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Editorial Results (free)

1. New step to curb tech giants' power advanced by Senate panel -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Congress has taken a new step toward reining in the market dominance of Big Tech.

Bipartisan legislation advanced by a Senate panel would bar the dominant online platforms from favoring their own goods and services over those of rivals. It could, for example, prevent Amazon from steering consumers to its own brands and away from competitors' products on its giant e-commerce platform.

2. Oil demand, climate change clash in California pipeline plan -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — A proposal to replace an oil pipeline that was shut down in 2015 after causing California's worst coastal spill in 25 years is inching though a government review, even as the state moves toward banning gas-powered vehicles and oil drilling.

3. Pelosi, Schumer to huddle with Biden on voting legislation -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Top congressional Democrats will huddle with President Joe Biden at the White House on Friday, looking to salvage their effort to enact federal voting legislation that could counter state laws restricting access to the ballot.

4. Dems push $25B to electrify school buses, a Biden priority -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democratic lawmakers are unveiling legislation that would invest $25 billion to convert the nation's fleet of gasoline- and diesel-powered school buses to electric vehicles, aiming at a component of President Joe Biden's $2.3 trillion infrastructure plan to improve children's health.

5. Biden wants infrastructure deal, but GOP doubts persist -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden wants Congress to know he's sincere about cutting a deal on infrastructure, but Republican lawmakers have deep-seated doubts about the scope of his proposed package, its tax hikes and Biden's premise that this is an inflection point for the U.S. as a world power.

6. Biden aims for bipartisanship but applies sly pressure -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Joe Biden has begun publicly courting Republicans to back his sweeping infrastructure plan, but his reach across the aisle is intended just as much to keep Democrats in line as it is a first step in an uphill climb to any bipartisan deal.

7. White House grades states' infrastructure as it pushes bill -

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Biden White House is amplifying the push for its $2.3 trillion infrastructure package with the release of state-by-state breakdowns that show the dire shape of roads, bridges, the power grid and housing affordability.

8. Takeaways from Congress' first hearing on Capitol riot -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Security officials testifying at Congress' first hearing on the deadly siege of the Capitol cast blame and pointed fingers on Tuesday but also acknowledged they were woefully unprepared for the violence.

9. California: Criminal rings loot billions in jobless funds -

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Sophisticated hackers, identity thieves and overseas criminal rings stole over $11 billion in unemployment benefits from California last year, but the extent of the fraud might grow far larger: billions more in payments are under investigation.

10. Senate confirms Biden 1st Cabinet pick as Democrats control -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three new senators were sworn into office Wednesday after President Joe Biden's inauguration, securing the majority for Democrats in the Senate and across a unified government to tackle the new president's agenda at a time of unprecedented national challenges.

11. Democrats gaining Senate control as new members take oath -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Three new senators will be sworn into office Wednesday after President Joe Biden's inauguration, securing the majority for Democrats in the Senate and across a unified government to tackle the new president's agenda at a time of unprecedented national challenges.

12. McConnell: Trump 'provoked' Capitol siege, mob 'fed lies' -

WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell on Tuesday explicitly placed blame on President Donald Trump for the deadly riot at the Capitol, saying the mob was "fed lies" and that the president and others "provoked" those intent on overturning Democrat Joe Biden's election.

13. After a tumultuous 2020, Black leaders weigh next steps -

DETROIT (AP) — As a barrier-breaking year draws to a close, there's one undeniable fact: the strength of Black political power.

Black voters were a critical part of the coalition that clinched President-elect Joe Biden's White House bid. The nation will swear in its first Black woman and first person of South Asian descent as vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, who herself may be a leading presidential candidate in four years. And as the global push for racial justice continues, Congress is set to welcome several new Black, progressive freshmen next year.

14. Trump fires agency head who vouched for 2020 vote security -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump fired the nation's top election security official, a widely respected member of his administration who had dared to refute the president's unsubstantiated claims of electoral fraud and vouch for the integrity of the vote.

15. Trump threatens funds for states easing voting in pandemic -

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Wednesday threatened to hold up federal funds for two election battleground states that are trying to make it easier and safer to vote during the coronavirus pandemic.

16. California sued again for requiring women on company boards -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California's first-in-the-nation law requiring publicly held companies to put women on their boards of directors is facing a second legal challenge.

The law requires publicly traded companies to have at least one woman on their boards by year’s end. By 2021, boards with five members must have two women, while those with six directors must have three.

17. Public, election officials might be kept in the dark on hacks -

WASHINGTON (AP) — If the FBI discovers that foreign hackers have infiltrated the networks of your county election office, you may not find out about it until after voting is over. And your governor and other state officials may be kept in the dark, too.

18. US election security official highlights email threat -

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Beware the phishing attempts.

An election security official with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday warned top state election officials nationwide to safeguard against fraudulent emails targeting state and local election workers.

19. Trump to take his case to build wall to prime-time audience -

WASHINGTON (AP) — With no breakthrough in sight, President Donald Trump will argue his case to the nation Tuesday night that a "crisis" at the U.S.-Mexico border requires the long and invulnerable wall he's demanding before ending the partial government shutdown. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers face missed paychecks Friday as the shutdown drags through a third week.

20. California moves up primary, wants bigger impact 2020 vote -

Go west, 2020 presidential candidates? Early voting in California's primary will overlap with the traditional early nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

That could force the sprawling field of Democrats to navigate those states as well as California's notoriously complex landscape, where campaigning is done through paid political ads.

21. California moves up primary, wants bigger impact 2020 vote -

Go west, 2020 presidential candidates? Early voting in California's primary will overlap with the traditional early nominating contests in Iowa, New Hampshire, Nevada and South Carolina.

That could force the sprawling field of Democrats to navigate those states as well as California's notoriously complex landscape, where campaigning is done through paid political ads.

22. Top Midstate commercial transactions for second quarter 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, second quarter 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

23. Top Middle Tennessee commercial transactions for May 2017 -

Top commercial real estate sales, May 2017, for Davidson, Williamson, Rutherford, Wilson and Sumner counties, as compiled by Chandler Reports.

24. California becomes first state to ban plastic bags -

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed legislation imposing the nation's first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags, driven to action by a buildup of litter and damage to aquatic ecosystems.

25. How Google got states to legalize driverless cars -

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — About four years ago, the Google team trying to develop cars driven by computers — not people — became convinced that sooner than later, the technology would be ready for the masses. There was one big problem: Driverless cars were almost certainly illegal.