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Editorial Results (free)

1. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

2. Stocks end the week higher as US jobs report calms Fed fears -

Wall Street closed out a week of mostly choppy trading with broad gains Friday, pushing the S&P 500 to its second straight weekly gain.

The S&P 500 rose 0.9% and finished with a 0.6% gain for the week. Technology stocks were biggest gainers and did the most to drive the broader market higher. Microsoft rose 2.1% and Apple added 1.9%. Communication stocks and companies that rely on consumer spending also made solid gains. Only utilities closed lower.

3. Is COVID-19 the death of shaking hands? -

On March 8, 2020, the 8:45 morning service at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Franklin was unfolding as it did every Sunday. Just after the Prayers of the People, the rector offered The Peace. “May the peace of the Lord be always with you,” Father Rusty McCown said to the congregation. “And also with you,” they responded.

4. Carrying grandma’s legacy to new height -

North Nashville has always held a special place in Jason Word’s heart, and now his journey truly has come full circle. Word, 49, the new owner of Nashville’s four Save A Lot discount grocery stores, recalls many good times in the Brooklyn Heights area – between Trinity Lane and the Cumberland River – where his late grandmother, Ethel Watkins, ran the family grocery store, Watkins and Sons, following the death of her husband.

5. High court decision spotlights GOP divide over LGBT rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats flooded Twitter and email inboxes this week with praise for the watershed Supreme Court decision shielding gay, lesbian and transgender people from job discrimination. Republicans — not so much.

6. AP FACT CHECK: Trump says he saved space program after Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is making claims on space that are off course from reality.

Over the weekend, he took full credit for the government's role in the launch of SpaceX, the first-ever private spacecraft to attain orbit with astronauts on board. Trump also asserted that he saved the space program after President Barack Obama had ruined it and suggested that a Mars mission with astronauts was imminent.

7. Powell warns of a possible sustained recession from pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell warned Wednesday of the threat of a prolonged recession resulting from the viral outbreak and urged Congress and the White House to act further to prevent long-lasting economic damage.

8. Banks post big profits, but lower interest rates are a worry -

NEW YORK (AP) — So far, it appears 2019 was another record year for Wall Street.

Trading of stocks and bonds rebounded after a terrible end to 2018 and consumers spent tons of money on their credit cards, buoyed by a strong job market and steady economic growth. On Tuesday, JPMorgan Chase reported a record annual profit, while Citigroup posted its best results since before the Great Recession.

9. Uncertainties escalate for Fed as it weighs another rate cut -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Federal Reserve finds itself in an unusually delicate spot as it considers how much more to try to stimulate an economy that's still growing and adding jobs but also appears vulnerable.

10. Fed's odd dilemma: Low unemployment but pressure to do more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With the nation's unemployment rate at its lowest point since human beings first walked on the moon, you might expect the Federal Reserve to be raising interest rates to keep the economy from overheating and igniting inflation.

11. Hong Kong stock exchange swoops in for London rival -

LONDON (AP) — The Hong Kong stock exchange wants to buy its London counterpart to create a company worth more than $70 billion that could shore up the U.K. capital's status as a global financial hub after Brexit.

12. You won’t miss the pizza at Ed’s Fish & Pizza House -

Don’t expect to get a New York-style slice with pepperoni at Ed’s Fish & Pizza House. Nor with just cheese. Certainly not even a sniff of unfairly pilloried anchovies. Fact is, there’s been no pizza at Ed’s since 1993, when Big Anthony bought the place from his Uncle Ed Morris.

13. Senate GOP taking up judicial nominee some call 'the worst' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are working to soon fill the nation's longest judicial vacancy with a North Carolina lawyer whose nomination has raised objections from black lawmakers and civil rights groups concerned about his work defending state laws found to have discriminated against African-Americans.

14. Senate aims to confirm man for bench despite racial concerns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans are working to soon fill the nation's longest judicial vacancy with a North Carolina lawyer whose nomination has raised objections from black lawmakers and civil rights groups concerned about his work defending state laws found to have discriminated against African-Americans.

15. Probes of Trump taxes carry potential for millions in fines -

NEW YORK (AP) — Though President Donald Trump insists he did nothing wrong on his taxes, experts say he could be on the hook for tens of millions of dollars in civil fines if state and federal authorities substantiate a New York Times report that found he and his family cheated the IRS for decades.

16. Probes of Trump taxes carry potential for millions in fines -

NEW YORK (AP) — Though President Donald Trump insists he did nothing wrong on his taxes, experts say he could be on the hook for tens of millions of dollars in civil fines if state and federal authorities substantiate a New York Times report that found he and his family cheated the IRS for decades.

17. Trump slams Times 'hit piece' on reported tax avoidance plan -

NEW YORK (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday expressed outrage over a New York Times report that he received at least $413 million from his father over the decades, much of that through dubious tax dodges, including outright fraud.

18. NY Times: Trump got $413M from his dad, much from tax dodges -

NEW YORK (AP) — The New York Times reported Tuesday that President Donald Trump received at least $413 million from his father over the decades, much of that through dubious tax dodges, including outright fraud.

19. Airlines, consumer groups ready for fight over proposed bill -

As summer vacationers start to pack up and head home, Congress is considering a sweeping tally of proposals that could affect travelers, from dictating seat size and legroom to rolling back rules that require airlines to advertise the full price of a ticket.

20. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for June 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, June 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

21. Book Trump? Interest groups press case at his properties -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Payday lenders got regulators to rethink rules on how closely to vet borrowers. E-cigarette makers got a delay in federal oversight of many vaping products. Candy makers praised a decision to hold off on more stringent labeling standards. And title insurers declared "victory" for getting changes that benefited them in the tax overhaul.

22. New book leaves Trump 'furious,' 'disgusted' with Bannon -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump launched a scathing attack on former top adviser Steve Bannon, responding to a new book that portrays Trump as an undisciplined man-child who didn't actually want to win the White House and quotes Bannon as calling his son's contact with a Russian lawyer "treasonous."

23. Trump tries to stop book's publication -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is demanding the author and publisher of a new book about him immediately halt its release.

Trump attorney Charles Harder sent a cease-and-desist letter dated Thursday to Michael Wolff, author of "Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House."

24. Antiques, Garden Show books Earl of Spencer -

The Antiques and Garden Show of Nashville announces Charles, 9th Earl Spencer, brother of Diana, Princess of Wales and godson of Her Majesty the Queen, will headline the 2018 event.

The 28th annual Nashville tradition will be held Feb. 2-4 at the Music City Center.

25. Harvey Weinstein to take leave amid sexual harassment report -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Harvey Weinstein, the larger-than-life Hollywood executive and Oscar-winner, is taking a leave of absence from his own company after an explosive expose revealing decades of sexual harassment against women, from employees to actress Ashley Judd, was published in The New York Times Thursday.

26. Forrest kerfuffle might be sign of bigger problem -

Legislation that slipped through the House of Representatives honoring an unknown author who penned a Nathan Bedford Forrest apologist biography was enabled by the climate within the Republican-controlled body, a Memphis legislator says.

27. History points to protracted and tough Brexit negotiations -

LONDON (AP) — It took Britain more than a decade of trying to join the European club. It's now got just two to get out and strike a new relationship.

If anyone thinks that will be easy for Britain, a look back to its entry half a century ago will show how difficult and protracted talks with the EU can be.

28. US stocks, dollar slide after weak jobs report -

Banks and other financial companies led a modest decline in U.S. stocks Friday after a report indicating that hiring slowed sharply in May put investors in a selling mood.

The market slide snapped a two-day winning streak and sent bond prices surging as investors sought safety in U.S. government-backed debt. The dollar also fell sharply against several major currencies.

29. Airlines prep for holiday crush: More flights, bigger planes -

DALLAS (AP) — Airlines are shifting the timing of thousands of flights, even adding dozens of redeyes, as they try to avoid delays while hauling millions of passengers from now through the Christmas weekend.

30. Events -

Portland’s Music on Main. Bucky Covington will perform at this free event, which begins tonight at 7. Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs.

THURSDAY, JULY 23

Real Estate Investors Network

Advanced investor notes group: For local investors who want to actively invest in notes. The goal is to help each other stay motivated, analyze deals, discuss strategies, etc. Members should have more than a basic understanding of notes. 11:30 a.m., The Egg and I, 1000 Meridian Blvd, Suite 118, Franklin. Information: www.reintn.org/calendar.

31. Investors expect higher stocks in 2015, but also turbulence -

NEW YORK (AP) — Can the U.S. hold everyone else above water? That is the question investors are asking as Wall Street heads into 2015.

A strong U.S. economy helped propel the stock market higher in 2014, continuing a bull market that is on pace to celebrate its sixth birthday in March. On more than one occasion, investors dumped stocks following geopolitical flare-ups and concerns about the global economy, only to jump back in when an economic report or results from a big company suggested the U.S. economy was still resilient.

32. Drug and device firms paid $3.5B to care providers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — From research grants to travel junkets, drug and medical device companies paid doctors and leading hospitals billions of dollars last year, the government disclosed Tuesday in a new effort to spotlight potential ethical conflicts in medicine.

33. 10 things to know about corporate inversions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Burger King is drawing a lot of flak over plans to shift its legal address to a foreign country by merging with Tim Hortons, the Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain.

The transaction is called a corporate inversion, a maneuver that is becoming popular among companies looking to lower their tax bills.

34. Yellen: Job market makes Fed hesitant on rate hike -

JACKSON HOLE, Wyoming (AP) — If anyone thought Janet Yellen might clarify her view of the U.S. job market in her speech here Friday, the Federal Reserve chair had a message:

The picture is still hazy.

35. Yellen faces challenges as Fed trims bond buys -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen will take the helm of a Federal Reserve facing a significantly different economic landscape than the one that dominated Ben Bernanke's tenure as chairman, confronting her with different decisions as well.

36. Combined net worth of America's richest rises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Life is good for America's super wealthy.

Forbes on Monday released its annual list of the top 400 richest Americans. While most of the top names and rankings didn't change from a year ago, the majority of the elite club's members saw their fortunes grow over the past year, helped by strong stock and real estate markets.

37. Anxiety brews among immigration supporters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supporters of far-reaching immigration legislation fear they're losing the message war and say an all-out campaign is needed from business groups and other outside advocates with ties to House Republicans to turn it around.

38. GOP lawmakers seek to back away from 'fringe' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Before a House vote to give final approval to a contentious firearms bill last week, Speaker Beth Harwell implored her Republican colleagues to ignore demands from what she deemed "fringe" groups to make major changes to the measure.

39. Wal-Mart outlook wary even as profit rises -

NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart Stores Inc. offered a weak business outlook Thursday as new economic challenges for its low-income shoppers start to take a toll.

40. Nashville investor helps light fire under candle business -

Gretchen Hollingsworth says she never planned on selling her artisan candle business. Then she met Nashville investor Joe Moore.

He made an intriguing offer – a strategic partnership – after the two met at a New York trade show in 2009.

41. General Mills against amendment banning gay marriage -

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — General Mills said Thursday it opposes a proposed Minnesota constitutional amendment to bay gay marriage, the largest company in the state to come out against the measure so far.

42. House bans federal lawmakers from insider trading -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House on Thursday joined the Senate in voting to explicitly prohibit members of Congress and other top officials from making investments on insider information. But an effort to bridle purveyors of Capitol Hill political intelligence could delay the bill's enactment.

43. Obama uses tax proposals for his political message -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Aiming tax increases at millionaires and companies that ship jobs abroad may help frame the fairness theme of President Barack Obama's re-election campaign, but it's a plan that stands virtually no chance of passing Congress.

44. Actions the Fed might consider at meeting this week -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Federal Reserve holds a policy meeting Tuesday and Wednesday, it's widely expected to adopt some new step to boost the economy. The question is what it will be.

Whatever the Fed does will likely be intended to drive down long-term interest rates to encourage borrowing and spending and lift stock prices. The idea is that all of that would combine to help raise economic growth and hiring.