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Editorial Results (free)

1. Inflation at 40-year high pressures consumers, Fed and Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation jumped at its fastest pace in nearly 40 years last month, a 7% spike from a year earlier that is increasing household expenses, eating into wage gains and heaping pressure on President Joe Biden and the Federal Reserve to address what has become the biggest threat to the U.S. economy.

2. US shoppers find some groceries scarce due to virus, weather -

Benjamin Whitely headed to a Safeway supermarket in Washington D.C. on Tuesday to grab some items for dinner. But he was disappointed to find the vegetable bins barren and a sparse selection of turkey, chicken and milk.

3. 'I trusted the President': Jan. 6 rioters in their own words -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Facing prison time, many Jan. 6 rioters admit they were wrong to enter the U.S. Capitol and disavow political violence, despite what former President Donald Trump claims in spreading lies about the attack.

4. Omicron upends return to US schools and workplaces -

Some school systems around the U.S. extended their holiday break Monday or switched back to online instruction because of the explosion in COVID-19 cases, while others pressed ahead with in-person classes amid a seemingly growing sense that Americans will have to learn to co-exist with the virus.

5. Supply shortages and emboldened workers: A changed economy -

Employees at a fast-food restaurant in Sacramento, California, exasperated over working in stifling heat for low wages, demanded more pay and a new air conditioner — and got both.

Customer orders poured in to an Italian auto supplier, which struggled to get hold of enough supplies of everything from plastic to microchips to meet the demand.

6. Modest 0.3% rise in retail sales, but optimism still buoyed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans slowed their spending from October to November but still continued to shop ahead of the critical holiday season, brushing off rising prices and shortages.

Retail sales rose a modest, seasonally adjusted 0.3% in November compared with the previous month when sales jumped 1.8%, the U.S. Commerce Department said Wednesday.

7. Companies rethink return-to-office plans amid omicron cases -

NEW YORK (AP) — Companies of all sizes are rethinking their plans to send workers back to the office as the new omicron variant adds another layer of uncertainty.

Alphabet's Google and the nation's second largest automaker Ford Co. are among those once again delaying their return-to-office plans, while other businesses whose employees have already returned are considering adding extra precautions like requiring masks. Officials in the United Kingdom, Denmark, Norway and Sweden also have asked people in recent days to work from home if they can because of concerns about the variant.

8. Shoppers are back in store, online, but virus impact lingers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are spending freely and going back to store shopping, knocking out some of the momentum in online sales from last year when Americans were making many of their purchases exclusively via the internet.

9. US overdose deaths topped 100,000 in one year, officials say -

NEW YORK (AP) — An estimated 100,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in one year, a never-before-seen milestone that health officials say is tied to the COVID-19 pandemic and a more dangerous drug supply.

10. Macy's, Kohl's post strong results heading into holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — Department store chains Macy's and Kohl's delivered strong results for the fiscal third quarter as shoppers go back to buying dresses and other goods that fell to the bottom of the shopping list when the pandemic struck.

11. Target tames global supply backups; sales surge 13.2% in Q3 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target delivered another strong quarter, overcoming a slew of challenges from inflationary pressures to congested ports.

Third-quarter profits rose nearly 47%, while sales increased 13.2%, both exceeding expectations and the Minneapolis company raised projections for fourth-quarter comparable store sales.

12. Top Davidson County residential sales for October 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, October 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

13. A mother’s long-silent voice returns to inspire -

Becca Stevens shares intimate details about her life’s journey, in books, in sermons, in friendly conversation. They flow as generously as the fragrant oils she uses to anoint her children’s feet, the wounded women she loves and serves, and the congregants at her little chapel at Vanderbilt University.

14. Retail trade group: holiday sales could break new records -

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Retail Federation, the nation's largest retail trade group, expects that holiday sales gain could shatter last year's record-breaking season even as a snarled global supply chain slows the flow of goods and results in higher prices for a broad range of items.

15. Resilient shoppers push retail sales up 0.7% in September -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans continued to spend at a solid clip in September even while facing sticker shock in grocery aisles, car lots and restaurants as snarled global supply chains slow the flow of goods.

16. Companies scraping for staff ahead of the holidays -

NEW YORK (AP) — All employers want for Christmas is some holiday help. But they might not get their wish.

Companies that typically hire thousands of seasonal workers are heading into the holidays during one of the tightest job markets in decades, making it unlikely they'll find all the workers they need. For shoppers, it might mean a less than jolly holiday shopping experience, with unstaffed store aisles and online orders that take longer than usual to fill.

17. Toymakers race to get products on shelves amid supply clogs -

NEW YORK (AP) — Running out of time to get its products on store shelves ahead of the holidays, the Basic Fun toy company made an unprecedented decision: It's leaving one-third of its iconic Tonka Mighty Dump Trucks destined for the U.S. in China.

18. Top Davidson County commercial sales for August 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

19. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

20. List low, sell high: Let the bidders drive up the price -

With the post-Labor Day listing surge days away and the local real estate market spinning out of control, the feeding frenzy will once again fly into full swing. And while there are thousands of buyers hovering and an abundance of sellers, overpricing houses could be a big mistake.

21. With sales still surging, Best Buy raises prospects for 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Best Buy raised its sales outlook for the year after breezing past Wall Street expectations in the second quarter.

The nation's largest consumer electronics chain joined the slew of other major retailers like Walmart, Target and Macy's putting up banner numbers, suggesting that Americans have continued to be spend even as the delta variant spreads.

22. Target extends streak even as online sales growth cools -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's streak of strong results extended into its latest quarter but its skyrocketing online sales growth has come back to earth.

The Minneapolis retailer reported Wednesday that sales at its stores that have been open for at least a year rose 8.7% in the three-month period that ended July 31. That was on top of a 10.9% growth in the same 2020 span.

23. Top Davidson County residential sales for July 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, July 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

24. Free samples are back at Costco, but with safety in mind -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Pat Curry spotted bite-sized wood-fire rotisserie chicken with portabella mushroom at her local Costco in early June, she felt "giddy." After a 14-month hiatus, free samples were back.

25. Fewer working-age people may slow economy. Will it lift pay? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As America's job market rebounds this summer and the need for workers intensifies, employers won't likely have a chance to relax anytime soon. Worker shortages will likely persist for years after the fast-reopening economy shakes off its growing pains.

26. Rental assistance falls victim to politics, bureaucracy -

Before the pandemic hit, Jacqueline Bartley, a mother of two girls and a boy, had a comfortable life. Then the 41-year-old lost her job at American Airlines, quickly spent her savings and found herself months behind on the $1,350-a-month home she rented. Until then she had never missed a rent payment.

27. Top Davidson County commercial sales for May 2021 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

28. Lucky number: Biden is 13th US president to meet the queen -

LONDON (AP) — Imagine trying to make an impression on someone who's met, well, almost everyone.

Such is the challenge for President Joe Biden, who is set to sip tea with Queen Elizabeth II on Sunday at Windsor Castle after a Group of Seven leaders' summit in southwestern England.

29. Stores expect strong sales as children return to classrooms -

NEW YORK (AP) — As more children go back to the physical classroom, families are expected to spend robustly on a wide range of items, particularly trendy clothing like cropped tops, for the critical back-to-school season, according to one key spending measure.

30. Another jump in prices tightens the squeeze on US consumers -

WASHINGTON (AP) — American consumers absorbed another surge in prices in May — a 0.6% increase over April and 5% over the past year, the biggest 12-month inflation spike since 2008.

The May rise in consumer prices that the Labor Department reported Thursday reflected a range of goods and services now in growing demand as people increasingly shop, travel, dine out and attend entertainment events in a rapidly reopening economy.

31. Top Davidson County residential sales for May 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

32. US adds 559K jobs as firms still struggle to fill positions -

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. employers added a modest 559,000 jobs in May, an improvement from April's sluggish gain but still evidence that many companies are struggling to find enough workers as the economy rapidly recovers from the pandemic recession.

33. Shoppers go back to stores, but retailers face challenges -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans are going back to one of their favorite pastimes: store shopping.

With more people getting vaccinated and dropping their face masks, retailers from Walmart to Macy's are seeing an eager return to their stores after more than a year of their customers migrating online during the pandemic.

34. Target's profit surges as Americans cast restrictions aside -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target's sales and profits surged in the first quarter as its customers, emerging from the pandemic, returned in big numbers for dresses, cosmetics and luggage.

Sales at stores opened at least a year jumped 18% in the three-month period that ended May 1. That follows a 6.9% increase in the previous quarter. Online sales soared 50% after rocketing 118% higher in the final quarter of 2020.

35. Retailer results so far show people are going out, spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — At Walmart, sales of teeth whitener are popping as customers take their masks off. So are travel items. Macy's says that special occasion dressing like prom dresses are on the upswing as well as luggage, men's tailored clothing, and dressy sandals.

36. Walmart sales still boom as pandemic eases, stimulus helps -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart blew past Wall Street projections in the first quarter with U.S. stimulus payments to Americans helping to boost sales and the company raised its expectations for the year.

37. Macy's emerges from pandemic by swinging to surprise profit -

Macy's emerged from an unprecedented year with a surprising swing back into the profit column and it boosted its guidance for all of 2021.

Sales were fueled by government stimulus checks and and the massive rollout of vaccines that have emboldened Americans to head outdoors again, the company said.

38. US recommends 'pause' for J&J shots in blow to vaccine drive -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. on Tuesday recommended a "pause" in using the single-dose Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine to investigate reports of rare but potentially dangerous blood clots, setting off a chain reaction worldwide and dealing a setback to the global vaccine campaign.

39. 'How many of us will be left?' Catholic nuns face loss, pain -

GREENSBURG, Pa. (AP) — The nuns' daily email update was overtaken by news of infections. Ambulances blared into the driveways of their convents. Prayers for the sick went unanswered, prayers for the dead grew monotonous and, their cloistered world suddenly caving in, some of the sisters' thoughts were halting.

40. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

41. After pandemic year, weary world looks back — and forward -

No one has been untouched. Not the Michigan woman who awakened one morning, her wife dead by her side. Not the domestic worker in Mozambique, her livelihood threatened by the virus. Not the North Carolina mother who struggled to keep her business and her family going amid rising anti-Asian ugliness. Not the sixth-grader, exiled from the classroom in the blink of an eye.

42. Target powers through pandemic; sales growth explodes in 2020 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target will plow $4 billion into its business each year for the next several years to redo its stores and add new ones as well as speed up its delivery network, as the discounter aims to keep up with increasingly demanding shoppers shaped by the pandemic.

43. Macy's closes out a horrendous year with hope for 2021 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's is looking ahead to a year of recovery and rebuilding from the pandemic as the iconic department store chain offered annual forecasts that beat Wall Street forecasts.

Driving that optimism is Macy's push to accelerate online sales, while focusing on physical stores at top-tier malls and modernizing its supplier network to speed up deliveries.

44. Walmart sales still surging, but a chill may be on the way -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart is raising wages for 425,000 of its 1.5 million U.S. workers and is investing $14 billion this year to speed up its distribution network as the nation's largest retailer navigates vast industry changes that were accelerated by the pandemic.

45. GameStop's stupefying stock rise doesn't hide its reality -

NEW YORK (AP) — Behind GameStop's stock surge is the grim reality of its prospects: The video game retailer is floundering even as the industry around it is booming.

GameStop has been swept up in a battle between big-moneyed hedge funds betting against it and small investors trying to prop it up. That has caused GameStop's share price to soar despite the shaky financials underneath.

46. U.S. retail sales fell in December for 3rd straight month -

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans cut back on spending in December for the third-straight month as a surge in virus cases kept people away from stores during the critical holiday shopping season.

The U.S. Commerce Department said Friday that retail sales fell a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in December from the month before, a decline Wall Street analysts weren't expecting. Sales also fell in October and November, even as retailers tried to get people shopping for Christmas gifts early by offering deals before Halloween.

47. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

48. Vaccine injury claims could face bureaucratic 'black hole' -

Lost in the U.S. launch of the coronavirus vaccine is a fact most don't know when they roll up their sleeves: In rare cases of serious illness from the shots, the injured are blocked from suing and steered instead to an obscure federal bureaucracy with a record of seldom paying claims.

49. The holidays could make or break struggling stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Clothing stores and specialty retailers are offering big discounts and heavily promoting curbside pickup in hopes of rescuing a lackluster holiday shopping season in which surging coronavirus cases have kept many shoppers at home.

50. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

51. Americans risk traveling over Thanksgiving despite warnings -

Millions of Americans took to the skies and the highways ahead of Thanksgiving at the risk of pouring gasoline on the coronavirus fire, disregarding increasingly dire warnings that they stay home and limit their holiday gatherings to members of their own household.

52. Retail trade group sees solid holiday sales despite pandemic -

NEW YORK (AP) — The National Retail Federation, the nation's largest retail trade group, expects that holiday sales could actually exceed growth seen in prior seasons, despite all the uncertainty surrounding the pandemic.

53. Clarksville cemetery among 6 added to historic register -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A cemetery, a church and an old post office are among six properties in Tennessee that have been named to the National Register of Historic Places.

The six locations have been placed on the national list of cultural resources worthy of preservation, The Tennessee Historical Commission said Friday in a news release.

54. Target gains steam heading into crucial holiday season -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target is the latest big box U.S. retailer to show that it's prospering during the pandemic.

The Minneapolis company reported Wednesday that its online sales surged 155% in the three months that ended Oct. 31. Sales at its stores opened for a least a year rose 10%. Customer traffic rose 4.5% and average dollars spent rose nearly 16%.

55. Another booming quarter for Walmart but sales are slowing -

NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart turned out another stellar quarter as the world's largest retailer powers through a pandemic that has felled other national chains.

But sales at stores opened at least a year slowed in the three months that ended with October compared with earlier this year as the pandemic gained ground. Americans spent more per trip when they did go to Walmart, but they cut down on the number of visits they made.

56. Here comes Santa Claus — with face masks and plexiglass -

NEW YORK (AP) — Santa Claus is coming to the mall — just don't try to sit on his lap.

Despite the pandemic — and the fact that Santa's age and weight put him at high risk for severe illness from the coronavirus — mall owners are going ahead with plans to bring him back this year.

57. Cold weather means new challenges for struggling restaurants -

U.S. restaurants are moving warily into fall, hoping their slow recovery persists despite the new challenge of chilly weather and a pandemic that's expected to claim even more lives.

New York opens indoor dining on Wednesday, restricting capacity to 25%. San Francisco may do the same as early as this week. Chicago is raising its indoor capacity from 25% to 40% on Thursday, but says restaurants still can't seat more than 50 people in one room.

58. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

59. Pandemic tests shopper loyalty for clothing brands -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Archie Jafree heard that Lord & Taylor filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in early August, he was sad about the fate of the storied retailer with roots dating back to 1824.

Still, the 36-year-old northern Virginia resident acknowledged he hadn't shopped there in months, preferring instead to go to Nordstrom and Zara, where he feels the customer service is better.

60. AP FACT CHECK: Is Trump's America great again or hellscape? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican National Convention begged this question: Why are President Donald Trump's most fervent supporters describing the state of his union as a hellscape?

It was perhaps the central paradox for voters wondering what to believe in the rhetoric, because it defied logic to believe it all. Are Americans living in a dystopia or in an America made great again by Trump?

61. Target sales surge as Americans lean on big box stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target reported the largest quarterly sales growth, including an online sales spike, in its 58-year-history, the latest evidence that Americans are consolidating their trips to big box stores and pivoting their spending to around the home during the pandemic.

62. Tennessee appeals court listens to school voucher arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee continued to defend its school voucher program Wednesday, with attorneys asking a state appeals court to reverse a judge's ruling declaring the program illegal.

Davidson County Chancellor Anne C. Martin ruled in May that the school voucher law violated the Tennessee Constitution's "home rule," which says the Legislature can't pass measures singling out individual counties without local support.

63. COVID-19 reshapes, reduces back-to-school spending -

NEW YORK (AP) — For Michelle Lynn England, back-to-school shopping always meant heading to Target and the local mall with her two girls and dropping about $500 on each of them for trendy outfits.

64. Ann Taylor owner files for Chapter 11 bankruptcy -

NEW YORK (AP) — The operator of Ann Taylor and Lane Bryant filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection on Thursday, the latest retailer to do so during the pandemic.

Mahwah, New Jersey-based Ascena Retail Group Inc., which operates nearly 3,000 stores mostly at malls, had been dragged down by debt and weak sales for years.

65. Poll: Pandemic hurting Americans' finances in disparate ways -

BURTON, Mich. (AP) — Crystal and Chris Martin put off some payments on their home in this blue-collar town near Flint and are pinching pennies to make ends meet until they return to work. In Windsor, Connecticut, Anne Druce's family canceled home improvement projects out of an abundance of caution but remains financially secure.

66. Sizing up: As pandemic surges, so do waistlines -

NEW YORK (AP) — When Allison Weiss Brady and Michael Ladin emerged from weeks of locking down during the pandemic, they needed new clothes in new sizes — for different reasons.

Brady, 49, a charity fundraiser from a Philadelphia suburb, had been pulling back on her candy buying sprees during the lockdown and stepped up the cardio workouts at her home gym out of boredom. She lost 20 pounds and went down two sizes. In contrast, Ladin, 58, of Oak Park, Illinois, gained 10 pounds this past spring after sitting around eating chips and dip.

67. Top Davidson County residential sales for June 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, June 2020, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

68. Target permanently raises starting hourly pay to $15 -

NEW YORK (AP) — Target Corp. says it's permanently increasing starting hourly wages for its workers to $15 beginning July 5, several months ahead of schedule.

69. Can job market sustain its gains? Uncertainties cloud future -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Layoffs are slowing, unemployment is declining and hiring is gradually rising, suggesting that a steady rebound may be afoot in the U.S. job market.

Or is it?

So many uncertainties are overhanging the economy that no one knows whether hiring will expand steadily in the months ahead or merely plateau as employers recall only enough of their laid-off staffers to partially reopen for business.

70. TN high court won't take over Tennessee voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee's highest court declined Thursday to take up an appeal of a lawsuit challenging the legality of a school voucher program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

71. AP Exclusive: Athletes wary about virus, testing upon return -

Chris Thompson is an NFL running back. He also is the father of a 4-month-old daughter, Kali. Guess which of those facts matters more to him when he ponders eventually returning to work amid a pandemic.

72. Tennessee asks high court to take over voucher lawsuit -

NASHVILLE (AP) — School voucher advocates are asking the Tennessee Supreme Court to take up the case of a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a program that would let parents use public tax dollars for private school tuition.

73. Pandemic highlights big box stores' ability to pivot -

NEW YORK (AP) — Late last year, Best Buy began testing curbside pickup at select stores as a way to respond to customer needs.

But that was then.

The pandemic accelerated the company's plans and what was supposed to take months instead took just 48 hours, with Best Buy rolling out curbside pickup at all 900 of its locations in late March as customers sought to minimize contagion by ordering online and pulling up to stores to collect their purchases.

74. Macy's hefty loss reveals challenges among mall stores -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's warned Thursday that it could lose more than a $1 billion and see sales fall at least 45% during its first fiscal quarter after the coronavirus pandemic paralyzed retail operations nationwide.

75. Cagle is appointed counsel to CASE -

Charles W. “Chuck” Cagle, shareholder and chair of the education law and government relations practice group at Lewis Thomason, has been appointed as Tennessee representative and counsel to the Council of Administrators in Special Education.

76. AP FACT CHECK: Trump, GOP falsehoods on Flynn, Biden, virus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump and his GOP allies are misrepresenting the facts behind the legal case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn as they seek to allege improper behavior during the Obama administration in the presidential campaign season.

77. Risk of reopening US economy too fast: A W-shaped recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the coronavirus erupted in the United States, it triggered quarantines, travel curbs and business shutdowns. Many economists predicted a V-shaped journey for the economy: A sharp drop, then a quick bounce-back as the virus faded and the economy regained health.

78. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's perfect China 'ban,' death toll myths -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Truth often takes a beating when President Donald Trump talks about his administration's response to the coronavirus and the subsequent death toll in the U.S. This past week was no exception.

79. Judge blocks Tennessee from implementing voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Thursday blocked the state from implementing a contentious school voucher program just days after ruling the program unconstitutional.

The attorney general's office and school choice advocates had sought permission to continue processing applications while the legal battle over the state's voucher program — also known as education savings accounts — moves its way through the courts.

80. In reversal, Lee says state no longer implementing vouchers -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Gov. Bill Lee's office announced Wednesday the state has hit pause on a new school voucher program, reversing course just a day after the Republican encouraged parents to apply despite a recent court declaring the program unconstitutional and unenforceable.

81. Tennessee seeks permission to continue voucher program -

NASHVILLE (AP) — Tennessee is seeking permission to continue implementing a new school voucher program just days after a judge deemed the law unconstitutional and unenforceable.

The request comes after Gov. Bill Lee raised eyebrows when he announced Tuesday that the state would continue to encourage parents to apply for the vouchers — also known as education savings accounts — despite the judge's order declaring the program "unconstitutional, unlawful and unenforceable."

82. Judge rules Tennessee's voucher law is unconstitutional -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Monday ruled that the state's much-debated school voucher program is illegal and cannot be implemented despite education officials receiving thousands of applications from parents hoping to use public tax dollars on private school tuition.

83. What's shopping in a pandemic like? Drive to your local mall -

NEW YORK (AP) — Many Americans are getting their first taste of what pandemic shopping looks like at their local mall.

Simon Property Group, the nation's largest mall operator, reopened several dozen shopping centers across Texas, Georgia and roughly ten other states between Friday and Monday.

84. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

85. Judge weighs Tennessee voucher program arguments -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Wednesday weighed a wide range of arguments surrounding the legal battle over the state's much-debated school voucher program, noting that she plans on making a decision soon to ensure parents have enough time to plan ahead for the 2020-21 school year.

86. Record 22 million have sought US jobless aid in 4 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The wave of layoffs that has engulfed the U.S. economy since the coronavirus struck forced 5.2 million more people to seek unemployment benefits last week, the government reported Thursday.

87. Record 22 million have sought US jobless aid in 4 weeks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The wave of layoffs that has engulfed the U.S. economy since the coronavirus struck forced 5.2 million more people to seek unemployment benefits last week, the government reported Thursday.

88. States confront practical dilemmas on reopening economies -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Setting the stage for a possible power struggle with President Donald Trump, governors around the U.S. began sketching out plans Tuesday to reopen their economies in a slow and methodical process so as to prevent the coronavirus from rebounding with tragic consequences.

89. In nod to governors, Trump walks back total authority claim -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said he's open to some states "reopening" before federal social distancing guidelines expire at the end of month, as he appeared to back off his claim of absolute authority to decide when the time was right to act.

90. Stores try to stay relevant while their doors are closed -

NEW YORK (AP) — Long before there was a global coronavirus pandemic, brick-and-mortar retailers struggled to get people to walk through their doors instead of shopping online.

Now those retailers are faced with an even more Herculean task: how to stay on people's minds — and more importantly their pocketbooks — when many of their store doors are closed.

91. Macy's, Kohl's, Gap to furlough majority of their workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's, Kohl's and Gap Inc. all said Monday they will stop paying tens of thousands of employees who were thrown out of work when the chains temporarily closed their stores and sales collapsed as a result of the pandemic.

92. Macy's to furlough majority of its 125,000 workers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Macy's says it will temporarily stop paying tens of thousands of employees who were thrown out of work when the chain closed its stores in response to collapsing sales during the pandemic.

93. Staying afloat: $2.2 trillion bill offers economic lifeline -

WASHINGTON (AP) — In the coronavirus crisis, even doctors can face a cash crunch.

Dr. Benjamin Ticho, an ophthalmologist in Chicago Ridge, Illinois, has seen his revenue plunge 80% as patients stay home and he cancels non-emergency surgeries. He's cut his staff's hours sharply and is negotiating with his creditors.

94. Can blood from coronavirus survivors treat the newly ill? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Hospitals are gearing up to test if a century-old treatment used to fight off flu and measles outbreaks in the days before vaccines, and tried more recently against SARS and Ebola, just might work for COVID-19, too: using blood donated from patients who've recovered.

95. Top Middle Tennessee residential sales for February 2020 -

Top residential real estate sales, February 2020, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

96. Retail sales fall 0.5% in February, biggest drop since 2018 -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Retail sales fell 0.5% in February, the largest drop in more than a year, indicating that the consumer sector was slowing even before the coronavirus struck with force in the United States. Economists said they were looking for even weaker numbers in coming months.

97. Nervous consumers around world pull back amid viral outbreak -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Buffeted by fears of the fast-spreading coronavirus, consumers in the United States and overseas are showing increasing signs of cutting back on spending in what amounts to a severe threat to economic growth.

98. With spreading virus comes fears -- and lots of stockpiling -

NEW YORK (AP) — As an Arizonan, Gregory Cohen has never had to stock up ahead of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

99. Judge: School choice advocates can intervene in voucher case -

NASHVILLE (AP) — A Tennessee judge on Friday agreed to allow school choice advocates to intervene in a lawsuit challenging the legality of the state's school voucher program.

That means the Liberty Justice Center, the Institute for Justice and the Beacon Center of Tennessee will all have a chance to defend the much-debated voucher program as the case moves through the courts.

100. In Congress, questions about overdue testing for coronavirus -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Lawmakers on Tuesday expressed skepticism that U.S. health officials will be able to meet their goal of significantly ramping up testing for the new coronavirus.

Health officials have said U.S. labs should have the capacity to run as many as 1 million tests by the end of the week. But such testing has faced delays and missteps, and "I'm hearing from health professionals that's unrealistic," said U.S. Sen Patty Murray, during a Senate hearing.