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Editorial Results (free)

1. Yellen trip to Capitol detours into tense abortion debate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen's appearance before a Senate committee took an unexpected and tense detour into the abortion debate Tuesday when senators questioned her about the potential impact of an abortion ban on the American economy.

2. No turning back as automakers go electric -

Here’s a good analogy about the nation’s ever-changing automotive conversion from cars with internal combustion engines to a fleet of battery-powered electric vehicles.

“A lot of people sound worried, but I like to compare it to leaving the horse and going to the internal combustion engine. So, now the motor is the horse, and we’re leaving it behind,” says Ferman Clark of Brentwood, a now-retired GM employee who worked at the Saturn plant in Spring Hill from 1990 through the mid-2000s.

3. Johansen's OT goal gives Predators 1-0 win against Sharks -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Ryan Johansen scored from a sharp angle at 3:18 of overtime to give the Nashville Predators a 1-0 victory over the slumping San Jose Sharks on Tuesday night.

Juuse Saros made 25 saves for the Predators, who snapped a two-game skid as they try to maintain their hold on a wild card in the tight Western Conference playoff race.

4. US electric-vehicle tax credits ending for new Toyota buyers -

DETROIT (AP) — Toyota customers soon won't be able to get U.S. federal tax credits for buying electric or hybrid vehicles.

The automaker expects that sometime before the end of June it will reach a 200,000-vehicle cap on the credits, Bob Carter, Toyota's head of North American sales, said Wednesday. After that, the credits will be phased out over the next year, reaching zero, as Tesla and General Motors already have.

5. House votes to decriminalize marijuana, but Senate fate dim -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Marijuana would be decriminalized at the federal level under legislation the House approved Friday as Democrats made the case for allowing states to set their own policies on pot.

6. Eastbound and down to teen truck drivers -

The American Trucking Association sounded an alarm in October concerning the nation’s “historic high” truck driver shortage, estimating that an additional 80,000 drivers were needed to meet freight demands.

7. Congress backs Biden on Russia sanctions, clamors for more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With rare but fragile alignment, the U.S. Congress is largely backing President Joe Biden's decision to confront Russia with potentially escalating sanctions for the crisis in Ukraine as lawmakers brace for perhaps the most daunting foreign policy crisis the nation has faced in a generation.

8. Treasury brews up ideas for a more competitive beer market -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government wants to give beer lovers more choices than the usual suspects when they reach for a drink — and help them pay less for whatever they choose.

As part of a larger Biden administration effort to boost competition in all sorts of industries, the government is looking at ways to loosen the grip of a few big beer companies that control 65% of the market.

9. Saved pollution credits may hinder California climate goals -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Oil refineries, utilities and other companies that must pay to emit greenhouse gases in California have saved up so many credits allowing them to pollute that it may jeopardize the state's ability to reach its ambitious climate goals, according to a report by a panel that advises state officials.

10. Electric vehicle charging company to build factory in Lebanon -

NASHVILLE (AP) — An Australian electric vehicle charging company will establish its first U.S. manufacturing facility in Tennessee, an announcement that President Joe Biden on Tuesday hailed as being a result of the federal government's effort to build a national network of electric vehicle chargers.

11. Gov. Lee's State of the State speech -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee's State of the State speech, as prepared for delivery Monday night.

Thank you very much. Lieutenant Governor McNally, Speaker Sexton, Speaker Pro Tem Haile, Speaker Pro Tem Marsh, Members of the 112th General Assembly, Justices, Constitutional Officers.

12. Worker says she risked discipline if she left job amid storm -

MAYFIELD, Ky. (AP) — An employee of the Kentucky candle factory where eight workers were killed by a tornado said Tuesday that a supervisor threatened her with written disciplinary action if she went home early because storms were approaching.

13. Bob Dole to lie in state at Capitol as nation honors senator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bob Dole's casket will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol on Thursday as congressional leaders honor the former Republican presidential candidate and World War II veteran who served in Congress for 36 years.

14. Bob Dole, a man of war, power, zingers and denied ambition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole willed himself to walk again after paralyzing war wounds, ran for Congress with a right arm too damaged to shake hands, and rose through the Senate ranks to become a long-serving Republican leader and tough and tireless champion of his party.

15. 'Stupid' and 'insane': Some billionaires vent over tax plan -

Elon Musk isn't happy. With a personal fortune that is flirting with $300 billion, the Tesla CEO — the richest person on earth — has been attacking a Democratic proposal to tax the assets of billionaires like him.

16. Saros makes 28 saves as Predators down Sharks 3-1 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Juuse Saros made 28 saves to lead the Nashville Predators to a 3-1 win over the San Jose Sharks on Tuesday night.

Matt Duchene, Filip Forsberg and Mikael Granlund scored for Nashville, winners of two straight.

17. Commerce head out to save US jobs, 1 computer chip at a time -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo only wears watches made by Bulova — a company that laid off her scientist father, closed its Rhode Island factory and moved production to China in 1983.

18. Fortify your finances against natural disaster -

Emergency preparedness experts recommend that you have a “go bag” and a “stay bin” for disasters: Kits with supplies to help you survive a few days if you have to evacuate your home or shelter in place.

19. Nursing home overhaul bill would boost staffing, oversight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Responding to the ravages of COVID-19 in nursing homes, senior Democratic senators Tuesday introduced legislation to increase nurse staffing, improve infection control and bolster inspections.

20. Brat house: Sellers see nothing but perfection -

Houses are often like spoiled children, the product of loving parents who feel their offspring can do no wrong. Houses are often viewed with the same affection by their owners. They are absolutely wonderful. Flawless. If you do not believe the owner, read the property condition disclosure.

21. SEC takeover: Expansion would just mean more power, wealth -

Barring a dramatic change of direction, Texas and Oklahoma are moving toward taking the Red River Rivalry to the Southeastern Conference in a seismic shift that will have repercussions in college sports from coast to coast.

22. We have a winner! -

The first Tennessee State Fair was held at the Walnut Race Course in North Nashville in 1855. It was the same year poet Walt Whitman first published “Leaves of Grass,” Isaac Singer patented the sewing machine motor and Congress approved $30,000 to test camels for military use (clearly, that didn’t work out well).

23. Tennessee continues to reel in new companies -

A couple of months into a season of reopening, Tennessee is faring well in terms of existing companies coming back online and the influx of new operators, says Bob Rolfe, commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

24. One chord and the truth: Learning guitar late is hard -

Despite being profoundly unmusical, with compromised dexterity, I’ve decided to buy a guitar and try to learn to play.

Given those shortcomings, one might well ask: Why?

For starters, it would improve my Music City cred. And it would help me answer the question I’ve been getting for the past five years or so: So, now that you’re retired, how do you spend your time?

25. Boom in Native American oil complicates Biden climate push -

NEW TOWN, N.D. (AP) — On oil well pads carved from the wheat fields around Lake Sakakawea, hundreds of pump jacks slowly bob to extract 100 million barrels of crude annually from a reservation shared by three Native American tribes.

26. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

27. Analysis: Breaking down the College World Series teams -

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A look at the eight teams competing in the College World Series, which starts Saturday at TD Ameritrade Park. (Capsules in order of CWS opening games. Coaches' records through super regionals):

28. Yes. Tokyo Olympics are 'a go' despite opposition, pandemic -

TOKYO (AP) — Will the postponed Tokyo Olympics open despite rising opposition and the pandemic?

The answer is almost certainly "yes."

Senior International Olympic Committee member Richard Pound was emphatic in an interview with a British newspaper.

29. Republicans rebel against mask requirement in House chamber -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are rebelling against the requirement that they wear a mask on the House floor, stoking tensions with majority Democrats who are refusing to change the rules despite updated guidance from federal health officials.

30. Passing on your password? Streaming services are past it -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many of us were taught to share as kids. Now streaming services ranging from Netflix to Amazon to Disney+ want us to stop.

That's the new edict from the giants of streaming media, who are hoping to discourage the common practice of sharing account passwords without alienating subscribers who've grown accustomed to the hack.

31. A jab on the job: Companies, unions offer COVID-19 vaccines -

Marie Watson wanted to be among the first in line when she and other essential workers became eligible for the coronavirus vaccine — and with good reason.

32. Passenger vehicle travel rebounding to pre-pandemic levels -

Americans may be rounding a corner — literally — in their response to the coronavirus pandemic.

The number of daily passenger vehicle trips has hit a major milestone, reaching pre-pandemic levels for the first time in a year, according to data provided to The Associated Press by the transportation analytics firm Inrix, with Americans driving more often and farther than at any time since pandemic lockdowns were invoked.

33. Ban on renter evictions during COVID-19 pandemic is extended -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration is extending a federal moratorium on evictions of tenants who have fallen behind on rent during the coronavirus pandemic.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Monday moved to continue the pandemic-related protection, which had been scheduled to expire on Wednesday. The moratorium is now extended through the end of June.

34. AP-NORC poll: 1 in 5 in US lost someone close in pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — About 1 in 5 Americans say they lost a relative or close friend to the coronavirus, highlighting the division between heartache and hope as the country itches to get back to normal a year into the pandemic.

35. Common tools can save you time, money on taxes -

Receipts, like memories, tend to fade with time. That’s just one reason to digitize and track tax-related information. The right apps and habits can save space, time, money and hassle – but only if you use them.

36. House approves pro-union bill despite dim Senate odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House approved legislation that would invigorate workers' unions, following decades of court defeats and legislative setbacks that have kneecapped the labor movement's once formidable ability to organize.

37. House moves on pro-union bill despite dim Senate odds -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democratic-led House was poised Tuesday to pass legislation that would invigorate workers' unions, following decades of court defeats and legislative setbacks that have kneecapped the labor movement's once-formidable ability to organize.

38. Biden faces steep challenges to reach renewable energy goals -

PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — President Joe Biden wants to change the way the U.S. uses energy by expanding renewables, but he will need to navigate a host of challenges — including the coronavirus pandemic and restoring hundreds of thousands of lost jobs — to get it done.

39. Biden surveys Texas weather damage, thanks emergency workers -

HOUSTON (AP) — President Joe Biden heard firsthand from Texans clobbered by this month's brutal winter weather on Friday as he made his first trip to a major disaster area since he took office.

40. Democrats consider piecemeal approach to immigration reform -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After decades of failed attempts to pass comprehensive immigration legislation, congressional Democrats and President Joe Biden are signaling openness to a piece-by-piece approach.

41. Selling out or seeing the future? -

When much-honored songwriter, publisher, producer, Music Row Renaissance Man Craig Wiseman is asked about the ongoing flurry of big-name artists like Bob Dylan and Neil Young selling their song catalogs, there is wonder mixed with mirth in his voice.

42. Hank Aaron, baseball's one-time home run king, dies at 86 -

ATLANTA (AP) — Hank Aaron, who endured racist threats with stoic dignity during his pursuit of Babe Ruth's home run record and gracefully left his mark as one of baseball's greatest all-around players, died Friday. He was 86.

43. Fury at the shaken Capitol over the attack, security, virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — This time the fury enveloping the U.S. Capitol comes not from an insurgent mob but from within.

The anger on display is searing — Democrat against Republican; Republican against Republican; legislators of both parties against the catastrophic security failure that left top leaders of the government vulnerable to last week's violence as well as to the coronavirus in their ranks.

44. GA election officials reject Trump call to 'find' more votes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump pressured Georgia's Republican secretary of state to "find" enough votes to overturn Joe Biden's win in the state's presidential election, repeatedly citing disproven claims of fraud and raising the prospect of a "criminal offense" if officials did not change the vote count, according to a recording of the conversation.

45. Life, money lessons derived from the COVID-19 pandemic -

I’m a “be-prepared” kind of person. I like having money in the bank and a good stock of emergency supplies.

But I wasn’t prepared to see empty shelves at the supermarket, thousands of cars lined up at a Texas food bank or nurses dressed in garbage bags because there wasn’t enough protective equipment.

46. Alexander: Trump admin should aid in Biden transition -

NASHVILLE (AP) — U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander said Friday that President Donald Trump's administration should aid President-elect Joe Biden in his transition, saying the Democrat has a "very good chance" of becoming the next president.

47. Trump targets vote certification in late bid to block Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting nowhere in the courts, President Donald Trump's scattershot effort to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's victory is shifting toward obscure election boards that certify the vote as Trump and his allies seek to upend the electoral process, sow chaos and perpetuate unsubstantiated doubts about the count.

48. Trump targets vote certification in late bid to block Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Getting nowhere in the courts, President Donald Trump's scattershot effort to overturn President-elect Joe Biden's victory is shifting toward obscure election boards that certify the vote as Trump and his allies seek to upend the electoral process, sow chaos and perpetuate unsubstantiated doubts about the count.

49. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's shaky claims on virus, Dem misfires -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Impatient to return to the campaign trail, President Donald Trump dubiously claimed he's fully recovered and immune from COVID-19, hailed a cure that isn't so and declared the coronavirus is "disappearing" even as cases spiked.

50. Trump, Biden appeal to Catholics at virtual charity dinner -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden appealed to the nation's Roman Catholic voters on Thursday during a charity dinner that traditionally has been used to promote collegiality and good humor.

51. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's dubious claims on health care, court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't providing all the facts when he promises that people with preexisting medical problems will always be covered by health insurance if "Obamacare" is ruled unconstitutional.

52. AP-NORC poll: Dim view of economy stable as election nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Most Americans view the nation's economic situation as bleak, but a rising percentage also see signs of stability six weeks before Election Day — if not reasons for optimism.

53. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's made-up car plants, court revisionism -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his GOP allies are playing loose with the facts when it comes to a successor for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

Seeking to justify a possible confirmation vote before the Nov. 3 election, Trump asserted over the weekend that many high court nominations were made in an election year and "in all cases, they went forward." That's clearly not true.

54. Ex-Pence adviser says Trump bungled virus; she's for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former adviser to Vice President Mike Pence who served on the White House coronavirus task force says President Donald Trump once suggested that COVID-19 might be a good thing because it would stop him from having to shake hands with "disgusting people."

55. Biden to join Senate Democrats online for lunch, questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden is set to join Senate Democrats for an online lunch, returning virtually to the place that fostered his political career as he fields questions from allies on the race for the White House and the down-ballot effort to wrest the Senate's majority control from Republicans.

56. Takeaways: Trump's town hall offered preview of debates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The coronavirus cannot be wished away. Real people kept it real. Preparation — and the moderator — matters.

President Donald Trump's town hall in front of undecided Pennsylvania voters offered an intriguing preview of how he may approach his first debate against Democratic nominee Joe Biden in two weeks.

57. Trump denies downplaying virus, casts doubt on mask usage -

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Fielding compelling questions about voters' real-world problems, President Donald Trump denied during a televised town hall that he had played down the threat of the coronavirus earlier this year, although there is an audio recording of him stating he did just that.

58. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's torrent of falsehoods, Biden missteps -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Playing defense on his handling of the coronavirus, President Donald Trump is letting the falsehoods fly.

Over the weekend, he railed against cases of voting fraud that didn't exist, asserted that COVID-19 was "rounding a corner" despite what his top health advisers say and blasted Joe Biden for supposed positions on energy and health care that his Democratic rival doesn't hold.

59. 'Deadly stuff': Trump's own words bring focus back to virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Try as he might to change the subject, President Donald Trump can't escape the coronavirus.

In April, the president tried to shift the public's focus to the economy. In July, to defending the country's "heritage." In September, to enforcing "law and order." But all along the way, the death toll from the coronavirus continued to mount.

60. 'Deadly stuff': Trump's own words bring focus back to virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Try as he might to change the subject, President Donald Trump can't escape the coronavirus.

In April, the president tried to shift the public's focus to the economy. In July, to defending the country's "heritage." In September, to enforcing "law and order." But all along the way, the death toll from the coronavirus continued to mount.

61. In the open: White House advisers tussle over virus response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Infighting over the White House's handling of the coronavirus pandemic is spilling further into public view, with trade adviser Peter Navarro panning Dr. Anthony Fauci as President Donald Trump stands watch.

62. In the open: White House advisers tussle over virus response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Infighting over the White House's handling of the coronavirus pandemic is spilling further into public view, with trade adviser Peter Navarro panning Dr. Anthony Fauci as President Donald Trump stands watch.

63. Wall Street rallies as optimism returns to cap erratic week -

NEW YORK (AP) — Optimism returned to Wall Street on Friday, and stocks rallied to cap a shaky week dogged by worries that rising coronavirus counts may halt the economy's recent upswing.

The S&P 500 climbed 1%, and the biggest gains came from cruise ship operators, airlines, banks and other companies that most need the economy to continue to reopen and strengthen.

64. Country rocker, fiddler Charlie Daniels dies at age 83 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Charlie Daniels, who went from being an in-demand session musician to a staple of Southern rock with his hit "Devil Went Down to Georgia," has died at 83.

A statement from his publicist said the Country Music Hall of Famer died Monday at a hospital in Hermitage after doctors said he had a stroke.

65. AP-NORC poll: Nearly all in US back criminal justice reform -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans overwhelmingly want clear standards on when police officers may use force and consequences for officers who do so excessively, according to a new poll that finds nearly all Americans favor at least some level of change to the nation's criminal justice system.

66. Stormy weather puts damper on SpaceX's 1st astronaut launch -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Stormy weather is threatening to delay SpaceX's first astronaut launch.

A SpaceX rocket is scheduled to blast off Wednesday afternoon from Kennedy Space Center, carrying a Dragon capsule with NASA astronauts Doug Hurley and Bob Behnken to the International Space Station. It will be the first time astronauts launch from Florida in nine years and a first for a private company.

67. NASA, SpaceX bringing astronaut launches back to home turf -

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — For the first time in nearly a decade, U.S. astronauts are about to blast into orbit aboard an American rocket from American soil. And for the first time in the history of human spaceflight, a private company is running the show.

68. Unanimous Supreme Court throws out 'Bridgegate' convictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A unanimous Supreme Court on Thursday threw out the convictions of two political insiders involved in the "Bridgegate"  scandal that ultimately derailed the 2016 presidential bid of then-New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. The justices found evidence of deception, corruption and abuse of power in the scheme, but said "not every corrupt act by state or local officials is a federal crime."

69. House divided: Village, Parks decide to ‘demerge’ -

In a world turned upside down, it’s good to know local real estate is going with the flow.

Two firms – Village and Parks – had announced their merger in January, making them the largest firm in the Nashville area. For those trying to keep score at home, Village had sold to the newly formed Central Real Estate in early 2019.

70. HCA joins ventilator distribution effort -

Nashville-based HCA Healthcare will provide as many as 1,000 ventilators as part of the American Hospital Association’s collaboration with the federal government and health systems to distribute the equipment to hospitals experiencing a surge of patients with COVID-19.

71. Publicly traded firms get $365M in small-business loans -

Companies with thousands of employees, past penalties from government investigations and risks of financial failure even before the coronavirus walloped the economy were among those receiving millions of dollars from a relief fund that Congress created to help small businesses through the crisis, an Associated Press investigation found.

72. 7 essential tracks from John Prine, folk music's Mark Twain -

NEW YORK (AP) — Some people, the songs just come out of them. For nearly half a century, they tumbled out of John Prine like nothing.

His songs -- compassionate, funny, sage -- make up an American songbook that would be staggeringly intimidating if it wasn't so warm and welcoming. He began -- with a dare at an infamous open mic -- a fully formed songwriter who through calamity and cancer never once wavered in his wry, homespun humanism. He was, anyone would say, as good as they come.

73. Celebrated singer-songwriter John Prine has died at 73 -

John Prine, the ingenious singer-songwriter who explored the heartbreaks, indignities and absurdities of everyday life in "Angel from Montgomery," "Sam Stone," "Hello in There" and scores of other indelible tunes, died Tuesday at the age of 73.

74. Navigating tough transition from military to civilian job market -

One question I hear often from readers concerns military transitions. Many members of the military devote the first 20 years of their career to the U.S. Military. Around age 40, they’ll retire and start entirely new careers in the civilian world.

75. Turn out the lights, the party’s over -

He’s seen fire and he’s seen rain, but his violinist and accompanying vocalist, Andrea Zonn, says James Taylor never thought that he’d see a time when a virus from China would wipe out his spring and, likely, summer schedules.

76. Lawmakers resist Trump's proposed payroll tax break -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's proposed payroll tax break met with bipartisan resistance on Capitol Hill as pressure mounts on the administration and Congress to work more vigorously to contain the coronavirus outbreak and respond to the financial fallout.

77. Trump pitches payroll tax relief to wary lawmakers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump pitched his proposed payroll tax break Tuesday on Capitol Hill as pressure mounts on the administration and Congress to work more vigorously to contain the coronavirus outbreak and respond to the financial fallout.

78. Trump picks pardon requests from wealthy pals and GOP donors -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There's a common thread among the 11 felons who found favor with President Donald Trump this week — all who were pardoned or set free had advocates among the president's wealthy friends and political allies.

79. Tennessee's school voucher program faces lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Advocates for expanding school choices in Tennessee faced their first major road block Thursday after the state's largest communities filed a lawsuit seeking to block a new voucher program from going into effect later this year.

80. Impeachment takeaways: Trump's iron grip, McConnell delivers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-controlled Senate acquitted President Donald Trump on two impeachment charges Wednesday amid Republican complaints about what they called a rushed process and Democratic claims that Trump is a threat to democracy. The historic, three-week trial proceeded largely along partisan lines, with just one senator — Republican Mitt Romney of Utah — breaking with his party.

81. Legislators shouldn’t meddle with HOA restrictions -

No cause has had a better advocate than Pamela Davis Needham, who is working against proposed state legislation that she says would limit homeowners associations on many issues, including restrictions of short-term rentals.

82. Your home is a garden of bacteria; you’ll be fine -

Two weeks ago, I mentioned that Bob Harwood, a homebuilder with some 600 homes under his toolbelt, had recommended that anyone working in the residential real estate world should read the book “Never Home Alone.” In spite of his vast knowledge of construction, Harwood possesses an unquenchable thirst for knowledge.

83. Busy Vol Davis relishes delivering Super Bowl to world -

Charles Davis was in the middle of the broadcast when his cellphone began buzzing.

The PGA Tour was having a tournament in Dubai, and professional golfers were texting Davis to say they were watching him call the Super Bowl.

84. Pendulum swings on how to maintain a healthy house -

Tony Locke, the go-to structural engineer for Realtors in need of structural advice in Nashville, has a dual life with a second calling as a philosopher. Once, he was called to assess a project and noted that the concrete contractor was installing the rebar incorrectly in a sidewalk.

85. Life’s a blast for CMAC post attack -

CMAC & The Heart Attack, a show band raising a ruckus in joints from Leiper’s Fork to Douglas Corner and beyond and between, has its roots – lifeblood really – in a near-fatal occurrence for a luminary in Nashville sports broadcasting history.

86. High-stakes decision looms for Trump in showdown with Iran -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump faces one of the greatest tests of his presidency after Iran launched ballistic missiles at Iraqi bases housing U.S. troops. It was Iran's most brazen direct assault on America since the 1979 seizing of the U.S. Embassy in Tehran.

87. Pippen, Nesmith lift Vanderbilt over Davidson 76-71 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Vanderbilt used a balanced offensive attack to get a win over Davidson on Monday night.

Scottie Pippen Jr. scored 18 points, while Aaron Nesmith added 17 as Vanderbilt (8-4) beat Davidson 76-71.

88. Bernstein: Growth not always great for those outside downtown -

Bob Bernstein has been in business in Nashville for nearly three decades, opening up his first Bongo Java location on Belmont Boulevard 27 years ago. He recognizes he has been a part of the change and growth of Nashville but is unsure what the city’s plan is for itself, and what that means for him as a business owner.

89. Trump's Rust Belt revival is fading. Will it matter in 2020? -

TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — President Donald Trump once promised that coal and steel would be the beating heart of a revived U.S. economy — a nostalgic vision that helped carry him to victory three years ago in the industrial Midwest.

90. Bredesen introduces renewable energy firm -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A new business venture by former Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen takes on global warming by helping companies fund solar panels in communities with dirty-power electric grids.

The Democrat plans to introduce Clearloop on Tuesday at a conference headlined by former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. It's Bredesen's first big public foray since losing a U.S. Senate bid last year. Former campaign staffers Bob Corney and Laura Zapata are teaming up with him in the company.

91. Trump threatens to 'destroy' Turkey's economy with sanctions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Targeting Turkey's economy, President Donald Trump announced sanctions aimed at restraining the Turks' assault against Kurdish fighters and civilians in Syria — an assault Turkey began after Trump announced he was moving U.S. troops out of the way.

92. US troops scramble for the exits in Syria -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. troops scrambled for Syria's exits Monday while the Trump administration threatened economic penalties on Turkey for an invasion that opened the door to a resurgence of the Islamic State group -- the fighters who were the reason U.S. forces came in the first place.

93. ‘Because I love it:’ Volunteers rescue Walden’s Puddle -

From ailing eagles to orphaned opossums, from forsaken fawns to wounded woodchucks, some 120 species of Middle Tennessee wild birds and animals are provided treatment, rehabilitation and a second chance for survival – salvation, in other words – at Walden’s Puddle Wildlife Center of Greater Nashville.

94. Essra Mohawk lived sex, drugs and rock 'n roll life -

Uncle Meat leans back on the piano bench – arm-swept clear of the CDs and assorted implements of a musician’s life that fill it and the rest of the living room of the home in Bellevue – and sings a joyous, or at least joy-filled and powerful song titled “Rollin’ With The Punches.”

95. David Briley Q and A: Seriously consider 'pace of growth' -

Q: What do you see as the role of the mayor? What can the mayor do? What can the mayor not do?

A: “It’s evolved over time. If you go back to the 1960s and ‘70s there was a different political and media environment.

96. Revamped OxyContin was supposed to reduce abuse, but has it? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Dr. Raeford Brown was uniquely positioned to help the U.S. government answer a critical question: Is a new version of the painkiller OxyContin helping fight the national opioid epidemic?

97. Trump official consulted global warming rejecters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A Trump administration national security official has sought help from advisers to a think tank that disavows climate change to challenge widely accepted scientific findings on global warming, according to his emails.

98. The legends who made 'endangered' Music Row are gone -

More than a decade and a half ago I took a beloved poet, picker, prophet and pilgrim down to “Music City Row,” as he likes to refer to that stretch of Nashville. He hadn’t been there really for 30 years, and he lamented what he saw. Or didn’t see.

99. All our ex’s helped make Texas what it is today -

Texans stand second to none in their (often vocal) appreciation for their home state, but if it weren’t for Tennesseans, they’d be bragging in Spanish.

OK, I might be guilty of a little Texas-style exaggeration there. But still …

100. Escalating trade war causing anxiety in America's heartland -

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — When President Donald Trump began talking about tariffs in 2017, Upper Midwest soybean farmer Jamie Beyer suspected that her crop could become a weapon. Two years later, she and her family are watching the commodity markets on an hourly basis as an escalating trade war between the U.S. and China creates turmoil in rural America.