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Editorial Results (free)

1. Democratic chair issues subpoenas to oil executives -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The chairwoman of the House Oversight Committee issued subpoenas Tuesday to top executives of ExxonMobil, Chevron and other oil giants, charging that the companies have not turned over documents needed by the committee to investigate allegations that the oil industry concealed evidence about the dangers of global warming.

2. Oil giants deny spreading disinformation on climate change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top executives of ExxonMobil and other oil giants denied spreading disinformation about climate change as they sparred Thursday with congressional Democrats over allegations that the industry concealed evidence about the dangers of global warming.

3. Democrats call oil giants to testify on climate campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional Democrats are calling top executives at ExxonMobil and other oil giants to testify at a House hearing as lawmakers investigate what they say is a long-running, industry-wide campaign to spread disinformation about the role of fossil fuels in causing global warming.

4. Trump urged Justice officials to declare election 'corrupt' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump urged senior Justice Department officials to declare the results of the 2020 election "corrupt" in a December phone call, according to handwritten notes from one of the participants in the conversation.

5. Medicare evaluating coverage for $56,000 Alzheimer's drug -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare on Monday launched a formal process to decide whether to cover Aduhelm, the new Alzheimer's drug whose $56,000-a-year price tag and unproven benefits have prompted widespread criticism and a congressional investigation.

6. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

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7. 'Get used to me': Postmaster evokes Trump style in Biden era -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Louis DeJoy is uninterested in the niceties of Washington. The wealthy longtime businessman with an outer borough New York accent prides himself as a problem solver ready to disrupt an unwieldy bureaucracy. And he's facing potential legal troubles.

8. Hearing on Jan. 6 violence exposes stark partisan divisions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans sought to shift the narrative on the violent Jan. 6 insurrection during a congressional hearing Wednesday, with some painting the Trump supporters who stormed the building as patriots who have been unfairly harassed, as Democrats clashed with the former Pentagon chief while drilling into the government's unprepared response.

9. Top Davidson County residential sales for March 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, March 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

10. Biden: Governors, mayors need $350 billion to fight COVID -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden met with a bipartisan group of governors and mayors at the White House on Friday as part of his push to give financial relief from the coronavirus pandemic to state and local governments — a clear source of division with Republican lawmakers who view the spending as wasteful.

11. Family behind OxyContin attests to its role in opioid crisis -

Two of the owners of the company that makes OxyContin acknowledged to a congressional committee on Thursday that the powerful prescription painkiller has played a role in the national opioid crisis but stopped short of apologizing or admitting wrongdoing.

12. Family behind OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma offers 'sadness' -

Two of the owners of the company that makes OxyContin acknowledged to a congressional committee on Thursday that the powerful prescription painkiller has played a role in the national opioid crisis but stopped short of apologizing or admitting wrongdoing as they made a rare appearance in a public forum.

13. Watchdog says USGS chief retaliated against whistleblower -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The head of the U.S. Geological Survey violated federal whistleblower-protection laws by reassigning an employee who lodged an official complaint against him, the Interior Department's inspector general office said Thursday.

14. US vetted stars' politics to showcase Trump virus response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Public relations firms hired by the Department of Health and Human Services vetted political views of hundreds of celebrities for a planned $250 million ad blitz aimed at portraying President Donald Trump's response to the coronavirus outbreak in a positive light, according to documents released Thursday by a House committee.

15. House to investigate DeJoy possible campaign law violations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats said Tuesday they will investigate whether Postmaster General Louis DeJoy encouraged employees at his former business to contribute to Republican candidates and then reimbursed them in the guise of bonuses, a violation of campaign finance laws.

16. Progressive challengers' year: 3 wins and some close calls -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Progressives trying to shove Congress to the left by competing in this year's Democratic primaries ousted three moderate incumbents, won other victories and established themselves as a force that's not going away.

17. Emergency postal aid stalls as WH rejects House-passed bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Help for the U.S. Postal Service landed in stalemate Sunday as the White House dismissed an emergency funding bill aimed at shoring up the agency before the November elections as "going nowhere" and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged senators to act quickly.

18. DeJoy says Trump attacks on mail-in ballots 'not helpful' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Postmaster General Louis DeJoy told lawmakers Monday that he has warned allies of President Donald Trump that the president's repeated attacks on mail-in ballots are "not helpful," but denied that recent changes at the Postal Service are linked to the November elections.

19. AP FACT CHECK: Trump muddies facts on mail ballots, Harris -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is muddying the facts about mail-in voting and vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris on the eve of the Democratic National Convention.

Asked to disclaim the racist conspiracy theory that Harris isn't eligible to serve in the White House because of her immigrant parents, Trump repeatedly demurred and said he knew little about it, even as the false rumors swirled on social media over the past week. Harris unquestionably meets the Constitution's requirements to be vice president. On Sunday, Trump's own White House chief of staff acknowledged her eligibility.

20. Watchdog: Homeland Security officials were wrongly appointed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The two most senior officials in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security were improperly appointed to the posts under federal law by the Trump administration, a nonpartisan congressional watchdog said Friday.

21. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's smoke and mirrors on executive orders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't telling the full story when it comes to executive orders on coronavirus relief payments and health care.

Over the weekend, the president suggested that his move to bypass Congress with executive action calling for up to $400 in weekly unemployment assistance would mean immediate cash in hand for laid-off Americans during the pandemic. There's no guarantee of that. His own economic adviser acknowledged Sunday that various details remained to be worked out, including contributions from the states, and that legal challenges appeared likely.

22. Postal Service loses $2.2B in 3 months as virus woes persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. Postal Service says it lost $2.2 billion in the three months that ended in June as the beleaguered agency — hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic — piles up financial losses that officials warn could top $20 billion over two years.

23. Congress urges Postal Service to undo changes slowing mail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers from both parties are calling on the U.S. Postal Service to immediately reverse operational changes that are causing delays in deliveries across the country just as big volume increases are expected for mail-in election voting.

24. Trump encourages mail voting in Florida but sues in Nevada -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an abrupt reversal, President Donald Trump is encouraging voters in the critical swing state of Florida to vote by mail after months of criticizing the practice — and while his campaign and the GOP challenge Nevada over its new vote-by-mail law.

25. House committees subpoena top Pompeo aides over IG firing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats have subpoenaed four top aides to Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, saying that the Trump administration is stonewalling their investigation into the firing of the State Department's top independent watchdog earlier this year.

26. Audit: US sent $1.4B in virus relief payments to dead people -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nearly 1.1 million coronavirus relief payments totaling some $1.4 billion went to dead people, a government watchdog reported Thursday. Legal and political issues hang over the misdirected taxpayer funds, the latest example of errors in massive aid being dispensed at crisis speed.

27. Pick for top NY prosecutor won't withdraw from Trump matters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's pick to be the top federal prosecutor in Manhattan won't say whether he would withdraw from overseeing matters related to Trump in his current job, as Securities and Exchange Commission chairman, or if confirmed as U.S. attorney.

28. As party leaders age, progressive Black Democrats take stage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Yearning for change, a group of progressive Black Democratic congressional hopefuls is rushing toward the national stage, igniting rank-and-file enthusiasm in a party dominated by aging white leaders.

29. As party leaders age, progressive Black Democrats take stage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Yearning for change, a group of progressive Black Democratic congressional hopefuls is rushing toward the national stage, igniting rank-and-file enthusiasm in a party dominated by aging white leaders.

30. Watchdogs say Trump admin limiting oversight of virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government watchdogs are warning that a legal determination by the Trump administration could severely limit their ability to oversee more than $1 trillion in spending related to the coronavirus pandemic.

31. Ousted State watchdog confirms investigations into Pompeo -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ousted State Department Inspector General Steve Linick on Wednesday told members of three congressional committees that before he was abruptly fired, he was investigating Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's use of government resources as well as the secretary's decision to approve a multibillion-dollar arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

32. Watchdog who found hospital shortages unfazed by Trump barbs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The author of a federal report that found U.S. hospitals faced severe shortages of coronavirus test supplies and equipment says she is not intimidated by criticism from President Donald Trump, even after he moved to replace her as chief watchdog of the Department of Health and Human Services.

33. GOP leader names picks for House panel overseeing virus aid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Thursday named five Republicans, including his top deputy and one of Congress' most combative defenders of President Donald Trump, to a new panel tracking federal coronavirus and economic relief spending.

34. As $2 trillion starts to flow, oversight of virus cash lags -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress unleashed about $2 trillion to deal with the coronavirus crisis. So far, only two people are working to oversee how it is spent.

Bharat Ramamurti started out as a watchdog of one, the sole appointee to a five-member Congressional Oversight Commission. The Democratic Senate aide was joined Friday by Republican Rep. French Hill of Arkansas.

35. HHS: Federal stocks of protective equipment nearly depleted -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Strategic National Stockpile is nearly out of the N95 respirators, surgical masks, face, shields, gowns and other medical supplies desperately needed to protect front-line medical workers treating coronavirus patients.

36. Trump removes watchdog tapped for $2T virus rescue oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has removed the inspector general tapped to chair a special oversight board for the $2.2 trillion economic relief package on the coronavirus, the latest in a series of steps Trump has taken to confront government watchdogs tasked with oversight of the executive branch.

37. States demand ventilators as feds ration limited supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two weeks ago, the Pentagon promised to make as many as 2,000 military ventilators available as the federal government strains to contend with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Wednesday, less than half had been allocated, despite a desperate need across the country.

38. States demand ventilators as feds ration limited supply -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Two weeks ago, the Pentagon promised to make as many as 2,000 military ventilators available as the federal government strains to contend with the coronavirus pandemic. As of Wednesday, less than half had been allocated, despite a desperate need across the country.

39. Congress locks Trump oversight into $2.2 trillion package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump declared that "I'll be the oversight" as lawmakers were in the final days of drafting what became a $2.2 trillion rescue plan for American businesses. In the end, Congress ensured that won't be the case.

40. Paid parental leave for fed workers could spur wider changes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The federal government's 2.1 million employees will get paid parental leave for the first time, a galvanizing moment in the growing movement to bring the benefit to all U.S. workers.

41. Judiciary panel to take reins on Trump impeachment inquiry -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is moving to the forefront of President Donald Trump's impeachment inquiry, starting with a hearing Wednesday to examine the "high crimes and misdemeanors" set out in the Constitution.

42. House Oversight panel sues Barr, Ross over census documents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Oversight Committee sued two top Trump administration officials Tuesday for refusing to produce documents related to a decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census.

43. Fed’s Powell sees steady growth, signals pause in rate cuts -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chairman Jerome Powell indicated Wednesday that the Fed is likely to keep its benchmark short-term interest rate unchanged in the coming months, unless the economy shows signs of worsening.

44. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for September 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

45. US diplomat: Trump linked Ukraine aid to demand for probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A top U.S. diplomat testified Tuesday that President Donald Trump was holding back military aid for Ukraine unless the country agreed to investigate Democrats and a company linked to Joe Biden's family, providing lawmakers with a detailed new account of the quid pro quo central to the impeachment probe.

46. Diplomat: Trump linked Ukraine aid to demand for probe -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former U.S. Ambassador William Taylor provided lawmakers Tuesday with a vivid, detailed and what some lawmakers called "disturbing" account of the way President Donald Trump wanted to put the new Ukraine president "in a public box" by demanding a quid pro quo at the center of the impeachment probe.

47. Veteran Democrat Maloney to take over Cummings panel for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A veteran House Democrat from New York City will for now take over the House committee that the late Rep. Elijah Cummings chaired.

Carolyn Maloney will serve as acting chair of the House Oversight and Reform Committee until Democrats choose a permanent chair at an undetermined future date.

48. Dems pan 'Zuck buck,' want Facebook to rein in currency plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facebook endured a second day of criticism from Congress over its plan to create a digital currency as senior House Democrats asked Facebook to scale back the project and threatened legislation that would block big tech companies from getting into banking.

49. States, cities sue US government over census question -

NEW YORK (AP) — Seventeen states, the District of Columbia and six cities sued the U.S. government Tuesday, saying the addition of a citizenship demand to the census questionnaire is unconstitutional.

50. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for November 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

51. House OKs GOP bill expanding gun owners' rights -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans rammed a bill through the House on Wednesday that would make it easier for gun owners to legally carry concealed weapons across state lines, the first significant action on guns in Congress since mass shootings in Nevada and Texas killed more than 80 people.

52. Yellen suggests a continuation of gradual rate hikes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Wednesday that the Fed expects to continue raising interest rates gradually. And she sought to assure lawmakers that the Fed would take care not to choke off any extra growth generated by tax cuts as long as inflation stayed tame.

53. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for September 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2017, for Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for September.

54. Yellen says Fed watching slowdown in inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen raised the possibility Wednesday that the Fed would consider slowing the pace of its interest rate increases if inflation remained persistently below its target level.

55. House GOP blocks Dem efforts to protect consumer watchdog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Wednesday blocked Democratic efforts to preserve the independence of a consumer watchdog created after the 2008 economic meltdown as the GOP pressed ahead with an overhaul of the nation's financial regulatory law.

56. House lawmakers heap blistering criticism on Wells Fargo CEO -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Angry lawmakers heaped another round of blistering criticism on Wells Fargo's CEO, pressing Thursday for details about what senior managers knew about allegedly illegal sales practices and when any concerns were disclosed.

57. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for April 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

58. With new monument, Obama and Dems seize on Equal Pay Day -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama and other Democrats on Tuesday seized on Equal Pay Day — a symbolic event dramatizing how much longer it takes a woman to earn as much as a man — to court women voters and call out Republicans for inaction on the issue.

59. Drug exec takes the Fifth on Capitol Hill, angers lawmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Infuriating members of Congress, a smirking Martin Shkreli took the Fifth at a Capitol Hill hearing Thursday when asked about his jacking up of drug prices, then promptly went on Twitter and insulted his questioners as "imbeciles."

60. Yellen to investors: Expect continuity at the Fed -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen sought Tuesday to reassure investors that she will embrace the approach to interest-rate policy that her predecessor, Ben Bernanke, pursued before he stepped down as chairman last month.

61. IRS official: Lavish conference followed IRS rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An Internal Revenue Service official at the center of the agency's latest scandal told lawmakers Thursday that an expensive conference held in 2010 conformed to existing rules, though he acknowledged it was not the best use of taxpayer money.

62. IRS official: Lavish conference followed IRS rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — An Internal Revenue Service official at the center of the agency's latest scandal told lawmakers Thursday that an expensive conference held in 2010 conformed to existing rules, though he acknowledged it was not the best use of taxpayer money.

63. Congress looks at doing away with the $1 bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers have shown about as much appetite for the $1 coin as kids do their spinach. They may not know what's best for them either. Congressional auditors say doing away with dollar bills entirely and replacing them with dollar coins could save taxpayers some $4.4 billion over the next 30 years.

64. Bill to cut Senate confirmations gets final action -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House gave final congressional approval Tuesday to a bill that would save the slow-paced Senate some time by eliminating the need for confirming nominees to some 170 executive branch jobs and 3,000 military officer positions.