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Editorial Results (free)

1. House Dems propose $28 million to address formula shortage -

WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democrats unveiled a $28 million emergency spending bill Tuesday to address the shortage of infant formula in the United States.

Rep. Rosa DeLauro, the Democratic chair of the House Appropriations Committee, said the bill would help the Food and Drug Administration take important steps to restore the formula supply in a safe and secure manner.

2. Jackson on track for confirmation, but GOP votes in doubt -

WASHINGTON (AP) — After more than 30 hours of hearings, the Senate is on track to confirm Ketanji Brown Jackson as the first Black woman on the Supreme Court. But Democrats seem unlikely to confirm her with a robust bipartisan vote, dashing President Joe Biden's hopes for a grand reset after partisan battles over other high court nominees.

3. Senate committee wraps up hearings on Jackson's nomination -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Legal experts praised Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in her final day of Senate hearings on Thursday, with a top lawyers' group saying its review found she has a "sterling" reputation, "exceptional" competence and is well qualified to sit on the Supreme Court.

4. Not all Western companies sever ties to Russia over Ukraine -

A shrinking number of well-known companies are still doing business in Russia, even as hundreds have announced plans to curtail ties.

Burger King restaurants are open, Eli Lilly is supplying drugs, and PepsiCo is selling milk and baby food, but no more soda.

5. Companies revert to more normal operations as COVID wanes -

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time in two years for many people, the American workplace is transforming into something that resembles pre-pandemic days.

Tyson Foods said Tuesday it was ending mask requirements for its vaccinated workers in some facilities. Walmart and Amazon — the nation's No. 1 and 2 largest private employers respectively — will no longer require fully vaccinated workers to don masks in stores or warehouses unless required under local or state laws. Tech companies like Microsoft and Facebook that had allowed employees to work fully remote are now setting mandatory dates to return to the office after a series of fits and starts.

6. US inflation jumped 7.5% in the past year, a 40-year high -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation soared over the past year at its highest rate in four decades, hammering America's consumers, wiping out pay raises and reinforcing the Federal Reserve's decision to begin raising borrowing rates across the economy.

7. Businesses react to ruling against Biden vaccine mandate -

For companies that were waiting to hear from the U.S. Supreme Court before deciding whether to require vaccinations or regular coronavirus testing for workers, the next move is up to them.

Many large corporations were silent on Thursday's ruling by the high court to block a requirement that workers at businesses with at least 100 employees be fully vaccinated or else test regularly for COVID-19 and wear a mask on the job.

8. Inflation at 40-year high pressures consumers, Fed and Biden -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Inflation jumped at its fastest pace in nearly 40 years last month, a 7% spike from a year earlier that is increasing household expenses, eating into wage gains and heaping pressure on President Joe Biden and the Federal Reserve to address what has become the biggest threat to the U.S. economy.

9. Inflation squeezes holiday budgets for low-income shoppers -

NEW YORK (AP) — Emarilis Velazquez is paying higher prices on everything from food to clothing.

Her monthly grocery bill has ballooned from $650 to almost $850 in recent months. To save money, she looks for less expensive cuts of meat and has switched to a cheaper detergent. She also clips coupons and shops for her kids' clothing at thrift stores insted of Children's Place.

10. Omicron unravels travel industry's plans for a comeback -

Tourism businesses that were just finding their footing after nearly two years of devastation wrought by the COVID-19 pandemic are being rattled again as countries throw up new barriers to travel in an effort to contain the omicron variant.

11. Soaring prices a heavy burden for consumers as holidays near -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A worsening surge of inflation for such bedrock necessities as food, rent, autos and heating oil is setting Americans up for a financially difficult Thanksgiving and holiday shopping season.

12. Top Davidson County residential sales for August 2021 -

Top residential real estate sales, August 2021, for Davidson County, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

Chandler Reports has been publishing Real Estate Market Data since 1968. That year, Chandler began collecting residential sales information for the Chandler Residential Report, considered the authoritative source for residential real estate sales information. Over the next three decades, the publications have been continually refined, enhanced and expanded, growing to include lot sales data, new residential construction and absorption information, and commercial sales. In 1987, Chandler Reports began one of the first on–line real estate market data services in the country, and is a nationally recognized leader in the industry. In 2004, Chandler Reports was purchased by The Daily News Publishing Co. In 2007, Chandler introduced RegionPlus, including property research for Nashville and Middle Tennessee. Visit online at chandlerreports.com.

13. Once fading, mask sales starting to rebound -

NEW YORK (AP) — Masks, which had started to disappear from store shelves, may be front and center again.

A spot check of businesses and other data sources are showing that mask sales have been rising in recent weeks as Americans worry about the surging cases of the delta variant of the coronavirus. Retail analysts expect mask sales will get another jolt after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention late Tuesday changed course on some masking guidelines, recommending that even vaccinated people return to wearing masks indoors in parts of the U.S. where the cases are surging.

14. Travel numbers climb as Americans hit the road for holiday -

Americans hit the road in near-record numbers at the start of the Memorial Day weekend, as their eagerness to break free from coronavirus confinement overcame higher prices for flights, gasoline and hotels.

15. Rising commodities costs hit Americans at home and on road -

NEW YORK (AP) — Rising prices for a variety of commodities are contributing to a jump in prices at the consumer level, with Americans paying more for meat, gasoline, items they keep in their homes and even the homes themselves.

16. Continental Europe could allow US tourists back this summer -

BRUSSELS (AP) — American tourists could soon be visiting continental Europe again, more than a year after the European Union restricted travel to the 27-nation bloc to a bare minimum to contain the coronavirus.

17. Big-business pushback against voting measures gains momentum -

Big business has ratcheted up its objections to proposals that would make it harder to vote, with several hundred companies and executives signing a new statement opposing "any discriminatory legislation."

18. From job cuts to online commerce, virus reshaped US economy -

WASHINGTON (AP) — At first, it was expected to be brief. At least that was the hope.

Instead, a once-in-a-century pandemic has ground on for a year, throwing millions out of work and upending wide swathes of the American economy. Delivery services thrived while restaurants suffered. Home offices replaced downtown offices. Travel and entertainment spending dried up.

19. Biden's $15 wage proposal: Job killer or a boon for workers? -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden's effort to raise the federal minimum wage to $15 an hour could provide a welcome opportunity for someone like Cristian Cardona, a 21-year-old fast food worker. Cardona would love to earn enough to afford to move out of his parents' house in Orlando, Florida, and maybe scrape together money for college.

20. Airbnb to block, cancel reservations ahead of inauguration -

NEW YORK (AP) — Airbnb says it will be blocking and cancelling all reservations in the Washington, D.C. area during the week of the presidential inauguration.

The decision, announced Wednesday, was in response to various local, state and federal officials asking people not to travel to Washington, D.C. It came two days after it said it was reviewing reservations in the area ahead of the inauguration and said it will bar any guests associated with hate groups or violent activity.

21. Restaurants to retailers, virus transformed business -

It would be just a temporary precaution. When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon – as soon as New York was safe again.

22. Winter travel raises more fears of viral spread -

Tens of millions of people are expected to travel to family gatherings or winter vacations over Christmas, despite pleas by public health experts who fear the result could be another surge in COVID-19 cases.

23. From restaurants to retailers, virus transformed economies -

NEW YORK (AP) — It would be just a temporary precaution.

When the viral pandemic erupted in March, employees of the small insurance firm Thimble fled their Manhattan offices. CEO Jay Bregman planned to call them back soon — as soon as New York was safe again.

24. Small business aid went beyond hard-hit companies, data show -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government on Monday identified roughly 650,000 mostly small businesses and nonprofits that received taxpayer money through a federal program that was designed to soften job losses from the coronavirus but also benefited wealthy, well-connected companies and some celebrity owned firms.

25. Trump donors among early recipients of coronavirus loans -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As much as $273 million in federal coronavirus aid was awarded to more than 100 companies that are owned or operated by major donors to President Donald Trump's election efforts, according to an Associated Press analysis of federal data.

26. Small business aid went beyond hard-hit companies, data show -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The government on Monday identified roughly 650,000 mostly small businesses and nonprofits that received taxpayer money from a program that was designed to soften job losses from the coronavirus but also benefited some politically connected firms.

27. Risk of reopening US economy too fast: A W-shaped recovery -

WASHINGTON (AP) — When the coronavirus erupted in the United States, it triggered quarantines, travel curbs and business shutdowns. Many economists predicted a V-shaped journey for the economy: A sharp drop, then a quick bounce-back as the virus faded and the economy regained health.

28. Meatpackers cautiously reopen plants amid coronavirus fears -

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota pork processing plant took its first steps toward reopening Monday after being shuttered for over two weeks because of a coronavirus outbreak that infected more than 800 employees.

29. CDC compiles new guidelines to help organizations reopen -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Businesses should close break rooms. Restaurants should consider disposable menus and plates. Schools should have students eat lunch in their classrooms.

These are some of the recommendations offered in new federal plans designed to help restaurants, schools, churches and businesses safely reopen as states look to gradually lift their coronavirus restrictions.

30. Health officials ready new guidelines as restrictions ease -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Businesses should close break rooms. Restaurants should consider disposable menus and plates. Schools should have students eat lunch in their classrooms.

These are some of the recommendations offered in new federal plans designed to help restaurants, schools, churches and businesses safely reopen as states look to gradually lift their coronavirus  restrictions.

31. Housing market chills, layoffs, US cos. dial up virus fight -

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Wednesday related to the global economy, the work place and the spread of the virus.

32. Virus relief package could help Trump, Kushner businesses -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The $2 trillion legislative package moving through Congress to shore up the U.S. economy devastated by the coronavirus was carefully written to prevent President Donald Trump and his family from profiting from the federal fund. But the fine print reveals that businesses owned by Trump and his family still may be eligible for some assistance.

33. Many businesses cautious about restarting economy amid virus -

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — President Donald Trump wants the country open for business by mid-April, but some experts warn it's not as easy as flipping a switch: Economies run on confidence, and that is likely to be in short supply for as long as coronavirus cases in the United States are still rising.

34. Wide swath of economy seeks share of COVID-19 rescue package -

WASHINGTON (AP) — As Congress works on a rescue package to help shore up a U.S. economy hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic, a wide swath of business, from the solar power industry to casinos and hotels, along with doctors, nurses and educators are urging lawmakers to give them a share of the pie.

35. With spreading virus comes fears -- and lots of stockpiling -

NEW YORK (AP) — As an Arizonan, Gregory Cohen has never had to stock up ahead of a hurricane or other natural disaster.

36. Virus impact: Airlines extend flights suspensions -

BEIJING (AP) — Airlines are extending their suspension of flights to mainland China, while more retailers are putting an estimate on the economic damage they expect to incur from the virus outbreak in China.

37. Beverage companies aim to get bottles recycled, not trashed -

Every year, an estimated 100 billion plastic bottles are produced in the U.S., the bulk of which come from three of America's biggest beverage companies: Coca-Cola, Pepsi and Keurig Dr Pepper.

The problem? Only one-third of those bottles get recycled; the rest end up in the trash.

38. Suddenly, luxury stores miss free-spending Chinese tourists -

NEW YORK (AP) — There was something missing at the luxury jeweler Tiffany & Co. in recent months: Chinese tourists.

For the second time in as many months, a big seller of high-end goods noticed that a particularly crucial demographic of its shopping base had made itself sparse, damaging sales and stoking fears of worse to come.

39. Southwest has been faced with fines, union safety complaints -

DALLAS (AP) — Southwest Airlines runs its planes hard. They make many short hops and more trips per day than other U.S. airliners, which adds to wear and tear on parts, including the engines.

As the investigation into last week's deadly engine failure continues, Southwest CEO Gary Kelly could face questions about whether the company's low-cost business model — which puts its planes through frequent takeoffs and landings — is putting passengers at risk.

40. AP-NORC poll: Privacy debacle prompts social-media changes -

NEW YORK (AP) — If you've made changes to how you use social media since Facebook's Cambridge Analytica privacy debacle, you're not alone.

A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds that 7 out of 10 of online adults who've heard of the scandal — revelations that a data mining firm may have accessed the private information of some 87 million Facebook users to influence elections — have unfollowed accounts, deleted their profiles or made other changes in how they use social media.

41. Breaking up with Facebook? It's harder than it looks -

NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook's latest privacy scandal, involving Trump campaign consultants who allegedly stole data on tens of millions of users in order to influence elections, has some people reconsidering their relationship status with the social network.

42. Nissan bucks trend with 10% sales jump in January -

January US auto sales up 1 pct., but full-year drop expected

By TOM KRISHER and DEE-ANN DURBIN, AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — January's U.S. auto sales were a little better than a year ago, but most analysts and automakers predict a small full-year decline despite economic factors that favor the industry.

43. GM to launch self-driving vehicles in big US cities in 2019 -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors Co. expects to carry passengers and deliver goods with self-driving vehicles in big cities sometime in 2019, telling investors it's moving quickly and plans to be ahead of other automakers and tech companies.

44. California moves toward public access for self-driving cars -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — California regulators took an important step Wednesday to clear the road for everyday people to get self-driving cars.

The state's Department of Motor Vehicles published proposed rules that would govern the technology within California, where for several years manufacturers have been testing hundreds of prototypes on roads and highways.

45. Top Midstate residential transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

46. Trump's crude tweets: Would anyone else be fired? -

NEW YORK (AP) — If President Donald Trump were anyone else, he'd be fired, or at least reprimanded, for his latest tweets attacking a female TV host, social media and workplace experts say.

And if he were to look for a job, the experts say, these and past tweets would raise red flags for companies doing social media background checks, an increasingly common practice as tweets and Facebook posts become a daily, sometimes hourly part of our lives.

47. Top Middle Tennessee residential transactions for May 2017 -

Top residential real estate sales, May 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

48. Uber CEO to take leave; report recommends broad changes -

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber CEO Travis Kalanick will take a leave of absence for an unspecified period and let his leadership team run the troubled ride-hailing company while he's gone.

Kalanick told employees of his decision in a memo Tuesday, just as Uber released a report from former U.S. Attorney Eric Holder with recommendations on how to correct a workplace that lacks diversity and tolerates sexual harassment, bullying and retaliation against those who reported problems.

49. GM faces hard road getting compensated for Venezuela seizure -

DETROIT (AP) — General Motors became the latest corporation to have a factory or other asset seized by the government of Venezuela, and the Detroit automaker faces an uphill battle to recover any damages.

50. AP FACT CHECK: Trump's week of feints and false advertising -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump took steps on coal regulation and broader energy policy during a week also marked by shadow-boxing over health care and Russian intrigue. False advertising and rhetorical feints went into the mix.

51. Trump fuel economy move sets up fight with California -

DETROIT (AP) — The Trump administration's decision to re-examine Obama-era rules that govern automobile gas mileage could be the first round of a potentially bruising political fight: revoking the ability of California and other blue states to set their own, tougher car-emission standards.

52. Trump meets with his business council after Uber CEO quit -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump met with 17 business titans Friday at the White House, and some in attendance had planned to press him on his executive order upending the country's refugee program.

53. Uber CEO backs out of joining Trump's business council -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Uber CEO Travis Kalanick has quit President Donald Trump's council of business leaders, according to an internal memo obtained by The Associated Press.

Kalanick wrote to his employees that he'd spoken with Trump on Thursday to "let him know that I would not be able to participate on his economic council. Joining the group was not meant to be an endorsement of the president or his agenda but unfortunately it has been misinterpreted to be exactly that."

54. Top November 2014 residential real estate transactions -

Top November 2014 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

55. Top Midstate residential real estate transactions for January 2013 -

Top January 2013 residential real estate transactions for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

56. Jobs data force delicate balancing act for Obama -

WASHINGTON (AP) — A third straight month of weak hiring shows the U.S. economy is still struggling three years after the recession officially ended.

U.S. employers added just 80,000 jobs in June, and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2 percent, the Labor Department said Friday.