate this year, the Deep South is fielding more Black candidates than it has since Reconstruction.

In South Carolina, Jaime Harrison is raising a previously unfathomable amount of money in what has become a competitive fight to unseat one of the more powerful Republicans in the Senate. He's joined by Raphael Warnock in neighboring Georgia, the leading Democrat in a crowded field running for the seat held by an appointed Republican. Mike Espy and Adrian Perkins, meanwhile, are launching spirited bids for the Senate in Mississippi and Louisiana, respectively.

37. Takeaways: Coronavirus at center of Supreme Court hearings -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus won't surrender the national stage to anyone — not to President Donald Trump, Judge Amy Coney Barrett or majority Republicans holding the power to confirm nominees to the Supreme Court.

38. 4 members of Congress question NFL on concussion payments -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four members of Congress sent a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell on Wednesday questioning the league's formula for making concussion settlement payments to Black former players.

39. Biden vows to defeat Trump, end US 'season of darkness' -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden accepted the Democratic presidential nomination with a vow to be a unifying "ally of the light" who would move an America in crisis past the chaos of President Donald Trump's tenure.

40. AP FACT CHECK: Dems on minimum wage and poverty -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans tuned into the Democratic National Convention were told Thursday that the higher minimum wage favored by presidential candidate Joe Biden would lift all full-time workers out of poverty. That's not what $15 an hour is likely to do.

41. Biden seeking party, national unity in convention climax -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Joe Biden is hoping to start unifying divided America as well as the nation's diverse Democrats Thursday night as he accepts his party's presidential nomination in the climax of recent history's most unorthodox national convention.

42. Congress stalls on policing overhaul, despite public outcry -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress is hitting an impasse on policing legislation, as Senate Democrats on Tuesday opposed a Republican proposal as inadequate, leaving the parties to decide whether to take on the hard job of negotiating a compromise or walk away despite public outcry over the killings of Black Americans.

43. Portraits of former Confederate leaders removed from Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Portraits honoring four former House speakers who served in the Confederacy were removed Thursday after Speaker Nancy Pelosi declared that the men "embody the violent bigotry and grotesque racism of the Confederacy."

44. Pelosi orders removal of Confederate portraits from Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday she is ordering the removal from the Capitol of portraits honoring four previous House speakers who served in the Confederacy.

In a letter to the House clerk, Pelosi directed the immediate removal of portraits depicting the former speakers: Robert Hunter of Virginia, James Orr of South Carolina and Howell Cobb and Charles Crisp, both of Georgia. The portraits were to be removed later Thursday.

45. Senate GOP to restrict police chokeholds in emerging bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Driven by a rare urgency, Senate Republicans are poised to unveil an extensive package of policing changes that includes new restrictions on police chokeholds and other practices as President Donald Trump signals his support following the mass demonstrations over the deaths of George Floyd and other black Americans.

46. Scott's challenge: Uniting Senate GOP behind police overhaul -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP is looking for an answer on how to respond to national outrage over the police killing of George Floyd. And they are looking to Sen. Tim Scott to provide it.

47. Democrats propose sweeping police overhaul; Trump criticizes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats in Congress proposed a far-reaching overhaul of police procedures and accountability Monday, a sweeping legislative response to the mass protests denouncing the deaths of black Americans in the hands of law enforcement.

48. Key Democrats spurn push to defund police amid Trump attacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his allies have seized on calls to "defund the police" as a dangerous example of Democratic overreach as he fights for momentum amid crises that threaten his reelection.

49. Behind virus and protests: A chronic US economic racial gap -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States has been here before, staring into the deep chasm that divides white and black Americans.

It happened after cities burned in 1967, after Los Angeles erupted with the 1992 acquittal of police officers who beat Rodney King, after the 2014 police killing of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

50. 'Defund the police:' What does it mean? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Protesters are pushing to "defund the police" over the death of George Floyd and other black Americans killed by law enforcement. Their chant has become a rallying cry — and a stick for President Donald Trump to use on Democrats as he portrays them as soft on crime.

51. Democrats propose sweeping police overhaul; Trump opposes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats proposed a far-reaching overhaul of police procedures and accountability Monday, a sweeping legislative response to the mass protests denouncing the deaths of black Americans in the hands of law enforcement.

52. Democrats prepare police reform bills after Floyd's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats, powered by the Congressional Black Caucus, are preparing a sweeping package of police reforms as pressure builds on the federal government to respond to the death of George Floyd and others in law enforcement interactions.

53. Democrats prepare police reform bills after Floyd's death -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats, powered by the Congressional Black Caucus, are preparing a sweeping package of police reforms as pressure builds on the federal government to respond to the death of George Floyd and others in law enforcement interactions.

54. Lawmakers question federal prisons' home confinement rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers are raising questions about the federal Bureau of Prisons' release of high-profile inmates and are calling for widespread testing of federal inmates as the number of coronavirus cases has exploded in the federal prison system.

55. 'Very much alive': Biden victorious in 4 more primary states -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden decisively won Michigan's Democratic presidential primary, seizing a key battleground state that helped propel Bernie Sanders' insurgent candidacy four years ago. The former vice president's victory there, as well as in Missouri, Mississippi and Idaho, dealt a serious blow to Sanders and substantially widened Biden's path to the nomination.

56. Michigan primary could make or break Sanders' campaign -

DETROIT (AP) — Bernie Sanders proved his 2016 presidential bid was serious with an upset victory in Michigan powered by his opposition to free trade and appeal among working-class voters. Four years later, the state could either revive the Vermont senator's campaign or relegate him to the role of protest candidate.

57. Booker endorses Biden, says he'll 'restore honor' to office -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey has endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden. Booker announced on Twitter early Monday that Biden will "restore honor to the Oval Office and tackle our most pressing challenges."

58. Congress makes lynching a federal crime, 65 years after Till -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixty-five years after 14-year-old Emmett Till was lynched in Mississippi, Congress has approved legislation designating lynching as a hate crime under federal law.

The bill, introduced by Illinois Rep. Bobby Rush and named after Till, comes 120 years after Congress first considered anti-lynching legislation and after dozens of similar efforts were defeated.

59. Early voting in Tennessee's presidential primary begins -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Early voting for Tennessee's presidential primary has officially begun.

Voters will be able to cast their ballots ahead of the March 3 presidential primary starting Wednesday until Feb. 25.

60. Biden's poor showing in Iowa shakes establishment support -

DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Joe Biden's third presidential bid enters a critical stretch after a disappointing finish in the Iowa caucuses sent the former vice president on to New Hampshire with a skittish donor base, low cash reserves and the looming threat of billionaire rival Michael Bloomberg and his unlimited personal wealth.

61. 'Fail Not:' What to watch ahead of Trump's Senate trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hear ye, hear ye: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is hitting the send button on President Donald Trump's impeachment.

That's after she paused the whole constitutional matter, producing a three-week standoff with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and complicating the campaigning picture for the five Democratic senators in the White House race.

62. Pelosi: House moving to send impeachment to Senate next week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Friday the House will take steps next week to send articles of impeachment to the Senate ending Democrats' blockade of President Donald Trump's Senate trial.

63. Pelosi to 'soon' send impeachment articles for Senate trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday she will "soon'' transmit the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, signaling a potential thaw in the standoff with Senate Republicans as she warned against rushing to an acquittal without a fair trial.

64. Pelosi: 'I know exactly when' to send impeachment to Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday she knows ''exactly when" she'll be transmitting the articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, brushing back Democratic comments that the time has come to start the Senate trial.

65. 6 big questions ahead of Democrats' final debate of 2019 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just seven Democrats will take the stage for the sixth and final round of presidential debates in 2019. That's down from 20 candidates six months ago.

The field may be winnowing, but the primary contest remains deeply unsettled. The tug-of-war between the progressive and moderate wings of the party is deadlocked. There are essentially four front-runners, each with his or her own glaring flaws. And suddenly, one of the strengths of the Democratic Party's 2020 class — its diversity — has disappeared. Those issues and more will play out Thursday night when the Democratic Party's top candidates face off in Los Angeles, 46 days before primary voting begins.

66. 6 big questions ahead of Democrats' final debate of 2019 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Just seven Democrats will take the stage for the sixth and final round of presidential debates in 2019. That's down from 20 candidates six months ago.

The field may be winnowing, but the primary contest remains deeply unsettled. The tug-of-war between the progressive and moderate wings of the party is deadlocked. There are essentially four front-runners, each with his or her own glaring flaws. And suddenly, one of the strengths of the Democratic Party's 2020 class — its diversity — has disappeared. Those issues and more will play out Thursday night when the Democratic Party's top candidates face off in Los Angeles, 46 days before primary voting begins.

67. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

68. Takeaways from the 5th Democratic 2020 presidential debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats spent more time making the case for their ability to beat President Donald Trump than trying to defeat each other in their fifth debate.

Civil in tone, mostly cautious in approach, the forum on Wednesday did little to reorder the field and may have given encouragement to two new entrants into the race, Mike Bloomberg and Deval Patrick.

69. Ex-Massachusetts Gov. Patrick announces Dem presidential bid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced Thursday he is running for president, making a late entry into the Democratic race less than three months before primary voting begins.

70. AP FACT CHECK: Trump exaggerates scope of cease-fire deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As President Donald Trump describes it, the U.S. swooped into an intractable situation in the Middle East, achieved an agreement within hours that had eluded the world for years and delivered a "great day for civilization."

71. Sanders, Warren stockpile millions more than 2020 rivals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren don't just lead the Democratic presidential primary in fundraising. They've stockpiled millions more than their rivals, including former Vice President Joe Biden, who burned through money at a fast clip over the past three months while posting an anemic fundraising haul.

72. Dem presidential candidates call for Kavanaugh's impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Several Democratic presidential candidates have lined up to call for the impeachment of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh in the face of a new, uninvestigated allegation of sexual impropriety when he was in college.

73. Liberal, moderate divide on display in Democratic debate -

HOUSTON (AP) — Joe Biden parried attack after attack from liberal rivals Thursday night on everything from health care to immigration in a debate that showcased profound ideological divides between the Democratic Party's moderate and progressive wings.

74. Analysis: Biden looks like a front-runner, until he doesn't -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is the Democratic front-runner. And there were moments in Thursday night's debate when he looked the part.

Standing between a pair of liberal senators offering radical change, he unabashedly embraced his more moderate position on health care, forcefully pressuring Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren to level with Americans about the steep cost of implementing a fully government-run system. He was more polished and practiced than in previous contests. And he repeatedly leaned on the legacy of former President Barack Obama, who remains the most popular Democrat in the nation.

75. 7 questions heading into 10-candidate Democratic debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — And then there were 10. The Democratic Party's strongest presidential contenders — according to polls and fundraising, at least — meet on the same debate stage for the first time Thursday night.

76. Democrats propose spending trillions fighting climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates are releasing their plans to address climate change ahead of a series of town halls on the issue as the party's base increasingly demands aggressive action.

77. AP FACT CHECK: Trump twists facts on gun control and tariffs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Battling dual crises of gun violence and trade, President Donald Trump is twisting the facts in regards to gun control and exaggerating his case for tariffs against China.

Speaking Wednesday, Trump defended his past incendiary rhetoric on race in the wake of weekend mass shootings in Texas and Ohio and suggested that legislation addressing background checks was imminent. That's not the case.

78. AP FACT CHECK: Dems gloss over econ, migrant complexities -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Some of the Democratic presidential contenders dug in their heels with unsupported rhetoric about immigration, the economy and more Wednesday night as they scrambled to stay in contention for the winnowed-down debates to come.

79. Trump channels George Wallace with racial appeals -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If President Donald Trump putting race at the forefront of his re-election campaign rings familiar, that's because another White House hopeful did the same half a century ago — and saw the strategy resonate with many Americans.

80. 2020 tests if Democrats can rely on multiracial coalition -

DETROIT (AP) — When Barack Obama was on the ballot in 2008 and 2012, there was no question that Terrance Holmes would vote for the first black president. But as he helped fix cars this week at a repair shop on Detroit's west side, he recalled his ambivalence about the 2016 campaign.

81. Trump defends Acosta, will look into Epstein plea deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Tuesday he would be looking "very closely" at Labor Secretary Alex Acosta's handling of a sex trafficking case involving billionaire financier Jeffrey Epstein, though he also praised Acosta's Cabinet work.

82. New ruling puts high court overhaul back on 2020 Dems' radar -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Thursday's Supreme Court decision on partisan gerrymandering reignited calls from progressives for overhauling the high court, putting new pressure on Democratic presidential hopefuls during their first nationwide debates.

83. Health care, immigration top issues at Democrats' 1st debate -

MIAMI (AP) — Ten Democrats railed against a national economy and a Republican administration they argued exist only for the rich as presidential candidates debated onstage for the first time in the young 2020 season, embracing inequality as a defining theme in their fight to deny President Donald Trump a second term in office.

84. Takeaways from the Democratic presidential debate -

MIAMI (AP) — Democrats hoping that Wednesday night's first presidential debate of the 2020 campaign would be clarifying probably came away disappointed. There were no major stumbles but few standout moments as 10 candidates vied for the nation's attention.

85. Health care, immigration top issues at Democrats' 1st debate -

MIAMI (AP) — Ten Democrats railed against a national economy and a Republican administration they argued exist only for the rich as presidential candidates debated onstage for the first time in the young 2020 season, embracing inequality as a defining theme in their fight to deny President Donald Trump a second term in office.

86. Breakouts, burns and zingers: What to watch in the debates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sixty seconds for answers, a television audience of millions and, for some candidates, a first chance to introduce themselves to voters.

The back-to-back Democratic presidential debates beginning Wednesday are exercises in competitive sound bites featuring 20 candidates hoping to oust President Donald Trump in 2020. The hopefuls range widely in age, sex and backgrounds and include a former vice president, six women and a pair of mayors.

87. AP-NORC Poll: Democratic voters not fully tuned in to 2020 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly two dozen Democratic presidential candidates have crisscrossed the country for six months selling their vision for the United States. But, on the eve of the first debates in the campaign , a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows most Democratic voters haven't fully tuned in.

88. 'Why not now?' for slavery reparations, House panel is told -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers on Wednesday held the first congressional hearing in more than a decade on reparations, spotlighting the debate over whether the United States should consider compensation for the descendants of slaves in the United States.

89. Mueller's public statement fuels calls for Trump impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller's first — and possibly last — public statement on the Russia investigation is fueling fresh calls on Capitol Hill to begin impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, a step that Democratic leaders have so far resisted.

90. $15 minimum wage becomes part of 2020 presidential landscape -

From liberal firebrands Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren to moderates Joe Biden and John Hickenlooper, nearly the entire 2020 Democratic presidential field agrees that the federal minimum wage should be more than doubled, to $15 an hour.

91. Pot 'legalization 2.0': Social equity becomes a key question -

NEW YORK (AP) — Advocates for legalizing marijuana have long argued it would strike a blow for social justice after a decades-long drug war that disproportionately targeted minority and poor communities.

92. Lawmakers debate future of loan relief for public workers -

In 2007, the U.S. government made a promise to public service workers: Make 10 years of payments on their federal student loans and any remaining debt would be erased. But officials have largely failed to deliver.

93. Impeach or not impeach? Pelosi says focus first on facts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged divided fellow Democrats Monday to focus on fact-finding rather than leaping to talk of impeachment to hold President Donald Trump accountable for the "highly unethical and unscrupulous behavior" described in special counsel Robert Mueller's report.

94. Warren unveils $640B college debt forgiveness plan -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Democrat Elizabeth Warren is proposing the elimination of existing student loan debt for millions of Americans, part of a sweeping set of education funding proposals announced as she and other presidential candidates seek to differentiate themselves in a sprawling field.

95. The Latest: Report says officials blocked Trump's efforts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller says President Donald Trump's efforts to influence the Russia investigation "were mostly unsuccessful," but that was because the people surrounding the president "declined to carry out orders to accede to his requests."

96. Democrats raise $75M so far, signaling a drawn-out fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic presidential candidates raised about $75 million during the first quarter of the 2020 election, a lackluster sum spread out across more than a dozen campaigns that signals a drawn-out battle likely lies ahead.

97. Unions urge Democrats to focus on kitchen table economics -

LAS VEGAS (AP) — Ardently liberal, pro-labor and anti-corporate cash, the field of Democrats running for president may look like a union activist's dream. But some key labor leaders are starting to worry about the topics dominating the 2020 conversation.

98. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for March 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

99. 2020 Democrats court young voters, but will they show up? -

GRINNELL, Iowa (AP) — Austin Anderson was excited to see Beto O'Rourke on his college campus last week, intrigued by his "character" and talk of bipartisanship. But would he support the former Texas congressman in next year's Iowa caucuses?

100. Sanders' adds long-term care to his 'Medicare for All' plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont unveiled a revamped version of his "Medicare for All" plan on Wednesday, shaking up the 2020 presidential race by renewing his call for replacing job-based and private health insurance with a government plan that guarantees coverage for all.