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Editorial Results (free)

1. So, you think you’re an expert on all things related to July 4? -

Happy (almost) Fourth of July! In honor of the 246th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence, here’s a quiz about it and other historical bits from the early days of the country.

No cheating!

2. Officer hailed as hero testifies at Capitol riot trial -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A police officer lauded for his bravery during the U.S. Capitol riot testified Monday that a man carrying a Confederate battle flag jabbed at him with the flagpole before joining the mob that chased him up a staircase.

3. Jan. 6 committee's members are on diverging political paths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nine members of the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol insurrection are on diverging political paths as they prepare for public hearings that could become a defining moment in their careers.

4. Trump's Ukraine impeachment shadows war, risks GOP response -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Donald Trump was impeached in late 2019 after pressuring Ukraine's leader for "a favor," all while withholding $400 million in military aid to help confront Russian-backed separatists, even the staunchest defense hawks in the Republican Party stood virtually united by Trump's side.

5. Biden forest plan stirs dispute over what counts as "old" -

BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — President Joe Biden's order to protect the nation's oldest forests against climate change, wildfires and other problems devastating vast woodlands is raising a simple yet vexing question: When does a forest grow old?

6. A Bezos-Biden squabble: Can corporate taxes tame inflation? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Jeff Bezos this weekend became the latest centibillionaire to launch a political fight on Twitter by denouncing a tweet from President Joe Biden about corporate taxes as "disinformation" and "misdirection."

7. Democrats seek criminal charges against Trump Interior head -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee asked the Justice Departmen t on Wednesday to investigate whether a Trump administration interior secretary engaged in possible criminal conduct while helping an Arizona developer get a crucial permit for a housing project.

8. Democrats seek criminal charges against Trump Interior head -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee on Wednesday asked the Justice Department to investigate whether a Trump administration Interior secretary engaged in possible criminal conduct while helping an Arizona developer get a crucial permit for a housing project.

9. Biden showcases deficit progress in bid to counter critics -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Wednesday highlighted new figures showing the government's red ink will grow less than expected this year and the national debt will shrink this quarter as he tried to counter criticism of his economic leadership amid growing dismay over inflation going into midterm elections that will decide control of Congress.

10. Madeleine Albright honored by Biden, other world leaders -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A veritable who's who of Washington's political and foreign policy elite gathered Wednesday to pay their last respects to the late Madeleine Albright, a child of conflict-ravaged Europe who arrived in the U.S. as an 11-year old girl and became America's first female secretary of state.

11. Brainard wins Senate confirmation to be Fed's vice chair -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate on Tuesday confirmed the nomination of Lael Brainard to a four-year term as vice chair of the Federal Reserve, elevating her to the Fed's No. 2 post in the midst of the central bank's toughest fight against inflation in four decades.

12. Biden's election year challenge: Blame GOP for nation's woes -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has an election-year message for frustrated voters: At least he's trying.

For those who think he isn't doing enough to help Ukraine fend off the Russian invasion, Biden announced $800 million in new military support on Thursday. To ease the pain of high gas prices, he's tapped the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and reopened onshore sales of oil and natural gas leases on public land. And to address historic inflation, Biden has tried to smooth out supply chain-crimping bottlenecks at the nation's ports.

13. Thinking small: Biden scrounges for ways to break through -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With his sweeping domestic agenda on hold and images of horror in Ukraine dominating headlines, President Joe Biden is scrounging for ways to demonstrate that he's still making progress for Americans at a time when many feel the country is heading in the wrong direction.

14. EXPLAINER: Why does it matter if US calls Ukraine genocide -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When President Joe Biden declares Russia's Ukraine war "genocide," it isn't just another strong word.

A formal U.S. follow-up accusing Russia of a campaign aimed at wiping out a targeted group could carry obligations on the world to consider action. That's because of a genocide treaty approved by the U.N. General Assembly in the years immediately after World War II, signed by the United States and more than 150 other nations.

15. Biden: Russia war is genocide, trying to 'wipe out' Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden now says Russia's war in Ukraine amounts to genocide, accusing President Vladimir Putin of trying to "wipe out the idea of even being a Ukrainian."

"Yes, I called it genocide," he told reporters in Iowa on Tuesday shortly before boarding Air Force One to return to Washington. "It's become clearer and clearer."

16. 14 in GOP file for open US House seat in Nashville split -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Fourteen Republicans and two Democrats have met the filing deadline to run for a U.S. House seat in GOP-led Tennessee that opened after state lawmakers carved Democratic-tilted Nashville into three districts.

17. Supreme Court reinstates Trump-era water rule for now -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday reinstated for now a Trump-era rule that curtails the power of states and Native American tribes to block pipelines and other energy projects that can pollute rivers, streams and other waterways.

18. Jan. 6 panel puts Garland in 'precarious' spot, ups pressure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol are increasingly going public with critical statements, court filings and more to deliver a blunt message to Attorney General Merrick Garland and the Department of Justice.

19. Vanderbilt taps 26 notable names to democracy project board -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Vanderbilt University initiative aimed at bridging the gap of political polarization in the U.S. has named 26 members to its advisory board, ranging from politicians to musicians.

20. Judge: Trump likely committed crimes related to election -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge on Monday asserted it is "more likely than not" that former President Donald Trump committed crimes in his attempt to stop the certification of the 2020 election, ruling to order the release of more than 100 emails from Trump adviser John Eastman to the committee investigating the insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

21. AP FACT CHECK: Trump distorts Obama-Biden aid to Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Casting himself as tough on Russia, former President Donald Trump lowballed the amount of U.S. military aid provided to Ukraine during the Obama-Biden administration and claimed that only he himself in recent history didn't face a Russian invasion of another country. Not true.

22. Albright fled the Nazis, climbed to the summit of diplomacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Madeleine Albright fled the Nazis as a child and climbed to the summit of diplomacy and foreign policy in the United States, breaking the glass ceiling as the first female secretary of state and setting the pace for other women to follow.

23. Madeleine Albright, 1st female US secretary of state, dies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Madeleine Albright, the first female U.S. secretary of state, has died of cancer, her family said Wednesday. She was 84.

President Bill Clinton chose Albright as America's top diplomat in 1996, and she served in that capacity for the last four years of the Clinton administration. She had previously been Clinton's ambassador to the United Nations.

24. Under the hood of $1.5T bill for Ukraine, pandemic, agencies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Even for Congress, the $1.5 trillion price tag for its bipartisan package helping Ukraine and financing federal agencies for the last half of this year is a lot of money. And 2,741 pages is a long, long bill.

25. Harris heads to Poland amid turbulence over jets for Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Kamala Harris' trip to Warsaw to thank Poland for taking in hundreds of thousands of Ukrainians fleeing Russia's invasion took an unexpected turn before she even left Washington. She'll be parachuting into the middle of unexpected diplomatic turbulence over fighter jets.

26. Online university fined $22M for misleading students -

SAN DIEGO (AP) — A California judge has ordered an online, for-profit university and its former parent company to pay $22 million in penalties, saying they mislead students about the costs of their education, among other things, the state's attorney general announced Monday.

27. Dolly Parton, James Patterson — in words and music -

LA VERGNE (AP) — Sometimes even Dolly Parton has a hard time keeping up with the legend of Dolly Parton.

"I often go into my museum in Dollywood, you know, because I'm in the mood to be there or we're in there doing something or putting something new in. And I look at all that stuff and think 'When, how did that happen?'" she says. "I shake my head when I see, like a documentary or something. I think how did I do all that, how did I get all that done?"

28. On cusp of Biden speech, a state of disunity, funk and peril -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In good times or bad, American presidents come to Congress with a diagnosis that hardly differs over the decades. In their State of the Union speeches, they declare "the state of our union is strong" or words very much like it.

29. For high court nominees 'When's your birthday?' matters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Help wanted: Well-respected liberal jurist. Black. Female. Seniors need not apply.

President Joe Biden's search for a nominee to the Supreme Court isn't just limited by credentials, race and gender. The reality for the nation's oldest president — and for any president — is that for a lifetime appointment on the nation's highest court, youth is particularly prized.

30. Trump's stash of documents shows 'fragile' historical record -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As president, Donald Trump never liked to leave a paper trail. He avoided email, admonished aides to stop taking notes during meetings and ripped up documents when he was finished with them.

31. EXPLAINER: Where could revelations about Trump records lead? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Revelations that Donald Trump took government records with him to Mar-a-Lago are creating a political headache for the former president — and a potential legal one, too.

32. Senators strike bipartisan deal on domestic violence bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A bipartisan group of U.S. senators introduced a proposal Wednesday to reauthorize the 1990s-era law that extends protections for victims of domestic and sexual violence after it lapsed in 2019 because of Republican opposition.

33. EXPLAINER: How Alabama congressional map got to high court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A divided Supreme Court is allowing Alabama to use re-drawn congressional districts for the 2022 elections that a lower court found had improperly diluted the votes of Black residents. The high court's action Monday is a win for Republicans and sets the stage for a potentially major decision next year about race and redistricting that could affect minority political representation across the country.

34. Breyer leaves a court more conservative than one he joined -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the nearly 30 years that Justice Stephen Breyer has spent on the Supreme Court, it has been conservative, then more conservative and now much more conservative.

The court's rapid rightward shift in recent years was a change for the liberal jurist, who early in his career sat with the same group of eight other justices for more than a decade. But Breyer, who announced his retirement Thursday, said repeatedly that the court should not be seen as political. Judges, he liked to say, are not "junior-league politicians."

35. Justice Breyer to retire, giving Biden first court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Liberal Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer is retiring, giving President Joe Biden an opening he has pledged to fill by naming the first Black woman to the high court.

Breyer, 83, has been a pragmatic force on a court that has grown increasingly conservative in recent years, trying to forge majorities with more moderate justices right and left of center.

36. Biden has long been preparing for a Supreme Court pick -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has already narrowed the field for his first Supreme Court pick.

Biden said as a presidential candidate that if he were given the chance to nominate someone to the court, he would make history by choosing a Black woman. And word on Wednesday that Justice Stephen Breyer plans to retire should give Biden that opportunity.

37. In news conference, Biden calls on Fed to fight inflation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At a Wednesday news conference marking his first year in office, President Joe Biden called on the Federal Reserve to do more to fight inflation by pulling back on its monetary boosting of the U.S. economy.

38. 40 federal judges confirmed in 2021; Biden nominates 2 more -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden on Thursday made two final nominations to the federal bench this year as he caps his first year in office with 40 judges confirmed, the most since Ronald Reagan was president.

39. COVID-expanded child tax credit benefit nears lapse -

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's one of the most far-reaching of all the federal aid programs launched during the COVID-19 pandemic — up to $300 per child going directly into the bank accounts of families on the 15th of every month.

40. WH aims to restore faith in government by improving services -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden signed an executive order Monday aimed at rebuilding the public's trust in government by making it easier to do things like renew passports, apply for Social Security benefits and get aid after natural disasters.

41. Services in Washington, Kansas will continue to honor Dole -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole was to be honored with a private service at Washington National Cathedral and a public one at the World War II Memorial a day after lying in state at the U.S. Capitol, where President Joe Biden and top leaders from both parties saluted a "giant in our history."

42. Dole: 'Genuine hero' paid war's price, triumphed in Senate -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole was honored Friday at Washington National Cathedral and the World War II monument he helped create as top leaders from both parties saluted the longtime Kansas senator's ability to practice bare-knuckle politics without losing civility.

43. Biden to warn Putin of economic pain if he invades Ukraine -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is ready to warn Vladimir Putin during a video call Tuesday that Russia will face economy-jarring sanctions if it invades neighboring Ukraine as Biden seeks a diplomatic solution to deal with the tens of thousands of Russian troops massed near the Ukraine border.

44. Bob Dole to lie in state at Capitol as nation honors senator -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Bob Dole's casket will lie in state in the U.S. Capitol on Thursday as congressional leaders honor the former Republican presidential candidate and World War II veteran who served in Congress for 36 years.

45. Bob Dole, a man of war, power, zingers and denied ambition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Bob Dole willed himself to walk again after paralyzing war wounds, ran for Congress with a right arm too damaged to shake hands, and rose through the Senate ranks to become a long-serving Republican leader and tough and tireless champion of his party.

46. Colin Powell remembered as a model for future generations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Colin L. Powell, the trailblazing soldier-diplomat who rose from humble beginnings to become the first Black secretary of state, was remembered by family and friends Friday as a principled man of humility and grace whose decorated record of leadership can serve as a model for generations to come.

47. Youngkin's Virginia win jolts Democrats, tight race in NJ -

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Republican Glenn Youngkin won the Virginia governor's race early Wednesday, tapping into culture war fights over schools and race to unite former President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters with enough suburban voters to become the first GOP candidate to win statewide office in a dozen years.

48. Paid leave loss hits hard for Dems after decades of advocacy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Sen. Patty Murray of Washington, who was elected in 1992 as a self described "mom in tennis shoes," has been fighting for paid family and medical leave for decades. For much of this year she appeared to be winning.

49. Reaction to Colin Powell's death from US and world figures -

WASHINGTON (AP) — World figures are reacting to the death of Colin Powell, a Vietnam War veteran who rose to the rank of four-star general and became the first Black chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and then secretary of state. Powell died Monday of COVID-19 complications at age 84.

50. Bill Clinton in hospital for non-COVID-19-related infection -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former President Bill Clinton was admitted to a Southern California hospital with an infection but is "on the mend," his spokesman said.

51. Biden to restore 3 national monuments cut by Trump -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will restore two sprawling national monuments in Utah that have been at the center of a long-running public lands dispute, and a separate marine conservation area in New England that recently has been used for commercial fishing. Environmental protections at all three monuments had been stripped by former President Donald Trump.

52. Post-Trump, Democrats push to curb presidential powers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats say they will vote on legislation this fall to curb the power of the president, an effort to rein in executive powers that they say President Donald Trump flagrantly abused.

53. Justice Department reviewing policies on transgender inmates -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Justice Department is reviewing its policies on housing transgender inmates in the federal prison system after protections for transgender prisoners were rolled back in the Trump administration, The Associated Press has learned.

54. Elizabeth Holmes' trial to dissect downfall of a tech star -

Just six years ago, Elizabeth Holmes seemed destined to fulfill her dream of becoming Silicon Valley's next superstar. She was the subject of business magazine cover stories describing her as the youngest self-made female billionaire in history, former President Bill Clinton was reverently quizzing her about her thoughts on technology, and then Vice President Joe Biden was hailing her ideas as an inspiration.

55. Biden's judges: More diverse and more of them -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With no Supreme Court opening to slow them, President Joe Biden and Senate Democrats are putting judges on federal trial and appellate courts at a much faster clip than any of Biden's recent predecessors, including former President Donald Trump.

56. Pro-Sanders group rebranding into 'pragmatic progressives' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Stinging from the disappointment of Bernie Sanders' loss in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary, supporters pumped millions into the powerful advocacy group Our Revolution to keep the progressive fight alive and prepare for another swing at the White House.

57. Can Biden's plans manufacture more US factory jobs? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden will be trying to connect with blue-collar workers Wednesday when he travels to a truck factory in Pennsylvania to advocate for government investments and clean energy as ways to strengthen U.S. manufacturing.

58. 50-year war on drugs imprisoned millions of Black Americans -

Landscaping was hardly his lifelong dream. As a teenager, Alton Lucas believed basketball or music would pluck him out of North Carolina and take him around the world. In the late 1980s, he was the right-hand man to his musical best friend, Youtha Anthony Fowler, who many hip hop and R&B heads know as DJ Nabs.

59. Bezos' comments on workers after spaceflight draws rebuke -

NEW YORK (AP) — The world's richest man wanted to say thanks to the people who made his brief trip into space Tuesday possible.

But for some, Amazon founder Jeff Bezos' expression of gratitude went over like a lead rocket.

60. A look at 8 lawmakers appointed to probe Jan. 6 attack -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is acting swiftly to launch a new investigation of the violent Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, choosing a diverse slate of eight lawmakers — one from the opposing party — to serve on a select committee with subpoena power.

61. $40B pledged for gender equality, with $2B from Gates group -

The U.N.-sponsored global gathering for gender equality generated about $40 billion in pledges towards aiding women and girls on Wednesday, partly fueled by a significant $2.1 billion contribution from Bill and Melinda Gates' namesake foundation.

62. Lucky number: Biden is 13th US president to meet the queen -

LONDON (AP) — Imagine trying to make an impression on someone who's met, well, almost everyone.

Such is the challenge for President Joe Biden, who is set to sip tea with Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday at Windsor Castle after a Group of Seven leaders' summit in southwestern England.

63. Johnson & Johnson asks high court to void $2B talc verdict -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Johnson & Johnson is asking for Supreme Court review of a $2 billion verdict in favor of women who claim they developed ovarian cancer from using the company's talc products.

The case features an array of high-profile attorneys, some in unusual alliances, including former independent counsel Kenneth Starr, who is representing the women who sued Johnson & Johnson. The nation's largest business groups are backing the company, and a justice's father also makes an appearance because of his long association with the trade group for cosmetics and personal care products.

64. GOP senators ready $1T infrastructure counteroffer to Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republicans revived negotiations over President Joe Biden's sweeping investment plan, preparing a $1 trillion infrastructure proposal that would be funded with COVID-19 relief money as a counteroffer to the White House ahead of a Memorial Day deadline toward a bipartisan deal.

65. AP source: Biden to tap Emanuel for ambassador to Japan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is expected to nominate former Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel to serve as the U.S. ambassador to Japan, according to a person familiar with the president's decision.

66. Biden turns to Georgia to begin pitch for huge spending plan -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the closing days of his presidential campaign, Joe Biden swung through the Georgia town where Franklin Delano Roosevelt coped with polio, making the case that government can be a force for good. Now, 100 days after taking office, Biden is returning to the state trying to sell voters on his ambitious vision.

67. Analysis: Biden pitches big government as antidote to crises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Forty years ago, a newly elected American president declared government the source of many of the nation's problems, reshaping the parameters of U.S. politics for decades to come. On Wednesday night, President Joe Biden unabashedly embraced government as the solution.

68. AP FACT CHECK: Biden skews record on migrants; GOP on virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Taking a swipe at his predecessor, President Joe Biden gave a distorted account of the historical forces driving migrants to the U.S. border, glossing over the multitudes who were desperate to escape poverty in their homelands when he was vice president.

69. Gates helps launch drive for global vaccine distribution -

A new mass fundraising campaign aims to inspire 50 million people around the world to make small donations to Covax, the international effort to push for equitable global distribution of COVID-19 vaccinations.

70. Bill passes to stop executions of intellectually disabled -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers on Monday passed legislation designed to prevent death row inmates with an intellectual disability from being executed.

The action sends the bill to Republican Gov. Bill Lee's desk, with implications for the case of a current death row inmate. Pervis Payne's attorneys have argued he is intellectually disabled as they fight to prevent the state from executing him. He received a temporary reprieve from the governor last November due to the COVID-19 pandemic, but that relief has since expired.

71. Biden's virtual climate summit: Diplomacy sans human touch -

WASHINGTON (AP) — There will be no hands to shake or backs to slap, no way to look a foreign leader in the eye. The small human moments that define statecraft will be reduced to images on a screen.

72. Tennessee closer to banning executions of intellectually disabled -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee lawmakers are inching closer to advancing legislation designed to prevent death row inmates with an intellectual disability from being executed.

The proposal has gained a groundswell of support from disability advocates, legal experts and death penalty critics who argue Tennessee is long overdue in addressing the matter.

73. 'New strategy': Politicians in crisis refuse calls to resign -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The mere whiff of a scandal once unraveled political careers with stunning speed. Not anymore.

Suddenly embroiled in a federal sex trafficking investigation, Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida has denied the allegations, rebuffed suggestions that he resign and sent fundraising appeals that portray him as a victim of a "smear campaign." He's expected to make a high-profile appearance Friday at former President Donald Trump's Doral golf club in Miami.

74. Breyer says big Supreme Court changes could diminish trust -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Justice Stephen Breyer on Tuesday said liberal advocates of big changes at the Supreme Court, including expanding the number of justices, should think "long and hard" about what they're proposing.

75. Republicans trod well-worn path to court to sue Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — These are busy days for Republican state attorneys general, filing repeated lawsuits that claim President Joe Biden and his administration are overstepping their authority on immigration, climate change, the environment and taxes.

76. Biden readies for 1st news conference, White House tradition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — He'd led allied armies in the defeat of Nazi Germany only to find himself, a decade later, a tad intimidated before the cameras in an echoey room of the Old Executive Office Building, ready to make history again.

77. Biden Cabinet near complete but hundreds of jobs still open -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's Cabinet is nearly complete with the confirmation of Labor Secretary Marty Walsh. But the work of building his administration is just beginning, as Biden has hundreds of key presidential appointments to make to fill out the federal government.

78. Breyer mum as some liberals urge him to quit Supreme Court -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Forgive progressives who aren't looking forward to the sequel of their personal "Nightmare on First Street," a Supreme Court succession story.

The original followed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's decision to forgo retirement from the high court, located on First Street in Washington, when Democrats controlled the White House and the Senate during six years of Barack Obama's presidency, until 2015.

79. 'I don't need the vaccine': GOP worries threaten virus fight -

FRONT ROYAL, Virginia (AP) — In this rural swath of Virginia's Shenandoah valley, former President Donald Trump remains deeply admired, with lawn signs and campaign flags still dotting the landscape. The vaccines aimed at taming the coronavirus, however, aren't so popular.

80. Biden to name Sperling to oversee COVID-19 relief package -

Gene Sperling, a veteran of the Clinton and Obama administrations, will lead the oversight for distributing funds from President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion coronavirus rescue package, a White House official said Monday.

81. Former presidents, first ladies (except Trumps) urge Americans to get shots -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Four former presidents are urging Americans to get vaccinated as soon as COVID-19 doses are available to them, as part of a campaign to overcome hesitancy about the shots.

Two public service announcements from the Ad Council and the business-supported COVID Collaborative feature Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter as well as first ladies Michelle Obama, Laura Bush, Hillary Clinton, and Rosalynn Carter. All of them have received doses of the COVID-19 vaccines.

82. GOP struggles to define Biden, turns to culture wars instead -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden and the Democrats were on the brink of pushing through sprawling legislation with an eyepopping, $1.9 trillion price tag.

But many Republican politicians and conservative commentators had other priorities in recent days. A passionate defense of Dr. Seuss. Serious questions about the future of Mr. Potato Head. Intense scrutiny of Meghan Markle.

83. Biden's big relief package a bet gov't can help cure America -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden wants America to know that he's from the government and he's here to help.

That sentiment became a well-worn punchline under Ronald Reagan and shaped the politics of both parties for four decades. Democrat Bill Clinton declared the era of big government over in the 1990s, Barack Obama largely kept his party in the same lane and Republican Donald Trump campaigned on the premise that Washington was full of morons, outplayed by the Chinese and others.

84. Budget nominee Tanden withdraws nomination amid opposition -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's pick to head the Office of Management and Budget, Neera Tanden, has withdrawn her nomination after she faced opposition from key Democratic and Republican senators for her controversial tweets.

85. Biden's Cabinet half-empty after slow start in confirmations -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's Cabinet is taking shape at the slowest pace of any in modern history, with just over a dozen nominees for top posts confirmed more than a month into his tenure.

86. A Biden edge in COVID-19 bill: Dems reluctant to wound him -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic leaders have a potent dynamic on their side as Congress preps for its first votes on the party's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 relief bill: Would any Democrat dare cast the vote that scuttles new President Joe Biden's leadoff initiative?

87. Rush Limbaugh, 'voice of American conservatism,' has died -

PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Rush Limbaugh, the talk radio host who ripped into liberals, foretold the rise of Donald Trump and laid waste to political correctness with a merry brand of malice that made him one of the most powerful voices on the American right, died Wednesday. He was 70.

88. Trump's historic 2nd trial opens with jarring video of siege -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats opened Donald Trump's historic second impeachment trial Tuesday by showing the former president whipping up a rally crowd to march to the Capitol and "fight like hell" against his reelection defeat, followed by graphic video of the deadly attack on Congress  that came soon after.

89. Yellen: Biden's plan could restore full employment by 2022 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Sunday the country was still in a "deep hole" with millions of lost jobs but that President Joe Biden's $1.9 trillion relief plan could generate enough growth to restore full employment by next year.

90. Biden heading to Delaware as CDC recommends avoiding travel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden is heading back to his home in Delaware on Friday to spend the weekend with his wife and family, even as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that Americans forgo travel because of the coronavirus pandemic.

91. Biden seeks to go big, fast and alone on COVID relief -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden laid out his case Friday for moving fast and without Republicans, if necessary, to pass $1.9 trillion in coronavirus relief, armed with new signs of economic strain brought on by the continuing pandemic.

92. Senate confirms Pete Buttigieg as transportation secretary -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Pete Buttigieg won Senate approval Tuesday as transportation secretary, the first openly gay person to be confirmed to a Cabinet post. He'll be tasked with advancing President Joe Biden's ambitious agenda of rebuilding the nation's infrastructure and fighting climate change.

93. Biden seen likely to keep Space Force, a Trump favorite -

WASHINGTON (AP) — To the last moments of his presidency, Donald Trump trumpeted Space Force as a creation for the ages. And while President Joe Biden has quickly undone other Trump initiatives, the space-faring service seems likely to survive, even if the new administration pushes it lower on the list of defense priorities.

94. Kerry aims to talk US back into a lead role in climate fight -

From a wood-paneled library in his Boston mansion, new climate envoy John Kerry is talking the U.S. back into a leading role in global climate action, making clear the nation isn't just revving up its own efforts to reduce oil, gas and coal pollution but that it intends to push everyone in the world to do more, too.

95. Hank Aaron, baseball's one-time home run king, dies at 86 -

ATLANTA (AP) — Hank Aaron, who endured racist threats with stoic dignity during his pursuit of Babe Ruth's home run record and gracefully left his mark as one of baseball's greatest all-around players, died Friday. He was 86.

96. Biden takes the helm, appeals for unity to take on crises -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States, declaring that "democracy has prevailed" and summoning American resilience and unity to confront the deeply divided nation's historic confluence of crises.

97. Trump's pardon largesse a boon for well-connected fraudsters -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A former congressman who pocketed millions of dollars in bribes from defense contractors. A Republican fundraiser who paid handsome sums to illicitly lobby a presidential administration. An influential voice in conservative circles accused of duping donors who supported a border wall.

98. Wall Street hits records as hopes build for more stimulus -

Wall Street marked the dawn of President Joe Biden's administration with stocks rallying to record highs as hopes build that new leadership in Washington will mean more support for the struggling U.S. economy.

99. Trump frees former aides from ethics pledge, lobbying ban -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Donald Trump, in one of his final acts as president, released current and former members of his administration from the terms of their ethics pledge, a move that once again laid bare the failure to meet his 2016 campaign promise to "drain the swamp."

100. Biden takes the helm as president: 'Democracy has prevailed' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Joe Biden was sworn in as the 46th president of the United States on Wednesday, declaring that "democracy has prevailed" and summoning American resilience and unity to confront the deeply divided nation's historic confluence of crises.