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Editorial Results (free)

1. Border wall, impeachment battle imperil budget progress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate passed a long-overdue, $209 billion bundle of bipartisan spending bills Thursday, but a bitter fight over funding demanded by President Donald Trump for border fencing imperils broader Capitol Hill efforts to advance $1.4 trillion worth of annual Cabinet agency budgets.

2. Border wall, impeachment battle imperil budget progress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bitter fight over funding for border fencing is imperiling Capitol Hill efforts to forge progress on more than $1.4 trillion worth of overdue spending bills, one of the few areas in which divided government in Washington has been able to deliver results in the Trump era.

3. Trial Lawyers name Welborn to state committee -

Butler Snow attorney Joseph F. Welborn III has been named to the American College of Trial Lawyers’ Tennessee State Committee.

Welborn has more than 28 years of trial experience in business and commercial litigation including shareholder, corporate merger and acquisition, banking, contractual, real estate, intellectual property and business tort disputes. He also is experienced in representing individuals and businesses in civil rights litigation, as well as catastrophic personal injury and wrongful death cases.

4. 50 years later, musicians still find magic in Beatles ‘Abbey Road’ -

“Sonic fairy dust” is a phrase stuck in my head the last few days as I returned to “Abbey Road.”

It’s an apt assessment that I adopted from one of the folks I interviewed, music masters of various degrees, who generally genuflected while agreeing the album – which has just been released in a remastered/remixed version for its golden anniversary – was “sprinkled with sonic fairy dust.”

5. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims on extremists, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump fabricated a tale about foreshadowing Osama bin Laden's 9/11 attack and warning against a war in Iraq before it happened in a weekend of exaggerated boasts and faulty assertions about the U.S. fight against extremists.

6. Democrats protest $200M in additional border wall transfers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump has quietly transferred more than $200 million from Pentagon counterdrug efforts toward building his long-promised wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

That's according to Democrats protesting the move, which would shift $129 million to wall construction from anti-drug efforts in Afghanistan — the source of perhaps 90 percent of the world's heroin — along with $90 million freed up by passage of a stopgap funding bill.

7. Appeals court rules House should get Trump financial records -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal appeals court ruled Friday that President Donald Trump's financial records must be turned over to the House of Representatives.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit said that lawmakers should get the documents they have subpoenaed from Mazars USA. The firm has provided accounting services to Trump.

8. Democratic demands test Trump’s impeachment strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is rapidly confronting a decision at the core of House Democrats’ nascent impeachment inquiry: Should he comply with congressional demands and risk disclosure of embarrassing information? Or should he delay and possibly deepen his legal and political predicament?

9. Democratic demands test Trump’s impeachment strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is rapidly confronting a decision at the core of House Democrats’ nascent impeachment inquiry: Should he comply with congressional demands and risk disclosure of embarrassing information? Or should he delay and possibly deepen his legal and political predicament?

10. Trump's Senate Republican allies give OK to $5B wall request -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's Senate GOP allies are pushing to give him his full $5 billion request to build about 200 miles (322 kilometers) of fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border, but the plan ran into immediate opposition from Democrats and is a non-starter with powerful House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

11. Some Democrats concerned as Judiciary sets impeachment rules -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House Judiciary Committee is preparing for its first impeachment-related vote, set to define procedures for upcoming hearings on President Donald Trump even as some moderates in the caucus are urging the panel to slow down.

12. Democrats will try to block Trump's border wall maneuver -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Democrats are moving on two fronts to block President Donald Trump from using special emergency powers to transfer money from military base construction projects like new schools to pay for new fences along the U.S.-Mexico border.

13. John Cooper Q and A: Take care to remain 'livable city' -

Q: What do you see as the role of the mayor? What can the mayor do? What can the mayor not do?

A: “The mayor is given clearly in Nashville a dominant role in setting the tone for the city. That does not necessarily jump out at you from the (Metro) Charter ...

14. G-20 leaders clash over values, face calls to protect growth -

OSAKA, Japan (AP) — World leaders attending a Group of 20 summit in Japan that began Friday are clashing over values that have served for decades as the foundation of their cooperation as they face calls to fend off threats to economic growth.

15. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's misleading rhetoric on immigrants -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is spreading misleading rhetoric about illegal immigration.

At a Wisconsin rally , he suggested he's launched his plan to transport immigrants in the U.S. illegally to sanctuary cities in mass numbers — "my sick idea," as he proudly called it. There's no evidence that's happening.

16. Lee hails voucher-like bill's legislative advance -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee on Thursday declared it was a "historic day" after the Republican's voucher-like bill advanced out of the Senate despite being drastically scaled back and directly at odds with the House version of his legislation.

17. Republican Powers wins Tennessee Senate special election -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republican Bill Powers has won a Tennessee Senate special election.

The Clarksville city councilman and auto dealer defeated Democrat Juanita Charles by about 9 percentage points Tuesday. Charles is a U.S. Army veteran and a Clarksville real estate agent.

18. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, AG spread untruths on Mueller report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is still distorting the truth about the Russia investigation , claiming exoneration from a special counsel's report that he is also assailing as hopelessly biased.

19. AP FACT CHECK: Skewed Trump, Barr claims on Mueller report -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his attorney general are distorting the facts when it comes to special counsel Robert Mueller's report in the Russia investigation.

Trump and his team continue to insist that he was exonerated by the two-year investigation. That's not true. The report specifically declines to clear the president on possible charges of obstruction of justice.

20. Russian parliament adopts internet controls bill -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russia's lower chamber of parliament has adopted a bill that would expand government control over the internet, raising fears of widespread censorship.

The State Duma on Tuesday overwhelmingly voted to support the bill, which still has to be approved by the upper chamber of Russian Parliament and signed into the law by the president.

21. 'A monopoly on information': Russia closes grip on internet -

MOSCOW (AP) — Russian lawmakers approved Thursday a bill that would expand government control over the internet and whose opponents fear heralds a new era of widespread censorship.

The bill would install equipment to route Russian internet traffic through servers in the country. That would increase the power of state agencies to control information and block messaging applications, while users would find it harder to circumvent government restrictions.

22. But seriously: Legislature tackles small issues -

Just in case anyone thought the Tennessee General Assembly was all serious, all the time, it’s not.

Sandwiched this year among bills on school choice, voting rights, criminal justice reform and taxation are bills on cowboys, dogs, recording artists and breakfast. Granted, some of these bills aren’t going anywhere, but they’re available online via the General Assembly website, capitol.tn.gov, for those who would like a little break from heavier topics.

23. Lawmakers move to stop cities from banning plastic bags -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee could become the latest state to ban local municipalities from regulating certain plastic bags and utensils.

House lawmakers on Monday advanced a proposal making it illegal for local governments to impose bag bans, restrictions on Styrofoam containers and other disposable products. The bill must now pass the Senate before it can head to the governor's desk for final approval.

24. Mueller finds no Trump collusion, leaves obstruction open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Special counsel Robert Mueller found no evidence President Donald Trump's campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election but reached no conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. That brought a hearty claim of vindication from Trump but set the stage for new rounds of political and legal fighting.

25. Senate rejects Trump border emergency as Republicans defect -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-run Senate firmly rejected President Donald Trump's declaration of a national emergency at the southwest border on Thursday, setting up a veto fight and dealing him a conspicuous rebuke as he tested how boldly he could ignore Congress in pursuit of his highest-profile goal.

26. Mnuchin says he'll protect Trump privacy if taxes requested -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin suggested Thursday he will protect President Donald Trump's privacy if he receives a request from House Democrats for Trump's tax returns.

At a House Ways and Means Committee hearing, Mnuchin was asked whether he would meet a request for Trump's past tax returns. Chairman Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., is expected to formally ask for those as Democrats seek to shed light on Trump's financial dealings and potential conflicts of interest.

27. GOP senators appear ready to block Trump border declaration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-led Senate is set to deal President Donald Trump a rebuke on his declaration of a national emergency at the Mexican border, with the only remaining question how many GOP senators will join Democrats in defying him.

28. Senate rejection of Trump border emergency no longer certain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is trying to make it harder for Republicans to avoid an embarrassing Senate rebuff of President Donald Trump's effort to steer billions of extra federal dollars to building barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border by declaring a national emergency.

29. Bill limiting oversight panels heads to Tennessee House -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill limiting the powers of community oversight boards to investigate police misconduct claims is headed to the Tennessee House floor.

House Republicans advanced the bill on Wednesday with just Democratic lawmakers voting in opposition. No public testimony was given.

30. Democrats prepare resolution against Trump's declaration -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats will file a resolution Friday aimed at blocking the national emergency declaration that President Donald Trump has issued to help finance his wall along the Southwest border, teeing up a clash over billions of dollars, immigration policy and the Constitution's separation of powers.

31. Trump declares national emergency to get $8B for wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defiant in the face of a stinging budget defeat, President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday to get more federal dollars for his long-promised wall at the U.S.-Mexico border, relying on a broad interpretation of his powers that was certain to trigger stiff legal challenges.

32. Trump still coy on border deal, claims victory anyway -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers formally completed a bipartisan border security pact late Wednesday and President Donald Trump labored to frame it as a political win, even though it contains only a fraction of the billions for a "great, powerful wall" that he's been demanding for months.

33. Subpoena power at heart of community oversight board fight -

As Nashville gets its newly formed community oversight board up and running, some are accusing Republican state lawmakers of trying to gut the powers these police monitors need to be effective.

The mayors of both Nashville and Knoxville have expressed opposition to what state legislators are doing, and Republicans in the General Assembly and activists in Nashville appear to have dug in for a fight.

34. Border security bargainers trade offers as deadline nears -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers traded offers and worked toward a border security compromise Friday that would avert a fresh federal shutdown and resolve a clash with President Donald Trump that has dominated the opening weeks of divided government.

35. Unbowed by Trump, Democrats charge ahead with investigations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump warned Congress that investigations and legislation don't mix. But Speaker Nancy Pelosi said such threats have no place in the House, as unbowed Democrats charged ahead Wednesday with plans to probe Trump's tax returns, business and ties to Russia.

36. Briley: Legislature ignoring will of Nashville voters -

NASHVILLE (AP) — With Republican sponsored legislation pending to limit local investigations of police misconduct, Nashville Mayor David Briley said Tuesday it's his job to ensure the will of the voters is carried out by continuing to implement a community oversight board for police.

37. GOP leaders seek to limit local community oversight panels -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Republican lawmakers on Monday introduced legislation limiting the powers of community oversight boards just months after Democratic-leaning Nashville passed a referendum establishing such a group to investigate police misconduct claims.

38. Pelosi and Trump harden positions on border wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday hardened their positions about a border wall, casting doubt on the prospects of Capitol Hill negotiations intended to reach a compromise and avoid a second government shutdown.
"There's not going to be any wall money in the legislation," Pelosi, D-Calif., told reporters. Her remarks came after Democrats had signaled at least some flexibility in the talks on border security funding that began only Wednesday.
Pelosi's stance came as Trump used Twitter to reiterate his demands on the wall and appeared to sour on the congressional talks aimed at striking a deal with Democrats. Trump told reporters in the Oval Office that Pelosi is "just playing games" and repeated his threat to declare a national emergency and transfer billions of dollars in previously allocated funds to build the wall.
In a barrage of morning tweets, Trump sent mixed messages in which he alternately hardened his wall demand and also suggested that repairing existing fencing is a big part of his plan.
"Lets just call them WALLS from now on and stop playing political games! A WALL is a WALL!," Trump tweeted.
Democrats offered further details of their border security plan on Thursday, unveiling a measure that would not provide a penny for his wall, ignoring Trump's warnings that they'd be wasting their time if they don't come up with wall money.
The Democratic measure, totaling almost $22 billion for the customs service, border patrol and immigration agents, would significantly increase spending for scanners at ports of entry, humanitarian aid for apprehended migrants, and new aircraft to police the U.S.-Mexico border. It would freeze the number of border patrol agents and block any wall construction in wildlife refuges along the border.
Pelosi suggested she would be open to vehicle barriers called "Normandy fencing."
"If the president wants to call that a wall, he can call that a wall. ... Is there a place for enhanced fencing? Normandy fencing would work," Pelosi said.
Trump on Thursday tamped down expectations, telling GOP negotiators they were "wasting their time."
"Democrats, despite all of the evidence, proof and Caravans coming, are not going to give money to build the DESPERATELY needed WALL. I've got you covered. Wall is already being built, I don't expect much help!" Trump tweeted.
Trump's threat to unilaterally build the wall through an unprecedented use of emergency powers could upset congressional Republicans. Pelosi's hard-line move could push the president further in that direction.
The high-stakes talks are taking place against the backdrop of another possible shutdown in mid-February — an outcome Trump's GOP allies in the Senate are especially eager to avoid. It increases the chances that the only way to avert another shutdown would be to put a host of federal agencies on autopilot for weeks or months.
Trump and the White House have proven to be an unpredictable force in the shutdown debate, mixing softer rhetoric about a multi-faceted approach to border security with campaign-style bluster about the wall. Lawmakers negotiating the bill are well aware that he could quash an agreement at any time, plunging them back into crisis.
Pelosi's declaration promises to put a nail in Trump's request for $5.7 billion to build about 234 miles of barriers along the U.S. border with Mexico. Trump's GOP allies acknowledge he might have settled for just a fraction of it. The Democratic plan includes new money for customs agents, scanners, aircraft and boats to police the border, and to provide humanitarian assistance for migrants.
The Democratic offer was just a starting point in House-Senate talks on border security funding that kicked off in a basement room in the Capitol. Then, a top Democrat, House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita Lowey, D-N.Y., acknowledged that "everything is on the table," including the border barriers demanded by Trump. Lawmakers on both sides in the talks signaled flexibility in hopes of resolving the standoff with Trump that sparked the 35-day partial government shutdown.
"Democrats are once again supporting strong border security as an essential component of homeland security. Border security, however, is more than physical barriers; and homeland security is more than border security," said Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Calif.
Senators revisited a bipartisan $1.6 billion proposal for 65 miles of fencing in the Rio Grande Valley in Texas that passed a key committee last year. The panel of old-school lawmakers from the powerful appropriations committees has ample expertise on homeland security issues, as many of them helped finance fence built over the years that stretches across much of the 1,954-mile border.
"Because of the work we did years ago we've already built almost 700 miles of fencing on our nation's border," said Rep. David Price, D-N.C. "Whatever the president may say it is far from an open border. Meanwhile, the number of undocumented immigrants crossing our border or attempting to cross remain not at alarming highs but at historic lows."
Republican allies of the president said there will have to be some money to meet Trump's demands. But they also predict privately that the White House is eager to grab an agreement and declare victory — even if winning only a fraction of Trump's request.
"The components of border security are people, technology and a barrier. And everybody has voted for all three," said Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D. "To get to an agreement we've got to have all three in there."
But as talks on the homeland security budget open, Trump and Republicans are in a weakened position just 17 days before the government runs out of money again without a deal. Democrats won back the House in a midterm rout and prevailed over Trump in the shutdown battle.
"Smart border security is not overly reliant on physical barriers," said Lowey as the session began Wednesday. She said the Trump administration has failed to demonstrate that physical barriers are cost effective compared with better technology and more personnel.
The comments at once served notice that Democrats weren't ruling out financing physical structures, but would do so only on a limited basis.
The president surrendered last Friday and agreed to reopen government for three weeks so negotiators can seek a border security deal, but with no commitments for wall funds.

...

39. Analysis: Shutdown 2.0? Trump has reasons to avoid a repeat -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump learned over the past month a valuable Washington lesson that old-timers like House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell learned long ago: Shutdowns never work.

40. Trump casts doubt on seeing a budget deal that he'd accept -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said the odds congressional negotiators will craft a deal to end his border wall standoff with Congress are "less than 50-50."

As hundreds of thousands of furloughed federal workers prepared to return to work, Trump told The Wall Street Journal that he doesn't think the negotiators will strike a deal that he'd accept. He pledged to build a wall anyway using his executive powers to declare a national emergency if necessary.

41. House Democrats bringing new scrutiny to education secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wielding control of the House and a new set of investigative powers, Democrats are preparing to bring Education Secretary Betsy DeVos under the sharpest scrutiny she has seen since taking office.

42. Trump, Pelosi feud heats up again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — She imperiled his State of the Union address. He denied her a plane to visit troops abroad.

The shutdown battle between President Donald Trump and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is playing out as a surreal game of constitutional brinkmanship, with both flexing political powers from opposite ends of Pennsylvania Avenue as the negotiations to end the monthlong partial government shutdown remain stalled.

43. Trump indicates he won't declare emergency "so fast" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump tamped down expectations that he is close to declaring a national emergency to get the money he desires to build his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as a three-week impasse closing parts of the government continued on Friday.

44. Bill on federal workers' back pay in shutdown heads to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is edging closer to declaring a national emergency to pay for his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as pressure mounts to end the three-week impasse that has closed parts of the government and deprived hundreds of thousands of workers of their salaries.

45. Trump closer to declaring emergency; 800,000 won't get paid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is edging closer to declaring a national emergency to pay for his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as pressure mounts to end the three-week impasse that has closed parts of the government and deprived hundreds of thousands of workers of their salaries.

46. Democrats worry over AG nominee's view of presidential power -

WASHINGTON (AP) — William Barr once advised that a president didn't need Congress' permission to attack Iraq, that his administration could arrest a foreign dictator and that the FBI could capture suspects abroad without that country's consent.

47. Taxes may be a bigger part of online shopping this season -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Shoppers heading online to purchase holiday gifts will find they're being charged sales tax at some websites where they weren't before. The reason: the Supreme Court.

A June ruling gave states the go-ahead to require more companies to collect sales tax on online purchases. Now, more than two dozen have moved to take advantage of the ruling, many ahead of the busy holiday shopping season.

48. Amazon workers will find buyers’ market for condos, apartments -

Just as the gloom was starting to set in from the real estate slowdown came the announcement that Amazon was opening an office here that would employ 5,000 people making an average salary of $150,000.

49. Banks could face tighter scrutiny under Rep. Maxine Waters -

NEW YORK (AP) — Come January, the banking industry is going to be on Rep. Maxine Waters' time.

With Democrats taking control of the House of Representatives, the California representative is expected to become chairwoman of the powerful House Financial Services Committee, which oversees the nation's banking system and its regulators.

50. Haslam still weighing clemency of Tennessee death row inmate -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Haslam said Thursday he is still deciding whether to grant clemency to a Tennessee inmate set to be executed next week.

Haslam expects to make a decision soon, but declined to say how he was leaning regarding the pending Oct. 11 execution of 63-year-old Edmund Zagorski.

51. Court rules Tennessee probation overhaul unconstitutional -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee appeals court has ruled that Gov. Bill Haslam's overhaul of the state's probation system is unconstitutional, saying it violates defendant's rights.

The Tennessean reports the court also ruled Tuesday that the overhaul encroaches on judicial powers by allowing probation officers to issue punishments to probation violators. It also said due process wasn't being provided as defendants cannot challenge new punishments in court with an attorney.

52. Republican law limiting labor powers defeated in Missouri -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The steady march of new "right-to-work" laws in Republican-led states hit a wall in Missouri, where voters resoundingly rejected a measure that could have weakened union finances after national and local labor groups poured millions of dollars into the campaign against it.

53. Republican law limiting labor powers defeated in Missouri -

JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The steady march of new right-to-work laws in Republican-led states hit a wall in Missouri, where voters resoundingly rejected a measure that could have weakened union finances after national and local labor groups poured millions of dollars into the campaign against it.

54. Kavanaugh's views of presidential power drawing questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's past writings that a president should not be distracted by lawsuits and investigations could become a flashpoint in what's already shaping up to be a contentious confirmation battle.

55. Analysis: Trump court pick aimed at cementing legacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With fanfare befitting the nation's pre-eminent showman, President Donald Trump on Monday poured accelerant on his campaign to shift Washington's balance of power toward conservatives and remake the federal judiciary for generations to come.

56. Clocks may go a little cuckoo with power grid change -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Running late for work or just miss that bus? You could have a good excuse: Your electric clock might be running a bit cuckoo.

Because of a change in federal energy regulations, some scientists say your trusty, older plug-in clock may be losing or gaining a few ticks over time.

57. Jack Daniel's may no longer be scared cow -

When Van Halen front man David Lee Roth opened a bottle of Jack Daniel’s on stage back in the ’80s, the last thing he thought about was taxes and court appeals when he took a big swig of whiskey.

58. Blockchain tech ‘is the shiny new penny’ -

During the General Assembly session that just ended legislators debated a number of hot-button issues: guns, abortion, Confederate statues and medical marijuana.

But tucked among the headline-grabbers was a brief bill, less than 300 words long, that attracted no controversy whatsoever.

59. Tennessee lawmakers appeal refugee resettlement decision -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are appealing a judge's dismissal of their lawsuit against the federal government over the refugee resettlement program.

The Thomas More Law Center, which says it's working for free on behalf of the Republican-led General Assembly, filed a notice of appeal Thursday to the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

60. Look ahead to 2019 session: New faces, unfinished business -

The Tennessee Legislature took steps toward combating opioid abuse and reforming juvenile justice in the 2018 session but fell short of what many lawmakers hoped to achieve, setting the stage for renewed action in 2019 when a new General Assembly will convene.

61. East meets west as 2 legislators run out of time -

It wasn’t quite a constitutional crisis, but when Reps. Micah Van Huss and Joe Towns start teaming up, something is amiss.

Van Huss, a Republican from East Tennessee near Johnson City, and Towns, a Democrat from Memphis, are typically like water and oil. But on the final day of the 110th General Assembly, when they felt the Senate slow-walked and spiked their constitutional amendments, they suddenly became bosom buddies, forgetting they were on opposite sides of the argument over Memphis and removal of Confederate monuments.

62. House rejects GOP bill easing use of unproven drugs -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House rejected legislation Tuesday easing how experimental drugs are provided to people with terminal illnesses, as Democrats calling the bill risky and misleading overcame support from President Donald Trump and emotional arguments by Republican lawmakers and ailing constituents.

63. House panel won't let Las Vegas shooting survivors speak -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee legislative panel refused to let two Las Vegas concert shooting survivors testify Wednesday after Republicans delayed action on a Democratic bill to ban the device used by that gunman in October.

64. Time is right to address mass transit shortcomings -

For those who are unaware, there will be a referendum on May 1 that allows voters- residents of Davidson County to decide if the city should move forward with a transit plan. As the material being disseminated by the Nashville Area Chamber of Commerce notes, today is the best day you will have in Nashville traffic, plan or no plan.

65. Clemmons: UT football fiasco at heart of Haslam's plan to shrink Board -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to shake up the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees is getting blitzed by legislators, some contending it’s linked to the hiring of the Tennessee Vols football coach.

66. Details slow plan to shrink UT’s Board of Trustees -

Gov. Bill Haslam’s plan to restructure the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees appears to be a work in progress.

Timing is critical, too, with the 2018 session of the General Assembly moving at a snail’s pace and UT President Joe DiPietro’s contract set to run out in mid-2019.

67. Self-driving semis cut costs, eliminate jobs -

Rep. Pat Marsh had never heard of platooning before he was approached by Peloton Technology with claims that the technology it offers could give trucks fuel savings of more than 7 percent overall per year.

68. Russia probes come up against claims of executive privilege -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's White House is relying on a sweeping interpretation of executive privilege that is rankling members of Congress on both sides of the aisle as current and former advisers parade to Capitol Hill for questioning about possible connections with Russia.

69. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

70. TVA: $900M price tag to move Gallatin power plant ash to landfill -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A federal utility's top executive estimated Thursday that it would cost $900 million and take 24 years to comply with a court order to move coal ash from unlined and leaking pits and ponds to a lined landfill on the site of a Tennessee power plant.

71. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for September 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, September 2017, for Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports. Due to technical issues, Davidson County sales are unavailable for September.

72. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's tax plan is far from the biggest ever -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump presented a distorted picture of his tax plan this past week and claimed he was trying to keep the Obama health law's insurance markets afloat even as he took steps that could well sink them.

73. UK govt warns of Brexit chaos if lawmakers don't back bill -

LONDON (AP) — Brexit will descend into chaos if lawmakers don't approve a bill designed to lay the legislative framework for the country's EU exit, Britain's minister for leaving the European Union has said.

74. British government facing battle to pass key Brexit bill -

LONDON (AP) — With 18 months until Britain is due to leave the European Union, the U.K. government warned lawmakers on Thursday that it would be "reckless" to oppose a key piece of Brexit legislation.

75. UK government begins fight to pass key Brexit bill -

LONDON (AP) — The British government began battle Thursday to pass a major plank of its Brexit plans through Parliament, amid faltering progress in divorce talks with the EU.

Lawmakers are starting debate on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, which will revoke thousands of EU laws and regulations and replace them with domestic statute on the day the U.K. leaves the bloc.

76. Facts undercut claim that Arpaio case was driven by politics -

PHOENIX (AP) — Politicians have made numerous claims about former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's legal troubles and his immigration enforcement legacy since he was granted a White House pardon last week.

Arpaio and others have said he was the victim of a politically motivated prosecution brought by the Obama administration. President Donald Trump said Arpaio deserves a pass in part because of his work in fighting illegal immigration.

77. Single-payer cuts the middle men but at what cost? -

Republicans made “Repeal and Replace” a catchy slogan for the right, but Democrats have one of their own.

Get ready to hear a lot of “Medicare for All,” the new rallying cry of those who think it’s time the United States adopts a single-payer health care system – or something like it.

78. US weighs sanctions on Chinese companies to punish NKorea -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Having lost patience with China, the Trump administration is studying new steps to starve North Korea of cash for its nuclear program, including an option that would infuriate Beijing: sanctions on Chinese companies that help keep the North's economy afloat.

79. How GOP bill would dismantle many Dodd-Frank restrictions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Emboldened by a business-friendly president, Republicans in Congress have set a goal that is nothing if not ambitious: To undo the stricter banking rules that took effect after the devastating 2008 financial crisis.

80. Trump assails 'witch hunt' after naming of special counsel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump lashed out at the appointment of a special counsel to investigate allegations that his campaign collaborated with Russia to sway the 2016 election, tweeting Thursday that it is "the single greatest witch hunt of a politician in American history!"

81. Trump assails 'witch hunt' after naming of special counsel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump lashed out at the appointment of a special counsel to investigate allegations that his campaign collaborated with Russia to sway the 2016 election, tweeting Thursday that it is "the single greatest witch hunt of a politician in American history!"

82. GOP-led House panel votes to overhaul Dodd-Frank -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans took a major step toward their long-promised goal of unwinding the stricter financial rules created after the 2008 crisis, pushing forward sweeping legislation that would undo much of President Barack Obama's landmark banking law.

83. GOP-led House panel votes to overhaul Dodd-Frank -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans took a major step toward their long-promised goal of unwinding the stricter financial rules created after the 2008 crisis, pushing forward sweeping legislation that would undo much of President Barack Obama's landmark banking law.

84. House GOP blocks Dem efforts to protect consumer watchdog -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Wednesday blocked Democratic efforts to preserve the independence of a consumer watchdog created after the 2008 economic meltdown as the GOP pressed ahead with an overhaul of the nation's financial regulatory law.

85. House GOP takes first steps to undo financial law -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans worked to undo former President Barack Obama's law overhauling the nation's financial rules, arguing that it is undermining economic growth. Democrats countered that the GOP effort risked a repeat of the 2008 meltdown that pushed the economy to the brink of collapse.

86. Lobbying by hospitals, doctors, slows GOP health care drive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — "Obamacare" is showing surprising staying power, thanks in large part to doctors, hospitals and other health industry players opposing the alternatives that Republicans have proposed.

87. State sues Feds over Refugee Resettlement Program -

The state of Tennessee, spearheaded by Senate Majority Leader Mark Norris, filed suit against the federal government Monday, challenging the constitutionality of the Refugee Resettlement Program.

88. Republicans block Dem effort to get Trump's tax returns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Republicans on Tuesday blocked an attempt by Democrats to use an obscure law to obtain President Donald Trump's tax returns from the IRS.

Democrats on the House Ways and Means Committee tried to frame the issue as a matter of national security. They questioned whether Trump has any investments in Russia.

89. Tennessee bill would create sales tax holiday for guns -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A bill proposed in Tennessee's legislature would create a sales tax holiday for guns and ammunition.

The bill, filed Wednesday by Republican Rep. Dennis Powers, calls for a "Second Amendment sales tax holiday" on the first weekend of September each year.

90. Slow pace of AD hire typical of how UT works -

About the University of Tennessee’s athletics director search: What’s your hurry?

It only took a little over five months after Dave Hart’s retirement announcement to start the process of hiring a search firm and finalizing a committee that will oversee the selection process. The last thing you want to do is rush things, right?

91. Lawsuit: Trump businesses violate Constitution -

NEW YORK (AP) — To fight what it called a "grave threat" to the country, a watchdog group on Monday filed a lawsuit alleging that President Donald Trump is violating the Constitution by allowing his business to accept payments from foreign governments.

92. Lawsuits over Trump business threaten to tie up presidency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As a businessman, Donald Trump has kept the courts busy. That's hardly likely to change when he enters the Oval Office, creating an unusual and potentially serious problem for a sitting president.

93. GOP turns to arcane budget process to repeal Obamacare -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Yes, Donald Trump is taking charge and Republicans control both the House and Senate, having won an election promising to repeal President Barack Obama's health care law.

But in Congress, getting from Point A to point B rarely consists of a straight line, and Democrats in the Senate can easily gum up the works with procedural blockades. Since Republicans hold the Senate with just 52 votes, they are forced to employ an arcane, fast-track budget process to avoid a Democratic filibuster.

94. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for Nov. 2016 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2016, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

95. Iran seals deal with Boeing to buy 80 planes worth $16.6B -

TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — Iran's flag carrier finalized a major deal with U.S. plane maker Boeing Co. to buy $16.6 billion worth of passenger planes Sunday in one of the most tangible benefits yet for the Islamic Republic from last year's landmark nuclear agreement.

96. President-elect Trump means angst for 'Obamacare' consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump's election ushers in a time of high anxiety for people with health insurance under President Barack Obama's law, which expanded coverage to millions but has struggled to find widespread public acceptance.

97. WHY IT MATTERS: Wall Street Regulation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: The financial crisis that struck in 2008 touched off the worst recession since the 1930s Great Depression, wiping out $11 trillion in U.S. household wealth and leaving about 8 million Americans jobless. More than 5 million families lost their homes to foreclosure. Reckless trading and aggressive practices on Wall Street in the prior boom years were pinned with much of the blame.

98. AP FACT CHECK: Trump resurfaces debunked claims in speech -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite promising "the truth, and nothing else" in his convention speech, Donald Trump presented the nation with a series of previously debunked claims and some new ones Thursday night — about the U.S. tax burden, the perils facing police, Hillary Clinton's record and more.

99. Symbols of long-ago war keep dragging Tennessee down -

More than 150 years ago, we fought our nation’s bloodiest war, a conflagration that claimed 620,000 lives, almost as many as were killed in all other American war efforts combined.

Despite the horror of it all, we just can’t seem to learn a lesson, possibly because of Southern hardheadedness, and a century and a-half later, we seem doomed to an eternal task: pushing Sisyphus’ rock to the top of a hill only to have it chase us back to the bottom.

100. How does UT have a Hall of Fame without Neyland? -

His name is on the football stadium, where a twice-life-size statue of him is displayed between gates 15A and 17.

The roadway that runs between the stadium and the Tennessee River bears his name.