» Subscribe Today!
The Power of Information
Home
The Ledger - EST. 1978 - Nashville Edition
X
Skip Navigation LinksHome > Name & Property Search

Name & Property Search

Search results for 'Bill Martin' | Search again
DeSoto Public Records:11
Shelby Public Records:68
Editorial:100
West Tennessee:82
Middle Tennessee:282
East Tennessee:101
Other:0

You must be a subscriber to see the full results of your search.

Please log in or subscribe below if you are not already a subscriber.

TNLedger Knoxville Edition subscribers get full access to more than 13 million names and addresses along with powerful search and download features. Get the business leads you need with powerful searches of public records and notices. Download listings into your spreadsheet or database.

Learn more about our services | Search again


Editorial Results (free)

1. Bob Dole, a man of war, power, zingers and denied ambition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole willed himself to walk again after paralyzing war wounds, ran for Congress with a right arm too damaged to shake hands, and rose through the Senate ranks to become a long-serving Republican leader and tough and tireless champion of his party.

2. Biden praises Canada, Mexico as leaders discuss strains -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Reviving three-way North American summitry after a five-year break, President Joe Biden on Thursday joined with the leaders of Canada and Mexico to declare their nations can work together and prove "democracies can deliver" even as they sort out differences on key issues.

3. New laws steer some teachers away from race-related topics -

NASHVILLE (AP) — New measures that restrict how race is addressed in classrooms have spread confusion and anxiety among many educators, who in some cases have begun pulling books and canceling lessons for fear of being penalized.

4. Biden, Trudeau to discuss electric vehicle dispute at summit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden kicked off the North American Leaders Summit on Thursday with a one-on-one meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, calling their two countries' relationship one of the easiest in the early going of his presidency.

5. Biden ties legislative agenda to MLK push for racial justice -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday tied his legislative priorities on voting rights, police reform and climate change to Martin Luther King Jr.'s push for racial justice as he marked the 10th anniversary of the opening of the civil rights leader's memorial on the National Mall.

6. Yellen warns delay in raising debt limit will slow economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen sounded an urgent call Tuesday for Congress to raise the government's borrowing limit, a day after Senate Republicans blocked consideration  of a bill that would have done so.

7. Top Dems: We have framework to pay for $3.5T bill; no detail -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House and congressional Democrats have agreed to a "framework" of options to pay for their huge, emerging social and environment bill, top Democrats said Thursday, but they offered no details and the significance was unclear.

8. McConnell unmoved on debt limit, risking turmoil for Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden administration has been enlisting one emissary after another to convince Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell to help raise the federal debt limit.

It's not working.

9. Small agency, big job: Biden tasks OSHA with vaccine mandate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Occupational Safety and Health Administration doesn't make many headlines. Charged with keeping America's workplaces safe, it usually busies itself with tasks such as setting and enforcing standards for goggles, hardhats and ladders.

10. Memphis councilman Smiley running for Tennessee governor -

MEMPHIS (AP) — Memphis City Council member JB Smiley Jr. said Wednesday that he is running for Tennessee governor.

Smiley, a Democrat, made the announcement in a video on social media. He also held an event at the Orpheum theater in Memphis.

11. What are the defining events of your lifetime? -

One of those significant-number anniversaries of an unforgettable event is almost upon us: 20 years since 9/11. This is not a column about 9/11. I can’t bring anything new or insightful to the table on that topic.

12. Tennessee doctor launches 2022 gubernatorial bid -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Physician Jason Martin on Monday announced that he's running as a Democrat for governor in 2022, arguing that incumbent Republican Gov. Bill Lee's handling of the coronavirus pandemic prompted him to jump in the race.

13. Gresham Smith announces executive team expansion -

Gresham Smith, a national architecture and engineering firm based in Nashville, has expanded its executive management team, with Peter Oram, market vice president for the firm’s Transportation and Water + Environment businesses, being named chief operating officer, and Kelly Knight Hodges, market vice president for the firm’s Corporate + Urban Design business, selected as chief development and engagement officer, a new role that expands Gresham Smith’s executive management team from four to five members.

14. Tennessee won't incentivize COVID shots but pays to vax cows -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee has sent nearly half a million dollars to farmers who have vaccinated their cattle against respiratory diseases and other maladies over the past two years.

But Republican Gov. Bill Lee, who grew up on his family's ranch and refers to himself as a cattle farmer in his Twitter profile, has been far less enthusiastic about incentivizing herd immunity among humans.

15. We have a winner! -

The first Tennessee State Fair was held at the Walnut Race Course in North Nashville in 1855. It was the same year poet Walt Whitman first published “Leaves of Grass,” Isaac Singer patented the sewing machine motor and Congress approved $30,000 to test camels for military use (clearly, that didn’t work out well).

16. GOP ready to block elections bill in Senate showdown -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Democrats' expansive elections and voting bill headed  for all but certain rejection late Tuesday in a key Senate test vote, providing a dramatic example of Republicans' use of the filibuster  to block legislation and forcing hard questions for Democrats over next steps.

17. Black Americans laud Juneteenth holiday, say more work ahead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Black Americans rejoiced after President Joe Biden made Juneteenth a federal holiday, but some said that, while they appreciated the recognition at a time of racial reckoning in America, more is needed to change policies that disadvantage too many of their brethren.

18. Biden to sign bill making Juneteenth a federal holiday -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed legislation Thursday establishing a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery, saying he believes it will go down as one of the greatest honors he has as president.
Biden signed into law a bill to make Juneteenth, or June 19, the 12th federal holiday. The House voted 415-14 on Wednesday to send the bill to Biden, while the Senate passed the bill unanimously the day before.
"This is a day of profound weight and profound power, a day in which we remember the moral stain, the terrible toll that slavery took on the country and continues to take," Biden said.
Juneteenth commemorates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers brought the news of freedom to enslaved Black people in Galveston, Texas — two months after the Confederacy had surrendered. That was also about 2 1/2 years after the Emancipation Proclamation freed slaves in the Southern states.
It's the first new federal holiday since Martin Luther King Jr. Day was created in 1983.
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management, which is the human resources office for the federal government, tweeted Thursday that most federal employees will observe the new holiday — Juneteenth National Independence Day — on Friday since June 19 falls on a Saturday this year.
Biden noted the overwhelming support for the bill from lawmakers in both parties.
"I hope this is the beginning of a change in the way we deal with one another," Biden said.
The White House moved quickly after the House debated the bill and then voted for it.
"Our federal holidays are purposely few in number and recognize the most important milestones," said Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y. "I cannot think of a more important milestone to commemorate than the end of slavery in the United States."
Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, speaking next to a large poster of a Black man whose back bore massive scarring from being whipped, said she would be in Galveston on Saturday to celebrate along with Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas.
"Can you imagine?" said Jackson Lee. "I will be standing maybe taller than Sen. Cornyn, forgive me for that, because it will be such an elevation of joy."
The Senate passed the bill on Tuesday under a unanimous consent agreement that expedites the process for considering legislation. It takes just one senator's objection to block such agreements.
The vote comes as lawmakers struggle to overcome divisions on police reform legislation following the killing of George Floyd by police and as Republican state legislators push what experts say is an unprecedented number of bills aimed at restricting access to the ballot box. While Republicans say the goal is to prevent voter fraud, Democrats contend that the measures are aimed at undermining minority voting rights.
Several members of the Congressional Black Caucus went to the floor to speak in favor of the bill. Rep. Bonnie Watson Coleman, D-N.J., said she viewed Juneteenth as a commemoration rather than a celebration because it represented something that was delayed in happening.
"It also reminds me of what we don't have today," she said. "And that is full access to justice, freedom and equality. All these are often in short supply as it relates to the Black community."
The bill was sponsored by Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., and had 60 co-sponsors. Democratic leaders moved quickly to bring the bill to the House floor after the Senate's vote the day before.
Some Republican lawmakers opposed the effort. Rep. Matt Rosendale, R-Mont., said creating the federal holiday was an effort to celebrate "identity politics."
"Since I believe in treating everyone equally, regardless of race, and that we should be focused on what unites us rather than our differences, I will vote no," he said in a press release.
The vast majority of states recognize Juneteenth as a holiday or have an official observance of the day, and most states hold celebrations. Juneteenth is a paid holiday for state employees in Texas, New York, Virginia and Washington.
Rep. Clay Higgins, R-La., said he would vote for the bill and that he supported the establishment of a federal holiday, but he was upset that the name of the holiday included the word "independence" rather than "emancipation."
"Why would the Democrats want to politicize this by coopting the name of our sacred holiday of Independence Day?" Higgins asked.
Rep. Brenda Lawrence, D-Mich., replied, "I want to say to my white colleagues on the other side: Getting your independence from being enslaved in a country is different from a country getting independence to rule themselves."
She added, "We have a responsibility to teach every generation of Black and white Americans the pride of a people who have survived, endured and succeeded in these United States of America despite slavery."
The 14 House Republicans who voted against the bill are Andy Biggs of Arizona, Mo Brooks of Alabama, Andrew Clyde of Georgia, Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, Paul Gosar of Arizona, Ronny Jackson of Texas, Doug LaMalfa of California, Thomas Massie of Kentucky, Tom McClintock of California, Ralph Norman of South Carolina, Mike Rogers of Alabama, Matt Rosendale of Montana, Chip Roy of Texas and Tom Tiffany of Wisconsin.

...

19. Top Davidson County commercial sales for March 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, March 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

20. LGBTQ rights bill ignites debate over religious liberty -

A sweeping bill that would extend federal civil rights protections to LGBTQ people is a top priority of President Joe Biden and Democrats in Congress. Yet as the Equality Act heads to the Senate after winning House approval, its prospects seem bleak — to a large extent because of opposition from conservative religious leaders.

21. Biden marks 'Bloody Sunday' by signing voting rights order -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new executive order from President Joe Biden directs federal agencies to take a series of steps to promote voting access, a move that comes as congressional Democrats press for a sweeping voting and elections bill to counter efforts to restrict voting access.

22. Stocks rally on Wall Street, S&P 500 has best day since June -

Wall Street kicked off March with a broad rally Monday that sent the Dow Jones Industrial Average more than 600 points higher and gave the S&P 500 its best day in nine months.

The S&P 500 climbed 2.4%, clawing back nearly all of its losses from last week. More than 90% of the stocks in the benchmark index rose, with technology, financial and industrial companies powering a big share of the S&P 500's gains. Small company stocks also had a strong showing as they continue to outpace the broader market this year.

23. Rush Limbaugh, 'voice of American conservatism,' has died -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Rush Limbaugh, the talk radio host who ripped into liberals, foretold the rise of Donald Trump and laid waste to political correctness with a merry brand of malice that made him one of the most powerful voices on the American right, died Wednesday. He was 70.

24. A look at Tennessee Gov. Lee's third budget proposal -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's Gov. Bill Lee on Monday unveiled his $41.8 billion budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year. The spending plan includes increases for teacher pay and more funds for COVID-19 relief efforts, buoyed by better-than-expected revenues during the COVID-19 pandemic. The budget proposal needs ultimate approval from the Republican-dominant General Assembly. Here's a look at the highlights:

25. Top Davidson County residential sales for fourth quarter 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, fourth quarter 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

26. Dolly knows new statue would be for the birds -

Whatever adjectives might be attached to Dolly Parton – and many come to mind – “underappreciated” would not seem to apply.

Aside from music-related awards too numerous to list, she’s a former Ms. Magazine Woman of the Year, holder of honorary doctorates from Carson-Newman College and the University of Tennessee, a Kennedy Center honoree and a recipient of the American Legion Good Guy Award, Woodrow Wilson Public Service Award and the National Medal of Arts.

27. Selling out or seeing the future? -

When much-honored songwriter, publisher, producer, Music Row Renaissance Man Craig Wiseman is asked about the ongoing flurry of big-name artists like Bob Dylan and Neil Young selling their song catalogs, there is wonder mixed with mirth in his voice.

28. 4 Vols announce transfer plans 2 days after Pruitt's firing -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — Linebacker Henry To'o To'o, running back Eric Gray, linebacker Quavaris Crouch and offensive lineman Jahmir Johnson all entered the NCAA transfer portal Wednesday, two days after Tennessee fired coach Jeremy Pruitt and nine others.

29. Bradley hires Krause as senior adviser for 2 groups -

Mike Krause is joining Bradley Arant Boult Cummings LLP’s Nashville office as a senior adviser in Bradley’s Government Affairs and Economic Development practice groups.

Krause represents clients before the executive and legislative branches of government in both Tennessee and Washington, D.C.

30. Trump's presidential legacy, by the numbers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Words matter. But numbers tell stories, too. Presidential historians and others will plumb them as they assess President Donald Trump's legacy,

Trump's presidency is reflected in a broad range of numbers representing everything from the U.S. death toll during the coronavirus pandemic to the miles of his "big, beautiful wall" along the border with Mexico to the tens of thousands of tweets he sent during four years in office.

31. A look at the 29 people Trump pardoned or gave commutations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — For a second night in a row, President Donald Trump issued a round of pardons and commutations in the final weeks of his presidency, giving full pardons to his former campaign chairman, his son-in-law's father and another of his allies convicted in special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

32. Trump's presidential legacy, by the numbers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Words matter. But numbers tell stories, too. Presidential historians and others will plumb them as they assess President Donald Trump's legacy,

Trump's presidency is reflected in a broad range of numbers representing everything from the U.S. death toll during the coronavirus pandemic to the miles of his "big, beautiful wall" along the border with Mexico to the tens of thousands of tweets he sent during four years in office.

33. Urging mask use, Lee says mandate 'controversial' -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee Gov. Bill Lee said Monday he delivered a weekend address on the pandemic to "cut through the politics" and implore those who shun masks to wear them without him imposing a "controversial" state requirement, bidding to end the nation's worst new COVID-19 infection surge per capita.

34. Top Davidson County residential sales for November 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, November 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

35. Awaiting Yellen at Treasury: Yet another daunting crisis -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Janet Yellen is in line for another top economic policy job — just in time to confront yet another crisis.

Yellen, President-elect Joe Biden's apparent choice for treasury secretary, served on the Federal Reserve's policymaking committee during the 2008-2009 financial crisis that nearly toppled the banking system.

36. Biden taps ex-Fed chair Yellen to lead treasury -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President-elect Joe Biden has chosen former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen to serve as treasury secretary, a pivotal role in which she would help shape and direct his economic policies, according to a person familiar with the transition plans.

37. Biden gives boost to retiring senator's climate change plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A plan championed by retiring Sen. Tom Udall to harness the nation's lands and ocean waters to fight climate change is getting a boost from President-elect Joe Biden, who has made slowing global warming a priority for his incoming administration.

38. Tennessee offers drive-through COVID testing in rural areas -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is offering drive-through COVID-19 testing on Saturday in rural areas in each of the three grand divisions. The testing sites will be open from 9 a.m. to noon local time and will stay open until everyone in line has received a test, according to a news release from Gov. Bill Lee's Unified Command Group.

39. Election splits Congress, GOP bolstered as Democrats falter -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The election scrambled seats in the House and Senate but ultimately left Congress much like it began, deeply split as voters resisted big changes despite the heated race at the top of the ticket for the White House.

40. Democrats' Senate drive halted by GOP; key races undecided -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats faced increasingly long odds as the battle for Senate control hangs in balance, and Republicans brushed back multiple challengers to protect their majority. Still, it was too soon for the GOP to declare victory.

41. Tennessee offers drive-through COVID testing in rural areas -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is offering drive-through COVID-19 testing on Saturday in rural areas in each of the three grand divisions. The testing sites will be open from 9 a.m. to noon local time and will stay open until everyone in line has received a test, according to a news release from Gov. Bill Lee's Unified Command Group.

42. Republicans maintain control in Tennessee Legislature -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Republicans will maintain their supermajority control of Tennessee's General Assembly after Tuesday's election as Democrats failed to make big gains in their attempt to expand their influence over the state.

43. Democrats' Senate drive halted by GOP, but control teeters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats had a disappointing night in the battle for Senate control, but it was too soon for Republicans to take a victory lap Wednesday, although they brushed back multiple challengers to protect their now teetering majority.

44. Trump, Biden hand their fate to voters, with robust turnout -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Voters flocked to the polls on Tuesday despite the threat of the coronavirus and the potential of long lines to choose between President Donald Trump and his Democratic challenger, Joe Biden, in an election that will influence how the U.S. confronts everything from the pandemic to race relations for years to come.

45. AP News Guide: A look at Tennessee's election -

NASHVILLE (AP) — With all eyes on the presidential election, the biggest race in Tennessee remains the open U.S. Senate seat now that Republican incumbent Sen. Lamar Alexander is retiring as his term ends. A handful of U.S. House and legislative seats also remain competitive in the GOP-dominant state. Here is a summary of those races on the ballot:

46. In South, most Black Senate candidates since Reconstruction -

COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — In the battle for control of the U.S. Senate this year, the Deep South is fielding more Black candidates than it has since Reconstruction.

In South Carolina, Jaime Harrison is raising a previously unfathomable amount of money in what has become a competitive fight to unseat one of the more powerful Republicans in the Senate. He's joined by Raphael Warnock in neighboring Georgia, the leading Democrat in a crowded field running for the seat held by an appointed Republican. Mike Espy and Adrian Perkins, meanwhile, are launching spirited bids for the Senate in Mississippi and Louisiana, respectively.

47. Henry, Titans rally past Texans 42-36 in OT, remain unbeaten -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Expectations for Derrick Henry already are pretty high, with his history of mighty stiff arms and long touchdown runs.

Last season's rushing leader keeps finding new ways to top himself, taking the Tennessee Titans along with him yet again.

48. Congress takes another run at airline bailout; fate unclear -

House Democrats on Friday proposed a new $28.8 billion bailout for the airline industry after the carriers began furloughs of more than 32,000 workers to cut costs during a pandemic that has devastated air travel.

49. Tennessee appeals court upholds school voucher ruling -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The Tennessee Court of Appeals on Tuesday upheld a ruling that declared the state's school voucher program unconstitutional.

Davidson County Chancery Court Judge Anne Martin had ruled against the law because it only applies to Memphis and Nashville. A three-member panel of the appellate court upheld that ruling, The Tennessean reported.

50. Trump went even further than other uber-rich to shrink taxes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The tax-avoidance strategies that President Donald Trump capitalized on to shrink his tax bill to essentially zero are surprisingly common among major real estate developers and other uber-wealthy Americans.

51. Lipscomb selects vice provost for health affairs -

Quincy Byrdsong, a veteran health care and higher education leader, has been appointed vice provost for health affairs at Lipscomb University.

For more than 25 years, Byrdsong has served in various leadership roles at health systems and medical schools and universities across the country. In his new role at Lipscomb, Byrdsong will oversee the university’s health science programs, provide vision for the institution’s growth in these areas and engage more collaboratively with other health care entities in the community, Bledsoe said. He begins his post Oct. 1.

52. Ginsburg's body will lie in repose at Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The body of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will lie in repose at the Supreme Court this week, with arrangements to allow for public viewing despite the coronavirus pandemic, the court said Monday.

53. Uncertainty dominates presidential campaign's final stretch -

NEW YORK (AP) — Within President Donald Trump's campaign, some privately feared the worst heading into the national conventions.

They worried a strong showing by Democrat Joe Biden, combined with an underwhelming performance by Trump, would lock in the certainty of a blowout loss that would essentially end the election by September.

54. Biden ally Clyburn brings civil rights legacy to DNC -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In October 1960, a young James Clyburn gathered with other students and the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. as frustrations mounted over civil rights protests in what was becoming a tumultuous, dangerous year.

55. Ex-Fed Chair Yellen advises Biden on virus economic fallout -

WILMINGTON, Del. (AP) — Former Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen was among a team of advisers who briefed Joe Biden on Thursday about the economic fallout from the coronavirus.

The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee and his newly chosen running mate, California Sen. Kamala Harris, participated in the briefing from separate, socially distanced tables at a hotel in Wilmington, Delaware. In a brief appearance with reporters, Biden didn't offer details on the briefing.

56. AP News Guide: A look at Tennessee's Aug. 6 primary races -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The heated race to become the Republican nominee for an open U.S. Senate seat topped Tennessee's primary election Thursday, as well as contested challenges in a handful of U.S. House and legislative seats. Here is a summary of those offices on the ballot:

57. Tennessee appeals court listens to school voucher arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee continued to defend its school voucher program Wednesday, with attorneys asking a state appeals court to reverse a judge's ruling declaring the program illegal.

Davidson County Chancellor Anne C. Martin ruled in May that the school voucher law violated the Tennessee Constitution's "home rule," which says the Legislature can't pass measures singling out individual counties without local support.

58. John Lewis mourned as 'founding father' of 'better America' -

ATLANTA (AP) — John Lewis was celebrated as an American hero during his funeral Thursday as former President Barack Obama and others called on people to follow Lewis' example and fight injustice.

59. GOP tucks $8 billion for military weaponry in virus bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new $1 trillion COVID-19 response package by Senate Republicans is supposed to give the government more weapons to battle the surging coronavirus pandemic. But GOP lawmakers have more than just the "invisible enemy" in mind.

60. Civil rights icon Rep. John Lewis lies in state at Capitol -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a solemn display of bipartisan unity, congressional leaders praised Democratic Rep. John Lewis as a moral force for the nation in a Capitol Rotunda memorial service rich with symbolism and punctuated by the booming, recorded voice of the late civil rights icon.

61. Pelosi, others hail John Lewis as 'conscience' of Congress -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a solemn display of bipartisan unity, congressional leaders praised the late Democratic Rep. John Lewis as a moral force for the nation on Monday in a Capitol Rotunda ceremony rich with symbolism and punctuated by the booming, recorded voice of the late civil rights icon.

62. Congress passes sprawling plan to boost conservation, parks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan bill that would spend nearly $3 billion on conservation projects, outdoor recreation and maintenance of national parks and other public lands is on its way to the president's desk after winning final legislative approval.

63. Poll: Pandemic hurting Americans' finances in disparate ways -

BURTON, Mich. (AP) — Crystal and Chris Martin put off some payments on their home in this blue-collar town near Flint and are pinching pennies to make ends meet until they return to work. In Windsor, Connecticut, Anne Druce's family canceled home improvement projects out of an abundance of caution but remains financially secure.

64. Thomason names 4 Nashville shareholders -

Ten attorneys have been named shareholders at Lewis Thomason, including four based in Nashville. The Nashville attorneys are:

Brad Craig, who focuses his practice on general civil litigation defense, employment law, and education law in the Nashville office. He also regularly counsels boards of education on a variety of issues and his practice includes defending public entities and private businesses before the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, the Office for Civil Rights, and the Tennessee Human Rights Commission.

65. Hagerty leaves board over Black Lives Matter support -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee Republican running for U.S. Senate resigned from the board of a brokerage firm after the company expressed support for the Black Lives Matter movement, according to a letter from the candidate.

66. The best, worst from the 111th General Assembly -

Tennessee legislators, having adjourned sine die and high-tailed it homeward, it’s time for a final report card on the 111th session of the General Assembly.

The good news: It wasn’t all bad. The bad news: It wasn’t much good. Here is my highly subjective list of grades:

67. More U.S. workers getting Juneteenth off as awareness grows -

NEW YORK (AP) — A unprecedented number of U.S. companies are giving employees off for Juneteenth on Friday, raising hopes that the day commemorating the end of slavery could someday become a true national celebration.

68. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's overblown boasts about military, vets -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is exaggerating his accomplishments for the military and veterans.

With his relationship with Pentagon leaders under strain, the president bragged to West Point cadets over the weekend that his administration wholly destroyed the Islamic State group. He also asserted in a televised interview that he completely rebuilt a depleted U.S. military.

69. TN high court won't take over Tennessee voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's highest court declined Thursday to take up an appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of a school voucher program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

70. Liberty Bell Awards to Behm, Nelson, Mosley -

The Nashville Bar Association has chosen Margaret Behm, Jeanie Nelson and Juli Mosley as the recipients of the 2020 Liberty Bell Award for their work in creating Votes for Women, a permanent exhibit at the Nashville Public Library on woman suffrage and the legacy of the 19th Amendment.

71. 1,000 from Tennessee National Guard head to DC amid protests -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is sending about 1,000 members of its National Guard to the nation's capital to help quell continued civil unrest over George Floyd's death, a state official said Tuesday.

72. US cities erupt in more violence as Trump decries `lowlifes' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Tuesday turned up the pressure on governors to quell the violence set off by the death of George Floyd, demanding New York call up the National Guard to stop the "lowlifes and losers."

73. Seniors jump back into the job market despite risks -

Being a member of the 60-plus age group, Carolyn Northup is considered a high risk for COVID-19. So the veteran auto sale representative has spent the last six weeks working from home, connecting with longtime customers and following new leads.

74. Tennessee asks high court to take over voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — School voucher advocates are asking the Tennessee Supreme Court to take up the case of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

75. Biden's VP search puts spotlight on how long he would serve -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden has longed to win the White House for more than three decades. If he finally makes it there after November's election, he's already talking about leaving.

In an effort to ease concerns about his age, the 77-year-old presumptive Democratic nominee has said he wouldn't seek reelection if his mental or physical health declined. He has also referred to himself as a "transition candidate," acting as a bridge to a younger generation of leadership.

76. Judge blocks Tennessee from implementing voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Thursday blocked the state from implementing a contentious school voucher program just days after ruling the program unconstitutional.

The attorney general's office and school choice advocates had sought permission to continue processing applications while the legal battle over the state's voucher program — also known as education savings accounts — moves its way through the courts.

77. In reversal, Lee says state no longer implementing vouchers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee's office announced Wednesday the state has hit pause on a new school voucher program, reversing course just a day after the Republican encouraged parents to apply despite a recent court declaring the program unconstitutional and unenforceable.

78. University of Tennessee eyes fall semester back on campuses -

KNOXVILLE (AP) — The University of Tennessee system plans to end its hiatus on in-person classes amid the coronavirus pandemic and bring students back to campuses for the fall semester.

The university said Wednesday the decision follows the creation of task forces for individual campuses and systemwide.

79. Tennessee seeks permission to continue voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is seeking permission to continue implementing a new school voucher program just days after a judge deemed the law unconstitutional and unenforceable.

The request comes after Gov. Bill Lee raised eyebrows when he announced Tuesday that the state would continue to encourage parents to apply for the vouchers — also known as education savings accounts — despite the judge's order declaring the program "unconstitutional, unlawful and unenforceable."

80. Judge rules Tennessee's voucher law is unconstitutional -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Monday ruled that the state's much-debated school voucher program is illegal and cannot be implemented despite education officials receiving thousands of applications from parents hoping to use public tax dollars on private school tuition.

81. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

82. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

83. HCA joins ventilator distribution effort -

Nashville-based HCA Healthcare will provide as many as 1,000 ventilators as part of the American Hospital Association’s collaboration with the federal government and health systems to distribute the equipment to hospitals experiencing a surge of patients with COVID-19.

84. 'Under siege': Overwhelmed Brooklyn care home tolls 55 dead -

NEW YORK (AP) — As residents at a nursing home in Kirkland, Washington, began dying in late February from a coronavirus outbreak that would eventually take 43 lives, there was little sign of trouble at the Cobble Hill Health Center, a 360-bed facility in an upscale section of Brooklyn.

85. Apply here: How to spend $2.2 trillion — and rescue economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump aims to shovel $2.2 trillion into the U.S. economy over the next few weeks to try to cushion its free fall. But that means putting his fate in the hands of banks, profit-minded businesses and government bureaucrats he has frequently derided, along with a man who has emerged as arguably the biggest power broker to business in Washington: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

86. Why rich students get more financial aid than poor ones -

Colleges are increasingly spending more to woo affluent students with scholarships based solely on academic or other achievements, experts say. And it's leaving those who need aid the most with fewer resources to afford college.

87. Apply here: How to spend $2.2 trillion – and rescue economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump aims to shovel $2.2 trillion into the U.S. economy over the next few weeks to try to cushion its free fall. But that means putting his fate in the hands of banks, profit-minded businesses and government bureaucrats he has frequently derided, along with a man who has emerged as arguably the biggest power broker to business in Washington: Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

88. Tennessee advises doctors to use diapers, swim goggles to protect faces -

NASHVILLE (AP) — The state Department of Health is advising doctors to use diapers and swim goggles to protect their faces if they cannot obtain personal protective equipment due to shortages related to the COVID-19 outbreak, a Tennessee doctor said Thursday.

89. Stocks slump, despite Fed aid, as virus bill stalls again -

NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks fell about 3% on Wall Street Monday as Congress hit another roadblock in talks to inject nearly $2 trillion into the economy. Even an extraordinary flood of support from the Federal Reserve wasn't enough to lift stocks, as frustration with Washington and the number of coronavirus cases rise.

90. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for February 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2020, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

91. Davy or Andy? Who is greatest Tennessean? -

David Crockett, aka Davy: Great Tennessean or greatest Tennessean? Hold your fire, Andrew Jackson fans. I’ll explain later.

First: Efforts to place a statue of Crockett on the prime spot of the Capitol grounds are making progress in the Tennessee legislature. The House bill that would do so, sponsored by Rep. David Hawk, is paired with a Senate bill by Sen. Steve Southerland.

92. Treasury proposal: Deliver $500B to Americans starting April -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Treasury Department said Wednesday it wants to dedicate $500 billion to start issuing direct payments to Americans by early next month as the centerpiece of a $1 trillion plan to stabilize the economy as the coronavirus epidemic threatens a body slam to taxpayers and businesses.

93. Trump declares virus pandemic a national emergency -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Friday declared the coronavirus pandemic a national emergency in order to free up more money and resources. But he denied any responsibility for delays in making testing available for the new virus, whose spread has roiled markets and disrupted the lives of everyday Americans.

94. Trump preparing to invoke emergency powers over coronavirus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump is preparing to invoke emergency powers over the coronavirus outbreak, an emerging development Friday as an aid package teetered in Congress without his full public support.

95. Pelosi, White House near agreement on coronavirus aid bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the Trump administration hoped to announce an agreement Friday on a coronavirus aid package to reassure anxious Americans by providing sick pay, free testing and other resources in an effort to calm teetering financial markets and the mounting crisis.

96. Washington strains for virus response amid public closures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington is straining for an ample response to the coronavirus outbreak that is testing the nation's political and health care systems after President Donald Trump restricted air travel from Europe, Congress ran into trouble approving an aid package and the centers of power — the domed Capitol and stately White House — are being shuttered to visitors.

97. Chicken potpies for storm-scarred souls -

The staff of the Nashville Food Project sat in the darkened conference room at their headquarters in The Nations hours after the March 3 tornado. The power was still out from the horrific tornado that hit North Nashville, Germantown, East Nashville and beyond, cutting a swath of destruction and death that left its victims devastated and Nashville in a state of disbelief.

98. Judge: School choice advocates can intervene in voucher case -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Friday agreed to allow school choice advocates to intervene in a lawsuit challenging the legality of the state's school voucher program.

That means the Liberty Justice Center, the Institute for Justice and the Beacon Center of Tennessee will all have a chance to defend the much-debated voucher program as the case moves through the courts.

99. Fed's Powell faces a puzzling crisis with no simple solution -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jerome Powell is confronting his stiffest test yet as head of the Federal Reserve in an atmosphere vastly altered from what his predecessors faced. It makes an uncertain situation even more challenging.

100. Garden memories yield to tall-skinnies -

Dogan’s Garden – where I discovered mental, physical and spiritual respite – is gone, all but its memory erased by development and viral heritage neglect.

When I learned the home with its yard filled with countless multicolored plastic tulips had been sacrificed, I hastily drove to 2122 Herman Street, where the Rev. Dr. Dogan W. Williams – “just call me Dogan” – had retired after a career in the United Methodist ministry and a life spent advocating equality, kindness, scriptures, Jesus and easy friendship’s warm embrace.