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Editorial Results (free)

1. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims on extremists, impeachment -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump fabricated a tale about foreshadowing Osama bin Laden's 9/11 attack and warning against a war in Iraq before it happened in a weekend of exaggerated boasts and faulty assertions about the U.S. fight against extremists.

2. Trump confronts limits of his impeachment defense strategy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is confronting the limits of his main impeachment defense.

As the probe hits the one-month mark, Trump and his aides have largely ignored the details of the Ukraine allegations against him. Instead, they're loudly objecting to the House Democrats' investigation process, using that as justification for ordering administration officials not to cooperate and complaining about what they deem prejudicial, even unconstitutional, secrecy.

3. Iranian hackers said to target presidential campaign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Microsoft said Friday that hackers linked to the Iranian government targeted a U.S. presidential campaign, as well as government officials, media targets and prominent expatriate Iranians.

4. Sanders has heart procedure, cancels campaign events for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bernie Sanders' campaign said Wednesday that the Democratic presidential candidate had a heart procedure for a blocked artery and was canceling events and appearances "until further notice."

5. McConnell: Senate must take up impeachment if House approves -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republican Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that Senate rules would require him to take up any articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump if approved by the House, swatting down talk that that the GOP-controlled chamber could dodge the matter entirely.

6. GOP split over impeachment pushback as Democrats plow ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president's lawyer insists the real story is a debunked conspiracy theory. A senior White House adviser blames the "deep state." And a Republican congressman is pointing at Joe Biden's son.

7. AP FACT CHECK: Trump untruths on Ukraine, impeachment fight -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A whistle blew, an impeachment inquiry swung into motion and the president at the center of it all rose defiantly to his own defense, not always in command of the facts.

A CIA officer, in a complaint filed under federal whistleblower protections that preserve anonymity, alleged President Donald Trump abused his office in pressing for a Ukrainian investigation of a Democratic rival, Joe Biden. That revelation persuaded Democrats to move ahead with an inquiry that could produce articles of impeachment. Trump has reacted with anger, with weekend tweets that made the groundless accusation that Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff, the Intelligence Committee chairman taking the lead in the impeachment review , criticized him "illegally."

8. GOP split over impeachment pushback as Democrats plow ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The president's lawyer insists the real story is a debunked conspiracy theory. A senior White House adviser blames the "deep state." And a Republican congressman is pointing at Joe Biden's son.

9. Inmate asks for electric chair death in Thursday execution -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee inmate has made a last-minute request to be put to death in the electric chair, an option his lawyer described as "also unconstitutional, yet still less painful" than the state's preference of a three-drug lethal injection.

10. 2020 tests if Democrats can rely on multiracial coalition -

DETROIT (AP) — When Barack Obama was on the ballot in 2008 and 2012, there was no question that Terrance Holmes would vote for the first black president. But as he helped fix cars this week at a repair shop on Detroit's west side, he recalled his ambivalence about the 2016 campaign.

11. Veteran attorney West moves to Miller & Martin -

Attorney Dudley West, formerly with White & Reasor, has joined Miller & Martin’s Nashville office.

West has a diverse civil practice with an emphasis on business litigation and real estate. He has handled numerous commercial real estate acquisitions, dispositions and other transactions, and represented clients in a wide variety of business, real estate and other civil litigation matters in state and federal courts.

12. Bradley partner Lipshie named to Who’s Who list -

Samuel D. Lipshie, a partner in Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office, has again been named by Who’s Who Legal as among the world’s leading sports and entertainment law practitioners. He is listed in the Who’s Who Legal: Sports & Entertainment 2019 directory.

13. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for second quarter 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

14. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for April 2019 -

Top commercial real estate sales, April 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

15. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for April 2019 -

Top residential real estate sales, April 2019, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

16. On-duty Tennessee trooper killed in wreck on Interstate 40 -

JACKSON (AP) — A Tennessee Highway Patrol trooper has been killed in a wreck on Interstate 40.

THP spokesman Lt. Bill Miller tells news outlets that Trooper Matthew Gatti was responding to a car fire Monday afternoon when he lost control of his car and hit a tractor-trailer.

17. Block grants would come with control issues -

As this year’s legislative session winds down, details are beginning to surface on a bill authorizing Gov. Bill Lee to ask the federal government to provide TennCare matching funding – currently about $7.5 billion of a $12 billion TennCare budget – as a block grant.

18. 50-year survivor in a city of teardowns -

Bear Bryant could tell me about the Vandy game-day meetup he had with a U.S. president at this historic West End hotel. He’s dead, of course, as is that president, so I can ask neither about that day or their reflections as the Holiday Inn by Vanderbilt celebrates its 50th birthday.

19. AP FACT CHECK: Trump spins fiction about diversity visas -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is going after the "horror show" known as the diversity visa lottery program. His description of it is pure fiction.

The president offered a multitude of fabrications and partial truths over the past week on the subject of immigration — both the legal and illegal varieties — as he declared a national emergency aimed at finding the money to build his border wall. He said drugs are flowing across the hinterlands from Mexico, not from border crossings, and suggested that the federal prison population is laden with hardened criminals who are in the U.S. illegally. Neither claim is substantiated.

20. AP analysis: Steel tariffs waived even with tough trade talk -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite President Donald Trump's tough talk on trade, his administration has granted hundreds of companies permission to import millions of tons of steel made in China, Japan and other countries without paying the hefty tariff he put in place to protect U.S. manufacturers and jobs, according to an Associated Press analysis.

21. Trump still coy on border deal, claims victory anyway -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congressional bargainers formally completed a bipartisan border security pact late Wednesday and President Donald Trump labored to frame it as a political win, even though it contains only a fraction of the billions for a "great, powerful wall" that he's been demanding for months.

22. Trump still coy on border deal - but expected to sign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump isn't showing his hand yet. But with little Washington appetite for another shutdown, he's expected to grudgingly accept an agreement that would keep the government open but provide just a fraction of the money he's been demanding for his Mexican border wall.

23. Trump to call for unity, face skepticism in State of Union -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House says President Donald Trump will call for optimism and unity in his State of the Union address, using the moment to attempt a reset after two years of bitter partisanship and deeply personal attacks.

24. Congress to probe whether Trump told lawyer Cohen to lie -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are vowing to investigate whether President Donald Trump directed his personal attorney Michael Cohen to lie to Congress about a Moscow real estate project, calling that possibility a "concern of the greatest magnitude." Trump's current lawyer said the allegations sparking the inquiry are "categorically false."

25. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

26. Trump indicates he won't declare emergency "so fast" -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump tamped down expectations that he is close to declaring a national emergency to get the money he desires to build his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as a three-week impasse closing parts of the government continued on Friday.

27. Bill on federal workers' back pay in shutdown heads to Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is edging closer to declaring a national emergency to pay for his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as pressure mounts to end the three-week impasse that has closed parts of the government and deprived hundreds of thousands of workers of their salaries.

28. Trump closer to declaring emergency; 800,000 won't get paid -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is edging closer to declaring a national emergency to pay for his long-promised U.S.-Mexico border wall as pressure mounts to end the three-week impasse that has closed parts of the government and deprived hundreds of thousands of workers of their salaries.

29. Trump threatens emergency declaration ahead of border visit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump threatened on Thursday to declare a national emergency to circumvent Congress if he can't reach a deal with Democrats to fund his promised border wall. He headed to the U.S.-Mexico border to draw further attention to his case after negotiations with lawmakers blew up.

30. AP FACT CHECK: Do ex-presidents back Trump wall? They say no -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's recent claim that his predecessors endorsed his idea of a wall at the Mexican border got no support from the ex-presidents' club.

Trump stated in a Rose Garden news conference Friday: "This should have been done by all of the presidents that preceded me. And they all know it. Some of them have told me that we should have done it."

31. AP FACT CHECK: Trump claims innocence in probe; wall myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Feeling the pressure of investigations and a partial government shutdown, President Donald Trump is playing loose with the facts regarding hush payments made by his former attorney Michael Cohen to two women and is changing his story on his promise to build a concrete border wall paid for by Mexico.

32. Trump-Pelosi showdown over shutdown first battle of new era -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Nancy Pelosi often quotes Abraham Lincoln saying public sentiment is everything. It's a theory that will be put to the test when the new House Democratic majority gavels in this week and votes to end the government shutdown without money for President Donald Trump's border wall with Mexico.

33. White House, congressional Democrats see no deal on shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Chances look slim for ending the partial government shutdown any time soon.

Lawmakers are away from Washington for the holidays and have been told they will get 24 hours' notice before having to return for a vote. And although the Senate is slated to come into session Thursday afternoon, few senators were expected to be around for it.

34. Centerstone’s Stoll wins community service award -

Becky Stoll, vice president for crisis and disaster management at Centerstone, has won the 2018 Dorothea Dix Community Service Award presented by the Tennessee Association of Mental Health Organizations.

35. Conservatives warn Trump not to retreat on border wall -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is facing scathing criticism from conservative supporters after backing away from his threat to shut down the government over border wall funding, with some aggressively lobbying the president against signing a short-term deal with no wall dollars.

36. White House digs in on border wall, risking shutdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pushing the government to the brink of a partial shutdown, the White House is insisting that Congress provide $5 billion to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border despite lawmaker resistance from both parties.

37. Finding a White House chief of staff turns into a scramble -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Wanted: Top aide to most powerful leader in world. Chief qualification: Willing to take the job. Must also be prepared to tolerate regular undermining by boss and risk of steep legal bills. Post-employment prospects: Uncertain.

38. Tennessee electrocutes second inmate in 2 months -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee inmate became the second person to die in the state's electric chair in just over a month Thursday, nearly two decades after Tennessee adopted lethal injection as its preferred method of execution.

39. Tennessee to electrocute second inmate in as many months -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee inmate is scheduled to become the second person to die in the state's electric chair in as many months Thursday evening, nearly two decades after the state adopted lethal injection as its preferred method of execution.

40. Tennessee to electrocute second inmate in as many months -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee inmate is scheduled to become the second person to die in the state's electric chair in as many months Thursday evening, nearly two decades after Tennessee adopted lethal injection as its preferred method of execution.

41. Death-row inmate awaits court rulings, clemency decision -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee death row inmate was waiting Wednesday to see whether the U.S. Supreme Court or the governor would halt his Thursday execution in the electric chair.

David Earl Miller was sentenced to death for the 1981 murder of 23-year-old Lee Standifer in Knoxville. He has spent 36 years on death row, the longest of any Tennessee inmate.

42. Ceremonies for Bush draw together presidents, world envoys -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation's capital bids its final farewell to the late former President George H.W. Bush on Wednesday in a service of prayer and praise that is drawing together world envoys, Americans of high office and a guy from Maine who used to fix things in Bush's house on the water.

43. GM slashes thousands of jobs in tech shift -

DETROIT (AP) — Even though unemployment is low, the economy is growing and U.S. auto sales are near historic highs, General Motors is cutting thousands of jobs in a major restructuring aimed at generating cash to spend on innovation.

44. GM to lay off up to 14K workers, close as many as 5 plants -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors will cut up to 14,000 workers in North America and put five plants up for possible closure as it abandons many of its car models and restructures to focus more on autonomous and electric vehicles, the automaker announced Monday.

45. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for October 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, October 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

46. Gullett Sanford paralegal graduates to staff attorney -

Andrew Bellm, who had worked as a wills, trusts and estates paralegal at Gullett Sanford Robinson & Martin PLLC since 2015, is now a staff attorney with the firm.

Bellm, whose practice involves estate planning, probate, and guardianships and conservatorships, will continue to practice in the firm’s Wills, Trusts and Estates section.

47. Florida's partisan recount battle goes back to court -

FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Florida's ongoing recount battle heads back to a courtroom Wednesday. Lawyers for Democrats will ask a federal judge to set aside the state law mandating that mailed-in votes be thrown out if the signature on the envelope doesn't match the signature on file with election authorities.

48. Democrats seize House control, but Trump's GOP holds Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats seized the House majority from President Donald Trump's Republican Party on Tuesday in a suburban revolt that threatened what's left of the president's governing agenda. But the GOP gained ground in the Senate and preserved key governorships, beating back a "blue wave" that never fully materialized.

49. Trump: End birthright citizenship for some US-born babies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is making another hardline immigration play in the final days before the midterm elections, declaring that he wants to order an end to the constitutional right to citizenship for babies born in the United States to non-citizens. Most scholars think he can't implement such a change unilaterally.

50. Package to DeNiro recovered, Trump tweets against media -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Police recovered a suspicious package addressed to actor Robert DeNiro on Thursday, which investigators said was similar to crude pipe bombs sent to prominent Democrats, including former President Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, and to CNN.

51. 4 tax breaks for teachers -

The flood of education-related tax advice that seems to crest during back-to-school season often centers on students or their parents. But teachers can score a few tax breaks, too — if they do their homework. Three tax pros share their own lesson plans for cutting teachers' tax bills.

52. Withdraw Kavanaugh nomination? 'Ridiculous,' says Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump sided with his embattled Supreme Court nominee, defending Judge Brett Kavanaugh against allegations of sexual assault as the White House walked a fine line in addressing accusations that revived memories of the president's own #MeToo moments. Time and again, Trump has defended powerful men against the claims of women.

53. Trump cancels pay raise federal workers were due in January -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump informed Congress on Thursday that he is canceling pay raises due in January for most civilian federal employees, citing budget constraints. But the workers still could see a slightly smaller boost in their pay under a proposal lawmakers are considering.

54. Stars' bars transform Lower Broadway -

Luke Bryan wants you to bite his sushi. Really. The progenitor of the bro-country movement invites all comers to his Lower Broadway bar and restaurant – Luke’s 32 Bridge Food + Bar – to see what he has to offer that may be different from the delicacies and/or bar food fans and diners can find at the more than half-dozen country star-fronted restaurants that have mushroomed on Lower Broadway.

55. Haslam announces school testing listening tour -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam is launching a statewide tour to hear ideas to improve the state's problem-plagued elementary and secondary school online testing process.

Haslam announced Tuesday that the TNReady listening tour will include six stops statewide for teachers, administrators, and technology and assessment coordinators to discuss recent problems administering the tests and offer ideas for improvements.

56. Blackburn unanimously elected presiding judge -

Davidson County General Sessions judges have unanimously elected Judge Melissa Blackburn to serve as presiding judge through Sept. 2019.

Blackburn has been serving as presiding judge since Dec. 2017 when Judge Angelita Blackshear Dalton was elevated to the 20th District Criminal Court by Gov. Bill Haslam. She was elected to serve as judge of the Division II General Sessions Court in 2014.

57. $1 million-plus Middle Tennessee commercial sales for Q2 2018 -

Commercial real estate sales, Second quarter 2018, of $1 million of more for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

58. Trump's endorsements signal more involvement in GOP politics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Competing in a contested runoff campaign for Georgia's governor, Brian Kemp didn't see it coming: the single-most prized endorsement in Republican politics.

59. Trump 'disagrees' with Putin offer to interview Americans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump "disagrees" with Russian President Vladimir Putin's offer to allow the U.S. to question 12 Russians accused of interfering in the 2016 election in exchange for permitting Russia to interview Americans the Kremlin accuses of unspecified crimes, the White House said Thursday.

60. Facing critics over Putin summit, Trump wants to meet again -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Thursday he wants another meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin to start implementing ideas they discussed in Helsinki, casting the summit as a starting point for progress on a number of shared concerns.

61. Amid harsh criticism, Trump tries a tougher tone on Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump spent a second day managing the political fallout from his widely criticized meeting with Russia's Vladimir Putin, shifting stances and mopping up what the White House said were misstatements.

62. Trump: news media wants confrontation, even war, with Russia -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump accused the news media Thursday of trying to provoke a confrontation with Russia that could lead to war, as he continues to push back against criticism of his summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

63. Trump asserts Russia not targeting US, contradicting intel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday denied Russia is still targeting the United States, a claim sharply at odds with recent warnings from his top intelligence chief about ongoing threats to election security.

64. A day after back-tracking, Trump defends summit performance -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking to Twitter early Wednesday, President Donald Trump defended anew his much-criticized performance at the Helsinki summit, promising "big results" from better relations with Russia and hitting back at "haters."

65. Analysis: Trump court pick aimed at cementing legacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With fanfare befitting the nation's pre-eminent showman, President Donald Trump on Monday poured accelerant on his campaign to shift Washington's balance of power toward conservatives and remake the federal judiciary for generations to come.

66. Life in Trump's Cabinet: Perks, pestering, power, putdowns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross came in for an Oval Office tongue-lashing after he used a mundane soup can as a TV prop. Defense Secretary Jim Mattis got overruled by President Donald Trump's announcement that a new "Space Force" is in the offing. Environmental Protection Agency head Scott Pruitt caught a sharp admonition from Trump to "knock it off" after his ethics problems dominated cable television.

67. Top Middle Tennessee commercial sales for May 2018 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

68. Trump stands firm on immigration policy, sees it as a winner -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Calling the shots as his West Wing clears out, President Donald Trump sees his hard-line immigration stance as a winning issue heading into a midterm election he views as a referendum on his protectionist policies.

69. Trump's teasing jobs report tweet raises questions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With a tantalizing tweet, President Donald Trump seemed to tease a positive jobs report on Friday, a protocol-defying step that moved markets and raised questions about the appropriateness of the president publicly hinting at information that could make or lose fortunes.

70. False accusations about immigration fly between opponents -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and Democratic critics traded outraged, sometimes plainly false accusations about immigration as the debate over "lost" children and the practice of separating families caught crossing the border illegally reached a new boiling point.

71. Blockchain tech ‘is the shiny new penny’ -

During the General Assembly session that just ended legislators debated a number of hot-button issues: guns, abortion, Confederate statues and medical marijuana.

But tucked among the headline-grabbers was a brief bill, less than 300 words long, that attracted no controversy whatsoever.

72. House panel OKs plan to grow VA private care, a Trump pledge -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A House committee approved a wide-ranging plan Tuesday to give veterans more freedom to see doctors outside the Veterans Affairs health system and fix a budget crisis in its troubled Choice private-sector program, a major step toward fulfilling President Donald Trump's promise to expand private care options.

73. Trump's new 'Stormy' story stuns many in West Wing -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Thursday his reimbursement of a 2016 hush payment to porn actress Stormy Daniels had nothing to do with his election campaign. But the surprise revelation of the president's payment clashed with his past statements, created new legal headaches and stunned many in the West Wing.

74. Fatal shooting causes pandemonium in Opry Mills -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A fatal shooting set off pandemonium inside a mall in Nashville, Tennessee, provoking an outsized police response in the city where a gunman killed several people at a Waffle House less than two weeks ago.

75. Trump administration seeks to close immigration 'loopholes' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Trump administration officials said they're crafting a new legislative package aimed at closing immigration "loopholes" after the president called on Republican lawmakers to immediately pass a border bill using the "Nuclear Option if necessary" to muscle it through.

76. Trump signs $1.3 trillion budget after threatening veto -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump grudgingly signed a $1.3 trillion federal spending measure Friday and averted a midnight government shutdown — but only after undercutting his own negotiators and setting off a mini-panic with a last-minute veto threat. The episode further eroded the already damaged credibility of both the president and a White House staff that had assured the nation he was onboard.

77. Jack Daniel’s squeezed between barrel tax, threat of trade war -

NASHVILLE – Jack Daniel’s is over a barrel – literally – regarding a tax assessment, an attorney general’s opinion and the potential impact of President Donald Trump’s trade tariff.

78. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for February 2018 -

Top residential real estate sales,February 2018, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

79. Long-ago DUI offender helps keep others safe -

It was a warm Tennessee night in April of 1992 when 23-year-old Larry Randle got into his maroon Ford Thunderbird – the first car he ever owned – and drove a few miles to a friend’s house in his hometown of Martin, Tennessee to have a few beers and watch a basketball game on TV. He left around midnight to drive home, and just as he was pulling up to a stoplight he saw flashes of blue in his rearview mirror.

80. Work at home? Yes. Customers? No. -

“Chet Atkins’ Workshop’’ was the best-selling album of the guitarist’s career, earning Atkins a gold record in the 60s.

Today, it would probably get him a Metro Codes violation.

81. Wave of exits from West Wing sparks talk of brain drain -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump once presided over a reality show in which a key cast member exited each week. The same thing seems to be happening in his White House.

Trump's West Wing has descended into a period of unparalleled tumult amid a wave of staff departures — and despite the president's insistence that it's a place of "no Chaos, only great Energy!" The latest key figure to announce an exit: Gary Cohn, Trump's chief economic adviser, who had clashed with Trump over trade policy.

82. Trump says some lawmakers too fearful of NRA to act on guns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Putting fellow Republicans in the hot seat, President Donald Trump is calling for quick and substantial changes to the nation's gun laws even as he criticizes lawmakers for being too fearful of the National Rifle Association to act.

83. Trump says some lawmakers too fearful of NRA to act on guns -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Putting fellow Republicans in the hot seat, President Donald Trump is calling for quick and substantial changes to the nation's gun laws even as he criticizes lawmakers for being too fearful of the National Rifle Association to act.

84. Trump bucks NRA, backs raising age for buying assault rifles -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation should keep assault rifles out of the hands of anyone under 21, President Donald Trump says, defying his loyal supporters in the National Rifle Association amid America's public reckoning over gun violence. He also pushed hard for arming security guards and many teachers in U.S. schools.

85. Trump signs budget deal, government to reopen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday signed a $400 billion budget deal that sharply boosts spending and swells the federal deficit, ending a brief federal government shutdown that happened while most Americans were home in bed and most government offices were closed, anyway.

86. Congress votes to reopen government, passes budget deal -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House moved swiftly early Friday to reopen the federal government and pass a $400 billion budget deal, overcoming opposition from both liberal Democrats and tea party conservatives to endorse enormous spending increases despite looming trillion-dollar deficits.

87. Trump immigration plan draws criticism from top Senate Dem -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat dismissed President Donald Trump's immigration proposal as a "wish list" for hard-liners on Friday as the plan drew harsh reviews from Democrats and some conservatives.
Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., expressed satisfaction that Trump had provided some clarity to his immigration goals, which have befuddled members of both parties and hindered progress in Congress. The White House plan unveiled Thursday offers a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million young immigrants living in the U.S. illegally in exchange for new restrictions on legal immigration and $25 billion in border security.
Schumer expressed relief that Trump "finally acknowledged that the Dreamers should be allowed to stay here and become citizens," a reference to those young immigrants. But he said Trump's plan "flies in the face of what most Americans believe" and called the proposal "the wish list that anti-immigration hardliners have advocated for for years."
The White House proposal was labeled "Trump Amnesty Disaster" in an email distributed by conservative figure Richard Viguerie, who wrote that the numbers of immigrants it would allow in the U.S. "will make Republicans a permanent minority party."
Senior White House officials cast the plan as a centrist compromise that could win support from both parties and enough votes to pass the Senate. But it comes with a long list of concessions that many Democrats, and also conservative Republicans, especially in the House, may find impossible to swallow.
The plan would provide a pathway to citizenship for the roughly 690,000 younger immigrants protected from deportation by the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program — as well as hundreds of thousands of others who independent estimates say qualify for the program, but never applied.
Trump announced last year that he was doing away with the program, but he gave Congress until March to come up with a legislative fix.
The plan would not allow parents of those immigrants to seek lawful status, the officials said.
In exchange, Trump's plan would dramatically overhaul the legal immigration system. Immigrants would only be allowed to sponsor their spouses and underage children to join them in the U.S., and not their parents, adult children or siblings. The officials said it would only end new applications for visas, allowing those already in the pipeline to be processed. Still, immigration activists said the move could cut legal immigration in half.
It would also end a visa lottery aimed at diversity, which drew Trump's attention after the New York City truck attack last year, redirecting the allotment to bringing down the existing backlog in visa applications.
The officials spoke on the condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the plan before its release.
Under the plan, recipients could have their legal status revoked due to criminal behavior or national security threats, the officials said, and eventual citizenship would require still-unspecified work and education requirements — and a finding that the immigrants are of "good moral character."
The nonpartisan Migration Policy Institute said it believes the largest share of the White House's 1.8 million people who'd be eligible for citizenship — 1.3 million — are people who currently meet all of DACA's eligibility requirements. These include years in the U.S., their ages now and when they entered this country, and whether they have a high school or equivalent education.
Another 400,000 are people who'd be eligible for DACA protection but for their education. And 100,000 more are people who are under age 15 —the minimum age allowed for most people requesting protection under the program.
Trump ended the DACA program in September, setting a March 5 deadline for Congress to provide legal protections or the program's recipients would once again be subject to deportation. The officials said Trump would only sign legislation providing those protections if the other immigration changes he is proposing are implemented.
Trump earlier this month had deferred to a bipartisan group of lawmakers in the House and Senate to craft an immigration proposal, saying he would sign whatever they passed. But as talks on Capitol Hill broke down — in part because of controversy Trump ginned up using vulgar language to describe African countries — the White House decided to offer its own framework.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and others had also complained the president had failed to sufficiently lay out his priorities, leaving them guessing about what he might be willing to sign. One official said the Thursday release represents a plan for the Senate, with the administration expecting a different bill to pass the House.
McConnell thanked the president and his aides for providing the outline. "I am hopeful that as discussions continue in the Senate on the subject of immigration, Members on both sides of the aisle will look to this framework for guidance as they work towards an agreement," he said in a statement.
Doug Andres, a spokesman for House Speaker Paul Ryan, echoed the sentiment saying: "We're grateful for the president showing leadership on this issue and believe his ideas will help us ultimately reach a balanced solution."
Rep. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., an immigration hard-liner, called Trump's plan "generous and humane, while also being responsible" and said he'd work toward its passage. He said that besides protecting DACA recipients, "It also will prevent us from ending up back here in five years by securing the border and putting an end to extended-family chain migration."
But some of Congress' more conservative members seemed unwilling to open the citizenship door for the Dreamers.
"DACA itself didn't have a pathway to citizenship," said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, who battled Trump in 2016 for the GOP presidential nomination. "So I think it would be a profound mistake and not consistent with the promises we made to the voters to enact a pathway to citizenship to DACA recipients or to others who are here illegally."
Democrats were also raging. House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., blasted the plan as "part of the Trump Administration's unmistakable campaign to make America white again."
Democratic Whip Dick Durbin, D-Ill., urged Republicans to join together with Democrats to reach a bipartisan alternative.
"Dreamers should not be held hostage to President Trump's crusade to tear families apart and waste billions of American tax dollars on an ineffective wall," he said in a statement.
Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham, D-N.M., who chairs the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, said the White House was using DACA recipients "as bargaining chips for sweeping anti-immigrant policies."
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Follow Colvin, Miller and Fram on Twitter at https://twitter.com/colvinj, https://twitter.com/ZekeJMiller and https://twitter.com/asfram

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88. Trump adds confusion to government shutdown concern -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Injecting confusion into already perilous shutdown negotiations, President Donald Trump undercut his own administration's stance by tweeting Thursday that a children's health insurance program should not be part of a short-term budget agreement.

89. Trump insists his views on a border wall have not 'evolved' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump insisted Thursday his views on a border wall with Mexico have not evolved, pushing back against his own chief of staff's comments to lawmakers.

Trump said on Twitter: "The Wall is the Wall, it has never changed or evolved from the first day I conceived of it."

90. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for December 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, December 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

91. Middle Tennessee's $1M-plus residential transactions for 2017 -

There were 735 homes selling for $1 million or more in Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Sumner and Wilson counties in 2017, according to Chandler Reports.

Davidson County had the most with 386, followed by Williamson (316), Sumner (21), Wilson (10) and Rutherford (2).

92. Trump's checkup comes as chatter about his health lingers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is getting his first medical checkup since taking office, a head-to-toe exam on Friday as questions swirl about the health and fitness of the oldest person ever elected to the nation's highest office. In advance, the 71-year-old president has pushed back vigorously against suggestions he's mentally unfit, declaring himself "a very stable genius."

93. Governor adds 217 appointees to 93 boards -

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam has announced the appointments of 217 Tennesseans to 93 boards and commissions.

“By serving on our state boards and commissions, these Tennesseans are helping us provide responsive, effective and efficient service to their fellow citizens,” Haslam says. “I am grateful for their service and know they will well represent the people of Tennessee.”

94. With Rubio, Corker onboard, GOP finalizes huge tax package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans solidified support for their major overhaul of the nation's tax laws Friday, securing endorsements from wavering senators as they pushed to muscle their bill through Congress next week and give President Donald Trump his first major legislative victory.

95. GOP's not all that sad; party grapples with Alabama fallout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Weary national Republicans breathed a collective sigh of relief on Wednesday, a day after voters knocked out their own party's scandal-plagued candidate in deep-red Alabama. Yet all is not well in a party confronted with new rounds of infighting and a suddenly shrinking Senate majority heading into next year's midterm elections.

96. Butler Snow’s Polly elected president of Nashville Bar -

Erin Palmer Polly, a commercial litigation attorney at Butler Snow, LLP, will serve as the 2018 president of the Nashville Bar Association. In 2014, she was president of the NBA Young Lawyers Division, became a fellow of the Nashville Bar Foundation and received the Legal Aid Society Volunteer Lawyer’s Program Pro Bono Award.

97. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for November 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

98. Legislators not shy in pushing ‘model’ bills from outsiders -

The group that brought Tennessee the voter photo ID law could be on the brink of spawning another kink on the voting process, one that cross-checks jury service with voter rolls.

At the behest of the American Civil Rights Union, legislators across the nation who belong to the American Legislative Exchange Council could be sponsoring bills in the next couple of years requiring local election commissions to take a closer look at people who miss jury duty.

99. On Jerusalem, Trump delivers for supporters at home -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's move to recognize the divided city of Jerusalem as Israel's capital may have triggered a worldwide chorus of critics but the president had his ears closely tuned to his supporters at home.

100. Hey 8-4: Titans stay atop AFC South by beating Texans 24-13 -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee left tackle Taylor Lewan remembers only too well how the Titans always seemed to find a way to lose through his first two seasons in the NFL.

Now they're finding ways to win, and that's all that matters.